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CITIZENSHIP, SUSTAINABILITY, SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

CSR 3.0 - PERSONAL SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY WHY CSR 3.0 MUST BE FOCUSED ON THE YOUTH

YOUTH CSR CREATING A CSR ECOSYSTEM IN THE ACADEME

SCHOOLS AS SOCIAL CHANGE AGENTS

BOB THE BENITA AND  CATALINO YAP FOUNDATION (BCYF) ONLINE BULLETIN

VOLUME 2 | ISSUE NO. 1 | JANUARY 2017


CSR

3.0

-

Personal

Social

Responsibility

EXCERPT

FROM

THE

BOOK

INTRODUCTION

Responsibility is universal. The desire for a better society is universal, and most importantly, personal. Therefore CSR is not just for business alone. Every person dreams of living in a better world, and of providing a good life for themselves and their loved ones. It is this reason why they work for their dreams, and strive to be productive contributors to society. Hence, CSR must be viewed from a prism that is not limited to businesses, but rather encompasses up to the perspective of an individual, We ask the question,

TO

CSR

IN

ASEAN

Citizenship

As a practical start, each individual can contribute to the common good by being a good citizen who helps build his or her nation through simple everyday acts. This requires a fundamental and continuous understanding that one belongs to a community and that he or she has duties and responsibilities within this community Sustainability

Worldwide, the call for sustainable development is progressing. Sustainable Development is defined as “Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future

“How can individuals,

organizations and businesses

help build a better society?”

generations to meet their own needs”. Individuals, and organizations are encouraged to apply more sustainable practices like zero-carbon footprint, recycling, upcycling, water conservation, etc.

The Benita and Catalino Yap Foundation, together with Dr. Francisco L. Roman Jr. of the Asian Institute

Social Responsibility

of Management, came up with a local definition of

We need to strive to always be our brothers’ or

CSR during the UN Principals of Management

sisters’ keeper. Given the limited time and resources

Education Meeting at De La Salle University last

that we have, how do we alleviate the suffering of

February 2013. It requires ethical conduct, good

our neighbour? How do we use our talents to ensure

governance and imbibing Citizenship, Sustainability

we can do the most good? What efforts can we do in

and Social Responsibility. Personal Social

order to make the lives of others better and more

Responsibility (CSR 3.0) is anchored on three things:

meaningful?

The more these values are lived out as lifestyle, one’s commitment to create positive change will deepen. There is a personal transformation that occurs in an individual that strengthens their ability to make a difference.


CSR

FOR THE YOUTH BCYF adopts the definition of "youth" to mean all individuals aged 39 years and below. Our social development program in particular focuses on young people in high school (aged 13-18), college (aged 18 and above), young professionals, young entrepreneurs / businessmen, out-of-school youth, etc. Globally, and especially in the Philippines, young people are the most active in joining (and even starting) activities that help society. Their openness, technology-savviness, social inclination and desire to make a difference, are just some of the key characteristics of the youth that influence them to do things differently when it comes to CSR. What at BCYF believe that a CSR lifestyle for the youth is best nurtured once we form volunteers with a purpose. One must not only be involved and help out, but also think of the sustainability of initiatives. And of course the desired impact should be measured. To live a lifestyle of CSR, one must also subscribe to a Personal Social Responsibility Commitment. To provide CSR role models for young people to be emulate, BCYF has the CSR Youth Award, which recognizes outstanding young people who led initiatives in Citizenship, Sustainability and Social Responsibility.

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CSR YOUTH AWARDEES

CLARISSA DELGADO As co-founder and CEO of Teach for the Philippines, Clarissa has led the organization in its efforts to provide quality education to Filipino children. Since 2012, Teach for the Philippines has enlisted the best Filipino young leaders to commit two years of their lives to teach in public schools.

ARCIE MALLARI Through Arcie’s leadership, Silid-Aralan Inc. has helped empower low performing and underprivileged students in the Philippines. Arcie was a finalist in the 2015 CSR Youth Awards. After learning about sustainability as a key component of this Award, Arcie was able to transform his NGO into a financially-sustainable organization that is now looking towards becoming a social enterprise.

MACO RAVANZO Maco–who was born and raised in Basilan, Philippines–lost his father who was a Filipino soldier. As he knew the feeling of growing up without a father, he was inspired to setup I am Making a Difference to spread love and reach out to Filipinos. While finishing his graduate studies, Maco continues to run I am M.A.D, which has grown from two volunteers to more than 200 volunteers, and reaching more than 1,300 children.

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“Schools can be essential social change

agents, because they can significantly

impact the lives of many young

people…. They must, therefore, be more

intentional in developing a “CSR

Ecosystem” where the personal

transformation of a young person,

from regular volunteer to a purpose-

driven one, is supported…Through the

aid of research we can strengthen the

effectiveness of initiatives as opposed

to simply relying on anecdotal

evidence”

– EXCERPT FROM THE BCYF CSR PRIMER

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SCHOOLS AS

SOCIAL CHANGE AGENTS

Because of this enormous potential of young people to impact society, schools, colleges and universities are in the best position to realize this potential. Many of the potential change makers are the young people in schools. It is in the academe that they learn who they are, and what they are capable of. As an educator and/or school administrator, why not use this opportunity to guide the student towards a life of Citizenship, Sustainability and Social Responsibility? This is why the best place to build a CSR Ecosystem is in the school. Schools are encouraged to nurture initiatives and opportunities where their students can be exposed to CSR lifestyle. By doing this, the academe itself becomes a social change agent. The Future of CSR is going to be built on the youth, and the youth will define what CSR is. It is up to the schools to help shape this future.

The National CSR Educators Council (NCEC), which BCYF organized, is a council of colleges and universities who have committed to create a meaningful learning experience in their schools, so students can Make CSR a Lifestyle (Click the image to see the NCEC Members)

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BOB - BCYF Online Bulletin - Issue 1 - Vol2  
BOB - BCYF Online Bulletin - Issue 1 - Vol2  
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