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Contents COVER STORY – DONCASTER RESIDENCE

6

FROM THE PRESIDENT

11

INTER VIE W: PROFILING DOMINIQUE HUNTER

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R E G U L AT I O N S 2 1 B U I L D I N G P E R M I T D ATA

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AWA R D S 3 4 PLANNING TOPICS

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MARKETING TIPS

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T E C H N O LO G Y 43 JOB MARKET

For more information on BDAV News, Events, CPD Courses and Awards, visit news.bdav.org.au.

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BUILDING DESIGNERS A S S O C AT I O N O F V I C T O R I A

PO Box 174 Carlton South Vic 3053 (03) 9416 0227 info@bdav.org.au www.bdav.org.au

EDITOR

Giselle Grynbaum


Cover Story – Doncaster Residence


COVER STORY – DONCASTER RESIDENCE

Design that works on a challenging site to achieve views and privacy

Sync Design won the award for Residential Design - New Houses: $500K-$1M in the BDAV’s 2017 Building Design Awards for their Doncaster Residence project. Minimalist may not be a word that springs to mind when discussing a home built to a healthy budget, but this ethos was front and centre throughout the design process. The young family were happy to hand the reigns for their new home in Doncaster to David Tennant of Sync Design, and to provide the briefest of briefs. Perched on the top of a hill, and opposite Koonung Creek, the steeply sloped corner site presented significant challenges. The family wanted a generous three-bedroom, two living room and double-garage family home, without it looming over the neighbourhood. Negotiating a 3.45 metre drop from the north-east to the south-west corner of the site, Sync Design’s solution was to use the grade to install a basement garage that provided the owners with extra storage while keeping car parking out of sight and mind.

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“ Beautifully resolved mass, considered programme and overall composition. The complexities and risk associated with a steep corner block were a significant challenge, in which the designer has shown exceptional ability. ” MARC BERNSTEIN-HUSSMANN C H A I R , J U D G I N G PA N E L

What could have been an imposing house now happily blends into the streetscape. The minimalistic approach is evident in the external materials palette, pared back to just two contrasting materials: concrete and matt black render. These design elements carry through to the interior of the house, with concrete and black finishes used throughout. “Using a limited number of materials creates simplicity and provides cohesion throughout the house,” explains David.

The clients were hopeful the home could incorporate views to neighbouring parkland and creek, despite several commercial buildings barring the way. The design team achieved those views by using the high elevation to their advantage: angling the built form and placing living spaces up top. “The living room window perfectly frames the desired view points to the reserve and blocks the harsh western sunlight,” adds David. Continued page 9.....

C over S tory – D oncaster R esidence

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Like any modern house, the kitchen is the heart of the home, with an open-plan design featuring a central island with white granite benchtop and black custom cabinetry. An integrated fridge removes visual clutter, while three simple overhead canister lights create understated visual interest. A mirror has been neatly concealed as a splashback to provide light and contrast to the kitchen; it reflects greenery from the garden, bringing the outdoors in. This elegant, refined palette, together with the clean forms of the house, creates a timeless, minimalist design. The Judges agreed. “Beautifully resolved mass, considered programme and overall composition. The complexities and risk associated with a steep corner block were a significant challenge, in which the designer has shown exceptional ability. The arrangement of the cubist forms allows the building to sit comfortably upon the hill, with the rotated and abstracted boxes addressing the corner block equally. The interiors also speak to an experienced designer, with a sophistication that synchronises with the exterior as one object. The refined aesthetic with the smooth render and resolved fenestrations communicate a strong design response and an equally impressive technical capacity.”

DESIGNER

Sync Design www.syncdesign.com.au

BUILDER

Concept Build

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jack Lovel Photography

L S Planning Pty Ltd offers experience and expertise across a broad range of planning issues, such as:  Planning permit application preparation and management  Planning reports  Representation at VCAT  Expert witness advice and representation  Planning Scheme amendments  Strategic planning  Residential development concept preparation Town Planning is a complex field which is constantly evolving and requires a level of expertise to achieve a successful outcome. Please call to find out how the team at L S Planning can assist you, with your next project. www.lsplanning.com.au

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C over S tory – D oncaster R esidence

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“ Using a limited number of materials creates simplicity and provides cohesion throughout the house. ” —D — AV I D T E N N A N T


From the President


This first-floor extension clearly articulates old and new, so the scale of the original building is clearly identifiable. Design: Dig Design Photo: Rachel Lewis

Carpenter Street Project Design: Dig Design Photo: Rachel Lewis

Osborne Street Residence Design: Dig Design Photo: Rachel Lewis

Osborne Street extension to the rear is large, modern and open plan, creating a dynamic contrast to the existing home Design: Dig Design Photo: Rachel Lewis


H E R I TA G E H O W - T O : I T ’ S A L L A B O U T C O N T E X T

BDAV President, Lindsay Douglas talks about heritage homes that are appropriate for contemporary living

When home owners think of the word heritage, confusion reigns. What does a heritage listing actually mean? What restrictions do you have to abide by? What can be changed and what can’t be changed? It’s a veritable can of worms! However, in many cases, there are a raft of options available to heritage home owners keen to expand. Maintaining a heritage home so that it is appropriate for contemporary living is encouraged because it is essential to its long-term value. The key to designing an extension to a heritage home is to create something that doesn’t copy, but pays homage to the characteristics of the original building and its surrounds. This is where an experienced consultant can produce a balanced design that both respects the existing house and complements it with the addition of a quality piece of modern architecture. BUILDINGS TELL A STORY

One of my favourite things about walking through the inner suburbs of Melbourne is looking between houses or down a lane and being surprised by an exciting extension to a beautiful, old home. To me, it is not just the original house that is interesting, it’s the story the extension tells of its journey since. An extension with a contemporary aesthetic can really enhance the character of the home and have a ripple effect on the surrounding area. The combination of new and old can create a wonderful fusion, and I personally like the oomph the contrast adds to the design. I’ve been asked to plan extensions and renovations for many period houses, such as small workers cottages, in order to make them suitable for the way we live today. I enjoy the process of taking a trip down memory lane and wondering what life was like in these small homes. But, if I extend it in the same original style, it’s no longer a small workers cottage. It has been changed forever and the story is lost. Alternatively, if the extension is modern and the style is clearly differentiated, the story can be retained while the extension adds a new chapter and makes it practical for a new family. It may seem obvious, but the first thing I do on a new project is a site analysis of the property. If there is a house on the site, what style is it, and what is the style of the adjoining homes? Typically, house styles in inner Melbourne heritage areas are Victorian, Edwardian, Federation, Bungalow, Inter-war, Post-war and Modern. Secondly, local authorities and/or specialists need to be consulted on specific properties in order to investigate the opportunities and restrictions which may apply. Under a heritage overlay, the property may be a contributory to a wider heritage precinct or ‘individually listed’ and there are different requirements N E W S . B D AV. O R G . AU

depending on the area and local heritage policy. These details need to be confirmed prior to commencing any work. The design solution needs to respond to the neighbourhood character, heritage guidelines and site context. Once a design has been developed, a planning application needs to be lodged. This will typically include a full drawing set and planning report describing the design, explaining the context and the effect on adjoining properties. The planning application will also include a report explaining the design approach and how it responds to the guidelines. People often have negative attitudes towards heritage overlays because of the requirement to go through town planning process. When I added a modern extension to my Victorian home within a heritage area, going through town planning was a time-consuming process; however, it ensured the character of the surrounding area was preserved. C H A L L E N G E S A N D O P P O R T U N I T I E S I N A LT E R AT I O N S A N D A D D I T I O N S

