Page 1

annual report 2011

Renaissance renewing the liberal arts at boston college

chestnut hill, massachusetts 02467


produced by the office of marketing communications 9/2011 editor: Maureen Dezell writer: William Bole art director: Christine Hagg designer: Kristen Patterson photography: Gary Wayne Gilbert printed by: UniGraphic, Inc., Woburn, MA


annual report 2011

Renaissance renewing the liberal arts at boston college

TABLE OF CONTENTS

2 | From the President William P. Leahy, S.J.

4 | Growth Pattern Six programs that took place during the spring 2011 semester are evidence of Boston College’s ambitions in the liberal arts, and of the influence of a new entrepreneurial center

18 | From the Chair William J. Geary ’80

19 | Year in Review 26 | Financial Report 29 | Statistical and Financial Highlights 30 | Board of Trustees


From the President

I

n the mid-16th century, when the Society of Jesus began to found schools, one model of education originating in medieval universities stressed professional education in law, theology, and medicine, with a grounding in science, mathematics, and philosophy. A second approach, evident in Renaissance humanistic academies, favored literature, drama, and rhetoric, with the goal of developing the human spirit as well as the mind. The first Jesuit educators regarded these approaches “as complementary,” the historian John W. O’Malley, S.J., has written. According to O’Malley, Jesuit education succeeded because it formed itself around these two models, which together make up the liberal arts.

Today, the liberal arts perform several important functions in undergraduate education. At a time when learning is often fragmented into disciplines that do not relate to one another, the liberal arts offer a way of viewing the whole of human experience and knowledge, liberating students who might otherwise have been constrained in their growth by specialization. Additionally, the liberal arts challenge students to discover their intellectual passions and personal gifts. Exposed to a core curriculum, an essential feature of Jesuit education, many students who enter college discover their true interests or calling through exposure to knowledge and disciplines they had not previously experienced.

2 boston college | annual report 2011


In particular, faced with an uncertain economy, some students now feel compelled to quickly select a major course of study and a career path. But the message of Jesuit education is: Take time. Find your gifts. Listen to your deepest desires and test them. Then make your decisions. A vibrant liberal arts community gives students encouragement and opportunity for exploration and discernment about the program of studies right for them. Students of the liberal arts develop methods of learning and of expressing themselves in writing. As a history major, I learned ways of evaluating evidence, analyzing arguments, and making judgments that have served me well as a researcher, writer, teacher, and administrator. Students who graduate from college with a sense of who they are, a method of learning, and an ability to speak and write effectively are equipped to succeed, regardless of their particular major or career choice. And in an age when, we are told, individuals are likely to switch occupations several times over the course of their working lives, a solid grounding in the liberal arts is a significant asset because it offers a way of approaching life and work that is flexible and adaptive. In undertaking the liberal arts initiatives chronicled in these pages, Boston College invites students not only to gain knowledge and skills, but to ask themselves: What is it that I believe? What is it that I cherish? What is my relationship to others, and to God? What are my responsibilities in my community and in society? These are the kinds of questions that Jesuit schools have been inviting students to contemplate since the Society of Jesus opened its first schools more than 450 years ago.

william p. leahy, s.j. President

annual annualreport report2011 2011 || boston bostoncollege college 3


Growth Pattern Six programs that took place during the spring 2011 semester are evidence of Boston College’s ambitions in the liberal arts, and of the influence of a new entrepreneurial center By William Bole By William Bole when boston college unveiled its $1.5 billion Capital Campaign in October 2008, it announced seven strategic directions, previously ratified by the Board of Trustees, that would guide the University’s growth. Among them was a commitment to become a national leader in liberal arts education. “In the classic tradition, training in the seven liberal arts had the goal of educating an individual intellectually and spiritually to make reasoned and virtuous choices in his or her life,” Provost Cutberto Garza noted at the time. “Today’s liberal arts education needs to be redesigned to accommodate a world in which biology shades into ethics, literature into history, and politics into economics.” Fundamental to the redesign was the establishment of the Institute for the Liberal Arts, charged with coordinating 21st-century responses to an idea of learning that first flourished in the Renaissance but is ultimately rooted in the wisdom of classical antiquity. According to its first director, David Quigley (who is now the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences), the ILA is a University-wide program designed to “strengthen and encourage the liberal arts through interdisciplinary inquiry and interest, which from a practical perspective means that it will offer funding and administrative support to faculty who


From left, Brown University Professor Emeritus David Konstan with fellow Brown classicist Pura Nieto, Melissa Grasso ’12, and George Evangjeli ’14 at a symposium on the literary, mythological, and scientific aspects of dreams.

come up with practical, innovative proposals for programs that are going to fortify liberal education at Boston College.” Now directed by Mary Crane, Thomas Rattigan Professor of English, the ILA presented its first full slate of programs during the 2010–11 academic year, making its mark as an incubator of courses and programs that augment undergraduate curriculum, enrich intellectual life, and encourage imaginative thinking about the liberal arts. “Reinventing the liberal arts means fostering interdisciplinary work that bridges the gap between the liberal arts and the professional schools, and enhances liberal arts education for all BC students,” says Crane. As sponsor or co-sponsor of approximately 35 conferences, public lectures, seminars, symposia, artist residencies, film screenings, and other projects, the “ILA has created a space for scholars to think about shared interests unlike any that has existed before at Boston College,” according to Quigley. “Outside of the course curriculum and faculty scholarship, it’s become the central engine for advancing liberal arts on the Heights.” The following essay touches on six programs brought to life by the ILA in the spring semester of 2011.

annual annualreport report2011 2011 | | boston bostoncollege college 5


I.

dreams team

on a raw day in may 2011, three guests of Boston College—a classicist, a neuroscientist, and a psychoanalyst—crossed Beacon Street in Chestnut Hill, along with a half-dozen Boston College students and faculty. They had all just emerged from 10 Stone Avenue, the Tudor Revival home of the University’s Institute for the Liberal Arts, where the visitors had conducted small-group discussions on the nature of dreams with some 15 undergraduate students selected from two advanced Latin seminars and an introductory neuroscience course. Ambling through a late-day drizzle, the group headed toward McGuinn 121 for a Q&A with more than 200 students in the neuroscience course—to be followed that evening by a public forum in Higgins 300 on the topic “The Meaning of Dreams in a Scientific Age.” Assembled by Daniel Harris-McCoy, a visiting professor in classics, the “dreams team,” as he referred to it, consisted of Harvard University neuroscientist Allan Hobson, Brown University classicist David Konstan, and Jungian psychoanalyst William Ventimiglia of

Cambridge, Mass. The theme for the day, with roots in the Bible and ancient Greece, was the effect neuroscience has had on one of our most ancient concerns: where our dreams come from and what they mean. The evening program offered a striking sample of contrasting perspectives on a subject that was dominated through most of the 20th century by Freudian dream theory—a foundation all the speakers agreed was crumbling, if not already collapsed. “There is no evidence or support for what Sigmund Freud thought about dreams,” said Hobson during his evening talk. He described Freudian dream theory as “speculation, not science.” Hobson also presented findings suggesting, for instance, that people have trouble recalling their dreams not because they are trying to repress frightful memories, as Freud supposed, but because the brain modulators that enable memory are mostly shut down during sleep. Beliefs and theories about what dreams “mean” have evolved dramatically since antiquity, said Konstan, when the Greeks believed that dreams were messages from the gods and foretold the future. Evidence indicates that ancient Greeks recounted their dreams in a linear


and logical fashion, much like the speeches they heard in the Athenian agora, and in contrast to the bizarre and fantastic dreaming that moderns take for granted, Konstan added. The content of dreams, he said, may be “culturally determined,” with Greek epiphanic visions replaced by the sort of episodic dreams that dominated Western literature in the 18th and 19th centuries, before Freudian interpretation radically changed cultural expectations about dreams and what we say they mean. Ventimiglia, the Jungian therapist, argued forcefully that dreams still have meaning for the dreamer, but he and his colleagues agreed that the meanings are not as esoteric as either Jung or Freud believed. As Hobson put it, dreams are “stories about me,“ which invite reflection upon one’s own life. “The characteristic goal of liberal arts education is to engage individuals in pursuits that ultimately surprise, that awaken,” says Quigley, the former ILA director. “You do that when you take classics majors familiar with the dream-obsessed Greeks and bring them up against cognitive science, and when you introduce scientists to current theory about dreams as manifestations of personality.”

George Evangjeli ’14, one of those classics majors, sat with three other students and Konstan in a corner of a conference room at 10 Stone Avenue, and did some dream analysis. Evangjeli, who is from Boston, recounted a dream he had a few nights earlier in which he was standing in McElroy Commons, talking with a woman he had recently dated, but was not able to hear her voice or his own. Two female students in the group asked about the general quality of communication he had had with the woman before the dream. Evangjeli blushed, and then looked skeptical. He explained after the discussion, “I’m not really convinced that dreams have any meaning.” He added, however, that as a classics major he was interested in historical perspectives on human dreaming and wanted to hear about the science and psychology as well. “That’s why I came here,” he said. “This is unusual,” Ventimiglia observed that afternoon as he wended his way toward the Middle Campus with Hobson and Konstan. The Jungian was referring generally to the interaction among people of such diverging disciplines. “We don’t talk to each other frequently enough,” he said. “And we should.”

