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The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

January 2013

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January 2013 Issue #37

A Beacon is not a destination - It just helps to light the way

Let’s Go To Lodge Tonight Say, Brother, let’s go to Lodge tonight. We haven't been for years. Let’s don our little white aprons And sit among our peers. I feel a kind of longing, boy To climb up those old stairs. I know we'd get a thrill of joy And lay aside our cares. I'd like to get out on the floor; Come on, let’s get in line. I'd like to face the East once more And give the same old sign.

Kitchener #95, RImbey , Alberta Meets in the Royal Canadian Legion Hall

I want to hear the gavel’s ring, To hear the organ play. I want to hear the Craftsmen sing That old familiar lay. I think the Tyler ’d let us in Although he'd hesitate And then we'd see that same old grin! Come on, or we'll be late! Pass up your bridge or TV show Your wrestling bout or fight. Switch off that darned old radio.

Britannia #18, Ponoka, Alberta

The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

Let’s go to Lodge tonight. Author Unknown January 2013

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The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter Inside This Issue

Page #

D.D.G.M Page

3

Central District Meeting

4&5

2013 VISITATION and INTER LODGE EDUCATION

6

District Pictures

7&8

Beacon #190 49th Annual Burns Dinner

9

Eureka #10 “The Odd Couple” Dinner Theatre

10

Brethren who have passed to the Grand Lodge Above

11 & 12

Symbols of the Fellowcraft Degree

13

Our Senior’s Lodge

14

-By W Bro George Armishaw

Today's Morality ‑ Masonry at the Crossroads Part 2 - Society and The Mason’s Moral Leadership MW Bro. Jim Roberts

15 - 20

Masonry In The Mountains

20

From The Internet

21

Hi - My Name IS Rose

22

Where To Have Lunch Today

23

Masonic Membership

24

Concordant Bodies

25

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Welcome to The Beacon This newsletter is not an official Masonic publication and does not express the policies or opinions of any specific Masonic Lodge, District or Grand Lodge. So go ahead and enjoy it as my gift to you. If you have any ideas or suggestions to improve it let me know - I will always listen, I may not do anything about it, but I will listen. I would love to publish some of the stories from around the District, Alberta or even Canada. Stories about individuals, Lodge happenings, Lodge histories, Masonic papers or articles of interest to other Masons. This newsletter will not be published in paper format, but feel free to print it out and pass on to a brother.

The subscription list for this newsletter is based on the CDMEL (Central District Masonic Email List). If you or a friend would like to be added to the subscription list please go to the following link and sign up. www.mastermason.org/Beacon190/newsletter.htm

Are you your brother’s keeper? Several Masons in the District do not have access to computers &/or the Internet. If you know of such a Bro. And you think this newsletter is worth while, why not print off a copy to pass on. Another idea - if you would like a copy, but do not have a computer, ask your son or grandson to print it for you - he may get an idea of what it is you do at that secret Lodge meeting!

The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

Instructions to unsubscribe are included with each email sent out. W. Bro. Clark Johnston, Beacon #190, cjohnst190@gmail.com

January 2013

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RW Bro. Murdock (Dick) Cameron District Deputy Grand Master, Central District Grand Lodge of Alberta, AF&AM

Mailing address:

5204 - 56 Ave, Ponoka, AB T4J 1G8 Phone:

Home: 403-783-5206 Cell: 403-783-0614 Email:

chanter2@shaw.ca Web Page:

www.mastermasom.com/beacon190/ddgm Did you do your part for 2012??? Donate online

www.freemasons.ab.ca/primary Central District Officers 2008 - 2009 District Secretary

W Bro. Ron (Scottie) Vickers

403-845-6422

thistle001@telus.net

Education & Research Masonic Higher Education Bursary Masonic Foundation

W Bro. Allen Tarlington RW Bro. Tom Clark W Bro. John Jardine

403-843-4515 403-729-2340 403-783-5418

artarton@telus.net tdclark@cciwireless.ca j.jardine@shaw.ca

Central District Lodges - Meeting Nights Innisfail #8

Innisfail

3rd Thursday

7:30 PM

Eureka #10

Lacombe

4th Tuesday

8:00 PM

Red Deer #12

Red Deer

2nd Tuesday

7:30 PM

Mountain View #16

Olds

1st Monday

8:00 PM

Britannia #18

Ponoka

1st Wednesday

8:00 PM

Apollo #27

Stettler

3rd Thursday

8:00 PM

Kenilworth #29

Red Deer

1st Tuesday

7:30 PM

Kitchener #95

Rimbey

2nd Tuesday

7:30 PM

Lochearn #151

Rocky Mountain House

2nd Thursday

7:30 PM

Beacon #190

Red Deer

4th Monday

7:30 PM

Some Lodges have a meal before the Lodge meeting - check for times

Central District Web Page

http://mastermason.com/Beacon190/ddgm.htm The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

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Annual Central District Meeting was held in Ponoka on Oct. 2/12, hosted at Britannia Lodge #18, with Registration handled by W Bro. Scottie Vickers & Bro. George Streeter. The day commenced with MW Bro. Rod Ponech presented a very interesting paper on the History of Masonry in Alberta. A Britannia Medal was presented to MW Bro Ponech as well as to RW Bro. Chris Batty JGW. This was followed by an excellent meal provided by the Battle River #47 Chapter of the O.E.S. (Sheila Tobias & Judy Bowie) RW Bro Murdock (Dick) Cameron

The meeting itself, chaired by RW Bro. Murdock (Dick) Cameron was attended by 58 Masons with representatives from all 10 Lodges in the District. Grand Lodge

was represented by RW Bro Batty JGW & RW Bro. Bajan Doel, D.D.G.M. Athabaska District. 

A Memorial Service was conducted by Bro. Earl Giebelhaus.

Reports were heard from Lodges in the District except Red Deer #12.

Election of D.D.G.M. was conducted with RW Bros. Herb Keith, Tom Clark & Len Clarke forming

the Credentials Committee. W Bro. Ron (Scottie) Vickers was elected D.D.G.M. FOR 2013/14, to be installed at Grand Lodge in June 2012 

HEBF per-capita participation award went to Kitchener #95 (again), accepted by W Bro Allan

Tarleton. 

