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Appendix A: Potential.ly Personality Report The summary report from the 16 Personality Test (Jungian Style).

Hannah Longbottom 20164390 Appendix Files - Report Write Ups


Hannah Danielle Longbottom

Open mindedness

Summary Report

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Birmingham City University Indicator taken on

26 October 2020 Actuallzatlon

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Collaboration •

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Conscientiousness

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41, Core Traits {Strengths) Trait

Trait description

Openness Enjoys new ideas, may have an interest in art, and enjoys intellectual debate. to experience Intellect and artistic interests are the two most important, central aspects of openness to experience. High scorers on this scale love to play with ideas. They are open-minded to new and unusual ideas and like to debate intellectual issues. Low scorers prefer dealing with people or things rather than ideas. Note: Do not equate this scale with intelligence. Ethics

Sees no need for pretence, and is candid, frank and sincere. High scorers on this scale see no need for pretence or manipulation when dealing with others and are therefore candid, frank, and sincere. Low scorers believe that a certain amount of deception in social relationships is necessary. However, they are not unprincipled or immoral. They are simply more guarded and less willing to reveal the whole truth.

Empathy

Has sympathy for other people's emotions, is being considerate and tolerant. Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within the other person's frame of reference. For example, high scorers on this scale are more likely to show compassion and sympathy for another's pain, joy, or frustration. They tend to be more considerate and tolerant of others and often have the ability to help other people clarify their emotions and motivations. Low scorers are not as moved by the emotions of others. People sometimes perceive very low scorers as egoistic or inconsiderate.

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This report contains sensitive data. Please make sure physical and digital records are kept confidential and secure.

All rights reserved by Potentially Ltd 2020 I https://home.potential.ly Source: Graduate Plus (2020). Potential.ly [online] Available at: https://graduateplus.bcu.ac.uk/potential.ly [Accessed on 26 October 2020].


Appendix B: Rubin’s Four Tendancies Obliger Report The summary report describing the tendancies of the Obligers traits.

Hannah Longbottom 20164390 Appendix Files - Report Write Ups


THE FOUR TENDENCIES QUIZ Detailed Report: Obliger

QUIZ.GRETCHENRUBIN.COM Copyright © 2018 · All Rights Reserved. Gretchen Rubin

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Source: Rubin, G. (2020). The four tendencies quiz. Available at: https://quiz.gretchenrubin.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Obliger-Report.pdf [Accessed 20 November 2020].


Y O U R T E N D E N C Y:

Obliger

According to your answers, your dominant Tendency is Obliger. The “Four Tendencies” framework describes how we respond to expectations. We all face two kinds of expectations: --

outer expectations, such as meeting work deadlines or observing traffic regulations, and

--

inner expectations, such as quitting napping or keeping a New Year’s resolution.

UPHOLDER: “I do what others expect of me—and what I expect from myself.”

QUESTIONER: “I do what I think is best, according to my judgment. If it doesn’t make sense, I won’t do it.”

OBLIGER: “I do what I have to do. I don’t want to let others down, but I may let myself down.”

REBEL: “I do what I want, in my own way. If you try to make me do something—even if I try to make myself do something—I’m less likely to do it.” QUIZ.GRETCHENRUBIN.COM Copyright © 2018 · All Rights Reserved. Gretchen Rubin

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So what does it mean to be an Obliger? Obligers meet outer expectations, but struggle to meet inner expectations. They’re motivated by external accountability; they wake up and think, “What must I do today?” Obligers excel at meeting external demands and deadlines and go to great lengths to meet their responsibilities, so they make terrific colleagues, leaders, family members, and friends. Others rely on them, but because Obligers resist inner expectations, it can be difficult for them to meet their aims for themselves, in the absence of external accountability—to work on a Ph.D. thesis, to attend networking events, to get their car serviced. Obligers depend on external accountability, with consequences such as deadlines, late fees, or the fear of letting other people down. In fact, Obligers need external accountability even for activities that they want to do. If you want to read more, join a book group. When a person says, “I give 110% to my patients, so of course it’s impossible for me to exercise” or “Because I’m so busy meeting other people’s needs, I have no time for self-care” or “I’m always on the road managing five remote teams so all I can eat is fast food,” that’s an Obliger. Behavior that Obligers sometimes attribute to self-sacrifice or lack of self-esteem—“Why do I always make time for other people’s priorities at the expense of my own?”—is often better explained as need for accountability. The weight of outer expectations can make Obligers susceptible to burnout, because they often have trouble setting limits or telling people “no.” They may, in fact, reach the point of “Obligerrebellion,” a striking pattern in which they abruptly refuse to meet an expectation. Obligerrebellion may take a form that’s small and symbolic, like deliberately being late to work. Or Obliger-rebellion may be dramatic and far-reaching, like abruptly quitting a job, getting a divorce, or ending a long friendship, with the feeling, “I’ve had it. This is over. You’re dead to me.” As outlined in Better Than Before, my book about habit change, Obligers may find it difficult to form a habit, because often we undertake habits for our own benefit, without others’ oversight. For Obligers, the Strategy of Accountability is the crucial strategy of habit formation. For instance, QUIZ.GRETCHENRUBIN.COM Copyright © 2018 · All Rights Reserved. Gretchen Rubin

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if you’re trying to exercise more, you might: --

Hire a fitness trainer, coach, nutritionist, or other accountability partner

--

Team up with a friend who will be disappointed if you don’t follow through, or take a class with a teacher who will notice if you don’t participate

--

Consider yourself as a role model to children, employees, friends, and the like, to be an example of fulfilling commitments, showing respect for yourself, or modeling good behavior

--

Think about your duty to your future-self

When we understand ourselves and how our Tendency shapes our perspective on the world, we can adapt our circumstances to suit our own nature—and when we understand how other people’s Tendencies shape their perspective, we can engage with them more effectively. The Four Tendencies explain why we act and why we don’t act.