Opposite and above left: Audience members at “The Meaning of Dreams in a Scientific Age.” Above right: From left, Jungian psychoanalyst William Ventimiglia, classicist David Konstan, and Harvard University neuroscientist Allan Hobson.

annual annualreport report2011 2011 || boston bostoncollege college 7


II.

is a departure from most economics courses, which tend to be theory-oriented, says Crane, the ILA director. on an afternoon in late march, InterEager to expose undergraduates to the stellar assembly national Monetary Fund economist Ayhan in the series, the ILA organized and funded it as a oneKose crisscrossed the front of a lecture hall in Devlin credit spring semester course for undergraduates. “This Hall, gesturing broadly as he made a case that the seminar brings in practitioners from all over the world economies of emerging-market nations experiencing and students and faculty from a variety of departments. rapid industrial growth—such as Turkey, Brazil, Poland, It’s interdisciplinary, it’s global, and it enriches the curSouth Korea, and South Africa—are “decoupling” from riculum,” says Crane. advanced economies such as that of the United States. In the lecture hall, Kose called for discussion. “What The trend was underscored during the recent Western does this structural change mean for the global [ecofinancial crisis, when emerging markets kept chugging nomic] cycle?” he asked. His question hung over a room along while the West faltered, contended Kose. that looked and sounded much like the world itself, Kose’s lecture was one of eight offered during the with accents that spanned the globe from the Far East to spring by the International Economic Policy and Political Eastern Europe. A young Russian student argued that Economy Seminar. The series, conceived and coordinatthe “decoupling” seems less a fact of economic life than ed by Associate Professor of Economics Fabio Ghironi, a transient symptom of the recent Western meltdown. brings prominent representatives and practitioners from The guest speaker held his ground. “It’s a slow-going, finance, political science, and international affairs to structural change. It hasn’t happened overnight,” Kose campus for face-to-face lectures, seminars, and discusnoted. Then he asked, “Thirty years from now, will we be sions with students and faculty. asking if the United States has decoupled from China?” The seminar, which covers such matters as monetary Conversation was at the heart of the seminar. union in Europe and global greenhouse-gas emissions, Before his afternoon talk, Kose met individually with a

economic stimulation

International Monetary Fund economist and guest lecturer Ayhan Kose consults with Xiaoping Chen (left) and Alessandro Barattieri (far right), both graduate students in economics.

“This seminar brings in practitioners from all over the world and students and faculty from a variety of departments. It’s interdisciplinary, it’s global, and it enriches the curriculum.” — MARY CRANE

8 boston college | annual report 2011


half-dozen Ph.D. students in economics to offer guidance on their dissertation topics, then had lunch with graduate and undergraduate students. When his lecture ended, he headed to dinner at a local restaurant with six students and Ghironi. Dinner conversation ranged from opportunities in finance and in graduate school to fertility rates in Western Europe. Noting that his dinner companions included a fellow Turk, an Italian, an Indian, a Brazilian, a Chinese-born Canadian, and an American, Kose smiled and said, “All of the players are here. We could have a conversation about global [trade] imbalances.” And they did.

III.

contact lens

founded in 2009 to promote interdisciplinary study of constitutional government, Boston College’s Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy is well-versed in the conventional ways of exploring government. The center during the past academic year offered a series of public lectures and forums on immigration and national security. But in April, with the co-sponsorship of the ILA,

the Clough Center turned a different sort of focus on the often-overlooked workings of state legislatures, presenting a screening of the 2006 documentary State Legislature, by the renowned documentary-maker Frederick Wiseman. The octogenarian director was on hand to greet visitors and lead an after-film discussion in the Cushing lecture hall. Celebrated since the 1967 release of his groundbreaking Titicut Follies, which exposed the maltreatment of inmate patients at the Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, Wiseman has made more than 30 full-length feature films. He has explored American institutions in such films as High School (1968), Hospital (1969), Basic Training (1971), and Public Housing (1997). State Legislature trains an unblinking eye on yet another institution, this time in Idaho’s capital city of Boise. Like most ILA programs, the screening, which began at 10 a.m., had a goal of bringing in students and faculty from divergent disciplines. Among some 30 filmgoers who turned up was Katherine Galle ’11, a history major with a minor in American Studies, who said she came out on a Saturday morning in April (two days before she was to run the Boston Marathon) to get a filmmaker’s


forthcoming ila events 2011–12 ILA Symposium Science in the Liberal Arts University: Why It Matters to Us All–october A daylong symposium featuring guest speakers Brian Greene, Columbia University professor of mathematics and physics; Elizabeth Kolbert, The New Yorker; Steven Pinker, Harvard University professor of psychology;and Siva Vaidhyanathan, University of Virginia professor of media studies and law.

Practicing Plenitude: Cutting-Edge Lifestyles for People and Planet–october A two-day conference for ethnographers from Boston College and around the country. Cosponsored by the Chicago-based Center for Humans and Nature.

Celebration of Tomás Luis de Victoria–october Four concerts and a symposium celebrating the Jesuit composer Tomás Luis de Victoria, organized by music department chair Michael Noone. Part of the Jesuits in Music Series.

Charles Homer Haskins Society Annual Conference–november Medievalists and scholars of Viking, Anglo-Saxon, AngloNorman, and Angevin history convene yearly at Boston College for the Haskins Society conference, named for the historian who pioneered the study of medieval culture as an autonomous field.

International Economic Policy and Political Economy seminar–fall/spring Continuation of weekly seminars with top economics practitioners and policymakers such as George Akerlof, University of California Berkeley professor of economics and 2001 Nobel laureate in Economics, and Harvard professor of economics N. Gregory Mankiw.

Junot Diaz: Writer Residence–february Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao will lecture, give a public reading, teach, and meet with creative writing students, faculty, and Latino groups during a three-day residency.

James Joyce Events–april Weekly meetings of the Boston College Finnegans Wake reading group, Raidin the Wake, Boston Joyce Forum lectures, and conferences including “Joyce and Religion,” a multi-disciplinary seminar.

Forgotten Chapters/Boston Literary History 1790–1860–spring/summer Experimental course linked to an exhibition that goes on display at the Boston Public Library and the Massachusetts Historical Society in the spring and summer of 2012. Students will help design the exhibition. For more information,

www.bc.edu/ila

perspective on a topic related to her academic interests. Diana Araujo, an English major who would graduate a month later from the Woods College of Advancing Studies, was a documentary film buff who had already seen most of Wiseman’s other documentaries. She talked with the director about a paper she had written on his work. Clough Center Director Ken Kersch, an associate professor of political science, introduced Wiseman, who has thin, curly hair, a slight build, and a soft voice. He stepped to the podium and said, “I don’t like to say much before a film. I like to let the film speak for itself.” And the 217-minute documentary began speaking.

“There is almost no aspect of human behavior that a state does not regulate or is not asked to regulate.” — FREDERICK WISEMAN There is no narrator or background music in the Wiseman film, and he leaves it to the viewer to draw links and come to judgments. State Legislature captures a hallway conversation between a lawmaker and a pro-immigration activist about a proposal to let undocumented workers drive legally in the state. Later in the film, in the State Capitol rotunda, Mexican-American schoolchildren in folk costume are shown clicking their heels in syncopation to mariachi music, performing a traditional dance. Using his principal tool, a lightweight 16-millimeter camera, Wiseman spied moments like these for three months in hearing rooms, offices, and other corners of the Capitol building. He spent another 11 months editing the work. His approach was to limn the democratic process, not the legislative outcomes in that particular state. “It’s about Idaho, but it could be about almost anywhere,“ John Louis, a first-year master’s student in political science, said after the screening. Wiseman’s portrayal of the lawmakers in Boise, who meet from January to mid-March, is respectful. “I was quite moved by the complexity of the vast array of issues they had to deal with,” he told the audience afterward. “There is almost no aspect of human behavior that a state does not regulate or is not asked to regulate,” Wiseman added, alluding to scenes that caught debates over mad cow disease, the definition of marriage, second-hand smoke, video voyeurism, and regulations for the practice of acupuncture. “These people have enormous control over our lives, but most of us don’t pay any attention to it.”


In the hour-long discussion after the screening, Wiseman articulated what the history major had come looking for—an artistic sensibility that speaks to a truth about politics and its paradoxes. “I am interested in complexity. I am interested in ambiguity,” he explained when asked about his treatment of subjects. “And I’m not the first to realize that these exist in great abundance.”

A Boston College scholar of post-war Germany who teaches an undergraduate class titled Human Rights as History, Pendas says he had found that when he talked with colleagues at Boston College and elsewhere about human rights, “religion kept coming up.” He proposed to the ILA a “serious investigation into the evolving relationship between human rights and religion that looks at religion as a source of human rights; a human right; and a cause of human rights violations.” The conference—a classic scholar’s confab that drew boston college is striving to political scientists, theologians, sociologists, and other improve but also to redefine the liberal arts, faculty from institutions such as Yale, Duke, Princeton, says Crane. As part of that rethinking, the University is and the University of Chicago, as well as several univerhighlighting the contributions that research and learnsities abroad—ranged across the Christian Democratic ing can make to the advancement of social justice. This movement in post-war Europe, the rights of women in focus, Crane points out, draws inspiration from the Islamic societies, and the role that religion and human Jesuit tradition of service and addresses “the spiritual as rights have played in American foreign policy. well as the material well-being” of people and societies. The religious intellectual framework for the gathering On a weekend in April, a diverse collection of more was set by theologians such as David Hollenbach, S.J., than two dozen scholars from almost as many universi- University Chair in Human Rights and International ties converged on the Heights to explore the religious Justice, who chaired a session titled “Freedom of dimensions of a signature social concern: human rights. Religion as a Human Right” and underlined the place The two-day seminar, Human Rights and Religion in of human rights in contemporary Catholic social teachHistorical Perspective, was conceived and coordinated ing, particularly with regard to the dignity of the human by History Professor Devin O. Pendas, and funded by person. An overarching theme of the gathering was the the ILA. “historiography of human rights,” which, in the view of

IV.

faith based

At the conference on the religious dimensions of human rights, Perin Gurel, Yale University graduate fellow (left) and Timothy James, assistant professor of history and humanities, University of South Carolina at Beaufort. Right: Boston College Associate Professor of History Seth Jacobs (right) with Cambridge University Professor of History Andrew Preston.

