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Charleston Stage: The Wiz Curriculum Guide

THE WIZ

Education Guide

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Charleston Stage: The Wiz Curriculum Guide

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Setting The Stage Credits The Wiz Book by William F. Brown Music by Charlie Smalls Lyrics by Charlie Smalls Adapted from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum Directed by Marybeth Clark Music Directed by Amanda Wansa Costume Design by Barbara Young Theatre Etiquette

Discuss proper audience behavior with your students. While applause, laughter, and reaction, when appropriate, are appreciated and anticipated, unnecessary noise or movement can distract the actors and audience members, while also affecting the quality of the performance. It is very important that students understand how their behavior can affect a live performance. You, the teacher, and other adult chaperones for your group are responsible for your student’s behavior. We ask that the chaperones sit among the students rather than together in a group behind the students. Our ushers will react to disruptions and attempt to quell them. We reserve the right to remove any student causing a distraction from the theatre. When entering the theatre venue please make sure all of your students have name tags with their name and your school’s name.


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Meet the Creators! William F. Brown Brown's first Broadway credit was The Girl in the Freudian Slip, opened in 1967. It starred Alan Young and Marjorie Lord. He contributed to New Faces of 1968. He also wrote the book for the off-Broadway musical, How to Steal an Election, which starred Clifton Davis. Brown also had sketches appear in several Julius Monk nightclub revues. On the nightclub circuit, he worked on material for Joan Rivers, Georgie Kaye, David Frost and others. In television, he wrote material for over 100 television shows including That Was the Week That Was, The Jackie Gleason Show, Love American Style, and several Max Liebman specials. In 1975, The Wiz opened and he began work on another Broadway musical. This time, he worked with Charles Strouse and Lee Adams (who wrote Annie). Their show, A Broadway Musical, opened and closed on the same night in 1978. Brown has written several books of humor and frequently contributes articles to magazines. He had a syndicated comic strip Mixed Singles in 1975. Charlie Smalls Charlie Smalls (October 25, 1943 – August 27, 1987) He was African American, and best known for writing the music for the 1975 musical, The Wiz. After graduating, Smalls toured as a member of the New York Jazz Repertory Company before beginning work on The Wiz. Smalls won the 1975 for his work on The Wiz. He died at age forty-three in, during emergency surgery to repair a burst appendix. He is survived by his son Michael.


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Characters The Cast: DOROTHY:

A young, farm girl from Kansas who is very independent and loves an adventure.

THE TIN MAN:

A gentle, yet suave woodsman who longs for a heart and the ability to feel emotion.

LION:

A cowardly, clingy and confused beast who intensely desires courage.

SCARECROW:

A kind and caring friend who, although brainless, is quite intelligent. Innocent and good natured.

AUNT EM:

Dorothy’s kind but impatient Aunt who loves her very much.

EVILLENE:

The horrid, smelly Wicked Witch of the West who is petrified of water.

UNCLE HENRY:

Dorothy’s kind and wise uncle.

LORD UNDERLING: Evillene’s sniveling top henchman and servant. THE WIZ:

A cowardly man from Nebraska posing as a powerful wizard in Oz.

ADDAPERLE:

The clumsy but kind and sassy Good Witch of the North.

GLINDA:

The beautiful, kind and helpful Good Witch of the South, who is also a glamorous show girl.

ENSEMBLE:

Munchkins, Yellow Brick Road, Emerald City Citizens, Crows, Kalidahs, Poppys, Monkeys, Quadlings, Winkies, Mice, Tornado Dancers

PIT SINGERS:

Male/Female - ALL VOCAL RANGES - Group of back-up singers that soulfully sing alongside the show’s band.