QUIZ.GRETCHENRUBIN.COM Copyright © 2018 · All Rights Reserved. Gretchen Rubin

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Appendix C: Hannah Longbottom’s Johari Window My Johari window, completed by a mix of personal and professional connections, used to identify the blindsports in my personality.

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Appendix D: Primary Research Interview with Person A A transcript of my interview with Person A (a Creative Business Owner) and my analysis notes for the identified themes.

Hannah Longbottom 20164390 Appendix Files - Report Write Ups


Interview Questions – semi structured (Person A) Creative Director Tuesday 1st December 2020 at 11am 1. Have you always worked for yourself? If not, why did you make the decision to go alone? Self Employed working as a freelancer for other studios. Was made redundant from previous design role and started freelancing. 2. Did you have any worries when setting up your business? Not really – it was a case of needing to make an income. Follows gut instinct and knew that working for local studios wasn’t an option (they were few and far between). Person A networked with people he knew, some connections had excess work and his relationships built from there. Theme connection: Reaching out to other agencies – Airey refers to another creative who reached out to other agencies to offer his assistance during busier periods – six years on he still receives work from the connections he made. (Airey, 2013 :127) 3. What life lessons and war stories do you wish someone had told you – before you went alone? Struggles with the lack of collaboration for younger designers and middleweights. Freelancing and building a ‘community’ letting culture inform design is far more beneficial. Business set up: I am currently registered as a sole trader and trade under ‘Hannah Longbottom Designs’ and complete a handful of projects each year. With the aim of building up my confidence and client base for it to become more permanent. 1. Which business set up did you choose? Sole trader / Company / Partnership? Customer facing is an agency, but the set-up is him. When he has projects that require specialist help – he looks for a suitable specialist amongst his connections and brings others onboard. Theme connections: Self employment, collaboration, networking The conversation highlighted the importance of the sharing and talking with others to build a positive culture. Which is also representative of Maschmeyer (2020) discussing creatives reluctance to share and their protectiveness which is often detrimental to the design process. Source: Sanders, C (2020) Interviewed by Hannah Longbottom via telephone , 1 December 2020


2. How has this worked for you? Do you wish you had chosen a different option? The agency started life as a Magazine for ‘Creative Support’. It has evolved into events in Coventry, talks, lectures, gigs with a connections wall and exhibitions. To encourage and foster an independent culture whether it be artists, music, venues, ‘creativity reflects culture’. But after a ‘self-initiated’ review of where it was going, the decision was made to go back to client work. Completes enough projects to earn a living and allow time for some self development projects too. My biggest concerns: 1. Collaboration – I’ve always worked within a team and it’s nice to have the support. Going back to Uni I realise how much I missed proper collaborative practice. How do you get past this? By staying connected with younger audiences, building a strong network. Networking with other creatives for e.g creative boom, creative waffle podcasts etc. 2. I have been considering the option of a partnership, so that I can have someone to share the worries with and bounce ideas off – thoughts? Make good connections, build a network. You can successfully work ‘alone’ and know you have a good back up of ‘specialists’ with who you can send work out too when needed. This then leads to work of mouth, self promotion etc. 3. Contracts / Insurance – I have looked into contract templates from companies like Simply Docs with templates. Insurance is a headache; public liability, professional indemnity, cyber and data insurance. All the different hats you have to wear in business. Collaborate reach out, ask questions. Don’t be afraid to ask others for advice. 4. Work – will I earn enough? Getting work? Clients? Worries like others about clients, work etc. Extra info / questions / pearls of wisdom Struggles: Finding and making new contacts – you have to have the get up and go, they won’t fall into your lap. You also need self-initiation to learn and stay up to date. Wisdom:


Analysis: Use creativity to inspire others. Through words and language (semiotics & discourse) Typography Remember the difference: Creativity reflects a culture. Art working is taught. Think about which you do. Coventry Design Festival - An event to celebrate creativity. - The ownership is one everyone involved – real collaborative effort. It’s not about the perfect portfolio, it’s about people learning, asking questions, finding confidence and sharing their war stories rather than the ‘perfectly polished’ portfolio. - Hoping to launch a 365 day programme and mentor ship off the back. Small towns & cities don’t necessarily offer retention for creatives. They tend to leave for big cities, when we should be building local creative cultures – the hope is that it will be transferrable to other smaller cities. Reflection Maschmeyer (2020) – said creatives are too protective and don’t share. Person A iterates the same thing. People shouldn’t be afraid of change from agencies or sharing of information or having a creative review with others. Collaborative problem solving – much better creative by thinking about the environment you want to build.


Appendix E: Kinetic PR - My DNA An overview of my action in research (McNiff, 2015) primary research workshop with Kinetic PR and slide deck. The presentation was first delivered in session one, in session two it was re-capped. We then worked collaboratively to write our Business DNA.

Hannah Longbottom 20164390 Appendix Files - Report Write Ups


Kinetic PR - Angela Podmore Wednesday 18th November 2020

Workshop

My DNA Can you get a case study / testimonial from ‘happy clients’. • Cedix Design • Rainbambinos What do I want my business to be remembered for? • Care and attention • Passion What do I want my vision to say? • Problem Solving Design • Bringing ideas to life • Integrated Solution • Inspire What we do? • Problem Solving Design, a fresh new look and feel with wow factor. Vision - we are in business to do? • To deliver good design Mission? • Premium charges, project lifetime changes? Your difference - values • Freedom • Delight • Partnership • Sure-footed • Attention to detail • Scrupulous • Meticulous • Fanatical The above notes came from discussion surrounding the presentation slide deck attached. We discussed our motivations, what we wished to be remembered for. The results being my visions and valued - viewable on my website. Hannah Longbottom - 20164390 - Appendix Files - Report Write Ups Source: Podmore, A et al. (2020) How To Recession Proof Sales and Marketing. [Powerpoint Slides] (for Presentation). Kinetic PR. Unpublished


Developing marketing communications strategies and plans which bring about a step-change in your business growth. Guaranteed.