annual annual report report 2011 2011 || boston boston college college 11


several presenters, has taken inadequate account of religion as a source of ideas and action in this area. Holding sessions in a small windowless room in 21 Campanella Way, the scholars cast steady light on unheralded figures and little-appreciated episodes of recent history. A Saturday afternoon session on human rights, religion, and U.S. foreign policy, for example, focused on the part played by one man in making human rights a foreign policy priority: the late Jesuit priest Robert Drinan, a five-term congressman from Massachusetts (1971–81) who had formerly served as dean of Boston College Law School. In a presentation titled “The Human Rights Crusade of Father Robert F. Drinan,” Andrew Preston, senior lecturer in history at Cambridge University, surveyed the priest’s broad-based defense of human rights, in particular his advocacy of religious liberties. Though Drinan’s leadership in the human rights movement was well known in the 1970s, Preston pointed out, the Jesuit is scarcely acknowledged in academic histories of human rights. Citing the cause of Soviet Jewry as a prime example, Preston remarked, “Drinan was everywhere on this issue” at that time, “but is mentioned nowhere in the historical literature.” The historian added that on this and other

human rights issues, “he’s been totally forgotten” by other academic historians of that subject and period. In general, according to Preston, secular scholars often overlook religious contributions to social and political life. On those few occasions when historians acknowledge religion’s role in human rights policies of the era, they tend to emphasize the evangelical Protestant influences, according to William Steding of University College in Cork, Ireland, whose seminar presentation, “Jimmy Carter’s Evangelical Mission: Human Rights,” focused on the former President’s groundbreaking 1978 declaration that human rights would be a central focus of his administration, “the soul of our foreign policy.” Among critical ideas that emerged from the conference was an awareness that religion has been an “essential element in the development of human rights ideas and policies, certainly throughout the 20th century,” Pendas says. (He and other participants are quick to observe, however, that secular notions deriving from the Enlightenment were among other indispensable sources of human rights concern.) Pendas has asked conference contributors to expand their papers and presentations into longer treatments that take into account questions raised at the gathering, which will be offered as a collection to a major university press.


V.

harmonic convergence

on an evening in late march, students trickled into a classroom in Lyons as Kayleigh Dudevoir ’11, wrote the names of two Italian Renaissance songs–Orazio Vecchi’s “Il Bianco e Dolce Cigno” and “Lasciatemi Morire,” by Claudio Monteverdi—on a blackboard. Dudevoir is the founder of the Madrigal Singers of Boston College, a 14-member student-run ensemble made up almost entirely of non-music-majors who sing for the love of the art form. Encouraged by faculty adviser and linguistics Professor Michael J. Connolly, with University funding for Renaissance-era costumes and occasional travel expenses, the troupe has performed during the Christmas season at Rockefeller Center in Manhattan and Boston’s Prudential Center, and at various campus events. Robert Duggan ’11, a philosophy major who served as artistic director and conducted the ensemble, had stepped aside that evening so students could work on two 16th-century vocal music compositions under the baton of Scott Metcalfe, director of Blue Heron Renaissance Choir, who was teaching the fifth and final session of a master class with the young vocalists. The University’s artist-in-residence for the 2010–11

academic year, the Boston-based Blue Heron is widely considered one of the brightest lights in the city’s stellar early music scene. The ensemble drew praise recently from Alex Ross of The New Yorker, who lauded their “imaginative realization” of Renaissance polyphony and the stunning “contrasts of ethereal and earthly timbres” in their performance. As it happens, Dudevoir, a linguistics major and Massachusetts native who founded the Madrigals as a freshman, has long been a fan of Blue Heron. “It was absolutely wild for me” to get this opportunity, she says. Dressed in jeans and a sweatshirt, casual and friendly in his interactions with the students, Metcalfe urged the young singers to “access your inner Italian.” Standing in a circle holding sheet music, they laughed but listened as he continued, explaining that learning vocal music is not just about projection and intonation. “Some of the R’s are rolled, and some are not, in Italian. The energy is in the vowel, and the consonants are quite expressive,” he said, using an elaborate hand gesture to emphasize the “ir” in the grim word “morire,” part of Monteverdi’s madrigal (known to English-speaking audiences as “Let Me Die”). Most of the five coaching sessions the Madrigals spent with Metcalfe focused on improving their intonation,

Opposite: From left, Louie Fantini ’14, Jonathan Mott ’14, and Scott Metcalfe, director of the Blue Heron Renaissance Choir. Above left: From left, Katie Ring ’14, Katie Weintraub ’12, and Jamie McGregor ’13. Right: Metcalfe with Madrigal Singers artistic director Robert Duggan ’11.

annual annual report report 2011 2011 || boston boston college college 13


or the precision of notes they sing, and ear training, according to Dudevoir. At around 9:30 p.m., after nearly two hours of singing at what was the final rehearsal with Metcalfe, the six male and eight female singers became a bit chatty and Dudevoir said, “Everybody listen up. This is the last time we’ll see Scott.” Metcalfe looked surprised, saying, “I thought we were going out for ice cream.” They did, at the end of the semester. Sponsored by the ILA, the Heron musicians were artists in residence on campus for weeklong residencies in the fall and the spring semesters. Each time, they offered music lessons, worked with student choral groups, and held a series of concerts, rehearsals, workshops, and master classes organized by the Music Department. During his visits to classes in Medieval and Renaissance choral music during the spring semester, Metcalfe lectured on the Spanish Jesuit composer Tomas Luis de Victoria (1548–1611), and the challenges of performing his works today. In mid-March, Blue Heron commemorated the 400th anniversary of the death of the Spanish Renaissance composer, performing a free concert in St. Mary’s Chapel that featured Victoria’s six-voice “Requiem Mass.” The concert was a centerpiece of the Blue Heron spring residency, but not

the centerpiece, Music Department Chair Michael Noone stresses. “The artist-in-residence program is so much more than simply inviting professional groups to BC for one-off concerts,” he explains. “The whole concept is about a continuing relationship with our students.”

VI.

musings

amanda leahy ’11 sat by herself at the back of the Murray Function Room in Yawkey Center, wearing a gray summer dress on an unexpectedly wet, cold April day. Holding a hot cup of coffee with both hands, she scanned a single page that rested in her lap, moving her lips as she silently rehearsed lines of a poem she would read at that day’s 2011 Greater Boston Intercollegiate Poetry Festival. An English major from Lowell, Mass., Leahy was Boston College’s 2011 “entry” at the annual festival, a celebration of undergraduate creativity at 20 local colleges that drew an audience of 300 this year. English professor and festival coordinator Suzanne Matson had chosen her from among students in an advanced poetry writing class. She had never read her poetry to any public wider than the literary workshops in which she had participated.

At the Greater Boston Intercollegiate Poetry Festival: From left, soldierpoet Brian Turner; Amanda Leahy ’11; Suzanne Matson, English department chair; Skye Shirley ’10. Center: Noemi Paz, student at Pine Manor College. Opposite: Turner and Matson with writing students at a Q&A with the poet.

“Just take a deep breath. It’s no big deal,” Turner told the younger poet, adding, “The hardest part is over.” That is, she’d written the poem.

14 boston college | annual report 2011


“I’m excited. I’m a little nervous,” Leahy acknowledged. Then Matson approached, took her student by the hand, and led her to the center aisle of Murray to meet the evening’s special guest, poet Brian Turner. A serious man with short hair and a thick frame, the 43-year-old Turner attended community college in his hometown of Fresno, Calif. He went on to the state university there, then earned an M.F.A. from the University of Oregon, and went abroad to teach English. In 1999, he began a seven-year career with the U.S. Army, including one year as an infantry team leader in Iraq, where he wrote poems and carried a favorite, “Here, Bullet,” in a Ziploc bag he kept in his left chest pocket. That became the title poem in his celebrated 2005 debut poetry collection, a New York Times Editors’ Choice selection that year. “Just take a deep breath. It’s no big deal,” Turner told the younger poet, adding, “The hardest part is over.” That is, she’d written the poem. The poetry festival, which dates to the late 1980s, rotated for a while among Boston-area campuses, took a hiatus, then found a permanent home in 2006 in Chestnut Hill, where it is sponsored by Boston College Magazine and Poetry Days, the English Department’s annual celebration of the art form.

“What the ILA can do for artist-in-residency programs such as this one, that are already successful,” says Crane, the ILA director, “is to use some of our resources to boost what’s otherwise possible, increasing the audience or the scope of the program.” In this case, the Lowell Humanities Series, which is supported by the ILA, booked Turner for a lecture, then took the opportunity to partner with the student poetry programs. During the student readings, Turner sat in the front row, his arms folded, a look of steady interest and intensity on his face. He talked with students and guests for almost an hour afterward about their work and ideas. Turner said he has been invited to read his work at many universities recently, but “seldom in such a relaxing environment” where he could spend time with students and faculty. He had done that earlier in the day at Hovey House, where he recalled some of his wartime experiences and took part in a question-and-answer session with approximately 30 students and faculty members. Taking her turn at the podium that evening, Leahy read “Variations of a theme by,” (“When I think of Wordsworth, it is: /—Are you heading west? And / Was it for this?”) without missing a beat. She drew whistles and applause from a crowd that included friends, relatives, and scores of fellow poets.


afterword THE NATIONAL CONTEXT FOR LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION boston college is not the only institution seeking to revivify its liberal arts tradition. At a time when laments about the “crisis of the humanities” (and declining enrollments in those areas) have become commonplace on campuses, some universities are reasserting the value of the liberal arts, recognizing anew the intellectual inquiry and investigation these disciplines encourage and the perspectives they bring to a host of contemporary concerns. For example, Duke University recently launched a Humanities Writ Large initiative, funded with a $6 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Among other strategies, Duke intends to expand its “humanities labs,” which bring together scholars of various disciplines within and beyond the university, with a view toward a better understanding of challenges ranging from global health to democratic movements in the Middle East.