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Synopsis of THE WIZ Spoiler alert, you may not want to read this before seeing the play. Important NAMES will be in RED Synopsis The Wiz is a black version of the perennial Wizard of Oz. The characters and story line are largely faithful to the 1939 movie version of L. Frank Baum's 1900 story. It begins on a tumbledown farm in Kansas, but the tornado sets Dorothy and Toto down in a big-city-like Oz. The words are jive, the songs upbeat. After celebrating the demise of the Wicked Witch of the East with the Munchkins, Dorothy departs for the Emerald City with a live yellow brick road. She encounters a hip Scarecrow who wants to join her because he has a feelng he isn't going anywhere; an uptight Tin Man who needs Dorothy's help to hang loose again, and a mama's-boy Lion who has lost faith in the psychiatric help he's been getting from an owl. Together they will seek help from the Great Man in the flashy city. They encounter the deadly poppy field, and all escape except the Lion, who is tripping off with a group of the sensuous flowers. He is rescued by the mice squad, decidedly against his will. They meet with the Wizard, who agrees to grant all their wishes as a package deal — if they knock off Evillene, the Wicked Witch of the West. They nearly get to Evillene but are captured by her manacing winged monkeys. Only when the witch is at her meanest does Dorothy lose her cool and douse the old hag with water. Quite surprisingly, the wicked witch melts to a harmless puddle. Confronted with their triumph, the Wiz confesses that he was only a two-bit con man from Omaha until the Almighty Himself told him to come to the big city to spread the word about the simple things in life — power, prestige, and money — that only through his ability to give everyone in town a pair of green sunglasses has he been recognized as the powerful Wiz. Then, using similar magic, he convinces the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Lion of their brains, heart, and courage. There is the normal mix-up during his departure in his balloon without Dorothy and the re-appearance of the good witches, Addaperle and Glinda, who inform Dorothy that she has merely to click the heels of her silver slippers together three times to return home.


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Cur ri culum C onne ctio ns

~ABOUT THE WIZ – A Production History~

The Wiz: The Super Soul Musical "Wonderful Wizard of Oz" is a musical with music and lyrics by Charlie Smalls and book by William F. Brown. It is a retelling of L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in the context of African American culture. It opened on October 21, 1974 at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre in Baltimore, Maryland and moved to the Majestic Theatre (not the same Majestic Theatre that played The Wizard of Oz in 1903, which was on Columbus Circle, where Time Warner Center now stands) with a new cast on January 5, 1975. The 1975 Broadway production won seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical. The musical was an early example of Broadway's mainstream acceptance of works with an all-black cast. The musical has had revivals in New York, London, San Diego and the Netherlands, and an Off Broadway Encores! concert version was staged in June 2009. A film adaptation was released in 1978. Very many know the story of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, but in this new musical version it's a fantasy for today - mysterious, opulent and fanciful - a dream conjured up by a space-age child with Dorothy's adventures in the Land of Oz set to music in a dazzling, lively mixture of rock, gospel and soul.

~REVIEWS~ "Radiates so much energy you can hardly sit in your seat ... Great fun." New York Post "A carnival of fun ... Wickedly amusing." Time Magazine "One of the most cyclonic blasts to hit Broadway in a long time." Newsweek "A virtual musical circus ... Driving rhythms, soaring songs ... Boisterous, exuberant." - WABCT


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~ABOUT THE SHOW: FOLLOWING ALONG~ Act 1 Prologue - Kansas Scene 1: Munchkin Land Scene 2: Oz Countryside Scene 3: Woods Scene 4: Jungle Scene 5: Kalidah Country Scene 6: Poppy Field Scene 7: Emerald City Scene 8: Throne Room Act 2 Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene

1: West Witch Castle 2: Forest 3: Courtyard 4: Emerald City Gate 5: Throne Room 6: Fairgrounds 7: Outskirts of Quadling Country

Musical Nu mbers: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Overture The Feeling We Once Had - Aunt 'Em Tornado Ballet He's the Wiz - Addaperle, Munchkins Soon As I Get Home - Ensemble I Was Born on the Day Before Yesterday - Scarecrow Ease on Down the Road #1 - Dorothy, Scarecrow, Yellow Brick Road Slide Some Oil To Me - Tinman, Dorothy, Scarecrow Ease on Down the Road (reprise) - Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tineman, Yellow Brick Road Mean Ole Lion - Lion Ease on Down the Road - Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tineman, Yellow Brick Road Kalidah Battle - Friends, Kalidahs, Yellow Brick Road Be a Lion - Dorothy, Lion Lion's Dream - Lion, Poppies Emerald City Ballet (Pssst!) - Friends, Company So You Wanted to Meet the Wizard - The Wiz To Be Able To Feel - Tinman No Bad News - Evillene Funky Monkeys - Monkeys Everybody Rejoice (Brand new Day) - Friends, Winkies (Music and lyrics by Luther Vandross)


