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Up front: Kinsol Trestle completion nears under camera’s eye page 3 Artists: Students over the moon about art display page 21 For all the news of the Cowichan region as it happens, plus stories from around British Columbia, go to our website www.cowichannewsleader.com Your news leader since 1905

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

School secretary Äred for Äxing son’s grades Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

A

Andrew Leong

A sign-carrying Sarah MacDonald was among an overÅow crowd of about 2,000 assembled in Duncan city square Friday for a candlelight walk of empowerment in Take Back The Night. For more, see page 5.

Work underway to seal old Koksilah ash dump Preparing for future: future: Cowichan Tribes project underway to deal with waste from old incinerator Ashley Gaudreault

News Leader Pictorial

I

f you’ve noticed a steady stream of trucks taking off from the old Koksilah Road land¿ll and travelling south toward Bamberton, that’s Cowichan Tribes cleaning up tens of thousands of tonnes of old incinerator ash, CVRD’s Bob McDonald said Monday. According to Cowichan Valley Regional District’s manager of recycling and waste, Tribes got its hands on a federal funding grant to deal with heaps of ash left from when an incinerator ran there from the mid‘70s to late ‘90s. Tribes is ¿nalizing a contract with the company hired to move a portion of the ash to Richmond using

the Bamberton port’s barge facility to get it there, McDonald said. “They’re dealing with it, sorting out all the material, and they’ve got too much onsite to manage on the footprint they’re occupying,” he explained. “They’re trucking off a portion of it to a land¿ll in Richmond so they can start work on the site.” McDonald said the CVRD has been working with Tribes for a couple of years on a game plan for ash removal. The former-CVRD site is on band land, McDonald said, noting ash doesn’t pose a huge environmental threat but removal must be done properly. “They’re going to cap it properly and basically put it to bed so it doesn’t pose any environmental risk. “It’s kind of an industrial waste. It’s not unlike

contaminated soil but it’s not soil. The degree of contamination is there but it’s minimal,” he explained. “They’re going to dig up the whole shooting match, the soils around it all, and deal with it all properly.” McDonald believes Tribes will soon be looking towards future uses of the Koksilah Road dump site. “There used to be a big ravine there and I think they’re aiming to bring it back up to some usable grade so it can be for other uses in the future,” he said. Tribes spokesperson John Keating would not comment on the project prior to a contract being signed. He said an announcement could be forthcoming as soon as Friday. Work has already begun on removing the access ash to Richmond.

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Cow High secretary ¿red for allegedly altering her son’s test scores has lost an arbitration appeal. Arbitrator Mark Brown upheld School District 79’s decision to ¿re the unidenti¿ed woman on Feb. 16. As her son is a student at Cowichan Secondary School, and given the sensitive nature of the case, Brown did not identify the former secretary. She was accused in the spring of 2010 of altering her son’s answers on multiple-choice “bubble sheets,” which are scanned electronically by of¿ce staff to grade students. All that’s required to change an answer is an eraser and pencil, Brown noted. He determined that on at least three occasions, the secretary altered her son’s answers to improve his test scores. “The grievor was in a position of trust,” Brown wrote on his arbitration report. “The integrity of the employer’s student records is very important to the education system. The acts were not spur of the moment. They were calculated and repeated.” Brown also noted the former secretary denies any wrongdoing to this day. “If she had acknowledged the wrongdoing and shown some remorse my conclusion may have been different,” he wrote. The former secretary — referred to only as “the grievor” by Brown — was ¿red at the end of May last year. Her union — Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 606 — ¿led a grievance on her behalf, and Brown conducted his hearing on Jan. 31 and between Feb. 1 and 4 of this year. The union asserted the district’s investigation into the matter was Àawed, and the form of discipline used — termination —was excessive: no one had ever been terminated by the district before. more on page 5

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2 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

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TOP STORY

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 3

Extra cash available, if the community can match Ext The Kinsol Trestle fundraising campaign still needs to raise $275,000 in order to get matching government cash. The work currently underway is all fully funded, but there’s still more than a quarter-million dollars worth of federal and provincial grants available for extra and ongoing work — if the community can raise a matching amount.

That work will happen either way, but if the grants aren’t available it’ll be spaced out over the next few years instead of happening now. Restoration of the trestle started in July and is expected to be ready to cross on March 31. A grand opening is planned for late spring or early summer. The $7.4-million restoration project has included: replacing unsound timber, reinforcing 17 structural

piers, and finishing a new 614-foot walkway atop the structure for hikers, cyclists and equestrians. There’ll also be landscaping, a walkway into the Koksilah River canyon, and an information kiosk. Donations to the Save the Historic Kinsol Trestle rehabilitation project can be made online at www. kinsol.ca or by contacting Diane Myrden or Kim Martin at the campaign office at 250-709-1087.

Reborn trestle takes shape under camera’s eye A month from completion: Documentary filmmaker capturing transformation of heritage rail bridge Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

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t’s a good time to be the Kinsol Trestle. The historic monument’s rehabilitation is almost complete, and it’s the star subject of a documentary that’s also nearing the end of the line. Filming the trestle’s transformation is Yvonne Macnab and her small but professional crew. “I knew we couldn’t miss ¿lming this,” said Macnab, who spent seven years reporting on the challenges of saving the troubled trestle as an island television reporter. Macnab had decided to start her own production company at a fortuitous time: just as rehab work on the trestle began. Since that time about a year ago, Macnab — with award-winning shooters like Jesse Reardon — has been at the trestle for all the highlights of its restoration. “When they took the bents out and they were craning those out,” she recalled, “it was unbelievable to see these huge timbers Àying through the air — that was awesome.” Macnab said she feels a tad “It was unbelievlike an able to see these air traf¿c huge timbers Àying controller trying to through the air.” coordinate shooting around restoration highlights. “Knowing what is important, or going to be signi¿cant, can be nerve-wracking,” she said. “Like this week, the largest trusses were

Macnab

craned in and we have to get all kinds of clearance to be in certain areas to ¿lm it.” But knowing when to be there has its bene¿ts: Macnab was one of the ¿rst people to stand on the trestle’s newly restored upper deck. “I realized, ‘Oh my God, I’m on the deck.’ It was really a moment, to get there, to think we’re almost ¿nished the project,” she said. “It was just so moving, just like when we were in the Howe trusses. We’d been shooting the Howe trusses for years — they are, in terms of engineering, probably the most signi¿cant part of this trestle — and to actually be able to go in there … it was just so moving. “You just sense the history,” she added. “Everybody in this community has a tie to this trestle, so it’s just profound at times.” Work on the trestle’s rehab — and ¿lming on the doc — are expected to wrap up next month. But Macnab’s work is far from over. “We have to start editing and our work will actually start then,” she said. “We’ve got to put together a cohesive story.” That story has shifted in focus since the start of ¿lming, Macnab explained. “No one is buying history,” she said. “No one could care less about history at this point. Even the History Channel is not buying history, they’re not even looking at submissions. So I had to change, after we started, the whole idea of what we were going to ¿lm. So that was a bit of a struggle.” She doesn’t sound worried, though. “It’s even better than I thought,” she summed. Typically, Macnab said, she

Van VanIsle Isle AccountAccounting ing

Filmmaker Yvonne Macnab discusses a shot with camera operator Jesse Reardon during Älming for her documentary. would have written a script and lined up a bunch of grants before starting ¿lming. But because she didn’t want to miss her chance to capture the Kinsol’s transformation from the beginning, and because she’s a ¿rst-time documentary director, Macnab decided to work backward. Which means she’ll start applying for grants during the ¿lm’s editing process, and is still searching for a distributor. “We’ll know a little bit more once we starting piecing it together,” she said.

TV broadcasters and even theatrical release are being mulled. “We have dreams of entering it into the ¿lm festivals in the States and in Toronto, so we’re hoping it will be of that calibre, to be shown in some of those bigger ¿lm festivals,” she added. A Cowichan screening is a must, Macnab promised, and a portion of the ¿lm’s pro¿t will be dedicated to maintaining the trestle. But for now, Macnab is just excited to share what she’s seen. “You feel this huge responsibility,” she admitted. “What if I mess

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up? What if I didn’t do a good enough job? You hear all of those little voices playing their own reel in the back of your head — and then you look at the footage, and you say, ‘That’s amazing.’” Asked the name of her documentary, Macnab laughs. “There’s no title yet — A Troubled Bridge Over Water?” she joked. “But it’s not troubled anymore.” Anyone interested in becoming a ¿nancial partner in Macnab’s documentary can contact productions@ angle5.ca.


4 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 5

Unbelievable crowd takes back the night Candles burn: Estimated crowd of 2,000 walks for Tyeshia and Karrie Ann Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

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Andrew Leong

Mary Jim, mother of Tyeshia Jones, was among an overÅow city square crowd of about 2,000 assembled for a candlelight walk.