Tuesday, 18 November 2020 Version 1.0 1


Introducing: Kinetic – our remit

Social media strategies

Content marketing and media relations

Digital marketing

Internal communications

Crisis management

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

2


It’s all about reputation

It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you'll do things differently. Warren Buffet Berkshire Hathaway ‘The Omaha Oracle

1.0

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

3


Why competitive advantage is important

If you don’t have a competitive advantage, don’t compete.

If you don’t have a competitive advantage, don’t compete

Jack Welch Legendary American CEO

Jack Welch Legendary CEO

1.1

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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1.2 Why we’re here today

To capture your company’s ‘DNA’

Test that ‘DNA’

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

Turn that inspiration into action

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1.3 Why start with ‘WHY’?

The ‘Golden Circle’

WHY HOW

WHAT

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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1.4 Three questions to capture your ‘DNA’ 1. WHY are you in business?

2. WHAT do you differently or better than anyone else? 3. HOW do you do things differently

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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2.0 Thought-provoking questions

’

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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2.1 Thought-provoking questions Think of a delighted client:

• What made them so happy? • What makes you remember it? • How did you feel?

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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2.2 Thought-provoking questions • What gets you out of bed in the morning? • What keeps you up at night? • What excites you?

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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2.3 Thought-provoking questions • What do you want your business to be remembered for?

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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2.4 Thought-provoking questions • What is the ultimate goal of your business?

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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3.0 Your vision What do you like? What needs to change? Is there anything missing?

Hannah What we do: Problem-solving design giving you a fresh, new look and feel Vision (we are in business to deliver timeless design with wow-factor

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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3.1 Your mission What do you do better than any other? How are you different?

Hannah Mission (your difference): Design that grows with you

Or Design that’s right now and in [the future/its lifetime]

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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3.2 Your values How do you do things your way? Which character traits do you hold dear? Hannah’s Values (your code of conduct): Particular – we are fanatical. Design needs to be sure-footed so it delights all the time Conscientious – seek first to understand by listening to you Partnership – we’re a team so it’s all about building trust

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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3.0 Your vision What do you like? What needs to change? Is there anything missing?

Jordan What we do: Architectural services releasing your property’s potential – from the big idea to the technical detail and completion Vision (we are in business: See it, feel it, before you commit

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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3.1 Your mission What do you do better than any other? How are you different?

Jordan Mission (your difference): It’s all about you and your idea – guiding you through the endless possibilities

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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3.2 Your values How do you do things your way? Which character traits do you hold dear? Jordan Values (your code of conduct): Freedom to be flexible – it begins and ends with your vision and style Affordable in both design and build – we give a like-for-like price-match guarantee Meticulous – focus and attention to detail Personable – enthusiastic reassuring customer care

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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4.0 Have a plan and work the plan

ACTION

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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4.1 How this will work for you:

Š Kinetic Communications Ltd 2020

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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4.2 Turning content into sales

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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4.3 What’s next? Next, you need a clear idea of your target audience:

Personas document a deep understanding of the people we want to reach/attract and comprise: 1. Who – title, decision making capabilities 2. Where – industry type/sectors, geographical location 3. What – drivers/motivators 4. Why – problems/pain points

5. How – solutions, media, preferred content format

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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5.0 How you get it working for you

ACTION

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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5.1 The foundations of your marketing communications 1. Define your ‘DNA’ – the foundations for all of your communications. 2. Build a picture of who we’re targeting – creating detailed target audience personas. 3. What do we want to achieve? – setting measurable objectives to demonstrate ROI. 4. Website – best practice SEO basics. 5. Ensuring all of your social media platforms are aligned with your DNA. 6. Tying the above together – integrating your owned, earned and paid media in a strategic plan. WHY WHAT Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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5.2 How we know it works – case study

WHAT

Shortlisted for 2020 UK Content Awards

Working with SEO team to amplify coverage into sales leads

Highly credible editorial leading to high quality leads

“The highlight of RWM was meeting Kinetic”

CRM and LinkedIn – relationships continuing to grow

Defining brand ‘DNA’ instilled team confidence and focus

Case studies building engagement and web traffic

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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5.2 How we know it works – case study Website visitors Jan 2020 – Sep 2020 compared to same period last year

Acquisition Jan 2020 – Sep 2020 compared to same period last year

Traffic from referrals (links to FSS website on other websites) has increased by 258.62% in comparison to Jan – Sep 2019.

Goal conversions (eg newsletter sign ups, filling in contact form, requesting a quote) Jan 2020 – Sep 2020 compared to same period last year

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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5.3 What could we do? – making it happen – options Content marketing A 6-month programme of thought-leadership themes targeted towards your audience

Crisis and issue preparation Ensuring we’re prepared with media statements – eg challenges ?, etc

Social media

Round table

Monthly calendar of social media content to harness the success of Facebook, Instagram and other platforms

Running focus group events with sectorleading businesses to gain greater insight into your audiences and build brand visibility and credibility

Website and SEO

Inbound marketing campaign

Ongoing SEO support and website maintenance

Reaching out to key prospects via LinkedIn with tailored messaging

WHY WHAT Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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5.4 How we measure how well it’s working Key dials to see what’s working

CRM

Social media

Number of GDPR prospects

Engagement, followings and analytics

Emailer open rates Sales Number of leads

Conversion rate to prospects Conversion rate to customers

Google Analytics lifts in: Unique visitors Dwell time Conversions

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

Editorial Reach, authority and relevance

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5.5 What we promised you… Reputation and sales fit closely together Kinetic’s invented a good system to build and maintain trust - inside and out. That system will help you: • • •

Stand out and really say something that resonates with high quality prospects which convert quickly. Maximise your ROI in marketing. All in measurable and cost-effective ways.