Charleston Stage: The Wiz Curriculum Guide 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

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Who Do You Think You Are? - Friends If You Believe (Believe in Yourself) - The Wiz Y'All Got It! - The Wiz A rested Body Is a Rested Mind - Glinda Home – Dorothy

SCENES AND SETS: 2 acts, 13 scenes; sets are full stage. Only the Throne Room repeats. There is a semi-unit playing area in which the stage set pieces flow in and out. Light and projections are important. Paddywagon, coaches, and other conveyances.

Orchestration: Percussion I-II, guitar, bass, drums, reed I-II (flute, alto sax), reed III (clarinet, alto flute, tenor sax), reed IV (oboe, baritone sax), horn, trumpets I-II, trumpet III, trombone I, cello, violins I-Il, piano also acoustic piano and moog piano.

Period and Costumes Farm overalls and dresses, Dorothy's Sunday dress. Tornado and dancers dressed as wind, hip Munchkins, and queenly rags for Addaperle, silver slippers, Yellow Brick Road, Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Lion costumes with upbeat, urban flavor added to the traditional. The Wicked Witch of the West, earthly rags (lots of layers, dark colors, coarse textures). Kalidahs, weird, frightening swamplike creatures. Poppies, beautiful, sinuous streetwalkers. Green costumes for Wiz, gatekeeper, and the people of Oz. Winkies (the witches' stooges), appropriately dressed. Winged monkeys. Wiz's white flightsuit, goggles, and jeweled cape. Fantasy costumes for townspeople, the good and bad witches.

Choreography: Jazz, modern, ballet, rock, production numbers.

Lighting and Special Effects: Tight, controlled, colorful lighting throughout. Special projection effects for the Wizard, "Flying" Monkeys, melting witch, tornado, and many other magical effects such as smokepots, CO2-fog, ascending hot-air balloon, and magic tricks.


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Awards and nominations Tony Awards • Best Musical (winner) • Best Original Score (winner) • Best Featured Actor in a Musical-Ted Ross (winner) • Best Featured Actress in a Musical-Dee Dee Bridgewater (winner) • Best Costume Design-Geoffrey Holder (winner) • Best Choreography-George Faison (winner) • Best Direction of a Musical (winner) • Best Book of a Musical (nominee)

DID YOU KNOW… -- The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has been called the first American fairy tale. -- Baum's mother-in-law was Matilda Gage, one of the leaders of the turn-of-the-century Women's Suffrage movement. Students can research Gage and the Suffrage movement, and how they influenced Baum's career. (Baum satirizes the Suffrage movement in The Marvelous Land of Oz.) -- Many people believe that The Wizard of Oz is a political story, a thinly-veiled satire of the American Populist movement of the turn of the century. While most Baum and Oz scholars don't believe this to be the case (click here for details and links), it does demonstrate that Baum's writings reflected the times he lived in. Other examples of world events influencing Baum's works may include the Women's Suffrage movement in The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904), the San Francisco Earthquake in Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908), and the Russian Revolution in The Magic of Oz (1919). How many other real-life examples can be found in the Oz books, or any other source? (Note that there are no strict right-and-wrong answers to this, it's all a matter of interpretation. Also ties in with Language Arts.) For historical perspective on The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, you may want to buy the book The Historian's Wizard of Oz : Reading L. Frank Baum's Classic As a Political and Monetary Allegory, edited by Ranjit S. Dighe.

MAPS OF KANSAS!