third, the ILA hopes to ultimately involve the professional schools and professional education.” Boston College’s professional schools are thinking expansively about the liberal arts as well. In the most extensive restructuring of its core curriculum in more than 30 years, the Carroll School of Management has unveiled a revised core aimed at encouraging management students to cast more deeply into the liberal arts while pursuing the requirements of a management concentration. Under the new program of study, which will first affect students who enter as freshmen in 2012, undergraduates who choose to major or minor in a subject offered through the College of Arts and Sciences will be able to opt out of one or two core requirements at the Carroll School. For the first time in nearly two decades, the College of Arts and Sciences is reviewing its own core curriculum—the essence of the Boston College undergraduate experience in the liberal arts. Philosophy Professor Arthur Madigan, S.J., director of the core program, is leading the effort, which is currently considering quesMARY CRANE tions such as whether core classes are adequately challenging Boston College students (whose caliber, based on test scores and other quantitative measures, has risen noticeably in recent years). Separately, the A&S Honors program, which emphasizes the classics of Western thought and interdisciplinary study in small, seminar-style classes, is also under review. Dean Quigley says he hopes that the honors program approach to teaching and learning will serve as a model for an increasing number of A&S classes offered to all undergraduates. But the ILA will remain the principal incubator of ideas about improving and expanding the liberal arts at Boston College, says Quigley, who expects that the experiences and discussions under ILA auspices will ultimately help guide Boston College in “reimagining the core curriculum.” The ILA will organize and facilitate faculty discussion of the core curriculum—in Arts and Sciences and across the University—during Boston College’s Sesquicentennial Year. At that time, says Crane, “we will use our resources to bring faculty together to talk about what the core should look like over BC’s next 150 years.” ✵

“While many schools are placing new emphasis on the humanities, the ILA’s ambitions are broader.” — At Dartmouth, the three-year-old Daniel Webster Project for Ancient and Modern Studies, a faculty initiative, aims to bring both academic spheres to bear on issues of pressing moral and political importance. Much like the ILA, (though it has never been officially reviewed, endorsed, or rejected by Dartmouth College), the program sponsors lectures, conferences, and scholarly collaborations. At Harvard, a controversial multiyear effort to reform and expand the core curriculum, with emphasis on ethical, cultural, religious, and global studies, was approved in modified form in 2007. Many at Boston College feel that the University is particularly well-positioned to assume a leadership role in the broader efforts to renew the liberal arts, according to Crane, who points to three key advantages. “First, we have the Jesuit, Catholic tradition; the historic importance of the liberal arts in Jesuit education, and the emphasis on developing the whole person and making a difference in society,” she says. “Second, while many schools are placing new emphasis on the humanities, the ILA’s ambitions are broader. We are trying to bring the liberal arts together with the sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences. And

16 boston college | annual report 2011


afterword the national context for liberal arts education boston college is not the only institution seeking to revivify its liberal arts tradition. At a time when laments about the “crisis of the humanities” (and declining enrollments in those areas) have become commonplace on campuses, some universities are reasserting the value of the liberal arts, recognizing anew the intellectual inquiry and investigation these disciplines encourage and the perspectives they bring to a host of contemporary concerns. For example, Duke University recently launched a Humanities Writ Large initiative, funded with a $6 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Among other strategies, Duke intends to expand its “humanities labs,” which bring together scholars of various disciplines within and beyond the university, with a view toward a better understanding of challenges ranging from global health to democratic movements in the Middle East. At Dartmouth, the three-year-old Daniel Webster Project for Ancient and Modern Studies, a faculty initiative, aims to bring both academic spheres to bear on issues of pressing moral and political importance. Much like the ILA, (though it has never been officially reviewed, endorsed, or rejected by Dartmouth College), the program sponsors lectures, conferences, and scholarly collaborations. At Harvard, a controversial multiyear effort to reform and expand the core curriculum, with emphasis on ethical, cultural, religious, and global studies, was approved in modified form in 2007. Many at Boston College feel that the University is particularly well-positioned to assume a leadership role in the broader efforts to renew the liberal arts, according to Crane, who points to three key advantages. “First, we have the Jesuit, Catholic tradition; the historic importance of the liberal arts in Jesuit education, and the emphasis on developing the whole person and making a difference in society,” she says. “Second, while many schools are placing new emphasis on the humanities, the ILA’s ambitions are broader. We are trying to bring the liberal arts together with the sciences, the humanities, and the social sci-

ences. And third, the ILA hopes to ultimately involve the professional schools and professional education.” Boston College’s professional schools are thinking expansively about the liberal arts as well. In the most extensive restructuring of its core curriculum in more than 30 years, the Carroll School of Management has unveiled a revised core aimed at encouraging management students to cast more deeply into the liberal arts while pursuing the requirements of a management concentration. Under the new program of study, which will first affect students who enter as freshmen in 2012, undergraduates who choose to major or minor in a subject offered through the College of Arts and Sciences will be able to opt out of one or two core requirements at the Carroll School. For the first time in nearly two decades, the College of Arts and Sciences is reviewing its own core curriculum—the essence of the Boston College undergraduate experience in the liberal arts. Philosophy Professor Arthur Madigan, S.J., director of the core program, is leading the effort, which is currently considering questions such as whether core classes are adequately challenging Boston College students (whose caliber, based on test scores and other quantitative measures, has risen noticeably in recent years). Separately, the A&S Honors program, which emphasizes the classics of Western thought and interdisciplinary study in small, seminar-style classes, is also under review. Dean Quigley says he hopes that the honors program approach to teaching and learning will serve as a model for an increasing number of A&S classes offered to all undergraduates. But the ILA will remain the principal incubator of ideas about improving and expanding the liberal arts at Boston College, says Quigley, who expects that the experiences and discussions under ILA auspices will ultimately help guide Boston College in “reimagining the core curriculum.” The ILA will organize and facilitate faculty discussion of the core curriculum—in Arts and Sciences and across the University—during Boston College’s Sesquicentennial Year. At that time, says Crane, “we

annual report 2011 | boston college 17


From the Chair

I

t is my pleasure to share with you the University’s annual report for 2010–11, titled Renaissance: Renewing the Liberal Arts at Boston College. The report focuses on Boston College’s commitment to the liberal arts by highlighting six programs sponsored by the Institute for the Liberal Arts (ILA), a University-wide center charged with strengthening the liberal arts. The ILA demonstrates Boston College’s commitment to becoming a national leader in liberal arts education—one of the strategic directions guiding the University’s $1.5 billion Light the World capital campaign. The campaign also allows the opportunity to develop a model student formation program, as well as research initiatives in select sciences and in areas addressing urgent social concerns, leadership in our graduate and professional schools, and international programs and partnerships. And it furthers Boston College’s ambition to become the world’s leading Catholic university and theological center.

As I conclude my term as Chair of the Board of Trustees, please know that it has been a true privilege to serve our University, alumni, and friends. I am so proud of Boston College, its administration, faculty, and students, and their collective pursuit of excellence in higher education, service to others, and accomplishments in the world. On behalf of my fellow present and past Trustees, thank you for your love, enthusiasm, and support of our great University.

william j. geary ’80 Chair Boston College Board of Trustees

18 boston college | annual report 2011


Year in Review academic affairs The University conferred 2,397 undergraduate and 1,871 advanced degrees, including 127 doctorates. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood spoke at the 135th Commencement, where he received an honorary doctorate in public administration. Ann M. Davis, vice chairman of New Balance Athletic Shoe Inc., and managing trustee of the New Balance Charitable Foundation; New Balance Athletic Shoe Chairman James S. Davis; Senior Vice President James P. McIntyre ’57, M.Ed. ’61, Ed.D. ’67; and Sylvia Q. Simmons, M.Ed ’62, Ph.D. ’90, retired president of the American Student Assistance Program, also received honorary doctorates. Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Roderick L. Ireland addressed the 286 J.D. and 15 LL.M. graduates of the Law School. Fourteen graduating seniors received Fulbright Awards. Anne Kornahrens ’11 became the first Boston College student to win a Skaggs-Oxford Scholarship, a five-year joint Ph.D./D.Phil. program at Scripps Research Institute and the University of Oxford. Christopher Sheridan ’12 was awarded a Goldwater Scholarship, and Aditya Ashok ’12 was named Boston College’s seventh Truman Scholar. Amanda Rothschild ’11, a Rhodes Scholarship finalist, was one of 40 students nationwide selected for the Hertog Political Studies Program. Class of 2011 graduates Isabel Protasowicki and Alison O’Connell were chosen for the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals, a yearlong, federally funded fellowship for study and work in Germany. The University rose to number 31 in the latest U.S. News & World Report rankings of national universities, its highest position to date. Graduate school and professional programs also moved upward in the U.S. News survey released in March, with the Lynch School of Education climbing from 19th to 15th, the Connell School of Nursing from 26th to 21st, the Law School from 28th to 27th, and the Carroll School of Management from 39th to 34th. Among Ph.D. programs, the economics department was ranked 31st and chemistry 45th in the United States. The Graduate School of Social Work, a program that was not reviewed this year,

ranks 14th in the country. In addition, Boston College was 161st (of approximately 9,000) in the inaugural Times Higher Education World University Rankings, and 27th on the Forbes list of America’s Best Colleges. And Bloomberg Businessweek ranked the Carroll School number 16 in the “Best Undergraduate Business Schools 2011.” Princeton Review again ranked Boston College one of its “100 Best Value Colleges” for 2011. For the third consecutive year, communication was the most popular undergraduate major, with 895 students enrolled. It was followed by economics (818), biology (773), finance (755), and English (666). Among minors, international studies led competitors with 201 enrollees. The University received a record 33,000 applications for undergraduate admission to the class of 2015, a 10 percent increase over last year. This year’s freshman class set a new high average for class SAT scores. Boston College continues to see a significant upward trend in international student enrollment, and the entering class of 2014 included 714 AHANA students—a record 30 percent. The University named Notre Dame Law School Professor Vincent D. Rougeau dean of the Law School. Lynch School Associate Dean Maureen Kenny was named interim dean of the Lynch School of Education, replacing Joseph O’Keefe, S.J., head of the Lynch School since 2004, who will return to the faculty next year after a sabbatical. The Carroll School of Management unveiled a revised core curriculum that will give undergraduate business students the opportunity to major or minor in a subject offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. In an effort to engage the most academically promising first-year students, the University launched a pilot Distinguished First Year Scholars Program that will allow freshmen to work with faculty on research projects. What had been the department of geology and geophysics became earth and environmental sciences, reflecting the department’s research focus. Some 50 students enrolled in a new B.S. program offered by the psychology department that focuses on neuroscience. The Lynch Leadership Academy welcomed 25 inaugural fellows to its

annual annual report report 2011 2011 || boston boston college college 19


Year in Review yearlong program, which is designed to expand the executive skills of principals in Boston public, parochial, and charter elementary and secondary schools. The University established a Global Service and Justice Program that combines classroom work and overseas placements, under the auspices of the recently inaugurated McGillycuddy-Logue Center. The Law School and Tufts University began to offer a dual degree in law and urban and environmental policy and planning. Seventy-two graduating Carroll Graduate School of Management students took part in the school’s inaugural Oath of Ethical Conduct, a voluntary pledge for graduating MBAs and current MBAs across the country to “create value responsibly and ethically.” The Boston College Graduate School of Social Work conducted its 23rd Annual National Conference on Social Work and HIV/AIDS. Some 400 professionals from the United States and other countries around the world attended the weekend conference, held in Atlanta in May. Boston College President William P. Leahy, S.J., and Fordham University President Joseph M. McShane, S.J. ’72, addressed a forum about what Catholic higher education institutions can and cannot do for Catholic elementary and secondary schools, at the third Catholic