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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5.0 What next?

Next sessions: More DNA? Define your personas?

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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Every decent business deserves to be trusted Making a step-change to your business with stand-out content. Guaranteed. Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

Kinetic Communications Ltd, 4 Tenby Street, Birmingham. B1 3EL. Angela.Podmore@kineticpr.co.uk; charlotte.thorp@kineticpr.co.uk; holly.ingram@kineticpr.co.uk; gill.holtom@kineticpr.co.uk www.kineticpr.co.uk Tel: +44 (0) 121 212 6250 Registered in England No: 05069686

Vat No: 833 656121

If printing, please recycle

Care | Rigorous | Straight-talking | Pioneering | Delight

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Appendix F: LinkedIn Basics with Sales Marvel An overview of my action in research (McNiff, 2015) primary research workshop with Keith Rozelle, Sales Marvel to understand how to make the most from your LinkedIn profile.

Hannah Longbottom 20164390 Appendix Files - Report Write Ups


Online Workshop LinkedIn Basics Keith Rozelle 3rd December 2020 Keith Rozelle of Sales Marvel talked about how at some point we all sell something and for the person of LinkedIn, we are selling ourselves. Question: What is your current confidence level with LinkedIn? My answer 5. Coverage today: Why are you on LinkedIn? Corporate Networking and Connections. Populating your profile with: Who, what and experience. Tell your network what they get, when they are working with you. Who are you following? What connections do you have? What is the social selling index. A LinkedIn Profile: Should be a living and breathing and continually updated profile. - Who you are? - What you do? Best photo of yourself. Professional image, dress for work and take your photo. Stamford have done research for the importance of using a photo. Reviewing another’s profile. (Someone in the group, I made notes reviewing my own profile alongside the workshop) • Take a new photo - check the lighting, the focus and ensure your face takes up about one third of the space. • Put a header image in. Use a working photograph, think photo of myself designing? • What contact info do you supply? Only add a phone number if you want one? Ensure your email address is professional, name pronounctation? • People need to be encouraged to scroll. Do you need a LinkedIn company page? • About - Not necessarily about you. Think about what you have helped others do? Volunteering etc • Skills - energy, vibrancy. • Case study? Do people want to click the magic more button? • If you use an abbreviation, spell it out in full first. • Memberships? • If you are a student write: Source: Rozelle, K. (2020) LinkedIn Basics. “Student reading Masters in [Powerpoint Slides] (for Presentation). Sales Marvel. Unpublished. Design Management.”


Online Workshop LinkedIn Basics Keith Rozelle 3rd December 2020 Experience Section: - Achievements within the role. - Job Descriptions Skills: Show the 3 you want to be most known for. Recommendations: - Get recommendations from others. Lack of recommendations from others raises a red flag / amber light. Go to anothers profile and request a recommendation. You can put prompt questions in place. LinkedIn Dashboards: Helpful to learn - search appearances, profile views. Making a post, simultaneously posts to twitter too. Message: use impactful photos not videos at the moment. Most people are video driven out. Tage people and relevant posts. Use #hashtags, using 3 - 5. For postings you need courage! You have a place in this world remember that! Themes: You need courage Self reflection Communication skills Networking

Source: Rozelle, K. (2020) LinkedIn Basics. [Powerpoint Slides] (for Presentation). Sales Marvel. Unpublished.


Appendix G: Santander How Business Banking Can Help You Prosper. An overview of my action in research (McNiff, 2015) primary research workshop with Santander, including my research notes and slide deck.

Hannah Longbottom 20164390 Appendix Files - Report Write Ups


Online Workshop Santander - Making Sense Of Business Banking - page 1 Rob Simmonds, Andrew Pendleton and Lucie Hyde Thursday 12th November 2020

#santanderuniik - asked to contribute to their social media following and review the session. Andy Pendleton looks after a portfolio of 3000 clients across the West Midlands, who are SME Businesses. They run entrepreneurship competitions - also funded internships. - Future opportunities? Breakthrough programme, which is a holistic wrap around. Important due to the recent changes in verifying online payments. To have a business account, it gives the customers the appearance of a ‘legimate business’. If you want to apply for funding a Business Account is a must. Funding opportunities: Ad:venture and Innovate UK. Portfolio Career. Build a track record, to set you up for future opportunities, eg business loans. If you want to also work internationally, your Business Banking Manager can help. Also gives the opportunity for a Business Credit Card. Investment in Assets - equipment, they have an asset finance scheme. FACT: Businesses who seek advice are likely to secure better funding. Business Banking Managers, also have good connections. They are also there to offer support and connection for growth. When choosing sa bank, ask yourself can they connect you? The business manager should be there for you and are good to talk to and build connections with and therefore worth their fee.

Hannah Longbottom - 20164390 - Appendix Files - Report Write Ups Source: Simmonds, R et al. (2020) How Business Banking can help you prosper. [Presentation PDF] (for Presentation). Santander Business Banking. Unpublished.


