Page 1

I S S U E # 3 | J U LY 2 0 1 7

THE TRADE IN SERVICES MAGAZINE OF THE BCSI

shaping our contemporary culture Cultural industries: The Way Forward

Ascention Projix

www.bcsi.org.bb

Quality Standard Mark

20 32 40


2 2

T HTHEEEXPORT E X P O R T E RER

DEREK WIlkie and BCSI FLYER


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

EDITORIAL

GRAHAM CLARKE Graham Clarke is a Chartered Marketer and Current Executive Director of BCSI

3

We wish to dedicate this edition of the EXPORTER

the cover of this edition two young budding

to the promotion of two important festivals

project company which serves as the talent

which are being celebrated over this summer

brokers for artists, using their networking

- our annual national Crop Over Festival,

skills and creative concepts to find different

which is already in full swing, and the largest

projects through which the artists’ work can

festival for creative goods and services in

be displayed. The EXPORTER also sat down

the Caribbean – CARIFESTA X111, which

with Chetwyn Stewart, a veteran of the Crop

Barbados will host from August 17 – 27, 2017.

Over Festival and Founder of PowerX4 Band to

During CARIFESTA XIII a Market-place for

hear his views on the evolution of the festival.

all creative segments will be held and BCSI

A unique and very interesting article in this

will be sponsoring the participation of two

edition highlights the work of Dr. Che’ Corbin,

international music supervisors for advertising

who practices the art of Traditional Chinese

and movies and hosting a workshop in

Medicine (TCM). Dr. Che’ sees great potential

collaboration with CRS Music on what we call

for trade between Barbados and China in the

‘Conduits to Commerce’ - opportunities for

health and wellness sector as well as other

revenue generation within the music industry.

emerging sectors.

We will also be officially launching the Business

No one knows from where the next BIG idea

of Music (BOM) Regional Training Programme

will emerge - right now that big idea could be

during that workshop. This programme is

lying dormant in one of the remote villages of

for the benefit of artists - musicians, music

this little island – it could be resident within

producers, music performers, songwriters, and

one of our local primary or secondary schools,

those who provide business representation

just waiting for facilitation. That is why we

services to artists operating in countries

need continuous investment by government

served by the Caribbean Network of Service

and the private sector in programmes and

Coalitions (CNSC).

projects that support our artists. And, we

artists - Matthew Gittens and Jabari Alleyne of the Ascension Projix, the art-based creative

do need local delivery of those facilitation In this edition, we are also celebrating all

services to ensure that no artist is left behind

our artists and cultural entrepreneurs and

in the process.

highlighting some of them who are creating new and exciting cultural products and

We

services that with the right combination of

undertaken by the BCSI will go some way

investment, management, marketing and

towards advancing the cause of our cultural

promotion could

reap significant success

practitioners and we look forward to the

in the global marketplace in the future. On

positive impact these initiatives will have on

that note, we are pleased to showcase on

enhancing exports within the sector.

believe

that

the

initiatives

being


04

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Contents shaping our contemporary culture 06 The Business of Dance 08 The Visual Side of Art 12 Festival Evolution 16 Access: Fashion creative industry 20 Cultural Industries: The Way Forward 22 Traditional Chinese Medicine in Barbados 26 ICT in Music: Areas of Growth 28 CARIFESTA 2017 untold Stories 32 Ascention Projix IN-HOUSE News 36 PitchIT Caribbean 2017 38 Beyond the Border Trade Forum 40 Quality Service Mark: Steps to the Future 41 Cultural Industries Sector Profile Members’ corner 40 Janitorial Services - Assuring Quality 42 The Winning Formula


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

05

shaping our contemporary culture


06

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Dance is more than an artform.

in Education, Medicine, Cultural and Heritage Studies, Kinesiology and Health and Wellness are some of the areas that the dance entrepreneur can utilise to

The versatility of dance as a commercial

create a viable niche.

tool fits well within the current move towards the development of a cultural and

Dance Education Specialist

creative industry within the Caribbean.

According to Les Vygotsky’s Theory of

Dance, although commonly viewed as an

Constructivist Movement, the arts are

extra- curricular activity, has long been an

instrumental to student development. This

integral contributor to Caribbean cultural

career utilises dance as an educational

economies through areas such as:

tool for learning and reinforcement

national festivals, carnivals, street parties

using dance as an alternative method

and the tourism entertainment industry.

to traditional teaching techniques. This

As the Caribbean forges ahead with the

career sees the dance educator utilising

creative sector, dancers must tap (pun

the art form to teach subject areas such

intended) into not only those careers

as Mathematics, History, Science and

which are customary and familiar, but

Social Studies. The school’s syllabus is

also recognise the unique niche markets

fused with the elements of dance and

that the business of dance can facilitate.

fundamental dance techniques are used

Beyond the boundaries of the studio

as the driving indicators.

owner,

choreographer,

professional

performer and dance instructor, lies

Heritage Dance Specialist

alternative careers which can offer

The use of dance to re-enact and recreate

the

additional

historical and heritage moments in

opportunities for commercial success.

time and interpret exhibits is becoming

These innovative offerings can propel

increasingly popular. This uses dance

industry by marrying the creative and the

once again as a teaching tool, this time

commercial.

utilizing the performance aspect of the

dance

entrepreneur

art form to inform and edify. Museums The fusion of dance with other areas of

around the world such as the Museum of

study is not a new concept, however within

Modern Art in New York and the Walker

the Caribbean, the model is not widely

Art Centre in Minneapolis now offer more

explored

performance spaces as they recognize

thereby

presenting

greater

opportunity for commercial development by budding dance entrepreneurs. Careers

the appeal of “Live Art” to an audience.

the business of dance: Breaking the barrier of extracurricular

alicia payne/hurley Cultural Officer - Dance National Cultural Foundation (NCF)

The business of dance in the Caribbean has great potential for growth into a viable industry.


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

Dance Therapist

Dance Fitness Instructor

Expressive or Creative Arts therapy is the use of all

Dance and fitness have shared a long and healthy

creative interventions such as art, music, play and dance/

relationship from the late 1970s, with the introduction of

movement to address social, behavioural, cognitive and

Dancercise, however, the traditional has been repackaged

emotional issues that occur in an individual or a group

with a strong infusion of Caribbean culture breathing new

of persons’ lives. Dance/movement therapy is one facet

life into this field. Soca Aerobics, Wuk-Up Workout and

of expressive arts therapy that can be utilised to assist

Dancehall Fitness are some of the latest crazes to be

individuals - especially adolescents explore their feelings,

successfully promoted within the field.

and manage the radical physical and emotional changes they are experiencing. This type of therapy is useful in

The business of dance in the Caribbean has great

helping young persons with developmental, physical,

potential for growth into a viable industry, whether

medical, social and psychological issues to develop using

pursuing the traditional or non-traditional commercial

dance as a medium for change.

careers, therefore, dancers who live to dance can also prepare to dance for a living.