Higher Education Collaborative Conference. Cosponsored by the Roche Center for Catholic Education at Boston College and Fordham University’s Center for Catholic Leadership and Faith-Based Education, the conference was held September 26–28 at Boston College. Students, faculty, and local and national media packed Robsham Theater for an October 25 forum on the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, with U.S. Representative Barney Frank (D-Mass.); Sheila Bair, chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; and Paul Volcker, then-head of the president’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Six prominent scholars—John O’Malley, S.J., professor of theology at Georgetown University; Catharine Stimpson, professor of English at New York University; Alan Ryan, visiting scholar in the department of politics at Princeton University; Louis Menand, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English at Harvard University; and Stanley Fish, professor of humanities and law at Florida International University—gathered to discuss the definition, value, and future of liberal arts education at “Remapping the Liberal Arts for the 21st Century,” a daylong forum sponsored by The Institute for the Liberal Arts on November 13.

executive committee of the board of trustees | (standing, from left) John L. LaMattina, John M. Connors Jr., Susan Martinelli Shea, R. Michael Murray Jr., John F. Fish, T. Frank Kennedy, S.J., Robert J. Morrissey; (seated) William P. Leahy, S.J., William J. Geary, Kathleen M. McGillycuddy.

20 boston college | annual report 2011


Year in Review The Law School presented a forum on the late Robert Drinan, S.J., former dean of Boston College Law School and U.S. representative from Massachusetts, and a discussion of the book Bob Drinan: The Controversial Life of the First Catholic Priest Elected to Congress, the first comprehensive Drinan biography, by Raymond A. Schroth, S.J. New York University College of Nursing Dean Terry Fulmer, M.A. ’77, Ph.D. ’83, delivered the inaugural Connell School of Nursing Pinnacle Lecture, the first of a series that brings a widely recognized nursing leader to campus each semester to address issues at the forefront of health care today.

Education, was elected to the International Academy of Education. Mary Ann Hinsdale, IHM, an associate professor of theology, was installed as president of the Catholic Theological Society of America, the principal association of Catholic theologians in North America. At the Connell School of Nursing, professor Ann Wolbert Burgess and nurse theorist Sister Callista Roy, CSJ, were among the inaugural class of 22 nurse researchers inducted into the newly created Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame. Ann Riley Finck ’66, a nurse practitioner and preceptor in the neurological intensive care unit of New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, received the 2011 Connell School of Nursing faculty research and awards Dean Rita P. Kelleher Award, which recognizes a graduThe Provost reported that grant expenditures reached ate who is an accomplished nursing leader, an ethically $53.5 million in fiscal year 2011, an increase from $39 million in 2006. The biology department alone account- aware scientist, and a skilled and inquisitive clinician. Connell School of Nursing assistant professor Donna ed for nearly $6.4 million. The W.M. Keck Foundation Cullinan, who led a group of nursing faculty, students, awarded a team of Boston College scientists, headed by Ferris Professor of Physics Michael Naughton, a $1 mil- and alumni on a medical mission to Haiti in March, was presented with the University’s 2011 Community lion grant to develop a new microscope that uses nanoService Award. technology to deliver clearer images. Nineteen Boston College faculty members received Associate professor of physics Willie J. Padilla received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists promotions this year. College of Arts and Sciences faculty promoted to full professor were: Kevin Newmark, and Engineers, a $1 million grant that is the highest honor given by the U.S. government to individuals who Romance languages and literatures; Eileen Sweeney, philosophy; Sarah Babb, sociology; Elizabeth Rhodes, “show exceptional potential for leadership at the fronRomance languages and literatures; and Bruce Mortiers of scientific knowledge.” Stephen Wilson of the physics department and Dunwei Wang of the chemistry rill, S.J., theology. Also promoted to full professor were Ronnie Sadka of the Carroll School of Management department received Career Awards from the National finance department, and Rebekah Levine Coley of the Science Foundation. Lynch School associate professor counseling, developmental, and educational psychology Rebekah Levine Coley and her research team won a department in the Lynch School of Education. Faculty $900,000 grant from the MacArthur Foundation to study how housing influences the well-being of children members promoted to associate professor with tenure in low-income families. Sweeney Professor of Account- were: Adam Brasel, marketing; Jiri Chod, operations and strategic management; Johannes Gubbels, biology; ing G. Peter Wilson received the 2010 Distinguished Achievement in Accounting Education Award from the Sarah Ross, history; Scott Slotnick, psychology; C. Shawn McGuffey, sociology; Boyd Taylor Coolman, theology; American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Jane Flanagan, Susan Kelly-Weeder, and Danny Willis Alexa Veenema of the psychology department won a (Connell School of Nursing); Margaret Lombe (Graduate Young Investigator Award from the National Alliance School of Social Work); and Vlad Perju (Law School). for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression. Richard R. Gaillardetz was named the Joseph McCarSchool of Theology and Ministry associate professor Khaled Anatolios was named one of seven Henry Luce thy Professor of Catholic Systematic Theology. III Fellows in Theology for 2011–12. The Times Higher Education ranked Vanderslice Millennium Professor of university advancement and alumni The $1.5 billion Light the World campaign successfully Chemistry Amir Hoveyda and physics professor Zhipassed its midpoint, raising more than half its ambitious feng Ren among the top researchers in chemistry and goal just two years after its public launch in October materials science of the past decade. 2008. By the end of the year, more than 99,700 donors Lynch School of Education Monan Professor Philip Altbach, director of the Center for International Higher had pledged $794 million to the campaign, which drives

annual annual report report 2011 2011 || boston boston college college 21


Year in Review academic program development, faculty expansion, endowed undergraduate financial aid, student formation programs, capital projects, athletics, and efforts to advance Boston College as a leading global Catholic university. Buoyed by this early support, Light the World continues its surge toward its planned 2015 conclusion. Some 300 guests turned out to celebrate the campaign’s landmark achievements at this year’s October 28 New York Gala, hosted by the New York Regional Campaign Committee at the New York Public Library. Emmy Award-winning broadcaster Bob Costas P ’12 moderated a discussion with University President William P. Leahy, S.J., and William B. Neenan, S.J., vice president and special assistant to the president, who talked about the campaign’s milestone achievements and goals. Undergraduate alumni continued to show enthusiastic support for their alma mater, with nearly 26,000— 26 percent overall—contributing to the Boston College Fund. Meanwhile, life income and bequest gifts poured in, as membership increased to more than 1,400 in the Shaw Society, which recognizes donors who make legacy gifts. William J. Cunningham ’57, P ’80, received the William V. McKenney Award, the Alumni Association’s highest honor, given to a Boston College graduate who has made outstanding contributions to service, industry, and the University. Cunningham was recognized at the Alumni Association Awards of Excellence ceremony in October as a past association president and board member, and tireless fundraiser. The Rev. Nicholas Sannella, a physician, medical legal expert, parish priest, and University trustee, received the Ignatian Award at the ceremony, while former women’s hockey team captain Sarah Joy (Carlson) Hollingsworth ’05 took home the GOLD Award for her work as an emergency room nurse in hospitals at home and abroad. Susan Kelley, Ph.D. ’88, a one-time Boston College professor who is now the dean of the College of Health and Human Services at Georgia State University, won the Professional Excellence Award for her children’s rights advocacy. After years of planning, the University broke ground October 4 on Stokes Hall, a cornerstone of the University’s institutional master plan, and the first academic building to be constructed on Middle Campus since 2001. Named for Boston College alumnus, benefactor, and trustee Patrick T. Stokes ’64 and his wife, AnnaKristina “Aja” Stokes, P ’91, ’94, ’97, in recognition of their $22 million gift, the four-story, 183,000-squarefoot building will be the new home of the University’s

22 boston college | annual report 2011

humanities departments, undergraduate academic programs, 36 classrooms, a café, and an honors library. It is expected to be completed in fall 2012. The 23rd annual Wall Street Council Tribute Dinner raised more than $1.6 million to support the Presidential Scholars Program. More than 900 alumni, parents, and friends attended the April 28 event at the Waldorf=Astoria New York, where Citibank CEO Eugene McQuade, P ’06, ’10, the evening’s honoree, received the President’s Medal for Excellence. More than 46,400 alumni, parents, and friends turned out for alumni events during the course of the year. Reunion Weekend drew the largest number of participants, with more than 5,000 alumni and their guests returning to the Heights for celebrations of their milestone years.