Online Workshop Santander - Making Sense Of Business Banking - page 2 Rob Simmonds, Andrew Pendleton and Lucie Hyde Thursday 12th November 2020

What to ask? What to do next? Business advice at the Incubator Funding In one month (10th December) - de-mystifying finance. www.santanderbreakthrough.co.uk www.santanderbreakthrough.co.uk/events Digital Proposition - Pilot Scheme Contact Andy - which I did. Still waiting to hear from the next team. Workshops on Intellectual Property IPO in Birmingham - Legal Partner Contact: Richard.Scutt@bcu.ac.uk

Questions - what would you need to open a business account? Verify the individual - passport Verify location - driving licence Document to evidence your operation - Right to trade FREE Banking 12 - 18 months, dependant on the offer - monthly fee ÂŁ7.50 p/m Less than ÂŁ1000 per month in physical cash


How Business Banking can help you prosper


Who we are, what we do, why we do it


“Helping people and businesses prosper”

Over 230 Business Relationship Managers supporting businesses from startup to growth

Over 80 partner Universities across the UK and a dedicated team of University Relationship Manager

Over £500 million of lending to SMEs since 2012 through our Growth Capital team

Over £340,000 awarded to entrepreneurs from across the UK through our annual Entrepreneurship Awards

Whole range of non-financial support through Santander Breakthrough to help businesses prosper

Over 1,400 paid internships created with UK SMEs 3


The role of a bank in your business


“For many, the demands of running a business will leave little time for building financial expertise.�

5


Business credibility / professionalism Hotmail account you’ve had since you were 14 Your hobby has turned into a business No/limited online presence Personal rather than business social media Asking for payments made out to you personally Unable to take different type of payments Lack of professionalism/credibility 6


Getting into good habits “It is not uncommon for self-employed people to use a single bank account for managing both their business and household finances. The lack of separation means finances become mixed and cash flow management and personal budgeting can become more difficult�. Type of current account used to manage business or self-employment finances

38 28

26

5 Personal Busi ness current account current account onl y onl y

Busi ness and personal current accounts

Do not use any accounts

Don' t know

7 Source: Money Advice Trust, Taking Care of Business, November 2018


Make HMRC your friend • •

Registered as self-employed A Director of a Limited Company

See https://www.gov.uk/self-assessment-tax-returns and https://www.gov.uk/corporation-tax for guidance

Late filing – Corporation Tax

Penalty

1 day

£100

3 months

Another £100

6 months 12 months

HMRC will estimate your Corporation Tax bill and add a penalty of 10% of the unpaid bill Another 10% of any unpaid tax

Late filing - Self-Assessment

Penalty

Miss deadline

£100

3 months

Daily penalty of £10 per day up to 90 days

6 months

5% of tax due or £300, if greater

12 months

5% of tax due, or £300 if greater, but HMRC will also investigate

8


Receiving funding? Bank details You must supply your organisation’s bank details so we can validate them.

To qualify for the grant you must have a business bank account

The grant payment will be made directly into the applicant’s business bank account via BACS.

9


Manage your portfolio career Part-time job employment = weekly wage

£ in

Freelance contract #1 = paid on invoice Freelance contract #2 = paid monthly on retainer Business revenue = paid on invoice, 30 days credit

£ out

Business startup costs Travel to/from work Mobile phone bills – personal or business? Website hosting Personal living expenses 10


Build your track record As your business grows, having a business relationship with your bank will become increasingly important.

11


It’s good to talk Analysis has shown that firms who seek advice have a much greater chance of securing finance. Source: House of Commons Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee, Access to finance - First Report of Session 2016–17

The evidence is unequivocal: businesses that seek and engage external help are more likely to grow. Growing Your Business: A Report on Growing Micro Businesses - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/growingyour-business-a-report-on-growing-micro-businesses

12


So, what do you do next?


Where do you go?

14 Source: https://www.paymentscardsandmobile.com/youth-attitudes-to-banking-and-online-banking-services/


What do you ask? • • • • • •

Is there someone you can talk to about your business?

• • • • •

Can you manage your account online?

• • •

Can they provide the products you need to run your business?

What do they know about your sector/type of business? Can you speak to someone when you need to? Can you speak to someone face-to-face? Can they introduce you to people in the business community? Can they signpost you to other sources of support?

Can you manage your account on the go? What costs will you incur? Have they had any data, security or IT issues? How ethical are they?

Can they support your international ambitions? What non-financial help can they provide? 15


When do you do it? Have you done some market research? Have you accessed business advice?

Have you looked into your insurance?

Have you looked into your banking requirements?

Have you worked out how to fund your idea?

Have you validated your idea?

Have you thought Have you looked at Have you secured about protecting the financial your domain name? your IP? viability? Have you decided on the right business model? Have you checked Have you decided on out relevant a legal structure? legislation? 16


Thank you. Our purpose is to help people and business prosper. Our culture is based on believing that everything we do should be


Appendix H: Money Management Edwards Accountants An overview of my action in research (McNiff, 2015) primary research workshop with Edwards Accountants, including my research notes and slide deck.

Hannah Longbottom 20164390 Appendix Files - Report Write Ups


Online Workshop Money Management Edwards Chartered Accountants 19th November 2020 This workshop discussed the types of files and business forecasting you would need, should you apply for financial backing. It covered the profit & loss demonstrating the breakdown, explaining how it isn’t a cashflow forecast. Top tips: • You may pay your insurances in one-payment but they spread out over the year. • Depreciation is allocated over the life of the product. • KPI’s are normally gross profit and operating profit. • You may compare with your Management accounts, to monitor performance. Cashflow forecast Sales Payments - presume you won’t be paid for 30 days Summary of your finances • Working capital • Interest and debt • Capital Expenses • Receipts • Others Cashflow can be difficult - because money is going in and out. When you start your profit and loss - look forward 3 years. Build from the ground up and understand your business. Reflection: The spreadsheets were far to in-depth for my current knowledge. I would always use an accountant and have experience of keeping basic records, money in and out and expenses - but I would need further instruction and teaching for anything more advanced. Themes: Business Admin & Record Keeping Finances Hannah Longbottom - 20164390 - Appendix Files - Report Write Ups Source: Taylor, N. (2020) Money Management, Understanding Cashflow, P&L Account and Balance Sheet. [Powerpoint Slides] (for Presentation). Edwards Chartered Accountants. Unpublished.