Neighbourhood: The proposed design should carefully consider the neighbourhood character; this means considering scale, setbacks, heights, materials and form for its appropriateness. A thorough site analysis is necessary to inform what is appropriate for the new design. It is important to consider what the council wants the design to address and understand that the scale of the new works should not dominate the original building. To minimise the visual impact at the front of the home and preserve the street’s character, the traditional home can be used to shield any rear extensions beyond by using site lines. Recycling: The environment is an important consideration in any building design. The story of the building is carried in all of its materials, so it is important to consider during any demolition works if there are original materials that can be recycled and re-used. Another option is sourcing recycled materials, which if selected appropriately, can fit in with the design and surrounding area. Parking: Parking is a potentially unexpected challenge in heritage areas because cars were not included in a building’s design until the middle of the 20th century. Look to the adjoining and nearby properties for hints on how parking might be incorporated. Generally speaking, the aim is to make the car recessive to the house. Garages and carports are not seen as heritage elements, so careful consideration should be given to their location. Meeting the check-list: One of the biggest challenges of designing in a heritage area is incorporating council criteria into the proposed design while sticking to the client’s brief. These are sometimes at odds, so it takes a lot of creativity and experience. Continued page 15.....

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Workplaces: Wellness + Wood = Productivity

“Until recently, we’ve really not had a whole lot of evidence to support that common hypothesis that having things like wooden surfaces in the office would be good for your wellbeing.”*

“What I found and got really excited about was that there’s a really strong association between the presence of wood and wellbeing. I’ve rarely seen a data set or a study which has shown such a clear link.”*

“If you’re a worker and you could see no wooden surfaces at all from your workplace, 53% of that type of worker was satisfied with what was going on in their workplace. When you move that up to having eight or more wooden surfaces - we’re talking things here like wooden chairs, wooden panelling on the walls, wooden floorboards, even quite small wooden items- but if you get to eight or more, then 82% of people were satisfied with their work.”*

“Having wooden surfaces in your workplace is strongly associated with: improved worker wellbeing, workplace satisfaction, and with all the positive things that can flow from that like improved productivity.”* N E W S . B D AV. O R G . AU

Download the free report - Workplaces: Wellness + Wood = Productivity at woodsolutions.com.au/ wood-at-work

*Associate Professor Jacki Schirmer, Health and Wellbeing Researcher, University of Canberra

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H E R I TA G E H O W - T O : I T ’ S A L L A B O U T C O N T E X T ( C O N T I N U E D )

C A S E S T U D Y: O S B O R N E

One of our projects was a small weatherboard cottage in a predominantly Victorian area. It had a heritage overlay and a history of disparaging renovations. The client asked for a large house to suit a modern family, and to restore the four front rooms back to their original condition. We created a break between the existing and modern extension by incorporating a courtyard garden. The garden became a feature of the home, with a passage leading to the swimming pool. The extension to the rear is large, modern and open plan, creating a dynamic contrast to the existing home. To hide the mass of the extension, we concealed it behind the existing residence. We looked at the site lines and the form of the extension to minimise the visual impact from the street, but create a visual appeal from the backyard at the same time. While the extension wasn’t timber, we used a timber batten feature that connected with the existing weatherboard residence. Having a contrasting extension enabled us to maximise and enhance the sense of space by opening up the house and connecting it with the backyard. Large sliding doors open up to the veranda, and the swimming pool is designed to feel as though it’s part of the living room. There is no question that designing in a heritage area comes with its challenges, but it also provides an opportunity to help a traditional home evolve to its full contemporary potential. Good design calls for a lot of imagination, careful planning and consideration to create modern architecture that fits within heritage areas. When done well, a new design element will not copy but instead complement key heritage elements of an original home.

“ There is no question that designing in a heritage area comes with its challenges, but it also provides an opportunity to help a traditional home evolve to its full contemporary potential. ” L I N D S AY D O U G L A S

A W O R D O N H E R I TA G E O V E R L AY S –

A Heritage Overlay (or HO) is one of a number of planning scheme overlays contained in the Victorian Planning Provisions, for use in planning schemes in Victoria. It controls both the ‘demolition’ and ‘new development/work’ on affected land.

– It cannot be assumed that an older area has a HO on a property; this needs to be confirmed with the local authorities. –

Areas with heritage significance are protected with a heritage overlay, which is in place to preserve and maintain the characteristics of the area and encourage good design solutions that respond to the proposed site and surrounding properties.

Most heritage places have a municipal heritage study that identifies the significant characteristics of the area, which is important to establish when looking at opportunities for any extension.

In addition to the Heritage Overlay, some properties may be registered with Heritage Victoria (HV). In such circumstances, a separate application to HV will be required.

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InterVIEW


INTERVIEW

Second in our new InterVIEW feature to get to ‘Know Your Designer’ is BDAV Vice-President, Dominique Hunter

Dominique Hunter runs Hunter and Richards, a successful interior design business she runs with her husband and business-partner, Antony Richards. Collectively, they have more than 40 years’ combined professional experience. Q: What architectural style of home did you grow up in? A: A Queenslander. Lots of timber, great summer ventilation but cold in winter. Q: What is your favourite finish? A: Cerakote Coatings. Not cheap but very sexy. And texturally, anything knurled. Q: What is your favourite Australian building? A: My Commercial favourite is the Queensland Art Gallery. Residential - Heide II. Both buildings have the same modernist style. Q: What is your favourite international building?

Q: What are you reading at the moment?

A: At the moment it is the home of Norwegian artist Bjarne Melgaard by the Selvaag brothers. Not sure if I like it, but it totally intrigues me.

A: A comic named Black Orchid by Neil Gamen & Dave McKean. I read it 20 years ago, so I’m reminiscing. Q: What are your ‘words of wisdom’ for a student building designer?

Q: What has been your biggest business/design challenge to date?

A: Draw through your design problems.

A: To say no. I still find it hard. Q: What motivated you to join the BDAV? Q: What are you passionate about? A: Things working well, whether it is a teapot, a home or a city.

A: I needed technical support and was not getting it from my other Professional Association.

Q: How do you like to spend your leisure time?

IMAGES (OPPOSITE):

A: It’s not fashionable, but I like spending Friday nights on the couch.

(top, right) Queenslander style architecture Source: Pinterest

Q: As a child, what did you want to be?

(top, left) Interiors of Heide II Source: heide.com.au

A: An architect in the days and an actor by night.

(centre, left) Interiors of Heide II. Source: Christine Francis Architects David McGlashan and Neil Everist

Q: Sum up your life, in four words.

(bottom) Home of Norwegian artist Bjarne Melgaard by the Selvaag brothers. Source: snohetta.com

A: Lucky. Funny. Full. Whirlwind.