Best Bulletin (Summons for those in the Canadian Rite) went to Kitch-

ener #95, accepted by W Bro. Herb Keith. 

Visitation & Inter-Lodge Visitation was introduced by W Bro. Allan

Tarleton which will see presentations being made in March & April Piper for the Grand Lodge Officers & the Memorial Service was RW Bro. Brent Chalmers

The day was closed by the D.D.G.M.s reminder:

Participate Participate Participate Visit - Visit - Visit

RW Bro. Chris Batty Jr. Grand Warden

MW Bro. Rod Ponech

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RW Bro. Chris Batty, Junior Grand Warden, Grand Lodge of Alberta, RW Bro. Murdock (Dick) Cameron, D.D.G.M. Central

Challenge plaque for the best Bulletin (Summons), presented by the D.D.G.M to Bro. Allan Tarleton WM and RW Bro. Herb

D.D.G.M. Murdock (Dick) Cameron is welcomed to Lochearn #151 by WM Ron (Scottie) Vickers (D.D.G.M. elect 2013) on the occasion of his official visit; October 11th. There were 22 members and guests in attendance - representing 7 Lodges from around the District. Bro Don Anderson of Apollo #27 presented a paper on the history of Freemasonry in Alberta, highlighting some of the interesting antidotes of individual Lodges. A lively festive board followed he meeting where more historical antidotes came to light. There was also some kind of challenge going on between Kitchener #95 and Lochearn #151 as they vowed to match each other with donations of $100.00 to the HEBF. The DDGM also put forward the challenge for each member to donate 10 cents per day - or $35.50 per year to the HEBF. (That’s the cost of a coffee and a muffin per month—I should be able to swing that…)

A visit to Locheran #151 is always a fun evening

Certificate for highest Lodge per-capita donations to the Higher Education Bursary Fund presented to Allan Taleton WM of Kitchener #95, by RW Bro. Murdock Cameron D.D.G.M &

The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

Bros. Streeter & Dunweber enjoying the fellowship

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2013 VISITATION and INTER LODGE EDUCATION

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As presented, at the District Meeting, by W Bro. All an Tarleton, District Research & Education chairman for Central District. allantarleton@hotmail.ca

One Lodge will HOST One Lodge will make PRESENTATION One or More Lodges will receive the PRESENTATION (Visit) Round One (1) to be completed in the month of March 2013 Apollo Lodge # 27 will be HOST (Thursday March 21st - Stettler) Kenilworth Lodge #29 will make PRESENTATION Eureka Lodge #10 will be RECEIVER of presentation Britannia Lodge #18 will be HOST (Wednesday March 6th - Ponoka) Lochearn Lodge #151 will make PRESENTATION Kitchener Lodge #95 will be RECEIVER of presentation Red Deer Lodge #12 will be HOST (Tuesday March 12th - Red Deer) Mountain View Lodge #16 will make PRESENTATION Beacon #190 and Innisifail #8 will be RECEIVERS of presentation Round Two (2) to be completed in the month of April 2013 Kenilworth Lodge #27 will HOST (Tuesday April 2nd - Red Deer) Britannia Lodge #18 will be make PRESENTATION Apollo Lodge #27 will be RECEIVER of presentation Mountain View Lodge #16 will HOST (Monday April 1st - Olds) Beacon Lodge #190 will make PRESENTATION Innisfail Lodge #8 will be RECEIVER of presentation Lochearn Lodge #151 will HOST (Thursday April 18th - Rocky Mountain House) Eureka Lodge #10 will make PRESENTATION Kitchener #95 & Red Deer #12 will be RECEIVERS of presentation Suggested THEMES for presentation are: HISTORY of the Lodge Hosting, Receiving or Presenting and/or Central Alberta and/or Alberta in General.

MASONIC STORIES stories while travelling or visitation’s out side of your Lodge area. Participate - Participate - Participate Visit - Visit - Visit The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

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Brethren of Lochearn #151 make a Christmas donation to the Rocky Mountain House Food Band. Pictures above, W Bro. Mark Spencer (Sec), the manager of the Food Bank, and W Bro. Ron (Scotty) Vickers

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Kenilworth’s Annual Moose Dinner held in December was a huge success with 50+ Masons and guests in attendance, including the Grand Master. Several Lodges from around the District, were represented. Mark your calendar for next December to attend: Kenilworth’s Moose Dinner

Brethren of Kitchener #95 were welcomed by their WM sporting a new top hat to celebrate the Christmas Season. Seated wwith WM Alan Tarleton are the DDGM, RW Bro. Murdock (Dick) Cameron from Britannia #18 (Ponoka) on the left and RW Bro. Tom Clark of Lochearn #151 out of Rocky Mountain House. Good to see the DDGM’s motto being followed; Participate, Participate, Participate Visit, Visit, Visit.

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Brethren of Beacon #190 held an emergent meeting to pass Bro. Keith Davis to the 2nd degree. Bro. Davis was one of five Brethren passed by Beacon in the month of November (I forgot my camera for the other 4 - but will catch them for the next degree). Pictured with Bro. Davis are Bro. Jeff Hood JW, W Bro. Bill Davis Sec., W Bro. Mark Honert WM and Bro. Scott Wambolt SW.

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The Brethren of Beacon #190 invite all Masonic Brethren and Guests to join them for their 49th Annual Burns Dinner, to be held on January 28th, 2013. Cocktails 17:00 hrs (Cash Bar) Dinner 18:00 hrs (Tickets $25) Followed by regular Lodge meeting at 19:30 hrs (or when the dinner and the Immortal Memory finishes).

For Tickets Contact: Bro Jeff Hood JW 403-396-6592 jeffhood2001@yahoo.com Or W Bro Clark Johnston 403-347-099 cjohnst190@gmail.com

A Date to Remember:

Monday January 14th 3rd Degree (York Rite) With Candidates from Kitchener #95 & Britannia #18 Hosted by Britannia #18 5115-60 Ave, Ponoka, AB Lodge tyles at 7:00 PM Contact; W Bro. W. Bro. Allan Tarleton artarton@telus.net 403-843-4515 The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

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Eureka Lodge #10 is proud to be a sponsor of the Cow Patti Theatre Company production of “The Odd Couple”, with a portion of the evening’s revenue going to the Masonic Foundation of Alberta. In addition to an evening of fun at the theatre there will be a silent auction and a 50/50 draw - with proceeds to the Masonic Foundation of Alberta. Make it a late Valentines gift - pick up your tickets from Bros. Wes, Jay, or member of Eureka. Lets fill up the hall with Masons and their guests - only 90 tickets available.