WE CATER FOR ALL TYPES OF OCCASIONS. • Weddings • Parties • Cocktail Receptions • Retreats • Staff Functions/Parties • Training Sessions • Meetings • Baby Showers •�Retreats

We can also help you plan your event! #33 Broad Street, Bridgetown, St. Michael (Opp. Republic Bank) 1 (246) 436-1177 ryannesrestaurant@gmail.com

07


08

T H E

E X P O R T E R

... art speaks to what is happening now whether literally or figuratively, we are all condition through time, place as well as our interactions with people and as an artist I find that it shows in my art.


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

the

Artof Akilah

09


10

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Tell us more about who Akilah Watts is. Akilah Watts is a Barbadian Contemporary Artist. Watts received her Associate Degree in Visual Arts from the Barbados Community College (BCC) in 2014 and went on to complete her Bachelors Degree in Studio

THE ART OF AKILAH

Art in 2017. Akilah Watts has exhibited locally in a number of group shows at the Morningside Gallery, The Frame & Art Co. , Grande Salle, Lion Castle, The Crane Gallery and in several other spaces. She has been featured in a few local publications such as the Easy Magazine in 2016. Watts is currently working simultaneously on two bodies of work. One body of work deals with the projection of Barbadian national identity through cultural symbols. She uses the Mother Sally figure, the Tuk Band, palm trees, the Coat-of-Arms, the Trident, the national colors as well as generic images of the sea and the Barbadian landscape in subversive ways. Her second body of work deals with the black female and how her hair can be seen as a symbol of strength and beauty.

AkilaH Watts In this edition the focus is on ‘Contemporary Culture’, as a Barbadian visual artist, where do you see the place of art Barbadian culture?

Visual Artist

I see art on multiple levels as it relates to Barbadian Culture. One of those levels being documentation. What I mean is that art speaks to what is happening, whether literally or figuratively. We are all conditioned through time, place as well as our interactions with people and as an artist I find that it shows in my art. In a couple of years when people look back at my art some of the questions that are not resolved in our society and in my art, by extension, will either have been answered or it will cause people to ask why things have not changed and hopefully take the steps to improve the society and its circumstances.

What three words would you use to describe Barbados’ Art scene? Fraught, struggling and close-minded would have to be the three words I use for the art scene in Barbados. Although there are people trying and the art scene is seemingly still alive, I feel as though it is alive by extension because of those artists who are already established that are constantly

beautifully braided


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

11

producing work and making a name for themselves here in the region and internationally. The art scene in Barbados is a peculiar thing because as far as some of the nationals believe art is a hobby and the first shows/exhibitions that come to their minds when they think about art in Barbados is NIFCA and the Crop Over exhibition.

Do you think it is sustainable to be a professional artist in barbados? I think it can become a possibility to be a sustainable artist here but at this present moment it is not. It is like putting your eggs in one basket, thinking that you can rest your professional career as an artist on Barbados’ art scene. Until we open up our minds to the greater possibilities of what art can bring to the island, and start treating art and artist like something to be held high on the career/ job spectrum we will be struggling.

What is next for you as an Artist? The next step for me is getting into some art residences, art shows/exhibitions both nationally and regionally and making a name for myself and my art. I hope to bring a little life back to Barbados’ art scene as well as influence Barbadian children and adults as it relates to the value of the arts, and to encourage them should art be a path they would like to pursue.

Where do you see your place in the development of Art Culture in Barbados? At this moment, I see myself as a willing participant in the development and documentation of art culture in Barbados. I see myself continuing to produce work that speaks to Barbadian national identity through cultural symbols, which will play a part in the documentation of past and present art culture in Barbados.

The butterfly effect (series)


12

T H E

E X P O R T E R


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

Festival

13

Evolution


14

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Inside of his band house, which just happens to be outfitted with a full sized mattress,

festival evolution

Chetwyn Stewart sits registering one of his patrons for his Foreday Morning Band. Chetwyn needs no introduction, as a long time veteran within the Crop Over realm and the current President of the Barbados Association of Masquerades (BAM), his reputation precedes him. During his busiest time of the year Chetwyn spoke freely to us about how the Crop Over festival has changed over the years. While change is indeed inevitable, not all change is seen as good. One of those changes being the price of costumes. The cost of

Even if prices to us go up, we can’t take up our price because the market wouldn’t sustain it.

playing mas has skyrocketed with revellers paying up to $5,000 for a frontline place within the most desirable party bands. For some this is seen as a small price to pay for the experience and the opportunity to party alongside the stars who travel to our island for Grand Kadooment.

chetwYn Stewart Founder of Power X Four

For others, however, the steady increase in pricing has left them side-lined. “The party bands are now kind of pricing themselves out of the market; they are more targeting the people overseas, so therefore, you find that a lot of the locals are not going on the road for Grand Kadooment.” While not in agreement with this, he notes that it is not only the costume that is being purchased but the entire package inclusive of drinks, sound system and security. PowerX4: The Next Generation is offering patrons a “premium band with affordable prices.” When asked about how the recently increased National Social Responsibility Levy (NSRL) will affect band leaders,


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

he spoke about how he anticipated it will

The evolution of carnival costumes is

impact PowerX4.

of course not only seen in Barbados but regionally as well as internationally, in

“We will definitely make less, in other

places such as Brazil whose ‘barley there’

words, we can’t take up our price. Even

costumes are infamous worldwide.

if prices for us go up, we can’t take up our price because the market wouldn’t

It is easy to believe that Crop Over has

sustain it.” Speaking on behalf of the BAM

lost its focus on culture and is now, in

he recently indicated that the increase in

some instances, just straight business

the NSRL tax from two per cent to ten per

although band leaders aren’t entirely

cent could cripple Crop Over especially

to blame as it remains the role of the

since they could not raise their prices to

National Cultural Foundation (NCF) to

offset the tax like other sectors.

ensure that Barbadian culture remains a central focus within the Crop Over

Another way that the festival has

Festival and by extension in the design

changed, much to the dismay of many,

of costumes.

is by the way of costumes. The skimpy

position that enough funds are not being

female costumes have been subject to

invested into the festival to maintain the

much discussions over the years with

cultural aspect.