Termination not excessive: arbitrator from page 1

“There is no dispute that the grievor was an effective and productive employee with a discipline-free work record,” Brown acknowledged of the 10-year employee early in his report. However, he found at the end termination was not excessive in this instance, and dismissed the grievances. “First, I conclude that the grievor had motive,” he wrote. “As any parent, she was concerned about her son’s well-being. The teachers stated that they talked to her on several occasions showing concern about absences, late assignments and marks…” It was noted the former secretary’s son was in the school’s enriched Excel Program for math/science and social studies/English. “Even if I give the grievor the bene¿t of the doubt relating to her lack of concern about actual marks,” continued Brown, “she was obviously concerned about her son’s stress levels.” SD79 secretary-treasurer Bob Harper said the district would have abided by the arbitrator’s decision regardless of the outcome, and was satis¿ed with its conclusion. A spokesman for CUPE Local 606 could not be reached for comment on Tuesday.

housands of Cowichanians and candles brightened Duncan’s streets on Friday night in a showing of community support unlike anything seen in Duncan city square before. But Take Back The Night’s walk and vigil did even more than that. The event in honour of Tyeshia Jones and Karrie Ann Stone also served to brighten the hearts of a community in mourning. “I’d never seen anything like it,” emcee and North Cowichan councillor Al Siebring said. “There was some discussion about how the last time the community came together like that was during NAIG (North American Indigenous Games). I think this was even bigger. I have never seen that many people crowded into downtown Duncan. It was unbelievable.” More than 2,000 people packed city square with candles and support for the families of Jones and Stone, both

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Coming to the City of Duncan Curbside Compost Collection Pickup begins Week of March 1 In an effort to reduce the amount of waste going to the land¿ll, the City of Duncan is implementing a Curbside Compost Collection Program. Each residence currently receiving garbage collection from the City of Duncan will have delivered to their door: • One 48 - litre Green Curbside Tote • One 7.5 - litre Beige Kitchen Catcher for collecting food waste • A sample of 100 per cent compostable bags to line the Kitchen Catcher Empty your Kitchen Catcher into the Green Curbside Bin and place the Green Curbside Bin out for collection every week. Please consult your Curbside Collection Calendar delivered inside your Kitchen Catcher for your scheduled pickup day. Please note: The volume of garbage allowed has been reduced to one 70-litre can every Two (2) Weeks. In order to make the transition to the Curbside Compost Collection program run smoothly, each resident can pick up Five (5) free Extra Garbage Tags at Duncan City Hall. Compostable Materials Include: • All Cooked and Raw Food Waste • Meat, Bones and Grease • Food - Soiled Cardboard • Milk Cartons Not Accepted: • Plastic, Metal, Glass, Styrofoam For a complete list consult your Curbside Collection Calendar. Questions? Call the City of Duncan at 250-746-5321.

Valley residents bearing candles of all shapes and sizes Take Back The Night. victims of murder in Cowichan. “There were so many people from so many places, it was just totally mind-blowing that so many people feel the need to support each other as much as they’ve done with these ladies,” said Duncan city councillor and cousin of Jones, Joe Thorne. “I just wanted to say thank you to all the people who came and I hope this is the ¿rst of something that will never end, that we’re going to stand together and protect our children more than ever.” Cowichan certainly stood together

Andrew Leong

Friday night, spilling out of city square into the streets and beyond. “There was a sea of candles out there in the dark,” Siebring described of his view from the stage. “It was just phenomenal.” Event organizer Jeff Leggat said he hadn’t known what to expect in terms of turnout that evening, especially considering the chilly weather. So he was thrilled by the “fantastic” turnout. Jones’ mother, Mary Jim, was also overwhelmed by the show of support. “I know Tyeshia was smiling from above us,” she said.


6 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

High-proÄle local pair backs Horgan

J

ohn Horgan obviously made an impact among at least some of his peers during his stint as a Cowichan MLA. The former Malahat-Juan de Fuca (now Juan de Fuca) MLA received a pair of high-pro¿le local endorsements recently in his bid for leadership of the provincial NDP. On Sunday at the Cowichan Valley Museum, Horgan announced Nanaimo-Cowichan MP Jean Crowder has joined

his campaign, just three days after Cowichan Valley MLA Bill Routley made the same move. “John is a politician who truly puts his constituents’ interests ¿rst,” said Crowder in a press release. “He is quick to set aside partisan differences and work with people from all walks of life and differing points of view to ¿nd practical solutions to community problems.” Routley echoed those comments in an earlier release.

FAITH

“I am supporting John because I know he truly cares about the people of our province, our lands, our forests and our environment,” said Routley. “John really gets rural issues and he has the creativity and collaborative approach that we need to ¿nd real solutions to rural problems.” Horgan is vying with Mike Farnworth, Adrian Dix, Dana Larsen and Nicholas Simons for a position that will be chosen April 17.

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SOUTH COWICHAN CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP Saturday Night Alive 7:00 pm Shawnigan Com Centre Pastor Terry Hale 250-701-5722

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WEDNESDAY 10:00 a.m. Holy Communion (traditional liturgy)

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SYLVAN UNITED CHURCH

St. Peter’s Anglican

Rev. Dr. Murray Groom

“Come Celebrate Life With Us” Services Sunday 8:00 am & 10:00 am Thursday 10:00 am

Sunday School Classes for Adult, Youth & Children 10:30 am Children’s Nursery & Toddlers Church and Sunday Worship Service (includes Children’s program) Pastor: Rob Westlake

h

Phone 746-7432 E-mail: bthlbap@shaw.ca bethelbaptistduncan.ca

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FRIDAY FRIDAY

ANGLICAN CHURCH

DUNCAN CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH

Corner of Trunk & Campbell

Worship Services 10am & 7pm Sunday School for Children Info for Church Ministries call: Phone 748-2122 Church ofÀce open 9-12pm Mon-Fri Email: crc.duncan@shawcable.com www.duncancrc.org Walt Vanderwerf, pastor

WORSHIP SERVICE 10:30 A.M. KIDS CLUB 6:00 P.M. YOUTH 7:30 P.M.

PASTOR GERRY WALL 746-8457

CITY GATE CHURCH

House of Prayer Open 9-noon, Mon, Tues, Wed Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. 1-123 Station St. Church OfÀce: 748-4304 ASL

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CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Pastor Wayne Lee

Duncan Pentecostal Church Sunday: 10:00 am

COME AS YOU ARE + LEAVE REFRESHED Worship 10:30 am Sundays 7:00 pm 2nd & 4th Sundays

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3036 Sherman Road Phone 748-8000

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931 Trunk Road, 748-1423 Pastor: Rev. Tim Schindel

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CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

Society, 6118 Lane Rd. Duncan (off Sherman)

(250) 709-3630 (lv. message) Sunday Service 10:30 am Sunday School

Attend the Church of your choice

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SUNDAY

To learn how the Baha’is are working toward building unity and peace or to attend a tranquil, devotional gathering call 748-6996

Sentinel Radio Program on AM 650, Sundays 8:30 am

985 Shawnigan Mill Bay Rd

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“Rely upon God. Trust in Him. Praise Him, and call Him continually to mind.”

2nd Wed. of Month 12:30 pm 4th Wed. of Month 7:00 pm www.christianscience.bc.ca

Monthly Jazz Vespers

6:30 p.m. Evening Service

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(Corner of Ingram & Jubilee)

Testimony Meetings ( 1 hr)

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Duncan United

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(teaching 10 commandments /Lord’s Prayer)

Sunday School (Nursery through Youth Group)

11:00 a.m. Family Bible Hour & Sunday School

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Welcomes You! Family Worship Sundays 11:00 am Taizé Chant & Meditation Last Sunday every month 7pm Rev. Fran Darling Willow St. at Alder 250-246-3463 h chemainusunitedchurch.ca

Sunday Service 10 am

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9:15 a.m. Remembrance Meeting

463 Ypres St.

CHEMAINUS UNITED CHURCH

250.743.4659 (HOLY)

SUNDAY:

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH

John Horgan, top, was endorsed by Jean Crowder and Bill Routley Sunday in Duncan.

(next to Frances Kelsey School)

BRAE ROAD GOSPEL CHAPEL

h

T

he controversial South Cowichan ECO Depot is up for discussion again this week at a meeting in Cobble Hill. But the CVRD is taking pains to distance itself from those talks. “Residents should know this is not part of the CVRD public consultation process,” said CVRD chairwoman Gerry Giles. “Despite the fact the group holding this meeting is calling it a public hearing and it appears to look like an of¿cial local government notice, it is not.” The meeting is being staged tomorrow by the anti-depot group FARMS, starting at 7 p.m. at the Cobble Hill Hall. The CVRD has engaged public relations ¿rm Acumen to steer the project through of¿cial public meetings (likely to be scheduled for next month), set up a website and generally get the message out at a cost of between $10,000 and $15,000.