When: Thursday February 28th Where: Lacombe Golf & Country Club, 6000 50 Ave Lacombe, AB Time: Cocktails 6pm - Prime Rib Buffet 6:45pm - Showtime 8:15pm How: Contact: Wes Shakleton wjshackleton4@gmail.com 403-784-3684 Jay Buyers bigredtruck@firehousemail.com

By the author of the original “Odd Couple” Neil Simon; Olive Madison is a successful news producer who seems in control of the world and her life, but is she? As the play opens, Olive and "the girls" are having one of their regular Friday night games of Trivial Pursuit. It is painfully obvious that Olive leads a somewhat disheveled home life. Olive decides to take in Florence Unger, whose husband has just told her he wants a divorce. Florence is a model homemaker, a clean freak, and seems to have many ailments. Together, Olive and Florence make up The Odd Couple, to the delight of audiences everywhere.

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A much-loved father, grandfather, great grandfather, and brother, George Richard Armishaw, 92, passed away peacefully following a brief illness at the Lacombe Hospital, November 7, 2012, with family at his side. George is survived by two sons, Doug (Marlene) of Nouvelle, QC and Wayne ( Catherine) of Lacombe, AB, five grandchildren, Keith, Linda, Lisa, Jeff and Holly as well as six great grandchildren, Nathan, Noah, Olivia, Emery, Clara and Zoe. He is also survived by two sisters, Gertrude (Ruth) and Mabel and a special friend Len Clarke. He was predeceased by his wife Sally, in 1982, and two sisters Evelyn and Florence and two brothers, Howard and Wesley (Sam). George was born in Mannville, AB, the eldest of seven children, spent his formative years in Myrnam, AB. He enlisted with the Canadian Army at the age of 19. He was first stationed at Camp Petawawa, and before being deployed overseas, he married Sally Kucille September 21, 1940 in nearby Pembroke, ON. He served as a clerk with the Royal Canadian Engineering Corp in France, Holland, Belgium and Germany, and attained the rank of sergeant. After WW ll, George and Sally returned to Alberta where George managed several lumber yards for Imperial Lumber, in Paradise Valley, Bashaw, and Rimbey. While in Rimbey, he moved to the oil industry, as an accounting clerk with Amerada Petroleum. In 1972, George and Sally settled in Lacombe where, in time, George assumed a position as a bookkeeper at the Parkland Regional Library until his retirement. George enjoyed his last 16 years at the Lacombe Senior’s Lodge where he led a very active life. At his passing, George was a 75 year member of the Royal Canadian Legion, a 60 year member of the Masonic Lodge, a member of the Scottish Rite and the Shriners. He enjoyed socializing, and looked forward to his daily morning coffee outings, volunteering, reading, and was diligent in communicating with a very extended network of family and friends, remembering birthdays, anniversaries as well as any other special occasions, with a card, a newspaper clipping and a short note. A humble family man, George will be remembered for his humour, kindness and generosity. Funeral service will be held at 2:00 p.m. Monday, November 12, 2012 at Wilson’s Funeral Chapel, Lacombe, AB. After interment at Fairview Cemetery, Lacombe the family will receive friends at St. Andrew’s United Church auditorium. Memorial donations may be made to the Masonic Higher Education Bursary Fund, The Grand Lodge of Alberta, 330 – 12th Avenue SW, Calgary, AB T2R 0H2 Mountain View Lodge is saddened by the passing of W Bro James B Spicer on December 11, 2012. As Burns wrote: “Let us pray that come as it may Come as it will for a’ that That man to man, the world o’er Shall Brothers be for a’ that.” James Bain Spicer was born on March 1, 1927 in Paradise, Nova Scotia. He was initiated on January 16, 1963, passed on May 20, 1963, and raised on June 24, 1963, in Avon Glen Lodge #170, in Edmonton. Jim Affiliated with Mountain View Lodge on December 2, 1974. Jim was Worshipful Master in 1981. He regularly attended Lodge and was always available to assist whenever there was a need. Jim will be missed by Mountain View Lodge.

Regret to advise the passing of Bro. Wendell Christensen, who was initiated into Kenilworth #29 in August 2005. The following is from the Red Deer Advocate; CHRISTENSEN Wendell Aug. 19, 1954 - Oct. 15, 2012 It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of Wendell in the Red Deer Hospice on October 15, 2012. He is survived by his family and many friends. A celebration of Wendell's life will be held at the family home on October 20, 2012. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in Wendell's honor may be made directly to the Red Deer Hospice Society, 99 Arnot Avenue, Red Deer, AB T4R 3S6.

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It is with sadness I advise the passing of W Bro. Ed Whitenett on Friday Nov. 16th. Bro. Whitenett has requested that there not be a Funeral Service. W Bro. Whitenett was Initiated, Passed and Raised in Peace River Lodge #89 in 1978. He was D.D.G.M in 1989 while a member of Coronation Lodge #72 and affiliated with Kenilworth Lodge #29 in 1992. He was a member of the Royal Arch and the Al Azhar Shrine. Bro. Whitenett, also known as “Stripes”, was President of the International Shrine Clown Association foe 2005 – 06. His smiling face was the first person you meet when attending Kenilworth’s Annual Moose Dinner – Bro. Whitenett was always the one to greet you at the bottom of the stairs to collect the tickets. He will be missed.