Money Management, Understanding Cashflow, P&L Account and Balance Sheet Neil Taylor - Director Edwards Chartered Accountants neiltaylor@edwardsaccountants.co.uk


Outline of the session u u u u u u u u

Profit and loss account Cashflow statement Balance sheet Developing and understanding financial projections Sensitivity of financial information Taxation Tax issues for start ups Questions


Profit and loss scenario 1 Jan-21

TURNOVER Sales DIRECT COSTS Cost of sales

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Total

30,000

30,000

30,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

70,000

70,000

70,000

630,000

24,000

24,000

24,000

40,000

40,000

40,000

48,000

48,000

48,000

56,000

56,000

56,000

504,000

GROSS PROFIT

6,000

6,000

6,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

14,000

14,000

14,000

126,000

OVERHEADS Wages and Salaries Rent Rates Office supplies Telephone and internet Insurance Motor Subscriptions Sundries Depreciation

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 21

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 42

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 62

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 83

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 104

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 126

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 145

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 167

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 188

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 208

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 229

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 250

48,000 12,000 4,200 1,800 2,400 3,600 4,800 2,400 2,100 1,625

OPERATING (LOSS)/ PROFIT

(796)

(817)

(837)

3,142

3,121

3,099

5,080

5,058

5,037

7,017

6,996

6,975

43,075

9

31

42

59

56

28

14

3

-

-

-

-

242

NET (LOSS)/ PROFIT

(805)

(848)

(879)

3,083

3,065

3,071

5,066

5,055

5,037

7,017

6,996

6,975

42,833

CUMULATIVE

(805)

(1,653)

(2,532)

551

3,616

6,687

11,753

16,808

21,845

28,862

35,858

42,833

42,833

INTEREST EXPENSE Overdraft Interest


Profit and loss account u

Measures a company’s financial performance

u

Matching and accruals concepts

u

Depreciation

u

Covering a specified time period (month, quarter, year)

u

Main categories – sales, cost of sales, admin expenses

u

KPIs – gross profit, operating profit

u

Management accounts vs statutory financial statements


Cash flow scenario 1 Jan-21 RECEIPTS Sales

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Total

-

36,000

36,000

36,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

72,000

72,000

72,000

84,000

84,000

672,000

4,000 9 -

32,130 4,000 31 1,200 -

32,130 4,000 42 1,200 -

32,130 4,000 59 1,200 1,335

51,330 4,000 56 1,200 -

51,330 4,000 28 1,200 -

51,330 4,000 14 1,200 3,735

60,930 4,000 3 1,200 -

60,930 4,000 1,200 -

60,930 4,000 1,200 4,935

70,530 4,000 1,200 -

70,530 4,000 1,200 -

574,230 48,000 242 13,200 10,005

NET CASH FLOW

(4,009)

(1,361)

(1,372)

(2,724)

3,414

3,442

(279)

5,867

5,870

935

8,270

8,270

26,323

OPENING BANK CLOSING BANK

1,000 (3,009)

(3,009) (4,370)

(4,370) (5,742)

(5,742) (8,466)

(8,466) (5,052)

(5,052) (1,610)

(1,610) (1,889)

(1,889) 3,978

3,978 9,848

9,848 10,783

10,783 19,053

19,053 27,323

1,000 27,323

PAYMENTS Invoiced Costs Wages and Salaries Overdraft Interest Fixed assets VAT


Cashflow statement u u

u u u

A summary statement of cashflows for a specified period Main categories – movements in working capital, interest and debt servicing, capital expenditures and receipts, other KPIs – interest cover, working capital cash generation Cash is king Management version (future) vs statutory version (historic)


Balance sheet scenario 1 Opening

FIXED ASSETS Fixed assets Accumulated Depreciation

Jan-21

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

-

1,000 (21)

2,000 (63)

3,000 (125)

4,000 (208)

5,000 (312)

6,000 (438)

7,000 (583)

8,000 (750)

9,000 (938)

10,000 (1,146)

11,000 (1,375)

12,000 (1,625)

1,000 -

36,000

36,000

36,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

72,000

3,978 72,000

9,848 72,000

10,783 84,000

19,053 84,000

27,323 84,000

-

3,009 33,330 445

4,370 33,330 890

5,742 33,330 1,335

8,466 52,530 1,245

5,052 52,530 2,490

1,610 52,530 3,735

1,889 62,130 1,645

62,130 3,290

62,130 4,935

71,730 2,045

71,730 4,090

71,730 6,135

NET CURRENT ASSETS

1,000

(784)

(2,590)

(4,407)

(2,241)

(72)

2,125

6,336

10,558

14,783

21,008

27,233

33,458

TOTAL NET ASSETS

1,000

195

(653)

(1,532)

1,551

4,616

7,687

12,753

17,808

22,845

29,862

36,858

43,833

CAPITAL & RESERVES Capital Retained Earnings

1,000 -

1,000 (805)

1,000 (1,653)

1,000 (2,532)

1,000 551

1,000 3,616

1,000 6,687

1,000 11,753

1,000 16,808

1,000 21,845

1,000 28,862

1,000 35,858

1,000 42,833

1,000

195

(653)

(1,532)

1,551

4,616

7,687

12,753

17,808

22,845

29,862

36,858

43,833

CURRENT ASSETS Bank Trade Debtors CREDITORS DUE < 1 YEAR Bank Trade Creditors Other Creditors


Balance sheet u

Measures a companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial position at a point in time

u

A summary statement of assets and liabilities showing net worth and liquidity

u

Cost basis vs valuation

u

Main categories â&#x20AC;&#x201C; fixed assets, current assets, liabilities, capital and reserves

u

KPIs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; debtor, creditor and stock days, liquidity ratios

u

Management accounts vs statutory financial statements


Developing financial projections u

Looking forward â&#x20AC;&#x201C; minimum 3 years

u

Build from the ground up

u

Profit & Loss, Balance Sheet.