DIRECTORY

The ANGLICAN CHURCH of ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

5800 Church Rd. (off Maple Bay Road) OfÀce Hours Tues.-Fri. 9 am - 1 pm, 250-746-6262 www.stpeter-duncan.ca

ECO Depot up for (unofÄcial) talks

Attend the Church of your choice

ALLIANCE CHURCH

SHAWNIGAN 1603 Wilmot Rd. Sundays: 10:00 a.m. Ph. 743-4454 DUNCAN - NORTH COWICHAN Duncan Christian School Sundays: 10 am

Ph. 748-5213

Sunday Celebration Contemporary Liturgical at 10 am Taize worship (7 pm, 1st Sun)

A progressive faith community, nurturing peace, working for justice, exploring and celebrating our faith together. “We warmly welcome you” www.duncanunited.org

746-6043

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COWICHAN SPIRITUALIST CHURCH OF HEALING & LIGHT

The Mercury Theatre 331 Brae Road, Duncan SUNDAY SERVICES 11 am Rev. Patricia Gunn - 748-0723 www.cowichanspiritualistchurch.com

3441 Gibbins Rd. 748-0110

www.duncanadventist.ca Saturday Services Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Family Worship Service: 10:30 a.m. Prayer Fellowship: Tuesday 7 p.m. Pastor: Paul Wilkinson ARE WE HERE BY INTELLIGENT DESIGN OR BY ACCIDENT? Dr. George Hilton will present a weekend seminar entitled Origins: Accident or Design? from February 25 to 27 at the Duncan Seventh-day Adventist Church at 3441 Gibbins Road in Duncan, BC. The seminar begins on February 25 at 7:00 pm and continues February 26 at 4:00 pm & February 27 at 1pm. For more information, contact Paul at 250-746-8820.

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ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCHES St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church is a family of people who are discovering the signiÀcance of following Jesus. Come, whoever you are, whatever your strengths, needs, faith or doubts. Sunday Worship Services 9:00 am & 10:30 am (nursery & Sunday School is available at the 10:30 am service only) www.standrewsduncan.org

Government & Herbert 746-7413 h

ST. EDWARD’S CHURCH 2085 Maple Bay Road, Duncan 746-6831 Saturday Mass Time: 5:00 pm Sunday Mass Time: 10:00 am Tuesday Mass Time: 6:30 pm www.stedwardsduncan.com

ST. ANN’S CHURCH

1775 Tzouhalem Rd, Duncan Sunday Mass Time: 11:00 am

ST. CLARE’S MONASTERY 2359 Calais Rd, Duncan

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Wed to Fri Mass Times: 9 am


Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Lake residents concerned one failing sewage system could lead to another For now: Sewage from failing Shawnigan Station system being trucked to Beach Estates Ashley Gaudreault

News Leader Pictorial

W

hat do a current and former CVRD director, a local developer, and a number of concerned citizens have in common? Try their involvement in a faulty sewage system in Shawnigan Lake. The sewer system for the Estates at Shawnigan Station is on the fritz. While the developer ¿ghts a legal battle about who is responsible for ¿xing it, efÀuent from that site is being trucked to the CVRDrun Shawnigan Beach Estates sewer system for processing. Add that to a Rick Spencer: long history of questions sense dif¿culty with the Beach Estates system and you have more than just sewage percolating in the south end. “I’m getting calls over and over about this and trucks going there,”

area resident and former Cowichan Valley Regional District director Rick Spencer said Tuesday. “It just doesn’t make any sense. Why wouldn’t these trucks go to wherever they would go normally? Why would you truck it somewhere where there’s risk and potential for disaster? “Is adding this extra waste from an outside area going to cause further damage to a previously failing system? A great deal of steps were taken to safeguard the Shawnigan Beach Estates residents/owners in the past. “Any further failures at this location may be irreversible and may become permanent. What happens to the homes and residents if this system cannot handle this excess?” Spencer wrote in an email. Developer Mike Kelly has been knee-deep in a legal battle with the builder of the sewage system at the Shawnigan Station development. That system, which has already received the CVRD’s stamp of approval and is pursuing a second phase of residential housing, currently serves about 65 homes. Kelly expects a working Shawnigan Station system to be in operation as early as next week. In the meantime, he said he has an agreement with the CVRD to use the Beach Estates system at a cost of about $135,000. Shawnigan Lake Director Ken Cossey squashed talk the Beach

Estates system’s currently failing. “The CVRD has allowed the Beach Estates to be used as the disposal site for this efÀuent generated by this project,” Cossey said. “(Beach Estates) has been upgraded over the last number of years, and from what I understand, is still operating alright.” Cossey is hoping the CVRD will be able to set up a capital reserve fund for future Beach Estates system upgrades. “I’d like to use that funding, that we’re receiving to put into a capital reserve fund for the Beach Estates program.” He also wants the regional district to take control of all its scattered septic systems. “Once (the Station) system is operational and up to CVRD standards, we’ll be taking it over. (The CVRD) has all these small utility projects going on all over the south Cowichan area and it’s time to consolidate them and take them over.” Meanwhile, Spencer says Ken Cossey: h feeling he’s wants control sympathy for r residents of B h Estates. E Beach “Boy if I lived there, I’d have a ‘For sale’ sign I guess. I don’t know what else you would do.”

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 7

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Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 9 ADVERTISING FEATURE

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Mentor Plus Performance Measurement specialists advocate that a simple approach of measuring the following indicators is a ¿rst step in the right direction: 1. Customer Attrition Rate 2. Customer Acquisition Rate 3. Average Sale 4. Frequency of Contact 5. Cost of Goods and Overhead These indicators are a good starting point toward a balanced perspective of a company’s performance. Much of the data you need to track these key indicators is likely already available to you. By simply setting up a “Àash report” (a scoreboard of critical business measurements) you can provide yourself a guide for making day-to-day

management decisions. Keep in mind that what you can measure, you can manage. By applying key measurements to your business, you will have the information you need to manage your company more effectively, empower your staff and grow your pro¿ts, and be well on your way to taking care of business. Want to learn more? To learn more about how to improve the performance of your business, be sure to attend our upcoming breakfast seminar on Thursday, March 3, hosted in partnership with the Duncan-Cowichan Chamber of Commerce. For details, go to www.mnp.ca/ businessbreakfast. Marsha Stanley, CA•CBV, CGA is a Business Advisor with Meyers Norris Penny who works with business owners and professionals to help them enhance pro¿tability and manage growth. For more information, contact Marsha at 250.748.3761 or marsha.stanley@mnp.ca.

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

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Rare Cowichan crowd takes back the night In this together: Outpouring of support something rarely seen in this community

I

t is a rare event that brings out 2,000 people in this community. So feel free to be impressed by the outpouring of support witnessed in downtown Duncan Friday night as our community walked together to Take Back The Night. In the past decade, you could count the number of local events of this magnitude without taking off your shoes. The annual Duncan Summer Festival parade is one. The Brentwood Regatta another. The Islands Folk Festival and SunFest make the cut. The Clean Air Event shows concert came close, but was limited by how much the the size of the arena. And of course the North American community Indigenous Games set the bar with the throng that packed Canada Avenue to cares welcome the athletes. But the Olympic Torch Relay fell short. The B.C. Seniors Games opening fell short. Cowichan Capitals crowds (no matter what the announcers may say) never come close. The theatre holds less than half that amount. The Walk of the Nations, political protest marches, charity fundraisers — none of these matched what we witnessed Friday night. We say this not to diminish any of these events, only to put into clear perspective that Take Back The Night was something remarkable. For a variety of reasons, the Tyeshia Jones tragedy struck a powerful chord in so many of us. We wanted her family to know we share their loss. Work on the Jones case continues, even as the community returns to a semblance of normal. We hope the investigation — and the investigation into Cowichan’s other tragic homicide, that of Karrie Ann Stone — end in another sharing, a sharing in a sense of closure when the killers are caught and justice is served.

We say:

The good and the bad of this week in Cowichan This we don’t

This we like Those images of shiny blond timbers amidst the venerable greys supporting the Kinsol Trestle have to be a gratifying sight for all those who stepped up to save this Cowichan landmark from the wrecking ball. It’s nice to see this impressive piece of history will be with us for a long while yet. This summer make sure you trek out for a visit. And take a friend.

The Kinsol Trestle is about a month from completion.

After last month’s Shakeout BC, how many of you took steps to make sure you and your family were fully prepared in the event of an earthquake? How about after last week’s miniquake shook up the valley? This week’s disaster in New Zealand? The big one could come at any time. Stop putting it off. Step up and get prepared.