W Bro. William (Bill) Henry Earl Thursday, 27 Dec 2012 Worshipful Master Red Deer #12 1985 - 86 12 July, 1919 - 27 Dec., 2012

Bill is predeceased by his loving wife Elsie in 2004 and two brothers and three sisters. After two weeks struggling with pneumonia Bill died peacefully at Red Deer Regional Hospital. Happily all of his family was able to visit him during his last days. Son Brian and wife Gayle (High River) arrived from Florida, daughter Linda (minus husband Don) from Doha, Qatar, grandson Darrin from Memphis (without wife Jenny), granddaughter Kaja Gjesdal with partner Sasha Lakovic and great-granddaughter Tatjana from Kelowna. Bill would never have lived as long and healthy a life as he did had it not been for his trusted friend/nurse Benita Davis and husband Ron, nor had he not been enriched by the friendship and care from Frances McCulloch and family. Everyone who knew Bill was inspired by his seemingly endless energy, kind words and generous spirit. Bill never lost his love for dancing and will be sorely missed at Legion and Golden Circle dances, Masonic Lodge and Eastern Star meetings and for all his enthusiastic volunteer work with Alzheimer's and CNIB. They don't make them like Bill anymore. He was one of the best of the "Greatest Generation", awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for surviving two tours of duty as a wireless operator in the RCAF during WWII and never stopped loving (literally) this great land we live in. He made his mark buying grain for UGG in Rimbey and Ponoka, later working in management in Calgary, Vegreville and Edmonton before retiring to sell real estate in his beloved Sylvan Lake community while getting away for winters in Palm Springs. Bill is mourned by his nieces in Regina, nephews in Flin Flon and Ft Saskatchewan and all his friends at Victoria Park, Red Deer. Linda and Brian wish to thank Dr. Hopfner and the nursing staff of Red Deer Regional Hospital for their tireless and admirable care. Bill will be cremated and a celebration of his life arranged for spring 2013. In lieu of flowers please donate to Alzheimer Society of Alberta and Northwest Territories 114 - 4728 Ross St, Red Deer, Alberta. Condolences may be forwarded to www.sylvanlakefuneralhome.ca

Red Deer Advocate Thursday December 27th

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Over the past few months I have had the pleasure of acting as a guide for five Brethren who were passed to the 2nd degree. I thought this article from the Masonic Renewal Committee of North America would be useful to explain some of the symbology of the degree. Beacon Lodge #190 will be holding a Mentor Night for the Fellowcraft Degree on Monday January 7, 2013, to which all Fellowcraft and Master Masons are invited to attend. 7 - 9 pm , Red Deer Masonic Hall.

ADMISSION TO THE MIDDLE CHAMBER The passage from the outer porch to the Middle chamber represents man's journey from ignorance to enlightenment. His wages as a Fellowcraft are received in the Middle Chamber. These wages are a symbol of the Divine Truth. The candidate must also find the doors to knowledge, the outer and inner entrances. To enter one of these he needs a pass. To go through the other he must have a word. Help is given him in each instance, but such assistance is limited. This signifies that man must acquire knowledge and spiritual satisfaction largely through his own effort, and he is often dependent upon others for help. Emphasis should be placed upon the amount of effort put forth by the candidate for without effort he cannot reap the reward, which he seeks THE MIDDLE CHAMBER Fellowcrafts assembled on the evening of the sixth day of the week, and those who were entitled to the wages of a Fellowcraft were invested with certain mysterious signs, tokens, and a word, which enabled them to pass the inner and outer guards, and to enter the Middle Chamber. If they did not have proper identification, they did not get into the Middle Chamber to receive wages. In modern Freemasonry, the Middle Chamber is the symbolic place of reward. In Masonic mythology this was thought of as the place where the Fellowcraft met to receive wages for their labors on the Temple of Solomon. THE WAGES OF A FELLOWCRAFT A Fellowcraft's wages are Corn, Wine, and Oil. While climbing the winding stairs, the Fellowcraft learns a beautiful lesson and one of the great doctrines of the science of Masonic symbolism; that he is ever to be in search of truth. For the wise, there is also the lesson that the knowledge of the nature of God, and man's relations to Him, is Divine Truth and can never be fully acquired in this life. Corn represents nourishment and the sustenance of life. It is also a symbol of plenty, and refers to the opportunity for doing good, to work for the community, and the performance of service to mankind. Wine is symbolic of refreshment, health, spirituality, and peace. Oil represents joy, gladness and happiness. Taken together, Corn, Wine, and Oil represent the rewards of living a good life. The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

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A hooded robber burst into a Vancouver bank and forced the tellers to load a sack full of cash. On his way out the door, a brave Vancouver customer grabbed the hood and pulled it off, revealing the robbers face. The robber shot the customer without a moment's hesitation. He then looked around the bank and noticed one of the tellers looking straight at him. The robber instantly shot him also. Everyone in the bank, by now very scared, looked intently down at the floor in silence. The robber yelled, " Well, did anyone else see my face?"

Be Safe out there Bros. Our Senior’s Lodge

There are a few moments of utter silence in which everyone was plainly too afraid to speak. Then, one old farmer named Bill from Alberta tentatively raised his hand and said,

-By W Bro George Armishaw

I live in this house, that’s fit for a King; It’s got room and board and everything. Activity choices are my kind of thing. And I like it. If I get sick, there’s medics on call. Someone to pick me up, if I chance to fall. A great staff here to humor us all. And I like it. My friends drop in, when they come to town; And tell me how things go in my old town; The T.V. lets me watch the world go around. And I like it. No lawns to mow – no shovelling snow, No seeds to plant – no weeds to hoe; I’ve turned it all over to some other Joe. And I like it. The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

"My wife got a pretty good look at you..." An Old Banker’s joke

“The Beacon” - newsletter is always looking for pictures, stories, papers or other items of interest from around the District or beyond. Take a few moments and share your Lodges events or programs. Its always nice to see what other Lodges are doing. Don’t forget to let others know of upcoming degrees or events - its not un-Masonic to advertise - and its always nice to see a full Lodge room. Bro Clark Johnston cjohnst190@gmail.com January 2013