Chetwyn maintains his

many expressing the view that band leaders are not designing with a cultural

Born out of a group of friends going on

theme in mind. When it comes to the

the road seeking a great time, PowerX4

issue of the skimpy costumes, he said it

has evolved into what he has coined ‘The

is not only up to the band leaders but the

Next Generation’ but, of course, some

people who purchase them.

things will never change as the industry veteran says that the same high energy

“A lot of people think that it’s just up to the

that is brought by the band year after year

band leaders to decide what people wear

will remain a focus. With his daughter set

but you have to give them (the patrons)

to take over full leadership of PowerX4

what they want if not you’re going to be

in the next three years, the EXPORTER

left with costumes.”

cannot wait to see what they get up to next.

15


16

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Lucky for us, living in Barbados means never being more than fifteen minutes away from the beach;

couture brand. Originally, the brand was

most of us call it our second home so

women have clothing fit issues too, why

naturally swimwear can be considered a uniform to us. Two of Barbados’ very own Swimwear Designers have been paving their way by using their talent, social media and our beaches to create and display their work. Chenique Jones, currently a student at the London College

of

Fashion

and

Christian

Gibbs best known for her excellently handmade

crochet

swimwear

are

setting trends making a name for themselves in the world of Fashion. The Exporter was honoured to have both girls answer a few questions on their love for creating and design as well as their future.

targeted at the petite woman as I found it extremely difficult to find clothing that would fit me and realised other women may be having similar issues. After showcasing at BMEX in 2012, a lady approached me and said “curvier don’t you make for us too”. Although I did not change my target market initially that conversation resonated with me and I included a plus size section in my 2013 collection Féorce. The brand caters to women of all body types as all of our pieces are bespoke, meaning made to the customer’s individual measurements.

What has been your greatest challenge and then greatest opportunity? Making the decision to place my focus on school (London College of Fashion) entirely for the past three years and close down all social media accounts for the brand even though I knew it was a huge risk with budding brands in Barbados

Tell us more about J’ainique Couture. (Chenique)

on the rise. This meant that once I’ve

J’aiNique is a combination of my

have to build the brand and gain a

middle and first name, the meaning

new clientele. My greatest opportunity

of the brand however Jai is French for

would be attending the London College

I have and couture means to design

of Fashion and being mentored by

fashionable clothes to a client’s specific

the Fashion Contour team. The tutors

requirements

measurements.

and technicians are so passionate

Therefore when combined the name

about Lingerie and swimwear [that] it

says I have one of a kind pieces.

inspires you to want to learn. Earlier

J’aiNique Couture is a bespoke fashion

this year I had the opportunity to attend

and

finished school I would essentially

Access: Fashion


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

Interfiliere Paris with one of the tutors and other students [we] networked with individuals across the board in [the] European Fashion industry including designers, buyers, textiles suppliers etc; an experience that I am truly grateful and appreciative of.

Given you would have identified your brand as a bespoke brand, do you see any scope in the future for mass production? Yes I do, that would however require changing the name as I won’t want to contradict myself.

You would have identified closing all social media accounts as a challenge. In general what are thoughts on the impact of social media as it relates to the consumption of cultural goods (fashion) in Barbados? This choice was definitely challenging, as I knew by doing this I would have caused the possibility of us loosing clients. The couture swimwear industry within Barbados is still a very small market and if there is a handful of us, there is a lot. So there is still room for all of us as we each have our own unique touch. As for one example of JNC our prints are one of a kind...designed in house and manufactured in the UK.

Who is Christian Gibbs and how did you get started making swimwear? I am proud 24 year old Queen’s College alumni who creates. I remember having this cool swimsuit design in my mind that I really liked but there was no one here who could make it for me the way I wanted. I decided to attempt making it and after turning 3 tops into knots, I successfully made it and I’ve been turning my crochet hook ever since. What is the greatest challenge you have faced with your designs? The availability of materials here is very limited and proves to be my greatest challenge. However, that has been an easy fix since I order what I can’t get here from international websites.

Where do you see your business in 5 years? In 5 years, I hope that people all over the world can spot my designs from a mile away and instantly know that “Krishtun made that”! Everything is currently made to order but I hope to have a physical store with items that are ready to purchase on hand.

Do you feel there is room for your growth in Fashion Industry here? There are so many talented young people who don’t get the exposure they deserve here. There’s a lot of quality work being produced but very few outlets to display or put them in the public’s view. I believe with the right funding and opportunities offered, our fashion industry can be as big as our growing music industry.

17


18

T H E

E X P O R T E R


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

CREATIVE INDUSTRy

19


20

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Two factors have influenced recent developments in the cultural industries sector. Firstly, the need to diversify the Barbados economy became very urgent after the global financial and economic crisis took root in 2008; the cultural industries were identified

Cultural industries: the way forward

as one element of the “new economy�. Secondly, there is the CARICOM agreement to pursue the services sector, of which the cultural industries is a critical part. Barbados had also begun to pay closer attention to the creative sector. The success enjoyed by artistes like Rhianna, Shontelle, Livvy Franc and Hal Linton was a clear indication that closer and more strategic attention should be paid to its development. The phenomenon of the annual Crop Over Festival and the lesser known financial successes of some visual artists had long presented a compelling argument that a well-supported cultural industries sector had the ability to generate significant employment and foreign exchange. The evolution of Crop Over, which provides state-supported vehicles for the development and evolution of soca music, presented opportunities to enhance Barbados’

andrea king Director, Cultural Industries Development Authority

competitiveness in the international arena in festivals and music. Empirical data in the most recent study on the sector, the SALISES Economic Impact Assessment of the Crop Over Festival 2005-2007, and many sectoral studies done by Dr. Keith Nurse, also encouraged Barbados to reposition the sector. In the interest of becoming a catalyst in the development of the diversified economy, a National Policy for the Cultural Industries was developed in 2007. Out of this the Cultural Industries Development Act was passed in the House of Assembly in October 2013, the Senate in the following month and was proclaimed on February 1st,

carifesta xiii & BCIDA Currently, there are specific interventions in Fashion and Visual Arts, and a MarketPlace for all creative segments in the upcoming CARIFESTA XIII, which runs from August 17 to 27, 2017.


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

It is therefore the vision of BCIDA to develop increasing export and trade activity in creative goods and services.