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I nter V I E W

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Regulations


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B U I L D I N G R E G U L AT I O N S 2 0 1 8

Kate Bell reports on the Building Regulations 2018 which commence on 2 June 2018

As all members should be aware, the Building Regulations 2018 commence on 2 June 2018. The 10 key areas of regulatory change are:

One of the changes which will most likely cause the largest disruption for most building designers (and other practitioners) is the fact that all building regulations, parts, schedules and forms have been completely renumbered. This means if you have any direct references to the building regulation numbers on your drawings, specifications, documents, forms etc, it will need to be amended, even if the regulation itself is unchanged.

1.

New forms and further requirements to make sure that the permits, orders and notices include the information that is needed.

2.

The Regulations have been modernised for the electronic use of documents for permits.

To assist with this transition, DEWLP has produced the following documents to cross reference between the two versions of the regulations, which are available at the Department’s website:

3.

Updated requirements for the chief officer, RBSs and building practitioners in relation to documenting performance solutions.

– Regulation Number Finder 1

4.

New building permit reporting requirements commencing on 1 July 2019.

5.

New obligations for the RBS to provide notice 30 days prior to a building permit lapsing to minimise lapsed permits.

6.

Clear obligations on the RBS and the owner to inform the adjoining owner about protection work.

7.

Introducing a new mandatory notification stage and inspections if the building work includes fire and smoke resistant building elements, which are lightweight construction in multi-storey residential buildings, and service penetrations in multi-storey residential and healthcare buildings. The Regulations also clarify the prescribed mandatory notification stages for demolition work or the construction of a pool.

8.

The Regulations clarify the obligations of owners in relation to ESM maintenance, and encourage the uptake of maintenance schedules to simplify information for the owner. They also clarify the notification requirements in relation to pool barriers.

9.

As-of-right construction of a Class 10a building with a floor area not exceeding 10sqm on undeveloped land.

10.

Formalising the process for granting a determination to treat two or more allotments as a single allotment for the purpose of a building permit application.

The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) has produced material online to provide an overview, including an overview brochure and a summary of changes. Alternatively, if you weren’t able to attend the BDAV April seminar which presented the changes, the DVD is available to order at the BDAV webshop. BDAV will also be facilitating a conversation about the Building Regulation changes at the May/June round of regional meetings.

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– Regulation Number Finder 2 BDAV is finalising the update of all our practice notes and Members will be notified when they are available in the Members area of the website. BDAV has also prepared a Management Note which extracts the specific regulation amendments which directly affect building designers. This is available in the Members section of the website. When the 2nd June 2018 does arrive, don’t forget that, under Section 10 of the Building Act: A building regulation, or an amendment to a building regulation, does not apply to the carrying out of building work if the relevant building surveyor is satisfied, and certifies in writing, that substantial progress was made on the design of the building before the building regulation or amendment commenced. OTHER REFORMS

Other reforms that are underway, on which BDAV will keep Members updated as there is progress include: CLADDING

The Building Regulations Sunset Review was substantially undertaken before the establishment of the Victorian Cladding Taskforce. While the Building Regulations 2018 will introduce a new mandatory notification stage relating to fire compartments in multi-storey residential and healthcare buildings, reforms related directly to cladding are being addressed through reforms and the state-wide audit arising from the Victorian Cladding Taskforce. Ministerial Guideline MG-14 Issue of building permits where building work involves the use of certain cladding products. Continued page 25.....

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N AT I O N A L E N E R G Y G U A R A N T E E S TAT E M E N T

Victorian Government legislates ambitious but achievable renewable energy targets The Victorian State Government agreed last month that the Energy Security Board progress development of the detailed design of the National Energy Guarantee for determination by the Energy Council at its August 2018 meeting.

At the Victorian Government’s request, the Commonwealth Government has agreed to urgently progress the outstanding elements of their Update on Commonwealth Design Elements paper to ensure an informed decision by the Council on the NEG in August.

Victoria will ensure that the NEG framework will not compromise the implementation of our emissions reduction and renewable energy targets.

“We have obtained assurances that the Energy Security Board will urgently provide an update to COAG Energy Council on the status of implementation of the ‘Independent review into the future security of the National Electricity Market: Blueprint for the future’ (the Finkel Review).”

Victoria has legislated ambitious but achievable renewable energy targets of 40 per cent by 2025 and net-zero emissions by 2050. The State Government will continue to pursue policies that ensure reliable and affordable power across Victoria. Significant issues remain to be addressed in the High Level Design Document and Commonwealth Design Elements paper, including setting the emissions target, EITEs, offsets, state additionality, the setting of the reliability standard, and market power mitigation and other technical matters.

“We will act in good faith on the development of the NEG, but we still have significant concerns that are yet to be addressed.” “We will continue to support the growth of renewable energy in Victoria to deliver a reliable and low cost energy system for the future.”

The Commonwealth Government needs to detail the mechanism future governments can utilise to scale up the emissions target.

.....Continued from page 23

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SWIMMING POOL SAFETY

In response to feedback regarding improvements to pool safety, the Victorian Government is evaluating options for legislative reform to enhance compliance and safety for existing swimming pool and spa barriers. A proposal for regulations to require owners to upgrade their barrier to the latest standard is to be deferred, as feedback indicated the legislative amendment to enhance compliance would be a more effective approach.

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REVIEW OF FEES

The Building Regulations 2018 also included changes to bring local council fees closer to full cost recovery. The fee Regulations will operate until 1 July 2020, which will provide for a review of all fees. The VBA and Building Appeals Board fees will stay the same until this review is completed.

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A PA R T M E N T A C C E S S I B I L I T Y R E Q U I R E M E N T S

Lee Wilson talks about the accessibility requirements of the current building and disability legislation when designing apartment buildings B A C K G R O U N D T O L E G I S L AT I O N

For those building designers involved with commercial building projects, it will come as no surprise that the accessibility requirements of the current building and disability legislation can often be complex and difficult to interpret. Particularly when considering that, in some situations, there are different requirements for differing uses of buildings and the availability of exemptions and concessions. This level of complexity obviously increases when designers move from domestic building codes and standards into commercial projects.

A PA R T M E N T B U I L D I N G A C C E S S

The BCA and Premises Standards have specific requirements in apartment buildings, including: – A continuous accessible path of travel for wheelchair users from the Council footpath to the building entrance; – An accessible entrance doorway;

On 1 May 2011, the Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 2010 (often referred to as the Premises Standards) were adopted. At that time, the Premises Standards and the National Construction Code, Building Code of Australia, Volume 1 (or BCA) were aligned to provide a consistent approach.

– An accessible path of travel to the doors of the apartments on at least one level of the building;

This approach affords designers and other project stakeholders assurance that if they comply with the accessibility requirements of the BCA and Premises Standards they cannot be found to be acting unlawfully under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA).

E Q U I TA B L E A N D D I G N I F I E D A C C E S S

These legislative requirements ensure that all building occupants have equitable and dignified access into not only new buildings but also existing buildings that are being upgraded or refurbished. In many cases this might trigger the need to address existing stepped entrances with upgrades to provide ramped or lift access for wheelchair users.

– Where a passenger lift is installed, an accessible path is required to all apartment doors on levels serviced by the lift; and To and within not less than one of each common area (such as gymnasiums, laundry rooms, BBQ areas and the like).