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Masonic Spring Workshop 1988

page 15 See Sept. issue of The Beacon for part 1

Today's Morality ‑ Masonry at the Crossroads Part 2 - Society and The Mason’s Moral Leadership MW Bro. Jim Roberts In the last paper I made some statements about the meaning of morality and ethical response ‑ I want to recall two items for you. Any moral philosophy is not simply obeying a rigid set of laws, but is a basis for studying appropriate responses. And secondly: a good moral philosophy is one that attempts to bring harmony to the whole of life ‑ and that includes our brother’s and sister’s lives as well. In Haywood's book “More About Masonry”, he has a chapter that is well worth your time to read entitled Masonry and Ethics. He makes some observations that I am sure you would agree with, but I wonder how well we apply them. He says. “When a man is good to himself his goodness is identical with what it is when he is good to another”. That is another way of saying “love your neighbour and yourself.” He continues, “there is no such thing as private morality‑ still less is there any difference or conflict as between private and public ethics... neither is it true that the external world in which we live and move is morally neutral or non moral." What Haywood is saying is that the world is made up of people who have concepts about ethical action, and that is what society reflects. As Masons, we are a part of the world’s scene, and it would be unwise for us to think that we are untouched by the moral perceptions ‑ or lack of them ‑ in our society. But we must also realize that we as individuals have some power to change what we perceive to be wrong. But perhaps we ought to examine the basis of much of what is, in my opinion, wrong in the world in which we live. Let me preface my comments with a statement that I believe to be true. Whenever new ideas or radical changes are introduced into our society there is a sincere desire usually to make the world a better place in which to live. No one sets out to destroy the world for they know; they too, will be consumed. The desire for change normally includes making our society more efficient, more hopeful and more just. Every ideology was spawned in an imperfect society hoping that a utopia would emerge. All have succeeded only partially, all have failed in one way or another. In the Western world in particular (although no part of the world is untouched), there are many areas in which change of the most radical kind has taken place. And in most instances they have cut both ways for good and for evil. Lets look at three among many. The first arena of change has to be our technology. A few years ago now, Jacques Ellul, a French lawyer, sociologist, theologian and author wrote a book entitled La Technique translated into English as The Technological Society. The gist of this book is, that though we are (Continued on page 16)

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helped immensely by the new technology (and it has advanced by leaps and bounds since he wrote the book), he warned that technology in and of itself is amoral ‑ that is "hi‑tech" has no moral principles unless we as human beings bring moral principles into what we undertake using this technology. If we do not, he says, then, we shall find that our technology will control us. For him the threat is real. We must admit that as efficient and labour saving as our new technology has made us it has also opened doors to its exploiters and has in many ways created insurmountable problems for those who depend on its use. The possibility of misuse and lack of moral control is already known to us and has penetrated those areas of business and other disciplines that were once considered impervious to misuse. And we are well aware that this technology can place tremendous power in the hands of a relative few who have the capacity to use it in an unscrupulous way. A textbook on moral principles has not yet been written in this area. The second area where there has been considerable change is in the arena of human rights. Human rights legislation has come about because of the obvious inequities in the treatment of human beings. There is no question in my mind that this has long been needed. Through our concern for human rights, the rights of women have been addressed; the rights of minority groups especially our native people have been heard in more meaningful ways; and the poor, the disadvantaged, the visible minorities have a voice where at one time it was lost in the strident noises of a society that seemed not to care. But as good as human rights legislation has been, there have been many in our society who have used ‑ or should I say abused ‑ the legislation in a selfish and immoral fashion. Not a day goes by without a report in the media of some form of what I consider to be a misapplication of what the Charter of Rights was intended to do. For many people human rights means license for them to act in an entirely uninhibited fashion with as few restraints as possible and without any concern for what it may mean to others in society. What has really happened is that there has been an erosion of social rights and the excesses and the selfishness of a few has made a mockery of the Charter. Our police and court systems are very often hamstrung by that which was meant to create a basis for social justice for all. Only too often real justice is perverted because of some technicality that has to do with individual rights and has nothing to do with the guilt or innocence of the individual. When human rights are based solely on individual rights, then it no longer has, what I consider at least, a true moral connotation. There must be room for the rights of society as well. I know that there are those who will say that such a conclusion is simplistic, but from where I sit I have no other criterion by which to judge. And the third area which has a bearing on all other areas of change is that the standard of morality has changed in our society. Now I am sure that none of us would really like to go back to the 'blue Sundays' and ‘black and white morality' of the era of our youth, at least mine which (Continued on page 17)

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was along time ago! There was a time when wrong doing had no defense. My father was not a man of many words but he knew how and when to take appropriate action and was well acquainted with that part of my anatomy in anything but an artistic way. But in the lifetime of many of us there has developed a permissive morality. The chief spokesman for this “new morality” (as it has been called) is one Joseph Fletcher in a work entitled Situation Ethics. He discards the notion that we require any “thou shalt nots” with respect to human behaviour: Our ethical decisions should be made out of the motive of “responsible love.” He says that in all of our actions requiring moral response let the situation decide the ethic and as long as we do this in a responsible loving context then it is OK. But the illustration that I remember the best was a quote at the end of an article in TIME which asked the question “what meaning does responsible love have to an eighteen year old boy in the back seat of a car with a sixteen year old girl?” As well motivated as the author may have seemed to be, he opened a Pandora’s Box of mischief the like of which we find hard to duplicate. It has become a purely selfishly based ethic, and what, at one time seemed to glue society together has been dismissed as “old hat” and “passe.” The rules of the game of life are gone and we all know that even the simplest game requires rules of some kind. The ramification of this once again -goes far beyond the individual and has infected the roots of our society. Lifestyles that were once considered to be anti‑social or possibly destructive have now been embraced. The norm for the primary groups of society was once the nuclear family ‑ now there are many options ‑ serial marriages, common law relationships with no sense of commitment in many cases etc. And right now in our church (as you must be well aware) we are battling with the whole concept of the place of the homosexual in society. Many of us can see the need for their rights -as individuals, but cannot see their lifestyle as acceptable as a norm and concerned people all across Canada are attempting to struggle with the whole issue. And those raising the questions are not bigots nor are they unfeeling. There is a genuine concern about a group of persons in our midst about whom no one has any definite way of defining who they are, and we are struggling with that. The fact remains that our whole society is plagued with the permissive morality, and if we fail to address it in our lives and in our Lodges we do so at our peril. Society then is at a crossroads in many areas. But with it we as Masons are members of that society along with our many brothers and sisters who are not in the Craft. When we enter the Lodge we bring with us some of the baggage that has been laid on us by the world. While we are in the Lodge we leave it just outside the door, but we pick it up again as soon as we leave the sacred retreat. And though we have been counselled ever so clearly to go out into the world with higher and better resolves, I wonder how many of us ‑ and I include myself - take with us the working tools of the speculative Mason. If we leave the working tools safely in their box, then of what value are they? One of my earliest experiences in Masonry is now a great embarrassment to me and I trust that you will keep this a secret among yourselves. During the first degree, a Brother presented me (Continued on page 18)