student life More than 6,000 students registered to use MyBC, a web-based software program that allows student clubs and organizations to manage their members, budgets, and schedules, and to advertise events on a common calendar. The Division of Student Affairs’ new Office of Health Promotion, which directs programs and services and provides information about student health and wellbeing, opened in February. That month, the division also launched a comprehensive new website (www.bc.edu/ studentaffairs), which brings together 14 student affairs departments and features student-centered news, events, and multimedia posts at one web address. Running on a platform of “Building Community Through Programming, Outreach, Accessibility, and Formation,” Mike Kitlas ’12 and Jill Long ’12 were elected president and vice president of the Undergraduate Government of Boston College. Student government leaders this year spearheaded two efforts to improve academic advising, working with faculty and administrators to develop advising guides for student majors, and collaborating with the University Council on Teaching and the Provost’s Advisory Council to draft an advising evaluation similar to course evaluation forms. Students greeted Boston Marathon runners with an inflatable maroon and gold arch emblazoned with the message “The Heartbreak Is Over—Mile 21,” which stood in front of Bapst Hall on Marathon Monday. Nearly 300 Boston College students ran the marathon to gather contributions for the Campus School for children with special needs. Boston College’s fourth annual Relay for Life raised


Year in Review $140,000 for cancer research, while 14 student participants in the seventh annual BC Idol competition raised $3,600 in ticket sales to support a music program at St. Columbkille School in Brighton, an elementary diocesan school that is managed in partnership with the University and the Lynch School. Men’s and women’s ice hockey players launched an after-school mentorship program at St. Columbkille. Team members made regular visits to the school, and kept in touch with students through e-mails and blogs. Students formed Every Bite Counts, an organization that works with Dining Services to collect and store leftover food for use by a local food bank. Boston College is once again among the top 10 producers of Peace Corps volunteers in its category, placing ninth in the 2011 rankings of colleges and universities with between 5,000 and 15,000 undergraduates.

jesuit, catholic mission The Church in the 21st Century Center published a pamphlet titled The Catholic Intellectual Tradition:

A Conversation at Boston College, an exploration of what is meant by the Catholic intellectual tradition, and how it can be a guiding force in a complex, contemporary university. It is available for download on the center website. Boston Archbishop Cardinal Seán O’Malley, OFM Cap., presided at the blessing of the Chapel of the Holy Name of Jesus at the new Blessed Peter Faber Jesuit Community on Foster Street on December 3, the Feast of St. Francis Xavier. The Faber Community is home to an international group of 75 Jesuits studying and teaching at the School of Theology and Ministry, who had lived at the former Weston School of Theology in Cambridge until August 2010. Theologians and historians joined the writers and producers of the PBS Frontline and American Experience series “God in America” for a panel discussion on “Lingua Sacra: Negotiating God-talk in America” in April. Thirty recent graduates signed on to the Jesuit Volunteer Corps in 2010, making Boston College the best represented university in the program this year. Some 500 alumni and friends of Boston College marked the

boston college vice presidents | (standing, from left) James P. McIntyre, Senior Vice President; John Butler, S.J., Vice President for University Mission and Ministry; Mary Lou DeLong, Vice President and University Secretary; Patrick J. Keating, Executive Vice President; Thomas P. Lockerby, Vice President for Development; Michael J. Bourque, Vice President for Information Technology; Patrick H. Rombalski, Vice President for Student Affairs; Thomas J. Keady, Vice President for Governmental and Community Affairs; Daniel F. Bourque, Vice President for Facilities Management; James J. Husson, Senior Vice President for University Advancement; (seated) William B. Neenan, S.J., Vice President, Special Assistant to the President; Peter C. McKenzie, Financial Vice President and Treasurer; Cutberto Garza, Provost and Dean of Faculties; Leo V. Sullivan, Vice President for Human Resources.

annual annual report report 2011 2011 || boston boston college college 23


Year in Review

boston college deans | (standing, from left) Thomas B. Wall, University Librarian; Susan Gennaro, Connell School of Nursing; Andrew C. Boynton, Carroll School of Management; Alberto Godenzi, Graduate School of Social Work; Mark S. Massa, S.J., School of Theology and Ministry; (seated) Maureen Kenny, Interim Dean, Lynch School of Education; David Quigley, College of Arts and Sciences; James A. Woods, S.J., Woods College of Advancing Studies.

Lenten midpoint at the Boston College Alumni Association’s 60th annual Laetare Sunday Mass in Conte Forum and a brunch afterward. University President William P. Leahy, S.J., Vice President for University Mission and Ministry Jack Butler, SJ., and Jeremy Zipple, S.J., ’00, a student at the School of Theology and Ministry, drew a capacity crowd to the Heights Room March 31 for “Three Jesuits: Who Do They Say They Are,” a panel discussion of what led them to their vocations as members of the Society of Jesus. The panel was sponsored by the Church in the 21st Century Center, STM, the theology department, the Alumni Association, and the Center for Ignatian Spirituality. Theologian Paul Knitter, the Paul Tillich Professor at Union Theological Seminary, characterized the free market economy as “a religion in dire need of dialogue with other religions” at the opening of the University’s third annual Symposium on Interreligious Dialogue, which was held October 7–9, and sponsored by the theology department, the Church in the 21st Century Center, and the School of Theology and Ministry. The Church in the 21st Century Center sponsored visits from Cardinal Francis George, OMI, archbishop of Chicago and past president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, in December, and Cardinal

24 boston college | annual report 2011

Roger Mahony, archbishop emeritus of Los Angeles, in March, as part of the center’s Episcopal Visitors Program. The program engages members of the Catholic hierarchy in conversation about important issues in the Church, and invites them to experience a Jesuit, Catholic university.

athletics For the second consecutive year, more Boston College athletic teams (21) received a perfect Graduation Success Rate score of 100 than did any other Division I intercollegiate athletics program, according to the NCAA. Football was one of only six bowl subdivision programs in the country to receive a score of 90 or better. Mark Herzlich ’10, a standout football player diagnosed with bone cancer in the spring of 2009, returned to play and led the team onto the field on opening day this season. The coed sailing team won its second consecutive Intercollegiate Sailing Association dinghy national championships, held in Cascade Locks, Ore. For the first time, both the men’s and women’s ice hockey teams won their respective Beanpot Tournaments in the same year. Both teams also won their conference championships and advanced to the NCAA tournament.


Year in Review Women’s teams registered other firsts for Boston College. The women’s soccer team advanced to the Final Four of the 2010 NCAA tournament, and the Eagles made their first appearance in the NCAA women’s lacrosse tournament. The Eagles’ 4 x 1500 meter relay team became the first Boston College women’s team to take a crown at the Penn Relays. With the floor of Conte Forum converted to half-rink, half-court, the men’s and women’s basketball and hockey teams showcased their song and dances skills in Boston College’s first ever Ice Jam, a preseason pep rally.

a vibrant multicultural city located at a crossroad between major Eastern and Western civilizations.

management

On March 4, the Board of Trustees approved a budget of $848 million for the 2011–12 fiscal year. It called for a 3.6 percent increase in undergraduate tuition, room, board, and fees, with tuition set at $41,480. Undergraduate financial aid will grow by 6.5 percent to $84.6 million, with overall student aid totaling $135 million. The budget also includes $4.5 million to fund academic initiatives outlined in the Strategic Plan arts approved in 2006, and additional funds to provide for Author Gish Jen (Mona in the Promised Land, World and a salary increase for staff and faculty (3.5 percent for Town) delivered a Lowell Humanities Series lecture, employees earning under $50,000 and 2.5 percent taught a master class in fiction writing, held an open for those over $50,000). book club–style discussion of her latest novel, fielded The Board was able to limit the tuition increase and students questions in an Asian-American literature allocate resources to support strategic priorities in part class, and met with senior creative writing students over because of $22.5 million in budget reallocations and savings lunch during her three-day sojourn as University writer that will be realized between fiscal years 2009 and 2012. in residence in early November. Blue Heron RenaisGround was broken in October for Stokes Hall, a sance Choir, Boston’s premier professional early music 183,000-square-foot academic complex that will house vocal ensemble, was artist in residence at Boston College the departments of classical studies, English, history, for the 2010–11 academic year. philosophy, and theology, as well as the A&S Honors Actor and director James Franco came to campus Program, the Academic Advising Center, and the Office April 15 to screen the world premiere of his film The of First Year Experience. Gasson Hall, which underwent Broken Tower, which is based on University Professor exterior and interior renovations starting in June 2010, of English Paul Mariani’s 1999 biography of the poet was slated to reopen in September 2011—two years in Hart Crane. Mariani, who consulted on the project and advance of the 100th anniversary of the building’s conplayed a cameo role as the photographer Alfred Stieglitz struction in 2013. On the Brighton Campus, remodeling in the movie, joined Franco on stage for a post-screenof 129 Lake Street (formerly known as Bishop Peterson ing Q&A with students. Hall) and 2121 Commonwealth Avenue (once the ChanBest-selling author Chuck Hogan ’89, whose cery of the Archdiocese of Boston) is underway. When novel Prince of Thieves was adapted into the 2010 film these projects are completed in 2011 and 2012, respecThe Town, directed by and starring Ben Affleck, received tively, employees currently working in More Hall are the Arts Council Alumni Award for artistic achievement expected to be relocated to the Brighton Campus, allowat the 13th annual Boston College Arts Festival April ing the University to build an undergraduate residence 27–30. Highlights of the 2011 festival included a theater hall on the current More Hall site. department production of the musical comedy Dirty University maintenance staff cleared a cumulative Rotten Scoundrels; a social justice film festival; a dance eight feet of snow from campus roads, sidewalks, parkshowcase featuring 18 student groups; and performanc- ing lots, staircases, and flat roofs between December 21 es by music ensembles. and April 1. Some 1,600 tons of snow were ultimately Paul Daigneault ’87, the founder and artistic director trucked to a “snowfield” on the Brighton Campus. of Boston’s SpeakEasy Stage Company, was appointed The University community gathered on January 21 Monan Professor in Theater Arts for the 2011–12 acaat St. Ignatius Church for a funeral Mass for Francis B. demic year. Campanella, who died on January 14, following a stroke, The McMullen Museum of Art at Boston College was at age 74. Appointed executive vice president of Boston the exclusive venue for Dura-Europos: Crossroads of Antiq- College in 1973, Campanella served for 25 years in the uity, an exhibition showcasing well-preserved Roman University’s number two position, under J. Donald artifacts excavated from the ancient site of Dura-Europos, Monan, S.J., and then William P. Leahy, S.J. ✵