A C C E S S I B I L I T Y S TA N D A R D S

These accessibility requirements are generally outlined in BCA Part D3 with passenger lift requirements in Clause E3.6. These reference Australian Standards AS 1428.1 and AS 1735.12 and include the following requirements: – Doors must be accessible and identifiable, with suitable circulation spaces, door controls, visual indicator bands on glazing, be easily operated and have a clear opening of at least 850mm.

These provisions also ensure that accessible accommodation options are available in nursing homes, hotels, motels and bed and breakfasts, with access to at least one of each unique space (such as terrace areas, games rooms, laundry facilities etc).

– Floor surfaces need to be slip-resistant and changes of levels in all accessible parts of the building must be ramped. Attention must be given to aligning the entry floor level to the Council footpath level with an accessible path.

Additionally, for the first time, the BCA introduced accessibility requirements into apartment buildings, and seven years on from the introduction of these requirements, these continue to be a problematic area for practitioners.

– All stairs need to consider handrails, tactile indicators on each landing, stair tread nosing strips and a clear width of at least 1m. Landings also need to be setback from corridors to ensure the handrail extensions don’t project into a corridor. – Access ramps need handrails/kerb-rails, tactile indicators on each landing and a clear width of at least 1m. – Corridors in all accessible parts of the building also need adequate spaces for a wheelchair user to turn around at the end of each corridor section (1540mm width) and at any change of direction. – Lifts must have a minimum size of 1100mm x 1400mm, door opening of 900mm, compliant controls on landings and in lift cars, a handrail near the lit car controls and audible/ visual information for lifts servicing more than 2 levels. Continued page 29....

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A PA R T M E N T A C C E S S I B I L I T Y R E Q U I R E M E N T S ( C O N T I N U E D )

P E R F O R MA N C E S O LU T I O N S

Notwithstanding the above, the BCA is a performance-based building code. As such, compliance can be achieved by following the prescriptive requirements, adopting a performance-based approach developed as a ‘Performance Solution’, or by a combination of the two (often used in upgrades to existing buildings).

3. Dimension everything, allowing for reductions in widths in common area corridors due to skirtings and architraves. 4. Reference the correct Australian Standards on drawings. 5. Set back ramps and stairs from property boundaries (by 900mmto allow for handrail extensions and tactile indicators inside the property) and from internal corridors (to ensure compliant handrail extensions can be provided).

The objectives of a performance-based building code are to create an environment that has more flexibility to develop innovative and cost-effective solutions by focusing on the outcomes that the build- 6. Lastly, have the design reviewed for compliance before applying for town planning approvals. ing is required to deliver. This is particularly relevant to apartment buildings when every square metre is important to a developer. Consideration of the above will help to ensure a smooth building permit and construction process. Ultimately, as a performance-based code, the legal compliance requirement in each part of the BCA is the applicable ‘Performance Requirement’ and a building solution will only comply if it satisfies the Performance Requirements. These Performance Requirements are outlined at the start of each part of the BCA and include structural, fire resistance, egress, services and equipment, health and amenity, energy efficiency and accessibility.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lee Wilson is a Disability Access Consultant with Melbourne Access Audits who has over 30 years’ experience in the construction industry. In early 2018, he was appointed by the Australian Building Codes Board as a Subject Matter Expert (Disability Access).

The Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB) is currently promoting this approach and encouraging the use of Performance Solutions, and this was a central topic of recent seminars delivered around the country. PLANNING REQUIREMENTS

Whilst outside the building and disability legislative frameworks, changes to the Victorian Planning Scheme and the introduction of the Apartment Guidelines for Victoria have introduced additional requirements inside 50% of the apartments in each development, which may be conditioned as a requirement on planning approvals: – A clear opening width of at least 850mm at the entrance to the dwelling and main bedroom. – A clear path with a minimum width of 1.2 metres that connects the dwelling entrance to the main bedroom, an adaptable bathroom and the living area. – The main bedroom with access to an adaptable bathroom. – At least one adaptable bathroom that meets the requirements of one of two different design options. K E Y R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S

When designing apartment buildings, the following six points are critical to a successful design and construction project: 1. Document all changes of level, with section details, handrail sections and stair/ramp details. 2. When procuring a lift, ensure the lift company certifies the design to BCA Clause E3.6.

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R egulations

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Graduates Get designs on your future. If you’re a Graduate of Building Design or Interior Design, why not consider a Graduate Membership of the Building Designers Association of Victoria. It’s a great pathway to ensure your future career plan or vision comes true. Amongst other benefits – including free job listings – BDAV Graduate Membership enables you to network with practitioners running their own design practice – who could be your future employers. To see what your future holds, go to www.bdav.org.au or contact the BDAV at info@bdav.org.au


Building Permit Data


B U I L D I N G P E R M I T D ATA 2 0 1 7 : A N A N A LY S I S

Inner Melbourne, has the largest proportion of commercial; hospital/healthcare; public buildings; residential and retail, At the March/April 2018 round of regional meetings, BDAV provided both for permit numbers and reported cost of works. an analysis tailored to each region (including relevant municipalities) Outer Melbourne has the largest proportions of domestic and in regard to building permit data for 2017. More information is industrial for both permit numbers and reported cost of works. available in a BDAV Management Note available in the Member pages of the BDAV’s website. by Kate Bell, BDAV CEO

This information was extracted with all due care from the Victorian Building Authority’s DataVic material which is available at: http://www.vba.vic.gov.au/a-z-information/vba-data This analysis included comparisons for local municipalities, region and the State for: –

Building Permit Numbers

Reported cost of works

Project types

Type of builder

For those Members in metropolitan Melbourne or who were unable to attend one of these six evenings, this article provides a snapshot and some additional information on building permit activity in Victoria in 2017, as well as the following regions:

BUILDER TYPE

Victoria has a significant reliance on owner-builders with 16% of all building permits or 19% of domestic building permits. This is more than double the percentage of owner builders in New SouthWales and Queensland. The VBA is aware that some builders or tradespeople ask consumers to sign an application form for a building permit as an owner-builder even though they will be doing all the work. In this instance, the building/trades may be unregistered or trying to avoid their legal responsibilities. This is one of the reasons legislation changes were introduced in 2016, including a: –

restriction of one project every five years;

compulsory online assessment;

requirement that owner-builders must use registered practitioners.

– Gippsland

These changes have already seen a reduction on the number of owner-builders in Victoria.

Inner Melbourne

North Central

North East

SINGLE DWELLINGS – CLASS 1A / REGISTERED BUILDER

North West

Outer Melbourne

South West

With a large proportion of the members in attendance at the regional events involved in Class 1a projects with Registered Builders, further analysis was requested for all building permits with this specific criteria.

In 2017, Victoria had 112,882 building permits for a reported cost of works of $35.8 billion.

Analysis shows for:

It will come as no surprise, that Outer Melbourne has seen the most – development with 42% (47,267) of the building permits, but interestingly only 37% ($13.1 billion) of the reported cost of works.

New dwellings (Class 1a and Registered Builder) across the State the average floor area for these builds are: 273sqm at $1,825 per sqm.

Inner Melbourne holds the largest proportion of reported cost of works 45% ($16.3 billion), for 27% (30,870) of the States permits. This is represented on the ground, by the number of apartment’s buildings being built in the Melbourne CBD.