u

Most importantly â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cash Flow

u

Understanding your business, and where is it heading

u

Who for?

u

What else does an investor look for ? u

Assumptions


Understanding & using the projections u

How much money is required? Based on what? u

u

Minimum sales & margin

What if….. ? Key sensitivities in the projections. u

Half the revenue / double the cost / reduce profit margins

u

Adjust customer or supplier payment terms

u

KPI’s relevant to your business – reach their minimum?

u

Projections must be robust

u

Under promise & over deliver


Profit & loss - 10% fall in sales Jan-21 TURNOVER Sales DIRECT COSTS Cost of sales

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Total

27,000

27,000

27,000

45,000

45,000

45,000

54,000

54,000

54,000

63,000

63,000

63,000

567,000

21,600

21,600

21,600

36,000

36,000

36,000

43,200

43,200

43,200

50,400

50,400

50,400

453,600

GROSS PROFIT

5,400

5,400

5,400

9,000

9,000

9,000

10,800

10,800

10,800

12,600

12,600

12,600

113,400

OVERHEADS Wages and Salaries Rent Rates Office supplies Telephone and internet Insurance Motor Subscriptions Sundries Depreciation

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 21

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 42

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 62

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 83

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 104

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 126

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 145

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 167

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 188

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 208

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 229

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 250

48,000 12,000 4,200 1,800 2,400 3,600 4,800 2,400 2,100 1,625

(1,396)

(1,417)

(1,437)

2,142

2,121

2,099

3,880

3,858

3,837

5,617

5,596

5,575

30,475

9

34

51

73

76

58

53

38

5

-

-

-

397

NET (LOSS)/ PROFIT

(1,405)

(1,451)

(1,488)

2,069

2,045

2,041

3,827

3,820

3,832

5,617

5,596

5,575

30,078

CUMULATIVE

(1,405)

(2,856)

(4,344)

(2,275)

(230)

1,811

5,638

9,458

13,290

18,907

24,503

30,078

30,078

OPERATING (LOSS)/ PROFIT INTEREST EXPENSE Overdraft Interest


Cash flow - 10% fall in sales Jan-21 RECEIPTS Sales

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Total

-

32,400

32,400

32,400

54,000

54,000

54,000

64,800

64,800

64,800

75,600

75,600

604,800

4,000 9 -

29,250 4,000 34 1,200 -

29,250 4,000 51 1,200 -

29,250 4,000 73 1,200 975

46,530 4,000 76 1,200 -

46,530 4,000 58 1,200 -

46,530 4,000 53 1,200 3,135

55,170 4,000 38 1,200 -

55,170 4,000 5 1,200 -

55,170 4,000 1,200 4,215

63,810 4,000 1,200 -

63,810 4,000 1,200 -

520,470 48,000 397 13,200 8,325

NET CASH FLOW

(4,009)

(2,084)

(2,101)

(3,098)

2,194

2,212

(918)

4,392

4,425

215

6,590

6,590

14,408

OPENING BANK CLOSING BANK

1,000 (3,009)

(3,009) (5,093)

(5,093) (7,194)

(7,194) (10,292)

(10,292) (8,098)

(8,098) (5,886)

(5,886) (6,804)

(6,804) (2,412)

(2,412) 2,013

2,013 2,228

2,228 8,818

8,818 15,408

1,000 15,408

PAYMENTS Invoiced Costs Wages and Salaries Overdraft Interest Fixed assets VAT


Balance sheet - 10% fall in sales Opening FIXED ASSETS Fixed assets Accumulated Depreciation

Jan-21

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

-

1,000 (21)

2,000 (63)

3,000 (125)

4,000 (208)

5,000 (312)

6,000 (438)

7,000 (583)

8,000 (750)

9,000 (938)

10,000 (1,146)

11,000 (1,375)

12,000 (1,625)

1,000 -

32,400

32,400

32,400

54,000

54,000

54,000

64,800

64,800

2,013 64,800

2,228 75,600

8,818 75,600

15,408 75,600

-

3,009 30,450 325

5,093 30,450 650

7,194 30,450 975

10,292 47,730 1,045

8,098 47,730 2,090

5,886 47,730 3,135

6,804 56,370 1,405

2,412 56,370 2,810

56,370 4,215

65,010 1,765

65,010 3,530

65,010 5,295

NET CURRENT ASSETS

1,000

(1,384)

(3,793)

(6,219)

(5,067)

(3,918)

(2,751)

221

3,208

6,228

11,053

15,878

20,703

TOTAL NET ASSETS

1,000

(405)

(1,856)

(3,344)

(1,275)

770

2,811

6,638

10,458

14,290

19,907

25,503

31,078

CAPITAL & RESERVES Capital Retained Earnings

1,000 -

1,000 (1,405)

1,000 (2,856)

1,000 (4,344)

1,000 (2,275)

1,000 (230)

1,000 1,811

1,000 5,638

1,000 9,458

1,000 13,290

1,000 18,907

1,000 24,503

1,000 30,078

1,000

(405)

(1,856)

(3,344)

(1,275)

770

2,811

6,638

10,458

14,290

19,907

25,503

31,078

CURRENT ASSETS Bank Trade Debtors CREDITORS DUE < 1 YEAR Bank Trade Creditors Other Creditors


Profit & loss - Increase in debtor days 30 > 60 Jan-21 TURNOVER Sales DIRECT COSTS Cost of sales