Jury out on climate change, Aboriginal relations Tom Fletcher Black Press

G

ordon Campbell was in a buoyant mood as he left the legislative chamber after his ¿nal question period as premier. “Free at last, free at last,” he said, quoting a traditional song made famous by U.S. civil rights leader Martin Luther King. The shackles of high of¿ce of¿cially remain around his ankles for another week or so, but with a stand-pat budget awaiting the next premier’s priorities, his 27-year career as an elected politician is effectively over. Campbell’s place in B.C. history is secure on several fronts, including scheduled elections, reduced business and personal tax rates and a more mature relationship with Ottawa. There are at least two important areas where his achievements remain in doubt: Aboriginal relations and climate change. In interviews last week, Campbell said his

greatest regret was the demise of the Recognition and Reconciliation Act. That law would have recognized a form of Aboriginal rights and title across the province, essentially a huge outof-court settlement for the 90 per cent of B.C. that remains without treaty settlements. It all collapsed pretty quickly, partly because it was seen as a backroom deal that was to be pushed through before the 2009 election. The mining and forest industries were alarmed, the legislation was held back, Aboriginal leaders took it to hearings, and chiefs around the province rejected it as a watered-down version of the rights they believed they could win in court. It is remarkable that Campbell went from “professional Indian ¿ghter,” as he was characterized by some after his 2002 referendum on treaty settlements, to the architect of the “New Relationship,” arguably a too-generous bid to untie B.C.’s biggest political knot. On Aboriginal relations, Campbell started deep in his own end and carried the ball at best to mid¿eld.

BC VIEWS

On climate change, one could say he scored at least a ¿eld goal. When I sat down with him last week, he mentioned a recent conference in California he attended with George Schultz, the economist and business executive who rose to be secretary of state for Ronald Reagan. With plans for a carbon trading system in disarray in the U.S., Campbell said Schultz pointed to B.C.’s revenue neutral carbon tax and said that is exactly what other jurisdictions should be doing to reduce greenhouse gases. By 2012, the B.C. carbon tax will account for just under seven cents on a litre of gasoline, on top of other fuel taxes B.C. and Ottawa continue to collect. It will set a “carbon price” of $30 a tonne across all fossil fuels. Campbell is convinced the carbon tax will survive, if not grow. He says leadership candidates should look at continuing the increases that are mandated until 2012, and continuing to offset them with personal and business income tax reductions.

One leadership candidate is already touting the bene¿ts of the carbon tax, and surprisingly, he’s not a B.C. Liberal. The NDP’s John Horgan now admits he was wrong to oppose the tax, but he wants it extended to the non-fuel emissions of heavy industries. Horgan has also cautiously embraced Campbell’s other main climate effort, run-of-river hydro and wind power, although he wants public ownership through a new BC Hydro division. Campbell’s climate agenda will have to reach beyond today’s mainly symbolic effort and spread to other jurisdictions if it is going to change the course of B.C. history. Tom Fletcher is the legislative reporter for Black Press. Reach him at tÀetcher@blackpress.ca.


Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Have an opinion you’d like to share? email editor@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

YOUR TURN

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 11

Do you think the Olympics were a good thing for B.C.? No, the bad part was how much money they spent on the buildings and the Sea to Sky Highway.

Don Rhoades, Cobble Hill

Yes, I loved the Oympics. For someone my age, it was something unreal, something I’ve never seen before in my life.

Olga Rhoades, Cobble Hill

What do you think? Log on to www.cowichannewsleader.com and answer our Question of the Week. Results will be published in our next edition.

Playing chicken with farmland taxes is discriminatory

Cowichan taxpayer well-served for its non-proÄt dollar

Dear editor Re: the Dorey plan. The cost and productivity of farmland is dictated by supply and demand and development or misuse is fully under municipal and Cowichan Valley Regional District control with existing bylaws and the ALR. When farmland is used for baseball ¿elds, exhibition grounds and public walking trails the supply of land is reduced and upward pressure might be expected. To apply punitive taxes to landowners that aren’t producing farm goods at a prescribed level is discriminatory. Current North Cowichan bylaws allow 12 chickens on .41 acres or more land. Is the next step in this process to raise the taxes on all properties that don’t have chickens in the backyard? Greg Gibson

In my opinion: Local social service agencies give good value

I

am semi-retired and no longer an administrator in the non-pro¿t sector. For nearly 20 years I have been diplomatic and creative, using language that was strength-based and positive. And now I want to scream! Government funding does not come without extensive Duncan expectations of accountability and you — Mr., Ms., and Mrs. Taxpayer — are getting Echo Heights should not be one heck of a good deal from sacriÄced for this future Andrew Leong the people who feed the Dear editor The Lost Fingers show off their technical musical dexterity — and their hot-pink suits — while performing offbeat hungry, clothe the naked and There was a glaring omission in the North interpretations of classic ‘80s songs during their Feb. 14 Cowichan Theatre production. give voice to the silent and Sandra Goth: Cowichan press release outlining the North marginalized. Cowichan’s capital funding strategy. Your Feb. Ask the ¿nancial of¿cers of sleep well but most will not. Are Youbou, the half-built 11 article shows North Cowichan ¿nancing Lost Fingers a lost opportunity non-pro¿ts who spend hours golf course on Mount Tzouhalem and all the an array of building projects with modest tax Dear editor th t needs d tto bbe and days looking for the $3.20 that isolated subdivisions along roads in the forest increases. In fact, this plan depends on the The Lost Fingers received two standing accounted for. more accessible? Where can one buy a bottle municipality acquiring $3.5 million through ovations with wild applause Feb. 12 at the The $3.20 that is part of a $5,000 grant that was of milk in The Properties? the sale of part of Chemainus’ Echo Heights Cowichan Theatre. I was very impressed by given to make sure that children are parented, the A planned community that can provide all Forest lands. The subject property consists of their technical abilities and their creative interelderly are tended, youth gain a sense of purpose types of affordable housing in higher density very rare Coastal Douglas Fir forest and Garry pretations of classic ‘80s tunes. It is very rare and the streets are safe. mixed use neighbourhoods would have a Oak ecosystems. It has been used as a park by to see a group with both the musicianship and I can assure you after nearly a quarter of a much smaller footprint. Our current system of local residents for generations and as a ¿eld inventive creative genius. Yes, genius. We are incremental haphazard residential development century balancing budgets you can sleep well in study site by schools and universities over the lucky to have brought them here. Although the leaves it to the taxpayers to ¿gure out how to the knowledge you are getting more than your tax past decade. group is not well-known outside of the major dollars’ worth. provide and pay for all the services that these This sale of valuable public property (in an centres in eastern Canada, they regularly sell I am not aware of programs run in this comnew people eventually need or want. The Bamiffy real estate market) is a hidden tax and one out eastern Canada and play to sold-out houses berton developer was willing to pay millions to munity by non-pro¿t agencies that could function that our children and future generations will of 10,000 in Europe. Last year they sold out without fundraised dollars, private donations, and offset those costs. pay. The plan of this council is to ¿nance basic six nights in Vancouver for the Olympics and ¿nancial wizardry. With the current industrial and forestry zoninfrastructure by selling off public assets. How played to a crazed room of appreciative dancFor every cheque written by government, ing on the property, perhaps the owners will decan this be sustained over the long term? What ers at the Victoria Jazz Festival two years ago. hundreds to thousands of dollars have to be found cide to clear cut the forest and introduce more will be sold next? How will future citizens They exceeded my expectations musically, heavy industrial development. I hope not. The elsewhere to make sure what the government says provide for themselves after we have destroyed but I was very disappointed no local reviewer it is funding can be delivered. Bamberton proposal would have left nearly their birthright? It is time for the adults in the was in attendance. They are the real deal and As the executive director of an agency that half of the entire area as permanent parks or room to pay for what they want rather than we rarely get a chance to bring a group of this brought in about $300,000 in government contracts open/green space for future generations to stealing from their children and grandchildren. calibre here. Their album has gone double another $100,000 had to be raised annually to enjoy. Which option would be better for the There is a better way. platinum and they are even outselling Madonna Saanich Inlet and our Cowichan Valley? make sure wages got paid and light switches could Kathy Wachs in record sales, but here they only drew a niche Hilding Franson be Àicked on. Chemainus crowd of musicians and those in-the-know The memory of the amazing creativity shown Duncan in the music world. A photo of them in their by the hard-working and underpaid staff I knew bright pink suits for Valentine’s Day would b compensates for years of struggle and helps me New trail a welcome addition have h been fun to see in the paper. believe my grandchildren will be OK. Dear editor KKirsten Schrader I don’t resent one cent of what was deducted in A thank you to Catalyst, the Trans-Canada CCowichan Arts and Culture Division Manager taxes from my paycheque. Trail people and the Cowichan Valley Regional I can assure you the skills it takes to keep non“Should the pay of a police officer appealing a suspenDistrict, for the construction of the new trail pro¿ t agencies aÀoat are substantial and there are sion be withheld pending the results of his appeal?” BBamberton philosophy so much running parallel with old Lake Cowichan and few businesses that do as much for as little. You answered: (57 votes) Somenos roads, ending at Johnston Road. It’s a bbetter than the status quo Being supported by communities like Cowichan great addition to the ever-growing network of 75 per cent YES DDear editor always created a sacred trust so we would make trails in our valley. Will this trail be extended, Mike Ward incorrectly assumes Bamberton sure dollars were well accounted for. and to where? To vote on the next Question of the Week, log onto the residents r would travel long distances by road If someone in your life supports, cares, listens, R.Mccauley web poll at www.cowichannewsleader.com to t somewhere else. Like people in any comfeeds, and loves you, you are far more likely to be munity m near larger centres, some will commute North Cowichan healthy and to learn. That is what social agencies do. Their business is to create safe places, build good skills, and listen. I doubt if there is anyone reading this who has not needed those things in their life. There are a lot of statistics that prove money Here are some tips: Keep it short — 300 words or less; Keep it local — letters raised in We want to hear your opinion on just about any matter of local interest. invested in creating a civil society is money well response to issues raised in our pages get top priority; Keep it clean — attack the issue, Here’s how to send it to us: spent and I want to assure you that the dividends to not the individual. • Email your thoughts to editor@cowichannewsleader.com you for the tax dollars invested in this community You must include your full name, home community and a phone number where we can • Mail your letter to Unit 2, 5380 Trans-Canada Highway, Duncan B.C., V9L 6W4 are substantial. reach you during office hours. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. • Fax it to us at 250-746-5829

We asked you:

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Letters will be edited for clarity, grammar, length and good taste. Name-withheld letters will not be published. We receive more letters than we have space for. Publication is not guaranteed.