Permits Gippsland  Inner Melbourne 

The table opposite provides the permit numbers and reported cost of works for each region. PROJECT TYPES

While domestic building permits make up 82% of the state total, the value of reported works makes up 52%. The proportion of project types by building permit numbers and reported cost of works across the state are summarised in the Management Note.

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6,826  

Reported cost of works  6%    $       969,060,531  

3%

30,870   27%    $ 16,264,577,310   45% 

North Central 

6,189  

5%   $   1,069,827,894  

3%

North East 

5,630  

5%   $       910,747,689  

3%

North West 

6,137  

5%   $    1,048,701,848  

3%

Outer Melbourne  South West  State 

47,267   42%    $ 13,135,231,589   37%  9,963  

9%   $   2,386,474,551  

7%

112,882  

    $ 35,784,621,412  

 

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B U I L D I N G P E R M I T D ATA 2 0 1 7 : A N A N A LY S I S ( C O N T I N U E D )

Extensions to existing dwellings (Class 1a and Registered) across the State the average floor area added for these builds is an additional 79sqm at $3,112 per sqm

This analysis covers each of the regions, where it shows that new homes in Outer Melbourne are larger while extensions are at their largest in the North East. Gippsland takes the title for the smallest average floor area for both new and extensions. Inner Melbourne has the most expensive per sqm for new builds and extensions, while North West is the cheapest for new, and North East cheapest for extensions. The average alteration of a Class1a project with a Registered Builder is $48,882 per building permit. The South West region of the State has a higher average alteration reported cost of works $75,738. With the cheapest renovations occurring in the North West region at an average of $22,846. S O H O W B I G A R E T H E B LO C K S O F L A N D?

Allotment size (site area or size of the building block in square metres on which new building work is to be carried out) for new class 1a building permits has also been analysised. The averages are significantly inflated in the regional areas due to some considerable large properties; however, the median prices

probably give a good overview of standard “in town” blocks for regional areas. M AT E R I A L S

For those of you with an interest in the materials that are in use in new Class 1a building permits across the State: –

70% of homes are brick veneer;

87% timber frame construction;

72% concrete or stone floor construction.

While 49% use steel roof construction, its use varies significantly across the State (which is not the case for the other construction elements noted above: –

Inner Melbourne and Outer Melbourne: tiles more prevalent (34% and 47% respectively)

Gippsland, North Central, North West and South West: steel prevalent (41%, 74%, 87%, 60% respectively).

Disclaimer. No warranties either expressed or implied are made in relation to the information. To the extent permitted by law, the VBA and BDAV excludes liability and responsibility for any direct or indirect loss or damage caused by use or reliance on anything contained in the information.

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Awards


1 0 - S TA R S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N C H A L L E N G E W I N N E R

Hacksaw House’wins the prestigious BDAV 2018 10-Star Sustainable Design Challenge

‘Hacksaw House’, an ambitious yet simple building design of a 10-star sustainable home, has taken out the prestigious BDAV 2018 10-Star Sustainable Design Challenge. The annual Design Challenge invites BDAV members to prepare a residential design - across any climate zone in Australia- for a single dwelling or multi-residential project, which achieves a NatHERS 10 Star energy rating. This year’s inspiring Challenge winner, ‘Hacksaw House’, was designed by Gruen Eco Design, in collaboration with Paperback Design, and recognised by the judges as a worthy winner and “an exceptional and admirable building design with a highly creative and innovative approach”. Its designers took a refreshing look at passive solar design, by investigating alternatives to the more traditional north-south floorplan and producing a zig-zagging north-façade, to invite the sun to penetrate deep into the house for long hours throughout the day. Gruen Eco Design Director, Simone Schenkel, said the team was delighted with the award win and the official recognition of its expertise in the sustainability space. “With a strong focus on employing recycled materials in the design including: concrete slab, brick and timber, Hacksaw House boasts sustainability from the ground up,” said Simone. “Sustainable design begins at the drawing board, and Hacksaw House is an excellent example of how sustainable materials and features can be incorporated into the early stages of building design.” A Commendation was also awarded to SUHO studio in collaboration with Studio Element Australia for its ‘Sagacious Today’ entry, a design which also carefully considered all aspects of sustainability. According to the judging panel, the ‘Sagacious Today’ design went “beyond being just 10-Stars and carefully considered all aspects of sustainability from passive solar design to thermal performance, embodied energy and life cycle assessment, affordability, regenerative energies and its interaction with the surrounding landscape.”

Sagacious Today

A list of past 10-Star Sustainable Design Challenge winners is available at www.bdav.org.au.

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Lauren Chau – XS Runner Up

XXS Runner Up, Stefan Mangiameli and XS Winner, Heidi Stoll

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sponsors of the 2018 small home BIG LIFE competition: – BDAV – James Hardie SCYON – TAFE (Victorian Building and Architectural Studies Network) – Small Change Design and Construction – Sanctuary Magazine Thanks to Sally Wills for her contribution to this feature. Judges (l-r): Andrew Wong, Geoff Hoare, Sally Wills, Adam Dovile. (Absent was Colin Crewes)

Submission by Pierre Isnard – winner of Small Family Home


SMALL HOME BIG LIFE COMPETITION

Evelyn Morraitis reports on the winners of the 2018 Small home BIG LIFE Competition

Building Design students have dominated at this year’s small home BIG LIFE competition – two being BDAV members: Heidi Stoll (Bendigo TAFE) took out the XS prize for the second year in a row, and Pierre Isnard (The Gordon) won the Small Family Home category.

footprints. What better way than to talk to our future designers about the benefits of smaller houses? It’s also an exciting design challenge for students – to design a very small home that is both beautiful and functional, which is more difficult than having no size constraints.’

The 2018 competition winners are:

EM: ‘Did any part of the Tiny House Movement add to your inspiration for creating the competition?’

– XXS Winner: Tet Wey Chen (University of Melbourne) – XXS Runner Up: Stefan Mangiameli (Bendigo TAFE) – XS Winner: Heidi Stoll (Bendigo TAFE) – XS Runner Up: Lauren Chau (Swinburne University) – Small Family Home: Pierre Isnard (The Gordon) – Innovation in Design: Sat Sat Naing Aung (University of Melbourne) This year’s presentation was held last month at the HIA Home Show at the Melbourne Convention Centre, and presented by Better Homes and Gardens’ presenter, Adam Dovile. The small home BIG LIFE competition – an initiative of design-firm Small Change Design & Construction – offers Building Design and Architecture students to participate in a competition that focuses on the small living and house trend. The criteria was to design a small house that is innovative, functional, energy efficient and buildable. Students were also asked to regard how storage is added, how the dwelling is furnished, how guests would be entertained, and how the space could be made to feel large. This year’s jury comprised Adam Dovile (Better Homes & Gardens), Colin Crewes (James Hardie), Andrew Wong (John Wardle Architects), Geoff Hoare, (Graaph Design), and Sally Wills (Small Change Design and Construction). BDAV’s Membership & Corporate Partnership Officer, Evelyn Morraitis, spoke with small home BIG LIFE competition creator, Sally Wills, about the competition: EM: ‘What prompted you to develop this initiative?’ SW: ‘I started the competition as a way of promoting the idea of small houses; to address sustainability and affordability. My own business specialises in very small homes but I realised pretty quickly I could make a much bigger difference if I promoted the ’small is better’ idea to our future designers. I understand that these students will not necessarily be designing the very small houses that the competition brief requires of them when they finally get out into industry, but I’m hopeful they will take a more frugal approach to space and encourage their clients to consider smaller homes. As we still build some of the largest homes in the world in Australia – average size is 233sqm - while our households are getting smaller – average 2.6 people - it’s important to make a start in reducing our housing N E W S . B D AV. O R G . AU