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with the working tools of that degree. And he handed me a most beautiful crafted twenty four inch gauge ‑ and it was mine, for he said “I now present you with the working tools, ... “ But he reached over and took it back! My feeling was a mixture of shame and guilt. But in reflection I learned a great lesson from that ‑ not immediately ‑ but gradually, as light in Masonry often is. What that Brother was giving to me that night was no less a gift for they were not crafted artifacts but useful speculative tools for the world of which I was a part. I wonder, my Brothers, if we do not leave the working tools in the Lodge to be on display again at the next meeting. I wonder if it's not only “the secrets of Masonry we lock up in the safe and sacred repository of our hearts" -but the meaning of the square and compasses as well. Oh yes, we are counselled to take our precious teachings with us into the world. My question is "How well do we undertake that counsel and apply it?” Now I realize that I am skating on thin ice for some and there will be those who will be having “roast minister" for a bedtime snack tonight. But I want to warn you I am a tough old bird. And I believe in Harry Truman's famous aphorism “If you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen." I want to relate an incident that is non‑Masonic to illustrate something about our responsibility as Masons. The incident involved a young lady whom I did not know, I just happened to be there as an onlooker. She was a nice looking girl, well dressed and smart appearing. And around her neck was suspended a gold cross, beautifully crafted and no doubt prized by her. But something, I don't know what, disturbed her and her language took on enough colour to make a sailor blush. What ever she may have been proclaiming by the cross suspended from her neck, it stood silent in the face of what she was proclaiming to her listeners. What she revealed to me was not what the cross represented. I want you to know that I was not raised in an ivory tower away from the real world. Before I was in the Ministry, I was in the army for seven years and in industry for another five, and I obtained a finely honed vocabulary from those experiences. And I am sure that there were times when I used inappropriate language only to regret it later. I guess there are also times and places where it might be considered OK by the group in which we find ourselves. But there are times when it is not only not necessary, it is entirely inappropriate. Festive boards are meant to be a time of good fellowship, laughter and story telling. But the honour of the craft suffers when some stories are told. And I can’t tell you in all candour that I inwardly cringe when I hear same of the stories that are told, not because of my calling a minister but because I am a Mason who really believes that we cannot leave behind in the Lodge Room those things that we claim to be a part of our daily living. I don't accept the dictum of many in our society that “boys will be boys" and that is sufficient excuse for off colour humour. I accept only “Masons must be Masons.” My friends and my Brothers, we are called to be leaders in our society – and if we do not begin to exercise responsible leadership in our fellowship, then where does it begin? The theme of the Grand Master this year – as we are well aware – is “Brotherly Love Exemplified – The (Continued on page 19)

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Freemason as a Role Model.” A role model is a new, but more effective way of saying “a good example”. But it goes beyond that simple definition. A role model is a living human being who exemplifies all that I would like to be, and endeavour to follow. None of us is that “perfect ashlar.” We are on that pilgrimage from that "imperfect” to the “perfect” we would like to attain. As we are well informed in the teachings of our order, our love for our Brothers and Sisters has first call upon our gifts and graces. The role model therefore, begins in the Lodge and at the Festive Board. And this, my Brother, was the earliest recollection of Freemasons that I had. Masons were the cream of the men in the town where I lived, and had ideals that I felt I could follow without misgiving. The role model then begins in the Lodge but it is in the society of which we are a part where we hone our skills and use those principles and landmarks that should set us apart from many others. We called to be as Masons, role models in our homes for we are the ones who are teaching the leaders of tomorrow, our children and grandchildren, giving them physical, spiritual and moral guidance that will assist them to cope with what is often a cold impersonal computer oriented society. No matter how efficient our high‑tech society has made us, we still require the love and the care of a human being in our dealings with each other. We are called to be role models in our communities, to be caring and responsible leaders of children’s groups in our communities and our churches. And many of you are. In our Lodges it is clear that we have a mandate to care for the impoverished, not only in body, but impoverished in mind and spirit as well. Our concern must extend into the homes of the shut‑in, the lonely elderly, those in nursing homes and extended care units. As leaders our lives must demonstrate that we are committed to the good for all humankind, not only in words but in deeds also. And in that leadership we are making the world a better place in which to live. We are called to be role models in our daily work. Nowhere is it more important to observe the plumb line dropped into our midst than in our daily labours. For it is here that the principles of truth and justice, fair play and tolerance are to be seen-. Immanuel Kant, a philosopher who had much to say about ethics and moral behaviour, said in what is called The Categorical Imperative. “Act as if the principle from which you act were to become, through your will, a universal law of nature.” Hence, if you can see your way clear to save a few bucks on that tax form, and only you will know - listen first to what Kant says: “Alright, then, lets make it universal law - everybody can do it.” Or let me put it another way, the Golden Rule which is found on one form or another in many faiths says: “do unto others as you would have them do unto you”. Principles are not items just where they are essential to our own well being, they are valid at all times. In other words, my Brothers, we are called to be roll models wherever we are and no area of our life is exempt. We do not have an option as men or Masons in the world. I want to conclude with a couple of thoughts that may not relate, perhaps, but are important to the future of Masonry. If Freemasonry is indeed at a crossroads today there maybe many reasons, certainly more than I have mentioned. Some have suggested that we need to update the way we do things, both in the ritual and the conduct of the Lodge. Others have said that we need to have a better image in society that we need to become more relevant in the (Continued on page 20)

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modern world. Still others would like us to be more service oriented. And, with L. C. Helms, I would agree that there are many areas that we could examine and make those kinds of changes that would enhance the meaning of the Craft, for both ourselves and our society. But the future of Masonry has always depended upon the people who make up its membership, and especially the leaders of today and tomorrow. We can tinker with the machinery, change its program structure, amend the Ritual and so on, but In the last analysis it is who we are in our Lodges and our society that will determine our destiny. L.C. Helms says near the end of his book A Modern Mason Examines His Craft that we must plan with both our heads and our hearts. Each Freemason actively involved in Masonic activities must remember the simple children’s saying, “If it is to be, it is up to me.” Part One printed in the September issue of “The Beacon” . All of MW Bro. Roberts major Masonic writings are available in his book titled “Masonic Papers and Addresses”, by Bro. James w. Roberts., It can be purchase through the Grand Lodge of Alberta Bookstore. Digital copies can be purchased through the Apple itunes Book Store or www.barnsandnoble.com