How to reach us

• Log onto www.cowichannewsleader.com and use the feedback button. For more information, call the newsroom at 250-746-4471

Sandra Goth is a semi-retired veteran professional of Cowichan’s non-pro¿t social services network.


12 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 13

Cowichan Lake shows off its new-look arena

Kick Start the New Year!

VALLEY VIEW VALMARTIAL MA ARTS

Tyler Clarke

News Leader Pictorial

T

he public got its ¿rst glimpse of the fruits of the $7.6 million Cowichan Lake Sports Arena renovation Feb. 11 at a special Spirit Day skate. Warm upstairs seating was completed in time for the event, in addition to a new skate shop, a new concession area, and a new grand entrance. The partial renovation completion quickly became the talk of the town, resulting in a much higher than usual turnout at the weekend’s minor hockey games. Completion comes about ¿ve months after an initial projection for the beginning of September. But project head John Elzinga said it is still on budget. Some buffer zone wish list items have been delayed due to the time overrun. Nothing major, Elzinga said, and many wish list items are still being included. The project also bene¿ts from a CVRD decision to not apply bonus or penalty clauses, which are dependent upon how long the renovations take. “Things just took a bit longer than we thought they would. No big reason,” Elzinga said, of the ever-changing completion date. “Weather does tie into it.” “It looks beautiful already,” Cowichan Lake Recreation Commission chair Sheila McFarlane said. “It looks like it’ll be the nicest

“training for all ages”

Call us for information on our “Little Dragon program” for 6-9 year olds Torrie Miller

sifu@valleyviewmartialarts.com www.valleyviewmartialarts.com 250-929-2211 #6 Valleyview Centre

Tyler Clarke

Architect Keith Tetlow and Cowichan Lake recreation manager Linda Blatchford, leave the Cowichan Lake Arena through its new entranceway. arena on the island.” McFarlane said that although there have been some naysayers in the community about the delayed opening, the commission isn’t up-in-arms. “You’re bound to have some delays,” she said, citing a wait for the $1 million federal grant, weather issues, and general construction issues as reasons for the delay. “We were hoping it would be ready, but most people understand,” she said. “On the whole, I think people will be very pleased

when they see it. I think we’ll be the envy of the island.” When complete, the arena will include new administrative of¿ces, multi-purpose space, a playschool room, meeting rooms, public washrooms and new dressing rooms. A new roof was put on and accessibility issues were addressed with the addition of accessible washrooms in the curling lounge, ramping to the south side of the stands and an elevator. The concession was also redone

to allow for better access from both sides of the building. The $7.6-million budget included $1 million in federal economic stimulus funding, $100,000 in previous savings, and $6.5 million in borrowing. The arena’s of¿cial grand opening has been scheduled for March 12, beginning with an opening ceremony at 10 a.m. It will include an open house, a free public skate, curling event and an Appollos alumni hockey game.

Plumbing problem closes Salt Spring ferry passenger deck Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

P

assengers of the MV Howe Sound Queen between Crofton and Salt Spring Island have been assured the vessel’s main passenger deck will re-open sometime this week. The passenger lounge has been closed since Feb. 13, when a blockage in the sewage system resulted in an unsavory plumbing problem.

“We had to do a hospital clean of the carpets before we could remove them,” BC Ferries’ spokeswoman Deborah Marshall explained on Friday. “We have now removed the carpets in the area, but because the steel Àoor is uneven, we have to lay a sub-Àoor before we can let passengers back in there because it’s a tripping hazard with the uneven Àoor surface.” In the meantime, Ferries staff has directed passengers to use the small lounge on the car deck, and has also brought on a bus for foot

passengers to shelter in during the voyage. But Nanaimo resident Rick Atkey is frustrated that passengers are paying full price for secondrate service. “There are approximately 30 regular workers who commute on this boat every day, and a like number of young children going to school over on Salt Spring Island, all of whom now have to huddle together on the car deck, exposed to winter wind and rain,” he wrote in a letter to Black Press.

“Despite emails and phone calls to BC Ferries, no one has heard any explanation or apology for this disgraceful and continuing incident.” Marshall urged any passengers who have concerns about service to contact BC Ferries’ customer care centre. “We certainly apologize,” she added. “It’s an unfortunate situation.” Ferries’ customer service centre can be reached at 1-888-2233779.

You are cordially invited to a free event to…

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“An Adventure and Felting” Celebrate in ourFilm Community

A“An day ofAdventure joining together Pema to in with Film andWangchen Felting” watch his inspiring true-life account, “Escape over Athe dayHimalayas” of joining together with Pema Wangchen to

watch his inspiring true-life account, “Escape over … Himalayas” culminating in making a wool Felt Leaf using the the felt process with Joanne Circle … culminating in making a wool Felt Leaf using Several Songs with special guest Jamyang Yeshi the felt process with Joanne Circle Sunday, February 27th 1:30 to 5:30 pm Several Songs withChurch, special guest Jamyang Yeshi At Sylvan United Mill Bay 985 Shawnigan Mill Bay Rd. Sunday, February 27th School) 1:30 to 5:30 pm (beside Frances Kelsey At Sylvan United Church, Mill Bay 985 Shawnigan Mill Bay Free Event, TastyRd. Treats Provided, (beside Frances Kelsey School) Everyone Welcome! For newcomers, local folks, young & old, Free Event, Tasty & Treats Provided, individuals families Everyone Welcome! Don’tFor missnewcomers, out, call to confirm your spot with & Cowichan local folks, young old, Intercultural Society at 250-748-3112 or emalynne@telus.net individuals & families Don’t miss out, call to confirm your spot with Cowichan Intercultural Society at 250-748-3112 or emalynne@telus.net

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14 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Most played songs

BY THE WAY

1) Perfect

Pink

2) Good to You

Marianas Trench 3) Lost in You

Three Days Grace

This week on SUN/FM

Nurturing pre-schoolers Most rented movies Bestsellers 1) Develop trust and cherish the child 2) Create a safe environment for exploration 3) Guide and respect the child: talk, sing, dance and play together

1) Due Date

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

1) The King’s Speech

Mark Logue

2) Get Low

2) Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand

Helen Simonson

3) For Colored Girls

courtesy early childhood advocate Mary Dolan

3) The Birth House

This week at Pioneer’s Video

Ami McKay

This week at Volume One

by News Leader Pictorial staff

Valley people

Nearly New fashions wanted

B

y the way, did you hear: • The New Life Church Women’s Ministry is seeking donations of quality used women’s clothing for the third-annual Nearly New Fashion Show set for March 26 at 1 p.m. Proceeds go to small loans helping women in poverty-stricken countries become self-supporting. Marita Judson tells us anyone who donates a bag of clothes will receive a free ticket. The ¿rst 200 tickets enter a draw for a free makeover by Paris Style Group Inc. Organizers will pick up clothing, call 250-709-9077. For more info or to volunteer call 250-748-6521. All money raised will be doubled by a special donor. • Darren Cole of Steeples Bar and Grill tells us he got word on Valentine’s Day the Shawnigan hot spot made it into the top ¿ve ¿nals of Small Business BC’s Successful You Awards. Cobble Hill’s Macdonald & Lawrence Timber Framing Ltd is up for the title of best employer. Winners will be announced March 29. • Helga Lambrecht says The Cowichan Spirit of Women would appreciate your support in a ¿nancial donation to help cover costs of their International Women’s Day event on March 9, again at the Eagles Hall. They need to cover beverages, plates, napkins, cake for about 200; decorations; photocopying and advertising