2015. The Act provided for a suite of tax-

paid to developing sustainability through

based incentives and funding for cultural

each part of the production value-chain.

practitioners, as well as the Barbados

Growth will be further inhibited by low

Cultural Industries Development Authority

levels of entrepreneurship and, while there

(BCIDA) to implement the Act.

is now academic qualification in the arts, there are very low levels of business skills

Barbados’ heavy social investment in free

applied to the development of this sector.

education, which enabled Art and Music to be always on primary and secondary

BCIDA has sought to address this in

curricula, has played a critical role in

its

preparing our nation for this new sector.

one initiative called PITCH, which is

That education now includes degrees in

designed to help creatives understand

Arts and Entertainment Management,

the financial anatomy of their businesses,

Fine Arts, Film and Theatre at the tertiary

identify their market and convey this

institutions. These current developments

information in a business plan to potential

in education and policy, coupled with other

investors/ financiers. BCIDA has also

strategic financial interventions, will propel

been conducting market research in

the cultural industries sector to become a

the USA, the UK and other parts of the

key economic driver.

European Union. A Film Commission has

It is, therefore, the vision of BCIDA to

been established to promote Barbados

develop increasing export and trade

as a destination for on-location filming of

activity in creative goods and services,

ads, films and television series. Currently,

through implementing effectively designed

there are specific interventions in Fashion

strategies

business

and Visual Arts, and a Market-place for

practices, and promotion and marketing of

all creative segments in the upcoming

Barbados’ creative cultural goods, services

CARIFESTA XIII, which runs from August

and experiences.

17 to 27, 2017.

The

for

sustainable

sector’s

practitioners

strengths various

through

The current development of the sector will intensify with the report of the Mapping of

digitalisation

the Cultural Industries. This document will

and strong internet connectivity. With

help to inform the strategic management

the help of funding opportunities made

of the sector, including an identification of

available through local, regional and

opportunities and challenges as well as

international programmes, the sector

the resources that must be deployed in

can grow. However, this growth will be

getting the cultural industries to achieve

severely handicapped if attention is not

their full potential.

increasing

stages

especially

of

development,

at

include

programming,

21


22

T H E

E X P O R T E R

the art of healing

traditional chinese medicine Dr. ChĂŠ Leon C Corbin Chinese Medical Practitioner


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

It may come as a surprise to many here in Barbados,

recommendation of Chinese taiji, meditation and

that we have Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)

general health preservation practices.

catch a draft” of Barbados and “avoid the wind as you avoid the sword (避风如避剑)” health

and many other related therapies readily available to both locals and visitors.

China and Barbados have both preserved grassroots practices such as eating certain dishes in respect

Looking deeper we find similarities in the traditional

of relevant days on the lunar calendar and the

health practices of Barbados and China. We find

knowledge regarding the coordination of farming

within the old sayings similarities such as “don’t

23


24

T H E

E X P O R T E R

practices in relation to the seasons and the turning of the earth. This is the practice of “health cultivation” by which health is regarded as a garden to be continually maintained and enhanced in accordance with the cycles of life. Many traditionalists consider this a higher form of medicine, whereby one visits the health practitioner to maintain and enhance one’s health as opposed to awaiting the onset of a disease or condition which perhaps could have been prevented by promoting stronger immune function, and strategic lifestyle changes. Chinese and Western medicine are more or less the same, in fact any medicinal, or therapeutic, healing technique applied with the principal of building up the individual’s own strength while expelling the unwanted 扶正祛邪(fu zheng qu xie), to restore balance, would be considered fully in keeping with Chinese medicine principles including psychology, and physiotherapy. The only difference being diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In fact, in this modern era, Chinese medicine practitioners do not shun from modern diagnostics such as x-rays,

In essence most of Chinese medicine is simply physics and the body’s natural selfrejuvenating reaction to relevantly applied stimulation.

blood work etc. Increasingly across the globe, western medicine practitioners are also taking on an understanding of TCM. In some techniques such as “dry needling”, we can also see the impact of TCM on western medicine. The majority of hospitals where I would have interned in China have both traditional and modern medicine side by side. The success of any healing discipline at the end of the day relies heavily on the practitioner. An integrated approach has become quite popular here in Barbados.


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

Many Bajans and Asians alike have

Chinese medicine has been shrouded

found renewed vigor in the pursuit of

in mystery for many years. In essence,

health and well-being. Technological

most of Chinese medicine is simply

advances allow scientists even keener

physics and the body’s natural self-

insights, which increasingly support

rejuvenating

TCM and related physiotherapy and

applied stimulation, which can be

health practices. Often it is the desire of

achieved by various techniques. I once

a patient to avoid particular medicines

asked an old Chinese medicine doctor,

due

which

“Shifu, if you could give one piece of

then lead them to seek lesser known

advice beneficial to all for promotion

methods such as acupuncture, fire

of good health, what would it be? Shifu

cupping, dietary variations, tai chi and

said, ”maintain happiness, balanced

related forms of traditional exercise.

lifestyle and eat more vegetables.”

Here in Barbados, we can now access

The study of life, the rebalancing and

Chinese cultural teaching through the

optimising of health and well-being will

Confucius Institute at UWI Cave Hill,

continue to be a major interest as it is

where you can also access language

the requirement for achieving all else.

to

personal

conditions

classes and scholarship information. Barbadians can participate and learn with the islands Chinese martial arts and Taiji clubs, or seek out the advice and therapies of our local acupuncture, tuina (Chinese medicine massage), iris diagnosis, reflexology and those with detailed knowledge of the practical use of medicinal herbs.

reaction

to

relevantly

Health, happiness and balance!

25


26

T H E

E X P O R T E R

The music business and indeed the entire entertainment industry are highly ICT in Music: areas of dependent on the use of technology. growth

From idea conceptualization to composition and production and finally market distribution and marketing, there are a large number of software tools (Pro Tools & Logic Audio), electronic devices (Mac/Laptop, synthesizers, drum machines, samplers) and services (YouTube/Vevo, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) utilised by industry professionals and hobbyists to render creative ideas into tangible creative products and then attract consumers to the said products. These tools and services are so readily available at low cost that almost anyone here in Barbados can produce music from their bedrooms, and many Crop Over tunes have been and still are created in this manner. Distribution and Marketing are activities at the money-making end of the creative spectrum, and there are indeed a large number of options for this. There are content aggregators such as Tunecore & CDBABY, which will place music onto a large number of distribution platforms such as iTunes, Amazon, SoundCloud, Spotify, Deezer and so on. The idea of building a local platform is a tantalizing one, and indeed this writer launched the first legal music download website dedicated to Caribbean music (gotrhythm.com) over 12 years ago. Gotrhythm gained great traction worldwide in a relatively short space of time, and at its peak recorded over ten thousand unique visitors per

day. Despite this “success”, the cost of attracting customers was very high

george thomas

and the ability to get them to purchase was very low. Gotrhythm’s biggest

President, The Association of Music Entrepreneurs

customer was from Japan and this person purchased over 80 downloads in a single transaction and several others over time. A DJ who was “Otaku” about Caribbean vibes. Generally speaking, people just do not buy music when they can get it for free! Another key issue was the lack of local e-commerce platforms, this forced Gotrhythm to use PayPal and this decision turned out to be an unfortunate one, as Paypal ultimately blocked Gotrhythm because of “too many non-North American transactions”, and this effectively killed the initiative. In 2017, music is mostly streamed as opposed to downloaded. This has a devastating effect on music sales revenue, because unlike the download