annual annualreport report2011 2011 | | boston bostoncollege college 25


Financial Report overview Boston College stayed on course during fiscal 2011, fulfilling its mission, managing its resources, and planning for a very bright future. At the beginning of the fiscal year, the University issued $195 million of debt to refinance existing debt and provide funds for new campus construction. In our meetings with the various credit rating agencies, we stressed three points. First, we are a Jesuit, Catholic educational institution that knows its mission is firmly rooted in the liberal arts. Second, we are an institution that carefully manages its resources and lives within its resources. Third, we are an institution that has a disciplined financial plan and is prepared to weather the all-too-frequent financial storms that come our way. At the end of their reviews, both Moody’s and S&P reaffirmed our rating at the AA- and stable level. While our financial position had not yet returned to what it was during fiscal 2008, both agencies observed that Boston College had persevered throughout the market downturn and intervening period.    At the end of fiscal 2011, we see an institution that has largely returned to pre-2009 financial levels. The financial results below speak to the hard work put forth by our faculty and staff and the generosity of our alumni and friends. The size of our endowment and the growth in net assets are at all-time highs for Boston College. While our sights remain higher, we have much to be thankful for. fiscal 2011 financial results As noted in the accompanying “Growth in Net Assets” chart (see page 28), the University’s net assets increased by $288 million, an increase of 13% over prior year levels. Strong market performance and fund-raising were the key drivers of this increase. Our primary liquidity ratio, “Expendable Resources to Debt,” improved to 1.7 times coverage (see chart, page 28); however, it remains below our target of 2.0. The University’s endowment fund increased by more than $241 million, to nearly $1.89 billion. This increase was made up of investment gains of $272 million, contributions of $52 million, and net assets reclassified or released of $5 million, which were offset by assets used in support of operations of $88 million. The portfolio return on the endowment fund was 18.3% versus the S&P 500 return of 26.0% and the Barclay Aggregate Bond Index of 5.9%. Over the past 10 years, the endowment fund has generated an annualized return of 7.0%, compared with the S&P 500 return of 2.6% and the Barclay’s return of 5.8%. The University’s endowment portfolio is well-diversified with 47% in

26 boston college | annual report 2011


domestic and international equities, 6% invested in fixed-income securities, and 47% invested in alternative strategies including absolute return funds, private equity funds, and real asset funds. The University’s portfolio is liquid and well positioned, with over 60% of our portfolio invested in securities that can be redeemed in 30 days or less. In fiscal 2011, gross plant assets increased by $94 million. The construction of a major new academic building, Stokes Hall, the renovation of Gasson Hall on the Middle Campus, and the renovations on the Brighton Campus of 129 Lake Street and 2121 Commonwealth Avenue were our largest capital projects. Strong enrollments led overall revenue growth of 3.2%. Tuition and fee revenues exceeded budget amounts while the related student receivable remained low. We increased financial aid funds by 7.2% to assist returning students and their families. Expense savings were achieved in many areas of the operating budget, most notably utilities, salaries, and fringe benefits. The University continued to aggressively pursue operating efficiencies in areas such as procurement, printing, overtime, and libraries. conclusion In fiscal 2011 we rebuilt our financial base and continued the momentum of our academic, research, and student formation programs. We are keenly aware that while progress has been made, we live in very challenging times. Recent events in Washington, in the Middle East, in Europe, and on Wall Street point to the volatility of the economy and world events. More than ever, great institutions are needed to develop leaders and help guide a society to change, grow, and prosper. Boston College—its trustees, its alumni, its faculty, its students, its staff, and its Jesuit leaders—is meeting this challenge. In fiscal 2012, the administration will work hard to provide the necessary resources to continue our important mission, deeply rooted in our liberal arts tradition. Our goal continues—Ever to Excel!

peter c. mckenzie ’75 Financial Vice President and Treasurer The University’s fiscal 2011 financial statements are available at www.bc.edu/offices/controller.

annual annual report report 2011 2011 || boston boston college college 27


2,500

Growth in Net Assets (1992 Base Year)

2,000

real millions

inflationary

1,500

1,000

500

0 fy2007

fy2008

fy2009

fy2010

fy2011

fy2007

fy2008

fy2009

fy2010

fy2011

1,600

Expendable Resources to Debt

1,400 total expendable resources

1,200 millions

total operating debt 1,000 800 600 400 200 0

Operating and Nonoperating Revenues tuition and fees, gross 46% auxiliary enterprises, gross 13% sponsored research, grants, and financial aid

6%

investment income, net

1%

private gifts

8%

realized and unrealized investment gains, net 25% other

1%

academic support

7%

research

5%

student services

6%

Expenses

general administration 14% student aid 17% instruction 31% auxiliary enterprises 19% public service/other losses

28 boston college | annual report 2011

1%


Statistical and Financial Highlights statistics

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Full-time equivalent enrollment Undergraduate Graduate/professional

9,471

9,505

9,512

9,599

9,518

3,132

3,152

3,308

3,414

4,120

12,603

12,657

12,820

13,013

13,638

Faculty Staff

675 2,193

679 2,228

708 2,316

725 2,293

737 2,304

Total full-time employees

2,868

2,907

3,024

3,018

3,041

Chestnut Hill Campus Newton Campus/other

5,481,081 1,092,075

5,481,766 1,313,008

5,481,766 1,317,818

5,493,499 1,301,227

5,501,713 1,588,275

Total gross square feet

6,573,156

6,794,774

6,799,584

6,794,726

7,089,988

Total full-time equivalent enrollment Full-time employees

Campus facilities (gross square feet)

financial (fiscal years ending May 31) In thousands of dollars Statement of financial position* Total assets Total liabilities

$2,945,213 (736,218)

$3,153,053 (824,404)

$2,898,500 (888,269)

$3,092,938 (905,514)

$3,487,314 (1,012,011)

Total net assets

$2,208,995

$2,328,649

$2,010,231

$2,187,424

$2,475,303

$1,752,760 18,162 235,852

$1,849,801 13,866 62,200

$1,491,158 11,487 (401,392)

$1,647,653 10,768 180,485

$1,889,079 14,127 271,796

Land, improvements, and purchase options Buildings (including capital lease and purchase option) Equipment Library books/rare book and art collections Plant under construction

$154,518 843,733

$215,049 873,603

$232,822 962,539

$234,200 1,004,577

$238,048 1,026,711

163,403 140,657

178,015 147,812

179,000 155,814

191,622 164,739

200,569 173,918

17,629

35,852

38,242

17,610

67,898

Physical plant, gross Accumulated depreciation and amortization

1,319,940 (452,953)

1,450,331 (498,998)

1,568,417 (530,929)

1,612,748 (573,137)

1,707,144 (619,065)

Physical plant, net

$866,987

$951,333

$1,037,488

$1,039,611

$1,088,079

$567,157 567,066 276,635

$600,684 600,587 93,199

$621,018 620,916 (318,520)

$628,354 628,247 177,086

$643,654 643,544 287,769

University scholarships, fellowships, and prizes Federal/state programs (including Pell grants) Student loans granted by the University

$100,900 7,900 9,879

$107,229 8,330 6,313

$113,752 8,571 5,299

$123,315 10,579 4,005

$132,594 10,834 5,434

Total student aid

$118,679

$121,872

$127,622

$137,899

$148,862

Endowment and similar funds* Net assets Investment income Realized and unrealized investment gains and (losses), net Physical plant*

Statement of activities* Total operating revenues Total operating expenses Total nonoperating activity Student aid

*2008 amounts adjusted to reflect Weston Jesuit School of Theology affiliation. annual annualreport report2011 2011 | | boston bostoncollege college 29


Board of Trustees officers

john m. connors jr. ’63, d.b.a. ’07 (hon.)

william j. geary ’80

Chairman The Connors Family Office Boston, Massachusetts

Chair

Vice Chair

robert j. cooney, esq. ’74

t. frank kennedy, s.j. ’71

Partner Cooney & Conway Chicago, Illinois

drake g. behrakis ’86 President and CEO Marwick Associates Lexington, Massachusetts

matthew j. botica, esq. ’72 Partner Winston & Strawn LLP Chicago, Illinois

cathy m. brienza nc ’71 Partner WallerSutton 2000, L.P. New York, New York

john e. buehler jr. ’69 Managing Partner Energy Investors Funds Mill Valley, California

patrick carney ’70 Founder, Chairman and CEO Claremont Companies Bridgewater, Massachusetts

hon. darcel d. clark ’83 Supreme Court Justice State of New York Bronx, New York

charles i. clough jr. ’64 Chairman and CEO Clough Capital Partners, L.P. Boston, Massachusetts

juan a. concepción, esq. ’96, m.ed. ’97, j.d., m.b.a. ’03 Associate Nixon Peabody LLP Boston, Massachusetts

margot c. connell, d.b.a. ’09 (hon.) Chairman and Member of the Advisory Board Connell Limited Partnership Boston, Massachusetts

Interior Designer Treasured Designs Atherton, California

t. frank kennedy, s.j. ’71 kathleen a. corbet ’82

trustees

Manager Snows Hill Management LLC Wellesley, Massachusetts

michaela murphy hoag ’86

kathleen m. mcgillycuddy nc ’71

Secretary

kathleen powers haley ’76

Founder and Principal Cross Ridge Capital, LLC New Canaan, Connecticut

Rector Boston College Jesuit Community Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

john l. lamattina ’71 leo j. corcoran, esq. ’81 Owner Autumn Development Company, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts

Senior Partner PureTech Ventures Boston, Massachusetts

timothy r. lannon, s.j. ’86 robert f. cotter ’73 President (Ret.) Kerzner International Coral Gables, Florida

President Creighton University Omaha, Nebraska

william p. leahy, s.j. cynthia lee egan ’78 President of Retirement Plan Services T. Rowe Price Owings Mills, Maryland

President Boston College Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

peter s. lynch ’65, ll.d. ’95 (hon.) john r. egan ’79 Managing Member Carruth Management, LLC Westborough, Massachusetts

Vice Chairman Fidelity Management & Research Company Boston, Massachusetts

t.j. maloney ’75 john f. fish President and Chief Executive Officer Suffolk Construction Company Boston, Massachusetts

President Lincolnshire Management, Inc. New York, New York

douglas w. marcouiller, s.j. keith a. francis ’76 Intelligence Analyst (Ret.) Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives New Bedford, Massachusetts

mario j. gabelli Chairman and Chief Executive Officer GAMCO Investors, Inc. Rye, New York

Provincial Jesuits of the Missouri Province St. Louis, Missouri

david m. mcauliffe ’71 COO and Managing Director of Investment Banking J.P. Morgan PLC London, United Kingdom

kathleen m. mcgillycuddy nc ’71 william j. geary ’80 Partner North Bridge Venture Partners Waltham, Massachusetts

Executive Vice President (Ret.) FleetBoston Financial Boston, Massachusetts

william s. mckiernan ’78 susan mcmanama gianinno ’70 Chairman and CEO Publicis Worldwide, North America New York, New York

Founder CyberSource Corporation Mountain View, California

robert j. morrissey, esq. ’60 janice gipson ’77 Beverly Hills, California

30 boston college | annual report 2011

Senior Partner Morrissey, Hawkins & Lynch Boston, Massachusetts


Board of Trustees john v. murphy ’71

susan martinelli shea ’76

john f. cunningham ’64

Managing Director Korn/Ferry International Boston, Massachusetts

Founder and President Dancing with the Students Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Chairman and CEO Cunningham & Company Boston, Massachusetts

r. michael murray jr. ’61, m.a. ’65

marianne d. short, esq. nc ’73, j.d. ’76

brian e. daley, s.j.

Director Emeritus McKinsey & Company, Inc. Chicago, Illinois

Huisking Professor of Theology University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, Indiana

Managing Partner Dorsey & Whitney LLP Minneapolis, Minnesota

stephen p. murray ’84 President and CEO CCMP Capital Advisors, LLC New York, New York

robert m. devlin patrick t. stokes ’64

Chairman Curragh Capital Partners New York, New York

Chief Executive Officer (Ret.) Anheuser-Busch Cos., Inc. St. Louis, Missouri

brien m. o’brien ’80

andrew n. downing, s.j.

Chairman and CEO Advisory Research, Inc. Chicago, Illinois

richard f. syron ’66, ll.d. ’89 (hon.) Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

Doctoral Student University of Notre Dame Granger, Indiana

david p. o’connor ’86

elizabeth w. vanderslice ’86

francis a. doyle ’70, m.b.a. ’75

Senior Managing Partner High Rise Capital Management, LP New York, New York

New York, New York

President and CEO Connell Limited Partnership Boston, Massachusetts

brian g. paulson, s.j. Rector Loyola University Jesuit Community Chicago, Illinois

scott r. pilarz, s.j. President University of Scranton Scranton, Pennsylvania

paula d. polito ’81 Chief Marketing Officer & Group Managing Director UBS Financial Services Inc. Wealth Management Americas Weehawken, New Jersey

richard f. powers iii ’67 Advisory Director (Ret.) Morgan Stanley Hobe Sound, Florida

pierre-richard prosper, esq. ’85 Counsel Arent Fox LLP Los Angeles, California

thomas f. ryan jr. ’63 Private Investor (Ret.) Boston, Massachusetts

bradley m. schaeffer, s.j., m.ed. ’73 Rector Faber Jesuit Community Brighton, Massachusetts

david c. weinstein, esq., j.d. ’75 Chief of Administration (Ret.) Fidelity Investments Newton, Massachusetts

emilia m. fanjul Palm Beach, Florida

john f. farrell jr.

trustee associates

Greenwich, Connecticut

mary jane vouté arrigoni

yen-tsai feng

peter w. bell ’86

Roy E. Larsen Librarian (Ret.) Harvard College Lexington, Massachusetts

General Partner Highland Capital Partners Menlo Park, California

charles d. ferris, esq. ’54, j.d. ’61, ll.d. ’78 (hon.)

geoffrey t. boisi ’69

Senior Partner Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo P.C. Washington, D.C.

Greenwich, Connecticut

Chairman and Senior Partner Roundtable Investment Partners LLC New York, New York

wayne a. budd, esq. ’63 Senior Counsel Goodwin Procter LLP Boston, Massachusetts

d.h. carroll ’64 President Pro Equine Group, Inc. Deerfield, Illinois

james f. cleary ’50, d.b.a. ’93 (hon.) Advisory Director Boston, Massachusetts

joseph e. corcoran ’59, d.b.a. ’09 (hon.) Chairman Corcoran Jennison Companies Boston, Massachusetts

thomas j. flanagan ’42 Retired Madison, Connecticut

mary j. steele guilfoile ’76 Chairman MG Advisors, Inc. Norwalk, Connecticut

paul f. harman, s.j. ’61, m.a. ’62 Vice President for Mission College of the Holy Cross Worcester, Massachusetts

daniel j. harrington, s.j. ’64, m.a. ’65, dhl ’09 (hon.) Professor of Theology Boston College School of Theology and Ministry Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

annual annual report report 2011 2011 || boston boston college college 31


Board of Trustees john l. harrington ’57, m.b.a. ’66, d.b.a. ’10 (hon.)

john a. mcneice jr. ’54, d.b.a. ’97 (hon.)

randall p. seidl ’85

Chairman of the Board Yawkey Foundation Dedham, Massachusetts

Chairman and CEO (Ret.) The Colonial Group, Inc. Canton, Massachusetts

Senior Vice President, Americas, Enterprise Servers, Storage & Networking Hewlett-Packard Company Marlborough, Massachusetts

daniel s. hendrickson, s.j.

giles e. mosher jr. ’55

john j. shea, s.j., m.ed. ’70

Doctoral Student Columbia University New York, New York

Vice Chairman (Emeritus) Bank of America Wellesley, Massachusetts

Associate Director, Catholic Center Sophia University Tokyo, Japan

john j. higgins, s.j. ’59, m.a. ’60, s.t.l. ’67

robert j. murray ’62

sylvia q. simmons, m.ed. ’62, ph.d. ’90

Fairfield Jesuit Community Fairfield, Connecticut

Chairman and CEO (Ret.) New England Business Service, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts

richard t. horan sr. ’53

therese e. myers nc ’66

President (Ret.) Hughes Oil Company, Inc. Newton, Massachusetts

Chief Executive Officer Bouquet Multimedia, LLC Oxnard, California

george w. hunt, s.j.

edward m. o’flaherty, s.j. ’59, th.m. ’66

salvatore j. trani

Treasurer Boston College Jesuit Community Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts

Executive Managing Director BGC Partners, Inc. New York, New York

thomas p. o’neill iii ’68

thomas a. vanderslice ’53, d.b.a. ’03 (hon.)

Fordham University Bronx, New York

richard a. jalkut ’66 CEO TelePacific Communications Los Angeles, California

anne p. jones, esq. ’58, j.d. ’61, ll.d. ’08 (hon.) Consultant Bethesda, Maryland

michael d. jones, esq. ’72, j.d. ’76 Chief Operating Officer PBS Arlington, Virginia

edmund f. kelly Chairman, President, and CEO Liberty Mutual Group Boston, Massachusetts

robert k. kraft Chairman and CEO The Kraft Group Foxborough, Massachusetts

robert b. lawton, s.j. Georgetown Jesuit Community Washington, DC

Chief Executive Officer O’Neill and Associates Boston, Massachusetts

President (Ret.) American Student Assistance Corp. Roxbury, Massachusetts

robert l. sullivan ’50, m.a. ’52 International Practice Director (Ret.) Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. Siasconset, Massachusetts

Osterville, Massachusetts

jeffrey p. von arx, s.j. sally engelhard pingree Director and Vice Chairman Engelhard Hanovia, Inc. Washington, D.C.

President Fairfield University Fairfield, Connecticut

vincent a. wasik r. robert popeo, esq., j.d. ’61 Chairman and President Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo P.C. Boston, Massachusetts

john j. powers ’73 Managing Director Goldman Sachs & Company New York, New York

nicholas s. rashford, s.j. Professor St. Joseph’s University Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Co-Founder and Principal MCG Global, LLC Westport, Connecticut

benaree p. wiley, d.p.a. ’09 (hon.) President and CEO (Emeritus) The Partnership, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts

jeremy k. zipple, s.j. ’00 Director and Producer National Geographic Television Faber Jesuit Community Brighton, Massachusetts

thomas j. rattigan ’60 peter k. markell ’77

Vice President and University Secretary

Natick, Massachusetts

mary lou delong nc ’71

Vice President of Finance Partners HealthCare System, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts

rev. nicholas a. sannella ’67

University Chancellor

Pastor Immaculate Conception Parish Lowell, Massachusetts

j. donald monan, s.j., ll.d. ’96 (hon.)

catherine t. mcnamee, csj, m.ed. ’55, m.a. ’58 Member, Congregational Leadership Team Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet St. Louis, Missouri

32 boston college | annual report 2011


produced by the office of marketing communications 9/2011 editor: Maureen Dezell writer: William Bole art director: Christine Hagg designer: Kristen Patterson photography: Gary Wayne Gilbert printed by: UniGraphic, Inc., Woburn, MA


annual report 2011

Renaissance renewing the liberal arts at boston college

chestnut hill, massachusetts 02467

Annual Report 2011, Renaissance: Renewing the Liberal Arts at Boston College  

Boston College 2011 Annual Report