Name: Kelly Hays Occupation: Food security coordinator for Cowichan Green Community Age: 28 Hometown: Prince George If you get a chance go see: Food Security: It’s In Your Hands Right now I am reading: Bicycle Magazine I’m listening to: world music At least once everyone should: ride their bicycles and vist local farms Most people don’t know I: design websites. Check out cyclecowichan.ca Proudest or happiest moment: travelling through India by bicycle with my partner Biggest fear: being forced to eat industrial food If I was appointed king of the valley I would: find a way to encourage people to eat local food and ride their bicycles more Before I die: I want to ride a bicycle all over Vancouver Island Words I live by: be the change you want to see in the world

expenses, door prizes, and gifts or an honorarium for the entertainers. Call 250-715-3893. • Shawn Cyr ambled into the News Leader Pictorial of¿ce on Valentine’s Day and may have made history. He claimed his missing keys from a cache of them kept full by residents who have discovered them in random places. Joanne Jenner said it’s the ¿rst time she can remember anyone picking up their missing keys in 35 years of working our front desk. • Heart and Stroke Celebrity Breakfast guru Colleen Marsel joined fellow Olympic torchbearers from B.C.’s Heart and Stroke Foundation in Vancouver to celebrate the ¿rst anniversary of the opening of the Vancouver Olympic Games. She and her husband were two of hundreds attending the celebration at the Cauldron in the Inner Harbour. • Ron Ingram is excited about Ryders Roadhouse, his new live entertainment venue in Mill Bay’s Pioneer Mall. Opening Feb. 26, the Roadhouse will host live music four nights a week with a coffee house format and opportunities for local musicians to hone their performance skills during performances that will be streamed live. Exciting things happening for you, your friends or your family that you want to share with your community? Send us a quick email at editor@ cowichannewsleader.com.

Cowichan

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 15

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16 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

You’ll feel like family! C ¢ 97 Seedless Grapes O 27 $ U 1 Apple Sauce N ¢ 97 T R Chicken Wings Diced Tomatoes Y 2/$700 2/$ 2/ $ 00 1 V Bathroom Tissue A $ 97 L French Bread 3 U ¢ Laundry Soap E 77 $ 97 CHILEAN PREMIUM QUALITY THOMPSON & FLAMES

FULLY COOKED BBQ

Pork Baby Back Ribs IN THE DELI

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Wednesday,y, Februaryy 23,, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 17

Seniors Good Life Hugs handmade by volunteers to help Cowichan Hospital An enthusiastic group of Cowichan Valley volunteers filled Lake Cowichan’s Lower Centennial Hall last Saturday, where they sewed together what they refer to as “handmade hugs.” “It’s wonderful,” organizer Julie McClure said, of the turnout, and of the donors. “Everywhere; fabric stores, general public. It came from everywhere you’d imagine.” A long row of boxes lined one of the hall’s walls, full of donated materials. The materials went toward the construction of blankets, baby shoes, and other comfort items typically not available at the Cowichan District Hospital. After a second Hug-A-Thon, scheduled for next month in Duncan, McClure hopes to have gathered together enough material to get them through to the fall. “It’s certainly put a dent in it already,” she said, at last weekend’s event. Always on the lookout for more volunteers, McClure encourages people to call her at 250-749-3189 for more information as to how one can become involved in the effort.

Silver Sage Nursery & Garden Gallery 1720 Baldy Mt. Road, Shawnigan Lake Open Thursday to Sunday 9-5 pm Stats 9-3 pm

250-743-3679

Tyler Clarke

Local volunteer Dianne Jones works on her sewing skills at the Hug-A-Thon, Saturday, February 19, at the Lower Centennial Hall.

Re-opening for the season Thursday, March 3

Reserve for your orchard now and enjoy fruit and berries for years to come! Gift certificates available! www.silversagenursery.com for map and plant list

2 Bedroom Suite Available

Join Our Seniors’Club

15% off

and get any regular menu item

EVERY VISIT!

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PLAN YOUR FUNERAL Plan For Your Tomorrow... TODAY Offering 0% FINANCING

Let us make your dinner & do your housekeeping! Spend time with friends & enjoy life more! Wedgwood House offers comfortable suites with dinner every night in our fine dining room, housekeeping every week and 24 hour emergency response monitoring. Enjoy weekly activities, entertainment and make new friends. Call 250-746-9808 for a tour!

Kevin Owens Manager

Now is the right time to think about tomorrow. Prearrange and Alicia Thompson take advantage of our Sales Advisor

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YOUR OPINIONS ARE IMPORTANT

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10

375 Brae Rd. Duncan

Direct Letters to #2 5380 Trans Canada Highway Duncan, BC V9L 6W4 or email: editor@cowichannewsleader.com

Helping you live well in the Cowichan Valley

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OFF

EVERY MONDAY FOR

SENIORS *Except Lotto, Tobacco & Advertised Specials

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Hours: Monday to Friday 9-6 pm Saturday 9-5

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18 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Seniors Good Life Ancient art of peace and movement boosts health Moving quietly and deftly in unison, the students practice an ancient art in an exercise room in Chemainus. Fuller Lake Arena offers Tai Chi every Wednesday morning with instructor Shannon Bellamy. “I love Tai Chi so I like having the opportunity to work with new students and pass on my love for it,” Bellamy said. Bellamy, a beginner instructor since 2001, said most of her students join because of the health benefits. “Tai Chi improves the things we lose as we age, co-ordination, flexibility and balance,” Bellamy said.

More than 20 students gather for two hours once a week to relearn the moves, be social, drink green tea and learn new moves. For new students like Morna McNair, the pattern and repetition is beneficial. “It’s making my mind work,” she said. “I’m learning new actions and using different parts of my brain.” In Tai Chi, there is a set of 108 moves that the students can learn. Judy Hudson, a 12-year veteran of Tai Chi, said it’s a very cumulative exercise. “A lot [of moves] are repeated and we do them one after the other,” she said.

She said the practice has given her better balance. “I’m also much more flexible,” she said. “It works all systems.” Bellamy said doing each move is an exercise that increases body awareness. “You take time to be one with your body,” she said. “You become more centred and more grounded.” McNair, whose friends encouraged her to join, said the classes are also an opportunity to be social. “It’s really fun,” she said. Hudson agrees. “All the classes are really fun and this one in particular really is,” she said.

Tai Chi students practice each move together in the exercise room at Fuller Lake Arena in Chemainus, Wednesday, Feb. 16.

Tai Chi is for all ages and abilities, Bellamy said. “All walks of life, all ages, all sorts of physical challenges,” she said of the 20 to 30 student members. “Everyone works at their own pace and at their own level,” Hudson said.

McNair said she enjoys the relaxing nature of the activity. “It’s such a soft, gentle way of learning something.” Tai Chi is also about energy flow, something that Thetis Island resident Carol Sowerby feels in class. “When everyone is doing it

you get the energy flow and you can really feel it,” she said. Bellamy said Tai Chi is accessible for anyone, even those with busy lives. “The nice thing about the way the society [Taoist Tai Chi Society of Canada] works is

you pay the initial registration fee and the monthly dues and then you can attend class anywhere,” she said. “It’s portable and flexible.” Bellamy said anyone interested in joining up to ‘play’ Tai Chi should do so as soon as possible. “Tai Chi helps fit you back into yourself,” she said. “When everything’s crazy, it gets you grounded.” Tai Chi is every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Fuller Lake Arena in Chemainus. For more information go to www.taoist.bc.ca.

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Review: Letters generates much from little

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 19 Your Community

Classifieds can take you places!

Ashley Gaudreault

News Leader Pictorial

T

he Mercury Players put on a great show considering circumstances in the weekend production of A.R. Gurney’s intimate Love Letters. Viewers of the Saturday evening show heard a disclaimer Letters players David Holmes and Maria Ridewood were working with a skimpy set, no equipment, no lights, no props and no sound. A Merc volunteer told the audience about how the theatre recently lost School District 79 as a tenant along with all its bells and whistles. The three-show run acted as a fundraiser for the theatre. But despite the lack in movement, scene changes and props, and what essentially were two actors reading their penmanship to each other — some through short letters, others more convoluted — the Merc’s Letters hit every mark on the comedy scale. Holmes, as Andrew Makepeace Lad the third, and Ridewood, as Melissa Gardner, began with goofy, child-like letters. But they edged toward more serious correspondence as they matured, giving the audience a good reminder of the fun and intimacy in the dying art of letter writing. Holmes and Ridewood sat plunked in their chairs for most of the performance at a sturdy dinner table with warm drinks and writing sticks. Melissa’s missives were about

Call us today • 310-3535 •

Spring into

Andrew Leong

David Holmes portrays Andy and Maria Ridewood is Melissa in a dramatic performance of Love Letters presented by the Mercury Players at Mercury Theatre last weekend. school studies, her lack of letter writing skills, her Àamboyant, Àoozy ways, her mother’s many divorces and alcohol abuse. Andy focused on his groin issues, adventures in the navy, black cocker dog Porgy, Geisha girlfriend, suburban family lifestyle and then ¿nally victory in his run for United States senator. Letters spanning nearly 50 years portray Andy as an already stuffy seven-year-old and insufferable, family man senator, and Melissa, as a blunt, free-spirited and unhappy woman. Melissa observes late in the play how she and her childhood

buddy have had such similar family backgrounds but oddly grew up so different. Irony arrives when they discover late in the game as opposites, they provided each other with what they needed. Letters ends with Melissa’s untimely, unexplained death and Andy’s last letter to Melissa’s mom. It would take terrible reading skills to bring Letters to its knees. You won’t ¿nd them here. Despite only a few, very minor stumbles, Ridewood and Holmes superbly captured the audiences’ attention from their stationary seats.