Say NO to Nostalgia April 20th - 22nd 2013 http://www.masonicspringworkshop.ab.ca/ Each April for the past forty-eight years, Masons have met in Alberta's Rocky Mountains, west of Calgary, for a weekend of fellowship and instruction. The goal of the Masonic Spring Workshop Planning Committee is to create a weekend experience in a relaxed atmosphere of fellowship offering individual Masons the opportunity:  to be challenged, excited, amused, exposed to new ideas, offered options for expression, and mentored in the ways and ideals of Freemasonry;  to renew old acquaintances; and The Keynote speaker is Pierre G "Pete" Normand, Masonic researcher, author published in Heredom, the Scottish Rite Journal, and speaker. Active in several Masonic bodies and founder of the first American Traditional Best Practices Lodge. 

Register by Dec 31st for a discount  Register by March 1st t for the Early-bird draw (weekend for 2 at the Delta Lodge Kananaskis Inn  Great Rate for Eight - register before Dec 31st For details on rates and to register on-line go to:

http://www.masonicspringworkshop.ab.ca/2013Workshop/Online-Registration.html The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

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From The Internet: On 2012-11-11, at 12:40 PM, idonald2 <idonald2@gmail.com> wrote:

You will be very happy to know that in Hamilton Ontario Canada at the Hillcrest Masonic Temple on Friday November 09, 2012 history was made. The MWPHGL of Ontario and Jurisdiction Mount Olive Lodge #1 held their first meeting at their new Temple at 267 Mohawk Rd Hamilton Ontario. This meeting was attended by many dignitaries of the MWPHGL as well as the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario. There are two things that make this special. First is the Hillcrest Masonic Temple is the home of my lodge, Hillcrest Ldg. #594 GRC as well as 3 other GRC lodges, Composite #667, Westmount #671 and Buchanan #550 and now Mount Olive #1 MWPHGL has joined or Masonic Family here on Mohawk Rd. Secondly W. M. Bro. Poole broke protocol have the guests from the GRC join in the ceremony of Mending the Chain for the recently deceased PM of Mount Olive Ldg, Bro. The Hon. Lincoln Alexander former Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. It was a very moving ceremony and also very symbolic for two reasons not only where we honouring a great statesman, (the 1st black member of the Ontario Parliament and later the Queens Representative in Ontario among his other accomplishments), but I also felt it was the symbolic healing of the 100 plus yrs our Grand Lodge had denied the recognition to the MWPHGL. This evening was the acorn that has sprouted in the very fertile soil and will grow to be a mighty oak and the core strength of our two grand Lodges tirelessly working together in the quarries making Masonry that much closer to perfection. I know that W. Bro. Poole is dedicated to the promotion of our Craft and I too can think that from the roots that have been laid down on Friday night we can only grow stronger. Fraternally Thine Ian M. Donald PM Hillcrest Ldg #594 GRC Ensor Ldg #729 GLKY

An older gentleman was asked: ... "At your ripe age, what would you prefer to get - Parkinsons or Alzheimer's?" The wise one answered, "Definitely Parkinsons. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better to spill half an ounce of good Scotch, than to forget where you keep the bottle!!" *******************************************************

An older gentleman was on the operating table awaiting surgery and he insisted that his son, a renowned surgeon, perform the operation. As he was about to get the anesthesia, he asked to speak to his son. "Yes, Dad, what is it?" "Don't be nervous, son; just do your best, and remember, if things don't go well and something happens to me, your mother is going to come and live with you and your wife..." The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

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Hi. MY NAME IS ROSE November 21, 2012 From “The Educator http://www.theeducator.ca

On the first day of school our professor introduced himself and challenged us to get to know someone we didn’t already know. I stood up to look around when a gentle hand touched my shoulder. I turned around to find a wrinkled, little old lady beaming up at me with a smile that lit up her entire being.. She said, ‘Hi handsome. My name is Rose. I’m eighty-seven years old. Can I give you a hug?’ I laughed and enthusiastically responded, ‘Of course you may!’ and she gave me a giant squeeze.. ‘Why are you in college at such a young, innocent age?’ I asked. She jokingly replied, ‘I’m here to meet a rich husband, get married, and have a couple of kids…’ ‘No seriously,’ I asked. I was curious what may have motivated her to be taking on this challenge at her age. ‘I always dreamed of having a college education and now I’m getting one!’ she told me. After class we walked to the student union building and shared a chocolate milkshake. We became instant friends. Every day for the next three months we would leave class together and talk nonstop. I was always mesmerized listening to this ‘time machine’ as she shared her wisdom and experience with me.. Over the course of the year, Rose became a campus icon and she easily made friends wherever she went. She loved to dress up and she revelled in the attention bestowed upon her from the other students. She was living it up. At the end of the semester we invited Rose to speak at our football banquet. I’ll never forget what she taught us“. She was introduced and stepped up to the podium. As she began to deliver her prepared speech, she dropped her three by five cards on the floor. Frustrated and a little embarrassed she leaned into the microphone and simply said, I’m sorry I’m so jittery. I gave up beer for Lent and this whiskey is killing me! I’ll never get my speech back in order so let me just tell you what I know.’ As we laughed she cleared her throat and began, ‘ We do not stop playing because we are old; we grow old because we stop playing. There are only four secrets to staying young, being happy, and achieving success. You have to laugh and find humour every day. You’ve got to have a dream. When you lose your dreams, you die. We have so many people walking around who are dead and don’t even know it! There is a huge difference between growing older and growing up. If you are nineteen years old and lie in bed for one full year and don’t do one productive thing, you will turn twenty years old. If I am eighty-seven years old and stay in bed for a year and never do anything I will turn eighty-eight. Anybody! Can grow older. That doesn’t take any talent or ability. The idea is to grow up by always finding opportunity in change. Have no regrets. The elderly usually don’t have regrets for what we did, but rather for things we did not do. The only people who fear death are those with regrets..’ She concluded her speech by courageously singing ‘The Rose.’ She challenged each of us to study the lyrics and live them out in our daily lives. At the year’s end Rose finished the college degree she had begun all those months ago. One week after graduation Rose died peacefully in her sleep. (Continued on page 23)

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Over two thousand college students attended her funeral in tribute to the wonderful woman who taught by example that it’s never too late to be all you can possibly be. REMEMBER, GROWING OLDER IS MANDATORY. GROWING UP IS OPTIONAL. We make a Living by what we get. We make a Life by what we give. Remember ‘Good friends are like stars….. ….. You don’t always see them, but you know they are always there.’