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Total

30,000

30,000

30,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

70,000

70,000

70,000

630,000

24,000

24,000

24,000

40,000

40,000

40,000

48,000

48,000

48,000

56,000

56,000

56,000

504,000

GROSS PROFIT

6,000

6,000

6,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

12,000

12,000

12,000

14,000

14,000

14,000

126,000

OVERHEADS Wages and Salaries Rent Rates Office supplies Telephone and internet Insurance Motor Subscriptions Sundries Depreciation

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 21

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 42

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 62

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 83

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 104

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 126

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 145

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 167

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 188

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 208

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 229

4,000 1,000 350 150 200 300 400 200 175 250

48,000 12,000 4,200 1,800 2,400 3,600 4,800 2,400 2,100 1,625

OPERATING (LOSS)/ PROFIT

(796)

(817)

(837)

3,142

3,121

3,099

5,080

5,058

5,037

7,017

6,996

6,975

43,075

3

63

120

126

160

186

181

191

192

183

188

181

1,774

NET (LOSS)/ PROFIT

(799)

(880)

(957)

3,016

2,961

2,913

4,899

4,867

4,845

6,834

6,808

6,794

41,301

CUMULATIVE

(799)

(1,679)

(2,636)

380

3,341

6,254

11,153

16,020

20,865

27,699

34,507

41,301

41,301

INTEREST EXPENSE Overdraft Interest


Cash flow - Increase in debtor days 30 > 60 Jan-21 RECEIPTS Sales

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Total

-

-

36,000

36,000

36,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

72,000

72,000

72,000

84,000

588,000

4,000 3 -

32,130 4,000 63 1,200 -

32,130 4,000 120 1,200 -

32,130 4,000 126 1,200 1,335

51,330 4,000 160 1,200 -

51,330 4,000 186 1,200 -

51,330 4,000 181 1,200 3,735

60,930 4,000 191 1,200 -

60,930 4,000 192 1,200 -

60,930 4,000 183 1,200 4,935

70,530 4,000 188 1,200 -

70,530 4,000 181 1,200 -

574,230 48,000 1,774 13,200 10,005

NET CASH FLOW

(4,003)

(37,393)

(1,450)

(2,791)

(20,690)

3,284

(446)

(6,321)

5,678

752

(3,918)

8,089

(59,209)

OPENING BANK CLOSING BANK

1,000 (3,003)

(3,003) (40,396)

(40,396) (41,846)

(41,846) (44,637)

(44,637) (65,327)

(65,327) (62,043)

(62,043) (62,489)

(62,489) (68,810)

(68,810) (63,132)

(63,132) (62,380)

(62,380) (66,298)

(66,298) (58,209)

1,000 (58,209)

PAYMENTS Invoiced Costs Wages and Salaries Overdraft Interest Fixed assets VAT


Balance sheet - Increase in debtor days 30 > 60 Opening FIXED ASSETS Fixed assets Accumulated Depreciation

Jan-21

Feb-21

Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

-

1,000 (21)

2,000 (63)

3,000 (125)

4,000 (208)

1,000 -

36,000

72,000

72,000

96,000

-

3,003 33,330 445

40,396 33,330 890

41,846 33,330 1,335

44,637 52,530 1,245

65,327 52,530 2,490

NET CURRENT ASSETS

1,000

(778)

(2,616)

(4,511)

(2,412)

TOTAL NET ASSETS

1,000

201

(679)

(1,636)

CAPITAL & RESERVES Capital Retained Earnings

1,000 -

1,000 (799)

1,000 (1,679)

1,000

201

(679)

CURRENT ASSETS Bank Trade Debtors CREDITORS DUE < 1 YEAR Bank Trade Creditors Other Creditors

5,000 (312)

Jun-21

Jul-21

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

6,000 (438)

7,000 (583)

8,000 (750)

9,000 (938)

10,000 (1,146)

11,000 (1,375)

12,000 (1,625)

120,000 120,0000

132,000

144,000

144,000

156,000

168,000

168,000

62,043 52,530 3,735

62,489 62,130 1,645

68,810 61,130 3,290

63,132 62,130 4,935

62,380 71,730 2,045

66,298 71,730 4,090

58,209 71,730 6,135

(347)

1,692

5,736

9,770

13,803

19,845

25,882

31,926

1,380

4,341

7,254

12,153

17,020

21,865

28,699

35,507

42,301

1,000 (2,636)

1,000 380

1,000 3,341

1,000 6,254

1,000 11,153

1,000 16,020

1,000 20,865

1,000 27,699

1,000 34,507

1,000 41,301

(1,636)

1,380

4,341

7,254

12,153

17,020

21,865

28,699

35,507

42,301


Taxation u

Corporation tax u

Charged annually taxable profits at 19%

u

Payable 9 months and 1 day after year end

u

Filing deadline 12 months after year end

u

Taxable profits are not the same as accounts profits u Add

backs

u Capital

u

allowances / depreciation

Corporation tax losses can be carried forward


Taxation u

u

VAT u

Standard VAT rate is 20%

u

Quarterly (or monthly) online VAT return filing

u

Payable 1 month and 7 days after VAT return period end

Payroll taxes u

PAYE/NIC deducted from employees

u

Monthly online filing (RTI)

u

Payable on 22nd of month following payroll

u

Auto enrolment


Tax issues for start ups u

Getting yourself investment ready u

Enterprise Investment Scheme u Income u Gains

exempt from CGT if disposed after 3 years

u Losses

u

tax relief on investment at 30%

on sale of shares are eligible for income tax relief

Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme u Income u Gains

tax relief on investment at 50%

exempt from CGT if disposed after 3 years

u Losses

on sale of shares are eligible for income tax relief


Tax issues for start ups u

u

Incentives for innovation u

R&D tax credits

u

Patent box

Other considerations u

Extraction of profits and dividends

u

EMI schemes

u

Entrepreneurs relief

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