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

business model where a customer was charged

local musicians to leverage existing platforms

US 99 cents to download and the artist can

which have hundreds of millions of consumers

make 70-80% of that, streaming models are

from across the planet, and be very clever with

subscription-based. For example, by paying

their marketing tactics by using methods such

$9.95 monthly, a consumer can stream as many

as payment for listings on industry blogs, top

tracks as they wish. In the streaming model, the

playlists and the use of professional digital

artist will be paid a percentage of the service

marketing services and publicists.

provider’s revenue for that time period which is proportional to the number of times their song

With all that said, a local digital platform could be

is streamed.

a useful tool to market or represent the island’s

To gain more context on the effort required to make money online please take a look at http://www. digitalmusicnews.com/2016/09/15/streamingmusic-earn-1-dollar/

culture from both tourism and an international music industry perspective. In my opinion this would be a B2B play in that the platform would be directly marketed to travel agencies, music supervisors for advertising and movies, record

Streaming has effectively killed music sales

labels, production companies, booking agencies,

revenue, and the digital music distribution

music festival promoters and concert promoters.

platforms are just marketing tools for all but the

The business owner of the digital platform should

very largest entertainment acts such as Rihanna,

have direct agreements with these tourism and

Adele, Taylor Swift, Drake and Justin Bieber,

music business entities, with an understanding

just to name a few, who’s hundreds of millions

that the platform represents an online “shopping

of fans provide economies of scale that make

list” of sorts. On a secondary level, there could

streaming profitable for them. The key attribute

be a retail play in which the platform could also

of these systems is discovery by large numbers

be used to submit music to the major online

of persons distributed all around the globe, and

distributors. A digital marketing service provider

the reporting analytics they provide which can be

could then be engaged individually by the artists/

leveraged to fine-tune your marketing strategy.

music producers to drive fans to the music. From

It is not economically feasible to invest in a pure

my perspective that is the only business model

play Barbadian music retail platform at this time

that could possibly gain some traction and add

because the costs of driving global attention to

quantifiable value. The direct B2C model just

this platform will never be recovered via music

won’t work financially and adoption will be low

sales. Would you build a Facebook, Instagram

because it is competing for consumer attention

or SnapChat just for Barbadian people? No,

against the globally established incumbents

because it would never gain the adoption of

which have spent, and continue to spend, vast

Facebook, Instagram or SnapChat. It’s best for

amounts on customer acquisition and retention.

27


28

T H E

E X P O R T E R


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

CARIFESTA 2017 Asserting our Culture, Celebrating Ourselves

Barbados has the distinguished pleasure & privilege of hosting the 13th edition of the Caribbean Festival of Arts, CARIFESTA in August. Over 4,000 artists, artistes and artisans are expected to participate within our shores under the theme, “Asserting our Culture, Celebrating Ourselves”, on what has been called the largest exchange of creative flows within the Caribbean and Latin America. CARIFESTA closely follows our Sweetest Summer Festival, Crop Over however; CARIFESTA differs from Crop Over in that CARIFESTA is the gathering of 23 Caribbean and Latin American countries, whose participants have the opportunity to showcase a wide array of cultural disciplines inclusive of dance, music, theatre arts, traditional culinary cuisine and visual arts, just to name a select few.

BCSI SECRETARIAT

A series of events will be held over the festival’s period which includes: • The Opening Ceremony • A Grand Market and Buyers Shopping Mall • CARIFESTA XXIII Symposium • Country Night • Super Concerts • Dance –‘Danse Caraibes’ • Literature- ‘A Literary Evening’ • Visual Arts- ‘Masters Exhibition’ With Crop Over being held from May 14th – August 7th and CARIFESTA from August 17th – August 27th, it is shaping up to be the “Biggest summer for Caribbean Culture”!

29


30

T H E

E X P O R T E R

WE DO: BRANDING CREATIVE STRATEGY WEB DESIGN

let’s talk. 1 (246)

547 8419 idscreativeinc hello@idscreativeinc.com www.idscreativeinc.com


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

untold stories

31


32

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Difficult times bring urgent art.

Ascension Projix is a company seeking to create sustainable livelihoods for local artists

reshape our contemporary culture over time, by finding unique

by aligning them with business opportunities to increase their

Our first project saw us creating glass art photo-ops for Piper

profitability. There is a wealth of artistic talent here on this island,

Heidsieck, Johnnie Walker Blue and ICBL at Elevate Suit and Tie

extending beyond depictions of sugar cane and chattel houses, and

Old Year’s Night last year. This led us to do further event branding

we find ways to utilise these skills to meet the needs of corporate

throughout the year, utilising Kevon “Von” Hall’s graphic design

Barbados. We also provide artists interested in launching projects

skills to create varying pieces for creative marketing for different

or ventures outside their everyday operations with technical

corporate clients. Last summer for the first time in Barbados, we

support to meet their goals. All in all, we simply want to make art

were able to have a full free art exhibit in a heavily frequented

visible.

space, where we partnered with Sky Mall to launch their 50th

methods of having art featured and used in our everyday spaces, so that it becomes a new norm in Barbadian life.