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Discussion before the Performance ACTIVITY

The wiz word search G Q T E F A C S K G A K X O Y

S N O Z V M D Z O D J C P A B

C Y I H C I C N D F N Z Z I I

A M J L B B L A I P H V N K T

ADDAPERLE AUNTEM DOROTHY EVILLENE GLINDA LION LORDUNDERLING SCARECROW TINMAN UNCLEHENRY WIZ

R I U H R M P L M L W L M E I

E H V O G E N L E Y G E H H R

C C W A R B D W A N T B O L I

R A V L R R W N F N E Z B O L

O N E E T I Q W U B B M X O J

W A M T Z Q A A G D P V O T K

F M R C H N O I L G R Z O J T

O N V U G L X E P H S O V B Q

V I S T Q M S Y P T S F L N U

T T U M Y R N E H E L C N U T

H Z L M D R R D O R O T H Y J


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All Language Arts completes the following standards: o Developing and using oral communication o Understanding and reading literary texts o Understanding and using informational texts o Building Better vocabulary o Developing written communication o Developing and using research strategies All Social Studies meets the following standards: o Understanding of different life around them and across the world o Understanding of different regions and human systems All Theatre Activities meet the following standards: – Connecting ideas and action – Understanding characters

Activities After the Performance Discussion Prompts 1. What are the differences between the book and the movie and the Wiz/Wizard of Oz? Why were these changes made? How is telling a story by writing it down different from showing it on a stage or screen? 2. Lost can be lonesome. What should you do and who should you to turn to if you are lost? How can you help someone who is lost? How would it feel to be lost? Could tie in a program that documents info on kids for security purposes‌ Activities In student pairs, role play Dorothy and a reporter. Write an interview with Dorothy for the school/community paper after she returns that reports her adventures in journalist style. Write a letter from Dorothy's perspective thanking her friends in Oz for their help while she was lost or telling Aunt Em why she misses home. They could be the Wizard and apologizing for leaving without Dorothy or for being a humbug. They could write to author L. Frank Baum and tell him what they think of his book and what they'd like to see happen to Dorothy next. There are lots of variations on this note-writing themes. Encourage students to write their own, original Oz adventures. The students can even make themselves the main characters! How did they get there? Who did they meet? What problems did they encounter? How do they get home?


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Use The Marvelous Land of Oz or any of the later Oz books to bring up the idea of a sequel. Discuss what a sequel is and why an author would write one. Students can also write their own sequel to The Wizard of Oz or any other story. Students can write and/or perform original Oz plays or skits. The newspaper of Oz is called The Ozmapolitan. Students can write and illustrate their own issue of The Ozmapolitan with news of what's going on in Oz. Use the events of an Oz book, or create your own news. Use Oz words for spelling, or study some of the more obscure vocabulary from the books or movie. (What does caliginous mean, anyway?) Society has changed greatly since 1900, when the book was originally written. In the movie version of The Wiz, we see the Wizard of Oz all urbanized. Most of Oz looks like back alleys, forests are replaced with amusement parks and subway stations. Students can make the Wizard of Oz more modern. Imagine Dorothy as a N*Sync obsessed valley girl with a pair of silver platforms. Maybe the Lion could be a tough, cigar smoking, geezer with no real tough stuff. Who knows what you can come up with, but have students rewrite The Wizard of Oz as if it were to take place in the current year and illustrate. (Contributed by John Roche.) and do more research on the people involved.

Reso ur ces Books AVAILABLE AT CHARLESTON COUNTY LIBRARIES The Wizard of Oz [compact disc] Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919. The real Wizard of Oz : the life and times of L. Frank Baum Loncraine, Rebecca, 1974The four Dorothys Ruditis, Paul. The annotated Wizard of Oz : the wonderful Wizard of Oz Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919. Visitors from Oz : the wild adventures of Dorothy, the Scarecrow, and the Tin Woodman Gardner, Martin, 1914-


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Films The Wiz [DVD] Lumet, Sidney, 1924The muppets wizard of oz [DVD] Thatcher, Kirk R. Wizard of Oz [DVD] Fleming, Victor, 1883-1949. Web Resources http://www.hairsprayontour.com/ Follow the tour and look at pictures, videos and do the interactive activities. www.theatremania.com You can always check on this site to see if a production of The Wiz… is playing near you! http://www.broadwaymusicalhome.com/shows/hairspray.htm The Broadway Musical Home – a wonderful resource with show information www.ibdb.com International Broadway Database: Infinitely valuable resource for any theatergoer…has ALL information about any production produced on a Broadway stage with cast and crew info as well as replacements and show dates. http://www.musicalheaven.com/ Musical Heaven! Another all-inclusive musical theatre lovers’ website with show info ranging from original cast information to recording lists.

The Wiz Study Guide  

The Wiz Study Guide