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20 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

&

Scene Heard PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

Wendy Hiebert, store manager, greets customers to new department.

NEW ORGANIC & NATURAL FOODS SECTION Specializing in Gluten, Wheat, and Dairy Free Products

PHARMACY MILL BAY

Rekha, natural health consultant offers new gluten, wheat, dairy free samples to customers

Dr. Ruth Simkin a new form of ms, who presented a lecture on here with Pharmedical weight loss, is pictured acist Larry Thorn Skoretz. e and Heather

Customers sample bamboo coffee and goodies

d” Cosmetician Laurel demos new “Youngbloo er. line of cosmetics on custom

Store Services: We pride ourselves on being the health professionals you can rely on to answer your questions, Come and meet Shannon Smiley our new cosmetician provide patient care and above all, to help you LIVE WELL. • Friendly, professional pharmacy services • Specialty compounding & consulting • Compliance packaging • Pharmacy vaccination services • Medication reviews • Natural health centre • Home healthcare products • full service cosmetics department • Postal outlet • Local delivery

MILL BAY 11A 2720 Mill Bay Centre 250-743-9011 Postal Outlet 250-743-6679 Hours: Mon-Fri:9 am-7 pm. Sat: 9 am-6 pm Sun & Holidays: 11 am-5 pm

Heather Skoretz, store owner, displays new self home test kit for celiac disease

Ca Camille Camille

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 21

Staging something? email arts@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

ARTISTS

Spinning their wheels for charity

Cut to the Chase

The UnÄnished Project Project: Weavers, knitters, crocheters, quilters and spinners are urged to bring their projects to trade, finish, give away or start, 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Whippletree Junction courtyard. The event includes a silent auction for the Somenos Transition House in Duncan. Call 250-701-7340 or 250-746-5250 for more.

Chasing Satellites (left): raucous rock’n’roll, hard-driving guitar work, great songs and lots of energy. Your chance to join their fan base is 9 p.m., Friday at the Crofton Pub, 1534 Joan Ave. Tickets are $10, or three for $25. Call 250-324-2000.

CVAC sitting on new fundraiser John McKinley

News Leader Pictorial

T

Andrew Leong

Ecolé Duncan Elementary Grade 2 student Halle Oud secures a piece of art work on the wall at Coffee on the Moon. The project organized by teachers Wilma ApplebyMillette and Diane Doucet featured more than 50 pieces of art works, with media ranging from watercolor, charcoal and crayon inside the popular java establishment.

Student art over the moon Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

P

rimary students at Duncan elementary are over the moon about a new art exhibit. After all, they’re the featured artists at Duncan’s Coffee on the Moon café. “I felt honoured because I never knew my art could be good enough to be in a restaurant,” Jaxon Baker said. “I was kind of nervous because of all the people who would see it,” added Blaire Murray. These six- and seven-year-olds in Diane Doucet and Wilma Appleby-Millette’s Grade 1 and 2 classrooms are the proud artists behind the images of toucans, fruit and houses hanging at the Canada Avenue coffee shop until Feb. 28. It’s an artistic tradition now in its fourth year, con¿rmed Coffee on the Moon co-owner Lee-Ann Berard.

“It started when I noticed the wonderful art coming home with my children who go to Duncan elementary,” she said. “I approached the teachers at that time and asked if the students needed a venue, because Coffee on the Moon supports local artists.” Berard praised the work of the Grade 1 and 2 students under the talented tutelage of Doucet and Appleby-Millette. “I think these teachers are fantastic at giving the gift of art,” Berard said. She’s not alone in that opinion — the student art shows are popular with Moon patrons. “In fact, just yesterday one of our regulars said this was their favourite show. Everybody loves it,” she said. The pieces, however, are de¿nitely not for sale. “The children will not part with their pieces,” Berard con¿rmed. “They’ve had offers, but they’re very possessive of their art.”

Women Helping Women New Life Women’s Ministry is seeking donation of quality used ladies clothing for our 3rd Annual

Nearly New Fashion Show Sat. Mar. 26 at 1pm. Admission $5. Donate a bag of clothes and receive a FREE admission ticket. First 200 tickets ENTER A DRAW for a FREE Makeover by Paris Styling. We can pick up clothing, call 250-709-9077. Tickets available online at www.newlifechurch.ca Please donate and buy your ticket early. For more information or to volunteer call 250-748-6521. Proceeds to micro-enterprise development loans to help women in poor countries become self-supporting. All monies raised will be doubled by special donor. Come help a worthy cause.

The students have visited the café gallery as a group, and many have taken their families to see their artwork. “I felt like our artwork looked really good there,” Ansel Nielsen said. “It felt good,” agreed Mya Gagnon. “Our teacher made us really good artists.” That was a common theme among the students. “Our teacher was really good teaching us what she taught us,” Davina Houston said. “I felt like a real artist,” added the appropriately named Matisse Ward. Some people, the students said, were surprised to learn the art on display was created by elementary students. “Probably because we’re just little kids,” Laena Devlin explained. “I felt proud,” Grace Brigham added. “It was quite exciting,” added Halle Oud, “because lots of people get to see my artwork.”

The Cowichan Spiritualist Church of Healing and Light Presents:

AN EVENING OF CLAIRVOYANCE

he Cowichan Valley Arts Council is of the opinion art can be found just about anywhere. Even underneath your seat. Who Cares About Five Chairs? is a challenge being put forth to the local artistic community to test its creativity while helping CVAC at the same time. For the remainder of the week, Portals, CVAC’s Island Savings Centre gallery, is playing host to ¿ve “interesting” chairs, each in need of a little care and a fresh eye. CVAC president Judy Brayden is encouraging local artists to purchase a chair for $25, then Judy Brayden: transform it into a $250-plus work of art art only knows that can be auctioned in conjunction with the April 6 to 10 Cowichan Valley Fine Arts Show at the Cowichan Cultural Centre. Proceeds will be split between CVAC and the artist. “Some will eventually end up looking like chairs, others…art only knows,” Brayden said. “Art isn’t simply two-dimensional wall stuff. Art is entertainment. Art is interactive.” Those not interested in working on a chair are still welcome to drop by and sketch or write comments and ideas on paper hanging from the gallery walls. The chairs will be on display Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Local designer and upholsterer Bonnie Schmaus will be lending inspiration through on-site demos between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Thursday. The chairs will be auctioned — along with dozens of other works by CVAC members — at the Cowichan Catch-ALive-ly Auction on April 6. Call 250-746-1633 for more.

CAPRICE THEATRE www.criteriontheatres.com 404 Duncan Street, DUNCAN 24 HR. Showline 748-0678

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OPENING FRIDAY

Tickets $20.00. For tickets & more info, contact Rev. Patricia Gunn 250-748-0723 or email: patriciais@shaw.ca

HALL PASS 14A

ADMISSION PRICES Adults $9.50, Juniors $8.00, Child & Senior $6.00 -- Tues. & Matinees ALL Seats $6.00


22 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Winning numbers

Got an event that needs publicity? Log onto cowichannewsleader.com, scroll down to the calendar and click “add event.”

Rachael Cardiello: on her first Canadian tour with members of the Tequila Mockingbird

Thursday-Friday: mainly sunny. High: 0 C. Low:

February 19 6/49:

TOWN CRIER Wednesday

Weather forecast -6 C.

10 16 20 26 34 48 bonus: 40

Saturday: cloudy. High: 5 C. Low: -7 C.

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Sunday: rain. High: 6 C. Low: -2 C.

Extra:

courtesy Chris Carss

24 38 83 85

Your Cowichan events calendar Orchestra, 8 p.m. Duncan Garage Showroom, 330 Duncan Street. Tickets are

$10 advance, $12 door. Call 250-748-7246.

After grueling auditions, months of hard work, frequent rehearsals and busy back-stage preparations, students at George Bonner Middle School present The Vile Veterinarian (or...How Much is That Doggie with the Widow) Feb. 22 to 24. The 7 p.m. show tonight is open to the general public. Tickets are $5 at the door.