Independence Art Installation entitled, “Dis Is Where We From”. All As much as this business was born out of a love for all things

throughout the mall were sculptures, photographs, canvas, print

Barbadian, it was also formed out of a genuine and burning

work and replicas depicting cultural highlights of our Barbadian

concern. With a population overflowing with artistic talent, there

heritage. They were coupled with their historical write-ups obtained

is a blatant lack of respect and appreciation for homegrown art

through research and interviews with historian Mr. Trevor Marshall,

in different forms. Ascension Projix is, therefore, determined to

which provided opportunities for important dialogue among


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

33

We can be reached by e-mail at ascension.projix@gmail.com or by telephone at 257-8241/829-7507.

generations of Bajans to learn and share points

for large art installations and whole sides of

on our culture. Another project with a similar

buildings are covered in murals. This should

goal saw us designing the first underwater

be included in our plans for development as

sculpture and artificial reef for Carlisle Bay,

a nation. One project Ascension is launching

depicting a 16ft canoe carrying an Amerindian

entitled, “Make Art Visible”, intends to spur

family across the sea. This sculpture, fabricated

this by creating one mural and one large

by Konstruk Caribbean, was scheduled to ‘drop’

installation in each parish. We also plan to hold

last November, however, we still await approval

contemporary art shows featuring art of varying

from some government agencies.

media, including innovative elements in the show to captivate the audience, as well as other

So much can be done to empower local artists,

culturally uplifting initiatives. All of our projects

as that is at the core of each endeavor we

provide income and exposure for the artists

undertake as a business, but relaxing this

involved, and require funding and involvement

challenge of red tape from government entities

from government and corporate Barbados, who

related to creative projects and increasing

can benefit greatly from the “stop and stare”

financial support from corporate Barbados

factor art naturally provides for marketing, as

would assist greatly. In Europe and North

well as general cultural stimulation.

America corporations pay thousands of dollars

Ascension Projix, the art-based creative project company, comprises of Matthew Gittens, the budding, detailoriented entrepreneur who conceptualized the company, and Jabari Alleyne, Economics and Mathematics graduate and former Fuel Oil Trading Operator for Shell Western Supply & Trading Ltd., who serve as the talent brokers for the artists, using their networking skills and creative concepts to find different projects through which the artists’ work can be displayed.


34

T H E

E X P O R T E R


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

in-house news

35


36

T H E

E X P O R T E R

GOING DIGITAL Program Coordinator Liana Welch with BCSI supported winners Heather and Elijah

The digital App Industry has taken the world by storm.

BCSI Secretariat

New age mobile applications are all the rage and Apps that can assist in making the everyday life of users just a little easier are very desirable. The PitchIT Caribbean challenge falls under The Caribbean Mobile Innovation Project (CMIP) and the challenge is specifically designed to strengthen the Caribbean mobile innovation ecosystem while enabling the sustainability and competitiveness of mobile entrepreneurs. The Barbados Coalition of Service Industries (BCSI) supported

seven

mobile

technology

entrepreneurs

throughout their PitchIT experience, providing them with technical assistance from industry professionals, targeted coaching sessions, training courses and boot camps all aimed at preparing them along with their mobile app businesses for market readiness. On Saturday May 13th, The BCSI in collaboration with the PitchIT Caribbean project, rolled out the PitchIT Caribbean Battle. This battle allowed seven Technology Entrepreneurs from Barbados, Antigua and Suriname, the opportunity to pitch their ideas to a panel of esteemed judges for their chance to win a coveted spot in the PitchIT Caribbean Final in St. Kitts & Nevis. The PitchIT Battle was divided into two separate tracts with the first one being Ideation. In this phase, participants

The Barbados Coalition of Service Industries (BCSI) supported seven mobile technology entrepreneurs throughout their PitchIT experience,

p


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

would have developed an innovative application based

announce that two of our supported entrepreneurs won

business idea within the last six months but have not

top prizes in the challenge. Heather Barker and Elijah

yet implemented their idea, essentially still being within

James walked away with USD $5,000 in seed funding for

the planning stages of their business. The second

the development of their mobile businesses. In addition

tract, was Early-Stage. Within this phase, participants

to this, the pair has been awarded places in PitchIT

developed innovative business ideas within the last

Caribbean accelerators throughout the Caribbean.

eighteen months and unlike in the ideation phase, have experienced some early success after having launched

Heather’s app, titled Isle&Dine, is described as the Air

their business. Competitors rolled out their plans

B&B of food. The user is allowed to book authentic

for new age Apps, with ideas ranging from in-home

meals in local homes. Users can also sign up to be

Caribbean dining experiences to directly connecting

hosts and prepare tasty local dishes for their guests.

buyers with sellers. The ideas were nothing short of

Isle&Dine offers a unique and authentic way for tourists

innovative. At the end of the battle, Phillip Belgrave with

and locals alike to experience the culinary culture of

his mobile app Pocket Shop, emerged the winner of the

Barbados. Elijah describes The Local App as a portal by

ideation phase while Elijah Belgrave from Antigua &

which users can access local information anywhere in

Barbuda took the top prize for the early-stage category

the world. Whether in Antigua, Barbados or across the

with The Local App. Both Phillip and Elijah won places in

world in China, users can enjoy access to news, weather,

the final PitchIT Competition. Another BCSI supported

events, phone directories, TV

entrepreneur, Heather Barker from ISLE&DINE also

entertainment and more.

and radio, nightlife,

secured her position in the final. The CMIP is providing technology entrepreneurs with From June 12th to the 16th, tech entrepreneurs from

the opportunity to take mobile innovation culture in the

all across the Caribbean region gathered in St. Kitts

Caribbean to a new level. BCSI is proud to have been a

& Nevis to participate in a week of activities which

part of this and we look forward to the success of all

culminated with the PitchIT Challenge. BCSI is proud to

winners and participants of the PitchIT Challenge.

t i h c pit

PitchIT Caribbean Winners receiving their awards.

37


38

T H E

E X P O R T E R

THIS ARTICLE PROVIDES a brief review of the recent jointly hosted workshop by the Barbados Coalition of Service Industries (BCSI), the Barbados Private Sector Trade Team and the Ministry of Industry, International

Business,

Commerce

and Small Business Development on the CARIFORUM/EU Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) and Brexit. Beyond

This workshop was entitled, the

Border:

A

practical

approach to economic sustainability. Conceptually, this forum was designed for technocrats to solicit from the

private sector, a new mandate to reset their work programme. A new mandate was considered to be necessary in an effort to make the EPA

beyond the border trade forum

work for Barbadian enterprises given the various developments in the world and domestic economies since 2008. This workshop featured presentations from

a

variety

of

organisations

giving an update EU-CARICOM trade under the EPA such as, the European Union Delegation to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean, the Office of Trade Negotiations of the CARICOM Secretariat

and

the

Barbados

elihu wahid Projects Officer, Trade Policy and Research


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

Statistical Service. In addition, this workshop also featured presentations by private sector companies which were successful in penetrating the European market. However, the main highlight of this workshop came in the form of a roundtable discussion on Brexit which featured many present and past high-ranking trade officials such as Ambassador Gail Mathirin of the OTN and former Ambassador of Barbados to the European Union and head of the EPA Implementation Unit, Errol Humphrey. The main takeaway from this discussion, however, is that Brexit is not a development to be feared but an opportunity for the region to extend its development paradigm.