SW: ‘The small and tiny house movement is a multi-faceted trend that is influenced by issues of sustainability, affordability, anticonsumerism, mindful living and downsizing. Given those very broad influences, there are a diverse group of people that are interested in living in smaller homes; young people are particularly interested as they are the most severely affected by housing (un) affordability. However, I find older people are just as interested in downsizing too, and I talk to lots of people who are looking for compact family homes which is why I’ve added the Small Family Home category to the competition.’ EM: ‘Given that the Small Family Home category is a new one, how long has the competition been running for?’ SW: ‘This year was the third year of the competition. The first year we had Peter Maddison (Grand Designs Australia) announce the winners; Barry Dubois (The Living Room) did the honours last year; and Adam Dovile kindly offered to announce the winners this year. I’m grateful these high profile individuals are enthused about the small and tiny house movement, and that they are happy to donate their time to facilitate a student competition.’ EM: ‘Do you generally see a difference between the works submitted by the students of architecture versus the Building Design students?’ SW: ‘This is the first year that I’ve invited architecture students to participate. The judging panel found the architects’ students work perhaps a bit more conceptual and daring than the building design students but found the building design student’s work had more detail in terms of construction. This, I think would reflect the different emphasis in each course. I think it’s good for building design and architecture students to interact more, and certainly to see each other’s work, as their progression through their education experience can only be a positive.’ EM: ‘Where do you see the competition in ten years’ time?’ SW: ‘I hope to take the competition national. Each year I get enquiries from students who study interstate, so it would be good to invite all Australian students to participate. As far as where the competition will be in ten years, I hope it will be part of the curriculum, all students from around the country participating, and a display at each of the homes shows in the capital cities. Got to think big!’ Congratulations to all winners and participants of the 2018 small home BIG LIFE competition! A wards

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Planning Topics


PLANNING TIDBITS

Little bits that can make a big difference to your town planning outcomes

A R E C O M M O N L A N D A P P L I C AT I O N S F U T I L E ?

A number of Supreme Court and Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (‘the Tribunal’) decisions consider the principles of futility: should a planning permit application be considered where its approval or subsequent implementation is so remote that it should instead be dismissed. This issue sometimes arises where the other parties to common land in an owners corporation (previously known as ‘body corporate’) or the owners corporation itself, have objected or refused consent requirements. The leading case on futility is the Supreme Court decision Port Phillip CC v Hickey [2001] VSC 129. In this case, the permit applicant was one member of a body corporate where other members did not consent to development on the common property. In that case the Supreme Court decision stated: I have great difficulty understanding how the owner’s refusal to give consent and the owner’s views can be said to be irrelevant to a planning permit application. It is implicit in the legislation that the position of the owner and his or her views may be relevant. In addition, to take an extreme case, if the owner of the property refuses to give consent, it would be highly relevant for the Authority and, subsequently the Tribunal, to know whether there was any realistic prospect of such consent being given. If not, it could be highly relevant to the Authority and the Tribunal in deciding whether to reject the application as futile. It should be borne in mind that while a permit may be given a lengthy duration, in the absence of express provision, the permit lasts for two years. An application in those circumstances may well be futile. Councils and VCAT ought to be able to deal summarily with futile applications. However, in subsequent Tribunal cases, it was found that the prior approval of the body corporate was not required for the Responsible Authority to consider and issue a planning permit. In Ryan v Frankston CC [2003] VCAT 762 (30 June 2003) the Tribunal considered an application to construct an extension to an existing dwelling, in which part of the proposal fell within common property. In its decision, the Tribunal summarised the main findings of the Hickey case: – the Planning and Environment Act 1987 contemplates persons other than the owner of the property in question applying for a permit; – there is no statutory or regulatory provision which renders invalid an application for a planning permit over common property of a body corporate by a member of the body corporate; N E W S . B D AV. O R G . AU

– the owners’ refusal to give consent and the owner’s views are relevant to consideration as to whether a permit should or should not be granted and could be highly relevant in deciding whether to reject the application for permit, either by the Responsible Authority or the Tribunal as futile. In the Ryan case, the Tribunal compared the facts of the case to the facts in Hickey, and found significant differences, including the amount of common property to be developed. In Spencermill Pty Ltd (PLN Planning Pty Ltd) v Mornington Peninsula SC [2007] VCAT 1289 Council considered the planning permit application to be futile, where the Council was a part owner in an owners corporation arrangement and had not given consent to the applicant in its capacity of owner. Council submitted to the Tribunal that the proposal required 100% support from the body corporate in order to proceed, and that it was pointless to have the planning permit application determined by the Tribunal as the proposal was futile, relying on the findings of the Hickey case above. In contrast, the applicant argued that other cases clearly demonstrated that Hickey is limited to its particular facts, and has not been universally applied by the Tribunal. The Tribunal’s decision stated: … the applicant in the present case …has an opportunity to challenge the body corporate refusal through an application to the Supreme Court under s 38(3)(a) of the Subdivision Act 1988. And that The s 38 process …. provides an opening which takes the matter beyond what one might ordinarily consider ‘futile’ as that word is commonly defined. In the circumstances … the planning application should not be struck out as futile, and should proceed to a hearing on its merits. The applicant assumes the risk that it may not ultimately be successful in achieving its intended outcomes for the site even if it obtains a planning permit. In Octopus Media Pty Ltd v Port Phillip CC [2008] VCAT 313, an application for signage was to intrude into airspace owned by Council, and Council in its capacity as owner had refused its consent. The Tribunal found that the lack of owner’s consent was not futile as to justify summary dismissal, and that the case should proceed to consider the merits of the proposal. The Tribunal also noted that: Section 48(1) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987... provides that the permit applicant can be someone other than the owner, provided the applicant provides a declaration that the owner has been notified about the application. The important point here is that there is no requirement that the owner must agree to the application, merely that the applicant must be able to prove that the owner was kept informed. Continued page 40..... P lanning T opics

39


PLANNING TIDBITS

These tidbits are part of the regular contribution made by Clause:1 Planning to Intersect. For more information visit www.clause1.com.au

In Gore v Stonnington CC [2018] VCAT 555, the Tribunal considered an application including minor buildings and works over common property, where three attached dwellings each had their own title around the building footprint, but all side, front and rear yards were part of the common area under the owners corporation. One of the owners made planning permit application for a change of use and minor works within an area of common property (fenced off from the front and rear yards of the two other dwellings). Owners of the other two dwellings had brought an appeal to the Tribunal on grounds including the futility of applying for works on common property without the consent of the owners corporation. In this case the Tribunal found that, because the rear and front yards, while in common property, had been fenced off between each dwelling, that the issue might otherwise be resolved. In considering the decisions of Hickey and Octopus Media above, the Tribunal also stated: Ultimately if there is no consent to the parking of vehicles on the common property at the rear of the subject land (Unit 1) then the permit cannot be acted upon or it may be that a permit would require amendment. So, in summary, the lack of owner or owners corporation consent is not necessarily futile to the consideration or granting of a planning permit application. The relevant case law indicates appropriate considerations in determining whether an application should be dismissed on the futility arguments, being:

The particular facts of each case;

Owner’s refusal to give consent and the owner’s views;

The extent to which a proposal encroaches onto common land or land controlled by the permit applicant;

The likely impact on the owner who has not provided consent;

The status of the owner withholding consent: natural person, public body or private corporation;

The absence of owners consent does not prohibit the consideration of a planning permit application affecting common property or other land not controlled by the applicant. There are alternative means of resolving owners corporation consent through the Subdivision Act 1988. Planning permit applicants should take care, when lodging an application for a planning permit where the applicant is not the owner of the land, or where the application affects land controlled by another person or owners corporation. It such circumstances, the applicant is obligated to notify all owners of the application. While you will not require their consent to make the application, you are required to advise them that you are doing so. The fact that you do not own the land does not automatically make your application futile.

Ph: 03 9370 9599 www.clause1.com.au

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Marketing Tips


DO YOU NEED A NE WSLE T TER?

Verity Campbell talks about the pros and cons of having a newsletter Despite the fact most businesses already have a website and/or social media, newsletters are still a popular way to stay in touch with (and market to) prospective clients. Many businesses use them, and you’ve probably wondered whether you should too. Let’s look at it this way: Your website is your online shopfront – you put it out there and you hope people come. Your social media platforms are the ‘tentacles’ that help bring prospective clients to your website. And your newsletter? It’s a vehicle that can guarantee (as much as is possible in this world) your business will be heard. Because you own the medium and you have permission to contact – you’re not waiting for happenstance and the good graces of Facebook or Instagram. Before you decide if a newsletter is yay or nay, take a minute to weigh up some of the pros and cons. PROS:

Newsletters are fairly low cost. Costs come through writing good content – that you do yourself or outsource – but apart from that, there are low overheads. Mailchimp or Campaign Monitor offer free or very affordable mailing services with standard templates you can adapt for your business.

Readers have to subscribe to get content. Successful email marketing begins with building a quality list. It can be hard to get readers signing up to your list in the initial months; it’s a slow and sometimes frustrating process, but remember you’re looking for quality, not quantity (which of course includes you, mum).

Information overload. It can be tempting to overload a newsletter with too much information. Along with creating quality, targeted content, you need to pay attention to the design, being mindful that people who tend to check email on phone might not be able to read your newsletter.

Strengthen relationships with clients. A newsletter enables you to build a richer more meaningful engagement with prospective clients, which is important because we know that it takes about 18 months from the start of planning a renovation/ new build to a decision on which building designer to go with. – Email is personal and direct to your audience’s inbox. Unlike a generic Facebook post or tweet, you can easily personalise and segment newsletters, allowing you to tailor messages to better target and connect with your audience.

Opportunity to convert leads. The ‘value’ of the Facebook fan and Instagram follower is generally much lower than that of an email subscriber who has opted-in, which demonstrates more invested in what you have to say.

You own your email list. You have a direct route to your network that you can tap into anytime. You can also gather statistics and insights into who reads and opens your newsletter, giving you valuable insights to help you better reach and convert potential clients.

CONS:

It needs to be done well to be effective (and this takes resources). Newsletters are not a ‘set and forget’ marketing strategy; you need to regularly evaluate their effectiveness and spend time getting to know your audience and what they want to read in order to get the best results.

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One-way communication. With social media, communication flows both ways, with readers able to comment back to us and share on their own accounts. Newsletters don’t facilitate this as well.

Lastly, keep in mind that the digital landscape is constantly evolving, and with new tools popping up in the market it pays to do some research to find one that best suits your business – and your clients. Postie is one example of new software being used by design professionals (hello Archsign), which allows you to create and curate email campaigns using your Instagram content. There are pros and cons to each of these software; however, perhaps we’ll save that for another day.

Writing, marketing and communications for design and related businesses. Join our weekly newsletter for new ideas, tips and advice. Sign up at www.veritycampbell.com.au/newsletter

M arketing T ips

42


Technology


TODD’S APPS

A monthly review of must have, worthy of looking or just plain interesting apps that are relevant to the design industry. Compiled by Todd Pearce, MBDAV.

IMAC PRO

Anyone using Mac hardware and CAD – might not have noticed that Apple has released an iMac Pro – it seems to be positioned between a tope spec iMac and the Mac pro in some ways but as the Mac pro hasn’t been updated for a few years – it seems to be the most powerful computer in Apples lineup. Anyone looking for a serious computing beast – definitely worth a check out. Price tag is scary but so is the performance. Same form factor as the iMac but comes in a new space grey colour which differentiates it from the standard iMac line up – the colour is probably not enough to make you buy one – but if you’re in the market for some serious hardware – with plenty under the hood; give this a look. Not sure if it’s just my local Apple store or if all of them – but there wasn’t one in store to look at – seems to be only available

online. Mac pro due for an update; which if they do could also be quite impressive. I’d love to hear from anyone who’s got one of these maybe even get a review from them?

IPHONE X

There a lot of debate around about the iPhone X vs iPhone 8 – is it worth the dollars etc. Opinions will vary, and people will decide on features and their budget if this is the sort of device they want. One interesting thing that I have heard which may tip the scales for some and worth looking into is… apparently the technology used for the facial recognition to track the face shape etc- whilst not visible to the naked eyes can actually give some people headaches and make it difficult to look at for any period of time. Of course, this can be disabled in the settings – however if the facial recog-

nition feature is a key part of the decision making – then maybe try before you buy to see if you are affected by this. I haven’t verified but one person whom I know didn’t cope with it – did some research and is suggesting that up to 30% of people can get disturbed by this phenomenon. Keep this in mind if you’re upgrading or if you’ve noticed something not quite right since getting one – perhaps this is the reason? Continued opposite....

If any other members use or know any new or interesting websites, tech or apps, please feel free to drop me a line to info@bdav.org.au and I’ll share it with the other members.

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TODD’S APPS (CONTINUED)

JOB MARKET

EXPERIENCED REVIT DRAFTSPERSON REQUIRED

DRAFTSPERSON REQUIRED

Small, dynamic and rapidly growing design office based in Bayswater North seeks a draftsperson with excellent REVIT skills (non-negotiable) to support our team. We specialise in energy-efficient and sustainable homes, covering renovations, energy efficiency upgrades, extensions, single residences and townhouses and certified passive homes. To apply, please email your resume to simone@gruenecodesign.com.au.

Geelong-based Belco Group seeks an enthusiastic draftsperson to assist us complete many different projects nationwide. Must be willing to diversify their skills in many areas, including design, drafting, admin, surveying and energy rating. Skills required for the job are experience with Revit and most Microsoft packages. If experienced with AutoCAD, Adobe and FirstRate5 this will be a bonus. Good knowledge of the Building Code and ResCode is also preferred. Annual salary will be based on skills and experience. Our innovative, flexible working environment creates excellent cohesion between staff and the way we approach work. Out-of-the-box thinking is encouraged, and promotes for better and happier workplaces where staff feel ownership and are recognised for their input. Please send your resume to cam@belcogroup.com.au.