Where to Have Lunch Today A group of Masons, all under age 40, discussed where they should meet for lunch. Finally they all agreed that they would meet at the Black Knight Inn Lounge because the waitresses there were gorgeous, with tight skirts and tighter tops. (And the Steak Sandwich is cheap) Ten years later, at age 50, the Masons once again discussed where they should meet for lunch. Finally it was agreed that they would meet at the Black Knight Inn Lounge because the food and service was good and the wine selection was excellent. Ten years later, at age 60, the Masons again discussed where they should meet for lunch. Finally they all agreed that they would meet at the Black Knight Inn Lounge because they could dine in peace and quiet and the restaurant had large screen TVs. Ten years later, at age 70, the Masons discussed where they should meet for lunch. Finally it was agreed that they would meet at the Black Knight Inn Lounge because the it was wheelchair accessible and had an elevator. Ten years later, at age 80, the Masons discussed where they should meet for lunch. Finally they all agreed that they would meet at the Black Knight Inn Lounge because they had never been there before. A group of Masons have been meeting for lunch (12 noon) at the Black Knight Inn - Remington Lounge, in Red Deer, every Wednesday for the past 10+ years. We welcome any Mason &/or guest to join us. Also an opportunity for anyone interested in joining Masonry to meet Masons and ask questions. It’s an informal gathering with numbers vary from 4 to 14+ and we can always find room for you. Come and enjoy some fellowship and solve the problems of the world - or at least give me some hints on how to improve my golf game. Clark - cjohnst190@gmail.com

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Masonic Membership? The members of a service organization, a golf club or a card club, fishing or hunting clubs are not obligated to pass through a course of instruction to understand their new organization. Freemasonry is a different kind of organization. It is so different that it is not easy to think of any other society with which to compare it. Masonry is not an obvious and familiar thing a man already understands when he joins it. It is, rather, something that he must learn. In order that this may be made more clear, let us consider a few facts. Masonry is so organized that a man cannot be admitted to it merely by paying a fee and signing a book. He must pass through a series of initiations, which require of him that he study and learn much. It does not entice men into its membership by offering them pleasures and indulgences, but calls them, if they are properly qualified and have the motive, to living a certain kind of life. Just what this life is the Fraternity does not set forth in a few simple rules but establishes in a beautiful system of ritual and symbolism. This system cannot be understood in a few minutes. It calls for study, reflection, and a vigorous application of the mind. The history of Masonry, which is very ancient, is interesting as such, but infinitely more, it is a living and active part of our work, not something dead and done with, but vital and close to us. One cannot understand Masonry apart from its history. Of like bearing is the fact that Masonry exists a system of laws. These laws are in the form of Ancient Landmarks. Old Charges, Constitutions, traditions, usages, edicts, regulations, customs, by laws and authority vested in officers. Whatever is done in Masonry is done lawfully. The Craft is not an open enclosure in which, after passing the barrier, every man is left free to do as he pleases. Rather, it is like an organism in which every part and organ acts according to the law of the whole. Consider also the offices in the Masonic system. They carry with them heavy responsibilities. The Master, for example, is not simply a presiding officer, but is indeed and in truth a Master, the executive head of the Lodge, responsible for its welfare to the Grand Lodge. To qualify for such an office he must pass through a long apprenticeship in active work and be certified as proficient. He should learn thoroughly the Ritual of all three Degrees, as well as the opening and closing ceremonies and rules of order, to say nothing of the laws and practices. As you enter this great world of Masonry you must not be content to look on it from a distance, but be eager to enter into it, take part in all its affairs, and to enjoy to the full the rich life that pulsates through it. (Continued on page 25)

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Concordant Bodies Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, Lodge of Perfection, Central Valley Meetings: 3rd Tuesday, 8:00 pm Freemason Hall, 4722 - 49B Ave, Lacombe, AB Contact Jim Innes, 403-343-3086 Royal Arch, Lebanon #38 Meetings: Third Thursday Apollo Lodge Hall, 5114-50 Ave Stettler, AB Contact: Jim Lockhart, jlockhart@xplorenet.com 403-742-5775 Mountain View #1 (Olds) 1st Tuesday - Venus #2 (Red Deer) 2nd Monday Alexandra #4 (Lacombe) 2nd Tuesday - Victoria #14 (Stettler) 3rd Monday Innisfail #37 (Innisfail) 1st Thur. Al Azhar - (Calgary) - Red Deer Unit Meetings - 3rd Wed. Freemason Hall, 4811-52nd Street, Red Deer, AB, Pres.: President: Noble Bill Canning 403-346-4414 railandtrail@shaw.ca Secretary: Noble Jim (JJ) Corbett 403-341-6065 b.canning@telus.net Al Shamal - (Edmonton) - Regional Club: Battle River Contacts: Cliff McDermott - Red Deer ccmcde@shaw.ca Don Anderson - Stettler - darand@telusplanet.net (Continued from page 24)

Your diligence in learning the catechism of the three Degrees is essential, as this will be the foundation upon which you can build a satisfying Masonic career. It will make it easier for you to take part in Lodge life, to visit other Lodges, perhaps to hold office; and at the same time it will become a part of your own mind from which you will constantly draw inspiration and light in your daily life. As you become qualified and as opportunity arises, we recommend that you stand ready to take an active part in the Fraternity, not content with remaining on the side. This does not necessary mean to hold office or participate in the Degrees; the work of Masonry is far more extensive than that. We are confident that this description of the task of being a Mason will neither depress nor discourage you, but rather will be an inspiration to you, a challenge to your best endeavors, a proof to you of the richness and value of that life with us into which you are now entering. Thanks to the Masonic Renewal Comm of NA The Beacon - Central District Masonic Newsletter

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