39


40

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Trade is a vital tool for economic development in any Small Island Developing State

(SIDS), so much so that trade in services is a key component for generating government revenue especially in Caribbean countries that depends heavily on tourism such as Barbados.

QUALITY standard mark

Yet, Trade in services is not acknowledged as one of the leading drivers of the today’s economy. The importance of services has continued to be overlooked and repudiated over the years, therefore it is imperative for organizations such as the Barbados Coalition of Services Industry (BCSI) to emphasize the importance and the impact of the Services Sector to our economy. Services undisputable contribution to economic welfare of Caribbean countries is noteworthy. However, the issue of measurement and the form in which services data is presented limits the extent to which an accurate picture can be presented of the contribution of services to national income. In addition, the concern of ensuring that high quality standards are maintained throughout the region is another road block for trade in services. Services unlike goods, because of its intangible nature, are very difficult to track and capture. Nevertheless, an attempt can be made to maintain a certain level of quality from service providers. This can be done via a Quality Standard Mark. The Barbados Quality Standard Mark (QSM) functions as a standard qualification seal that will be awarded to organizations which have met the required standard in service delivery. The QSM will ensure that good quality services can be recognized regionally and internationally. It offers service providers the ability to validate their competence and quality standards within their organization by proving credibility, accountability and visibility.

Shekita Walcott Assistant Project Officer


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

Quality marks are built on quality management systems which are “a set of co-ordinated activities to direct and

Registration Requirements

control an organization in order to continually improve

Organizations desirous of applying to be awarded the seal

the effectiveness and efficiency of it performance” (UK

will be required to undergo a registration process which

Department of Trade and Industry, 2000).

includes: • Validation by National Association

Thus, in a world that is becoming globalized and with the

• Completion of registration form

new technological advances it is important to ensure that

• Submission of registration and recommendation of the

the standards continues to meet changing market needs.

organization • BCSI’s formal acceptance of registration

How to apply for the QSM seal?

Further information on how to apply for the QSM and the accompanying documentation will be posted on the BCSI’s website.

41


42

T H E

E X P O R T E R


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

MEMBERS’ CORNER

43


44

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Cleaning is a part of Barbadian culture. From weekly house cleaning on Saturdays, to ‘picking’ down the house on Christmas Eve and cleaning from top to bottom‌ we love a clean home. When it comes to the world of Professional Cleaning, however, there is a higher standard that needs to be observed. The Barbados Association of Professional Cleaners (BAPC), is a body

cleanliness: a hidden industry in barbados

dedicated to the improvement of the standards of the environmental cleaning services sector, for both practitioners and consumers alike in Barbados. One of our main objectives is to ensure that all environmental cleaning sector service providers adhere to high industry standards and this can be achieved through our collaborative effort with the TEVT Council and the Small Business Association (SBA) with the creation of the Janitorial Level 2 Training Program. Forty (40) cleaning industry professionals participated in this pilot programme that was aimed at becoming advantageous to business owners, cleaning professionals and the cleaning industry, by raising the standard by which professional cleaning is judged here in Barbados. This programme was a huge step for the BAPC as an association and an even greater step forward for the Professional Cleaning Sector. With the completion of this pilot programme, we are expecting that other industry professionals will be afforded the opportunity to become qualified in the Janitorial Level 2, thereby, driving the sector in the right direction.

Barbados association of professional cleaners


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

45

The programme was rolled out in two phases, the theoretical and the practical. The practical side of the training programme was taught by several established industry professionals and business owners with many years of experience, who are also members of the association of professional cleaners. Trainers taught

and

reinforced

correct

cleaning

practices to the participants such as correct waste disposal, usage and storage of cleaning equipment, protective personal equipment and floor cleaning just to name a few. We welcome you to visit our Facebook page where you can browse through our history and follow all news related to the Janitorial Level 2 Training Programme as well as all of our initiatives. We have so much more in store for the Professional Cleaning Industry in Barbados.

Working together to educate, as well as to improve the standards of the environmental cleaning services for both practitioners and customers BENCHMARKING To ensure that all environmental cleaning sector service providers adhere to high industry standards ADVOCACY To be the primary advocate for the creation of an effective environmental cleaning sector LEADERSHIP To be a service leader in all environmental cleaning EDUCATION To educate members and the public Email: bapcgroup@gmail.com Tel: (246) 429-5357


46

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Have you ever heard of James Sider? He is the Founder and CEO of BandPage, one of the most popular music applications on Facebook, which has been able to raise to date up to $19M USD. What about Naom Bardin, the creator of Waze? It’s a real-time crowdsourced tracking application that helps you pick the fastest route on the road to your destination. Waze is currently valued at a whopping $1.3B USD! Both entrepreneurs are products of the well-known Silicon Valley, but when we think of

The winning formula: a robust entrepreneurship ecosystem.

stories like theirs, we can’t help but wonder what ingredients and conditions led to their success.

The prevailing question is how exactly do we chart a path to the development of a vibrant entrepreneurship ecosystem in Barbados?

There

isn’t

one

particular

component

which

stimulates

entrepreneurship but rather an amalgamation of several factors which result in a successful venture. Nevertheless, Barbados’ goal should be to produce an ecosystem of elements that work in tandem to support an ample number of high-growth self-sustaining businesses with extensive economic impact. For quite some time now, entrepreneurship has been viewed as one of the strongest propellers of growth of the Barbados economy. It has evolved into a catalyst of change deemed to bring new opportunities

Liana Welch

to an under-performing economy. Both the government and the

Project Officer, Barbados Coalition of Service Industries (BCSI)

private sector have recognised entrepreneurship as a driver for social and economic transformation. However, there remains a certain level of uncertainty amongst us about the construction of applicable plans, policies and culture to create an entrepreneurial spirit amongst our people. The prevailing question is how exactly do we chart a path to the development of a vibrant entrepreneurship ecosystem in Barbados? What are the basic principles and concepts which should be established? Here is my take on our approach.


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

1. Assessing our current entrepreneurship ecosystem

2. Create an ecosystem map.

Isenberg, 2011 describes an entrepreneurship ecosystem using six

After identifying the structure of the

domains: Policy, Human Capital, Markets, Finance, Culture and Support

ecosystem, we need now take a look at

Professions.