FA C E T U N E S 2

Never have a good headshot for social media or business apps and websites? Need one quick – facetunes 2 could be your new best friend. Essentially a selfie app. With a whole host of technology to quickly tidy up the headshot. You can whiten your teeth, widen your smile, eyes, even change your eye colours, blemishes and smooth skin. There are heaps of options in terms adjusting light sources and basically making you look better than you do. Maybe don’t go crazy – but if you need something fresh and quick without having to book your photographer. Facetunes 2 might just do the trick for you.

E N E R G Y R AT E R R E Q U I R E D

Melbourne-based ESD consulting firm wishes to add to its growing team. Skillset needs to include at least one of the following: FR5 accreditations (or nearly completed) and ESD reporting; part-time (minimum 3 days per week) - full time position; must be able to work initially in East Brunswick office location. Email: admin@fraterconsultingservices.com.au.

BUSHFIRE ASSESSMENTS

Keystone Alliance Bushfire Consultancy was born out of the requirements for building design and construction in designated Bushfire Prone Areas as a result of the “Black Saturday” fires of 2009.

We Specialise in: Bushfire Attack Level Assessments (BAL) for building permit application Bushfire Management Statements (BMS) for planning applications within BMO or WMO overlays Single Dwellings / Extensions / Sub-divisions / Multi Units

Here’s What Our Customers Say: “It is great to be able to rely on an expert in such an important area. We have found Keystone Alliance Bushfire Assessments to be quick and reliable in the delivery of their service” Ann West - Abcad Design

Contact Paul directly via email: paul@keystonealliance.com.au

713 Plenty Road Reservoir Vic 3073 Tel: 9478 8991 Fax: 9478 8997 Email: enquiries@keystonealliance.com.au www.keystonealliance.com.au

N E W S . B D AV. O R G . AU

Call us today on 9478 8991

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S TA N D A R D I S I N G B I M O B J E C T S

A new tool that supports the standardisation of BIM Objects across the Australian construction industry is now available. The key issue currently restricting the exchange and interoperability of BIM Objects between disciplines and projects, is the inconsistencies in properties, property naming and object designation. The Properties Generator resolves this issue. It is an upgraded and extended online version of the NATSPEC BIM Object/Element Matrix that is more powerful and simpler to use. It makes the exchange of information and interoperability of BIM objects possible from project to project and software to software, reducing the huge duplication of effort currently involved. NATSPEC CEO, Richard Choy, said the Properties Generator will greatly benefit the industry. “The Properties Generator addresses the major issues concerning information exchange of BIM objects between disciplines and projects. “The free exchange of standardised information and data will allow different systems and applications to work together. This is crucial to driving productivity across the industry.”

A global approach has been used by including objects based on buildingSMART’s Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), and classification data for major systems such as NATSPEC, UniClass, Omniclass, Masterformat and Uniformat. Properties can be selected from various sources such as IFC4, IFC 2x3, BIMForum LOD Specification, COBie and NATSPEC. These properties are also categorised by their data type, such as cost, manufacturer and geometric. This allows users greater flexibility in generating the properties that are relevant to them, and to filter these properties to their specific project or object library needs. Selected properties can then be exported as a PDF or Excel file, from which various file formats can be generated to enable them to be imported into BIM authoring and BIM-ready software applications.

future releases, including the possibility of adding additional properties as desired by major clients. Refer to the ‘Future Releases’ section on the Properties Generator website for items that could be considered for future additions and upgrades. Mr Choy hopes that the Properties Generator may continue to evolve and aid growth within the Australian architecture, engineering and construction industry. “At NATSPEC, we are dedicated to improving the construction quality and productivity of the built environment, so I am pleased this resource is now available. The Properties Generator is committed to promoting best practice, and will continue to develop based on industry use and feedback. NATSPEC welcomes any comments and feedback that you may have on the Properties Generator. For more information or to use the Properties Generator, visit www.natspec.com.au.

The Properties Generator is suitable for a variety of users including content creators, manufacturers, project teams, and client organisations. It is anticipated that the Properties Generator will be further developed and enhanced in

LANDSCAPE PLANS

We Specialise in:

We are the multi-unit specialists – Fast, experienced and cost effective with a solid understanding of Victorian municipalities’ requirements.

Multi unit developments Commercial and industrial developments Apartment developments

Multi unit plans from

$400 + gst

Here’s What Our Customers Say: “We work with Keystone Alliance as he has a strong understanding of council’s requirements and responds promptly, enabling us to deliver our client’s projects quickly” Director, Archestral Designs Pty Ltd

Contact Nina directly via email: nina@keystonealliance.com.au

713 Plenty Road Reservoir Vic 3073 Tel: 9478 8991 Fax: 9478 8997 Email: enquiries@keystonealliance.com.au www.keystonealliance.com.au

N E W S . B D AV. O R G . AU

Call us today on 9478 8991

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BDAV membership is the ultimate designers ‘must have’.

Membership Benefits include: • Belong to a true non-profit Association • Discounts on industry and business tools/services • Monthly Journal: BDAV News • Weekly eNews • Annual Awarded Magazine • Member updates • Continuing Professional Development: comprehensive program of seminars, workshops, webinars, and regional meetings • Documents for building projects: – project specifications – engagement agreements – indemnity documents – standard form contracts for residential and non-residential projects • Reference material, including a great suite of Practice Notes, Advisory Notes, and much more • Free* advice on matters including copyright, contracts, wages and conditions, legislative and regulatory requirements, etc • Access to Professional Indemnity Insurance through our preferred insurance agent • Accreditation for Thermal Performance Assessors • Lobbying and Representation • Annual Building Design Awards to promote your skills as a designer • Annual 10 Star Sustainable Design Challenge to promote knowledge of energy efficiency principles • Free website listing to generate referrals for your business in Find a Building Designer/Energy Rater

One look inside tells you that being a Member of the Building Designers Association of Victoria entitles you to many member benefits. Advantages such as important information to help you to promote your business, advice* for greater efficiencies, and especially our comprehensive Continuing Professional Development program, will assist you to reap the rewards.

• Free Job Listings for Members seeking staff or Members looking for work

Being a BDAV Member is a sound investment for your business – especially for sole-practitioners, who often work ‘in a vacuum’ and value peer support for advice and guidance.

• Help Desk

Phone: (03) 9416 0227 Fax: (03) 9416 0115 Email: info@bdav.org.au www.bdav.org.au *Advice is of an elementary nature. Anything significantly complex should be referred to an appropriate professional advisor. BDAV is an approved CPD Provider for the Victorian building industry, as administered by Victoria’s Building Commission.

• Student Scholarships/Grants/ Awards

• Online Member Forum • Access to latest information from the nation’s leading suppliers • Networking • Use of BDAV logo: provides recognition on your website and business stationery and much more!


designing amazing spaces

Building Designers can offer an incredible range of design skills to your project To get in touch with a BDAV building designer, go to www.bdav.org.au

Intersect May2018  

Monthly journal of the Building Designers Association of Victoria

Intersect May2018  

Monthly journal of the Building Designers Association of Victoria