We first need to holistically assess the strengths and

its content. Who are the participants

weaknesses of our current ecosystem and then the respective impact

within the ecosystem and how are they

on the entrepreneurs. If you are an entrepreneur living and operating in

connected? One of the most crucial

Barbados and you are reading this, what is your opinion of the financial

tasks is to define what a successful

opportunities readily available for you? Are support programmes and

entrepreneurship

existing policies efficiently tailored to address your needs? Are there

embody for a 21st century Barbados.

sufficient regulatory and legal frameworks put in place to impact the level

Each entrepreneurship ecosystem is

of entrepreneurship in Barbados? These are all questions we have to ask

unique to its jurisdiction and should,

ourselves, and more importantly, seek out our Barbadian entrepreneurs

therefore, be treated as such.

for the answers. Answers to these questions would definitively aid in

Relevant stakeholders should include

addressing any weaknesses within the ecosystem and certainly pave the

policy makers, educational institutions,

way for the implementation of practically focused policies. Undoubtedly,

financial

institutions,

entrepreneurs,

none of this can be achieved without the support and leadership from all

business

support

organisations,

stakeholders within the ecosystem.

non-governmental and

ecosystem

organisations

development

importantly,

would

agencies.

programmes

More

amongst

the aforementioned stakeholders need to take on an integrated approach to servicing the needs of the entrepreneurs. This should be strengthened by clearly defined roles to be played by each organisation

and

stakeholder

within

the ecosystem. With limited resources available, efficiency is key. This would, therefore, call for a realignment and rationalisation amongst a number of firms.

3. Study best practices from around the world. There is absolutely no need to totally reinvent the wheel. There are some existing entrepreneurship

ecosystem

models

that have been reasonably successful

The Entrepreneurship Ecosystem (Adapted from Babson Global titled “Domains of the Entrepreneurship Ecosystem,�, 2011)

47


48

T H E

E X P O R T E R

in producing top performing entrepreneurs. We can

for Barbados, our focus and efforts should be to pursue

learn from some of the best practices from around the

sectors for early success and build upon these to create

world without emulating them. The idea is to create an

sound programmes.

environment where entrepreneurs can flourish and grow as a result of better access to finance, improved support

In summary, we know that entrepreneurship can elevate

for new businesses, greater ease of doing business and

Barbados’ social and economic development, while

clearer regulations.

creating jobs and wealth. A supportive framework is,

Great models for success include countries like Israel,

therefore, essential. The emergence of a strong, healthy,

Germany and Ireland whose ecosystems have been

robust entrepreneurship ecosystem should take priority

developed to support specific sectors. For example, in

as a national economic development strategy. Needless

Germany, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research

to say, much of the framework already exists in Barbados.

launched BioRegio, an ecosystem targeted at promoting

It is now a matter of assessing where we are, engaging

creativity and collaborations in life sciences.

stakeholders by defining their roles and to integrate these elements into the ecosystem.

If we are successful at being creative with our local assets and strengths, an emerging niche entrepreneurial

We should also accelerate and promote success stories

ecosystem could produce more high growth businesses.

within Barbados. Nothing succeeds like success. Bringing

Currently, our strengths lie in a robust creative sector.

local wins to the fore can be a source of inspiration. Even

Additionally, our renewable energy sector has been making

better, successful entrepreneurs can share their learning

some waves for quite some time. I can’t neglect to mention

and experiences with others. This can immensely help to

the ICT sector which has also shown great potential. After

spur broad- based entrepreneurship.

envisioning the entrepreneurship ecosystem appropriate


50

T H E

E X P O R T E R

Global Picture

Opportunities

Cultural and creative industries (CCI) is a term

In November 2013, the Government of Barbados

used to describe economic activity in the arts.

passed the Cultural Industries Development Act

Using a broad definition of the arts, this term

which initiated fiscal incentives for the cultural

refers to music, literary arts, advertising, gaming,

and creative sector in Barbados. Under this

festivals, visual arts, performing arts, audio-

act, enterprises are encouraged to apply for a

visual media, radio and fashion and design. It

licence from the Minister of Culture. With such

is estimated that this sector contributes USD

a license, enterprises may apply for incentives

$2.3 Trillion to the global economy. Further, of

as it relates to all duties and taxes payable on

this figure, it is estimated that USD $124 billion

imported inputs. Further this act allows for

originates in the Caribbean and Latin America.

approved enterprises and/or projects to earn

CULTURAL INDUSTRIES SECTOR PROFILE

tax credit on marketing, training, investment and dividend payments .

Barbados

elihu wahid

Given that the total GDP in Barbados is only USD

Projects Officer, Trade Policy and Research

$4.5 billion, by merely tapping into the global

Challenges

market in a marginal way, there is tremendous

Some Cultural Practitioners have pointed out

scope for Barbados to exponentially grow the

that there are certain administrative difficulties

Barbadian economy. The most comprehensive

as it relates to accessing these incentives.

study of the contribution of the CCI in Barbados

Further on an institutional level, there remains

is the NCF sponsored economic Impact

a very large problem as it relates to the access

assessment of Crop Over 2005-2007. Under

to finance for entrepreneurs in the CCI. Given

this study it is estimated that the festival

the nature of their operations, which may tend

contributed BBD $56 million to the Barbadian

to be not very capital intensive, often CCI actors

economy in 2007. Taking the rises in the retail

or not able to secure the necessary financing

price index, it is estimated that in 2015 the

as a result of a lack of collateral. One means

festival contributed at least BBD $70 million.

of remedying this problem is for financial institutions to use the intellectual property of these persons as collateral. However, at the moment, financial institutions in Barbados do not seem to be very keen on this alternative.

12 Cultural times: the first global map of cultural and creative industries, EY, 2015 3 Moore, Winston and Jewel Brathwaite. “The Economics of Crop Over.� Economic Insight Issue 2. 4 Cultural Development Industries Act 2013-15


WWW.BCSI.ORG.BB

51


52

T H E

E X P O R T E R

BUILDING BUSINESSES. SUPPORTING SERVICES. EXPORTING EXCELLENCE.

Barbados Coalition of Service Industries (BCSI) Building #3 Unit 2B Harbour Industrial Estate Telephone: 1 (246) 429-5357 Fax: 1 (246) 429-5352 E-mail: info@bcsi.org.bb Website: http://www.bcsi.org.bb

The Exporter - Issue 3  

In this issue of The Exporter, the BCSI takes a look at 'Shaping Our Contemporary Culture' in the context of CARIFESTA and the rise of the c...

The Exporter - Issue 3  

In this issue of The Exporter, the BCSI takes a look at 'Shaping Our Contemporary Culture' in the context of CARIFESTA and the rise of the c...

Advertisement