Strengthening Families Together: a free 10-week program for families of persons with depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or obsessive-compulsive disorder. This program is offered free of charge. Learn self-care, communication, and coping skills in a supportive environment. Next session starts 7 p.m. Call 250-597-1718 or email cbastiaans@shaw.ca. The Cowichan Therapeutic Riding Association: Annual General Meeting, 7 p.m. in the CTRA lounge. Current, new, and prospective members are welcome.

submitted

The Cowichan Bay Maritime Centre: groundbreaking ceremony for the new centre and

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SILENT AUCTION FUNDRAISER For TYESHIA JONES

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Thursday Science of Addiction: a complimentary presentation based on the Rapid Recovery Techniques For Depression and Low SelfEsteem seminar by Dr. David Burns, 6:30 p.m., Travelodge Silver Bridge Inn, 140 Trans Canada Highway. To confirm attendance, call 1-800-6830111 or email: marketing@ edgewood.ca. Music in the Lake: featuring Kate Reid, 7 p.m., Centennial Hall, Lake Cowichan. Open stage at 7:30 p.m. Contact David Lowther for more information. A Cowichan Folk Guild presentation. Jon Cohen: the man featured in the first Duncan Garage Showroom video ever returns to western Canada. Backed

with Northcote, a Matt Goud project, 8 p.m., Duncan Garage Showroom, 330 Duncan Street. Tickets are $12 advance, $15 door. Call 250-748-7246. Zumba Fitness Day: wear red or pink and get your heart pumping for Heart Month by working out. Minimum $5 donation, 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. at Adage’ Studio 5795 Duncan Street, Duncan, or 7 to 8 p.m. at Queen Margaret’s School gym, 660 Brownsey Avenue, Duncan. All proceeds to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Friday The Children’s Hour: a Shawnigan Players presentation of a play by Lillian Hellman, running Feb. 25 to 28, 7:30 p.m. at the Duncan Garage Showroom. Tickets are $15 at Mason’s, Gallowglass, and Ten Old Books.

Look for the

Cowichan Theatre and Chalkboard Theatre present

Eve Ensler’s

The Vagina Monologues Friday, March 11, 2011 ǀ 7:30 PM Proceeds benefit local women’s charities.

Tickets: $22.50 eyeGO: $5

COMEAKIN ROOM 200 COWICHAN WAY DUNCAN BC

EVERYONE IS INVITED TO ATTEND All money raised will go toward the Tyeshia Jones trust account at the Duncan Bank of Montreal to offer as a reward to find the people(s) responsible for taking her life far too soon.

THANK YOU The Cowichan Spirit of Women Resource Centre

Furniture Galleries Flyer in the next

DOORS OPEN @ 3PM AUCTION CLOSES @ 6 PM 1. 50/50 DRAW 1. DOOR PRIZES 1. FOOD & DRINKS

If you have an item or service you would like to donate please contact Lena Williams @ 250.597.1166 or Coral Schedel @ 250.510.3766 All items need to be in no later than February 25th.

COWICHAN TICKET CENTRE 250.748.7529 2687 James Street Duncan BC V9L 2X5 www.cowichantheatre.bc.ca

Sunday February 27th QUWUTSUN’ CULTURAL & CONFERENCE CENTER

WE HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE

Limited Distribution VICTORIA TORIA 250-382-526 250-382-5269

NANAIMO NAIMO 250-756-41 250-756-4114


Wednesday, February 23, 2011

#OWICHANĂĽ .EWSĂĽ,EADERĂĽ 0ICTORIAL ĂĽ$EADLINES

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 23

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

CELEBRATIONS

DEATHS

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DEATHS Alicia Thompson Sales Advisor

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BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx CANNOTx BEx RESPONSIBLEx FORx ERRORSx AFTERx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx OFx PUBLICATIONx OFx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx.OTICExOFxERRORSxONx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx SHOULDx IMMEDIATELYx BEx CALLEDx TOx THEx ATTENTIONx OFx THEx #LASSIÙEDx $EPARTMENTx TOx BEx CORRECTEDx FORx THEx FOLLOWINGx EDITIONBCCLASSIÙEDCOMxRESERVESx THExRIGHTxTOxREVISE xEDIT xCLASSIFYxORx REJECTx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx TOx RETAINx ANYx ANSWERSx DIRECTEDx TOx THEx BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx "OXx 2EPLYx 3ERVICEx ANDx TOx REPAYx THEx CUSTOMERxFORxTHExSUMxPAIDxFORxTHEx ADVERTISEMENTxANDxBOXxRENTAL

DEATHS

375 Brae Road, Duncan DEATHS

Raymond Ayce Johnsen Walker October 23, 1941- February 11, 2011

$)3#2)-).!4/29 ,%')3,!4)/.

!DVERTISERSx AREx REMINDEDx THATx 0ROVINCIALx LEGISLATIONx FORBIDSx THEx PUBLICATIONxOFxANYxADVERTISEMENTx WHICHx DISCRIMINATESx AGAINSTx ANYx PERSONxBECAUSExOFxRACE xRELIGION x SEX x COLOUR x NATIONALITY x ANCESTRYx ORxPLACExOFxORIGIN xORxAGE xUNLESSx THEx CONDITIONx ISx JUSTIÙEDx BYx Ax BONAx ÙDEx REQUIREMENTx FORx THEx WORKxINVOLVED

#/092)'(4

CLASSIFIEDS! 310.3535 or bcclassiďŹ ed.com ✔ CallCHECK

#OPYRIGHTx ANDORx PROPERTIESx SUBSISTx INx ALLx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx INx ALLx OTHERx MATERIALx APPEARINGx INx THISx EDITIONx OFx BCCLASSIÙED COMx 0ERMISSIONx TOx REPRODUCEx WHOLLYxORxINxPARTxANDxINxANYxFORMx WHATSOEVER x PARTICULARLYx BYx Ax PHOTOGRAPHICx ORx OFFSETx PROCESSx INxAxPUBLICATIONxMUSTxBExOBTAINEDx INxWRITINGxFROMxTHExxPUBLISHERx!NYx UNAUTHORIZEDxREPRODUCTIONxWILLxBEx SUBJECTxTOxRECOURSExINxLAW

!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

251 Jubilee St.

Email: hwwallace@shawbiz.ca www.hwwallacecbc.com Locally Owned & Operated

IN MEMORIAM

IN MEMORIAM

In Loving Memory of

Raymond Walker died as he had courageously lived at home within his community. He was an accomplished communicator, a skilled therapist and a spirited teacher who did everything with grace, enthusiasm and love. He is survived by brother Grant, wife Sarah, daughters Danae and Oriana, grandson Ian and 35 remarkable Home Caregivers who made his long life wonderful and possible. A Memorial Service is planned at 2 pm on Saturday, February 26th at the Shawnigan Community Centre in Shawnigan Lake. In lieu of owers, donations are gratefully accepted (Any Island Savings Branch: In Memoriam Account # 90 213 3684) for those who not only lost a true friend but also their job. They lovingly cared for Ray, who gratefully cared for All.

Shirley Stuart January 19, 1947 ~ February 23, 2009

Your Community, Your ClassiďŹ eds Call 310.3535

In my heart your memory lingers, Always tender, fond and true; There’s not a day, dear mother, I do not think of you Love, Always and Forever, Lara

Your Community, Your ClassiďŹ eds. Call 310-3535


24 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

DEATHS

LOST AND FOUND

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

LOST CAMERA in blue case, Sunday. Jersey/Wallbank/ E. Shawnigan. (250)743-4957.

FAMILIES EARNING more. Work from home part or fulltime. No selling. No inventory. No parties. No large investment or risk. Visit www.familiesearningmore.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783 FOODSAFE AT Island Savings Centre, March 19, April 16 courses 8:30-4:30 $65. 250746-4154 www.saferfood.ca

LOST: LARGE friendly golden brown/white male dog, blue collar with tags, Riverbottom Rd area. Call 250-748-7485. The News Leader Pictorial office is holding several sets of “found” keys, & some eyeglasses since March 2003. Stop into the office and see if any belong to you. #2-5380 Trans Canada Hwy, Duncan. (next to Buckerfields)

TRAVEL GETAWAYS LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ. Winter Special. 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299. Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

TIMESHARE SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for CASH! Over $95 Million Dollars offered in 2010! w w w. s e l l a t i m e s h a r e . c o m (800)640-6886.

TRAVEL COSTA RICA 10 Days from $995. All Inclusive Vacation Packages. Free Brochure: Call 1-800-CARAVAN See all Tours Now: Visit www.Caravan.com SUNNY WINTER Specials At Florida’s Best Beach-New Smyrna Beach Stay a week or longer Plan a beach wedding or family reunion. www.NSBFLA.com or 1-800541-9621.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS CARDS OF THANKS THE FAMILY of the late Mavis Tipton wish to thank all of those who so kindly expressed their sympathy with cards, phone calls, visits, the lovely goodies and donations to charities. It was deeply appreciated. We would also like to thank the nurses on the 2nd floor of CDH, the nurses and staff at Cairnsmore Place and a special thanks to Dr. Hartford and Dr. Galbraith. Their kindness and care was truly heartfelt.

80% COMMISSION Travelonly has 500 agents across Canada. Business opportunities with low investment, unlimited income potential, generous tax/travel benefits. Run your travel company, full-time, part-time from home. Register for free seminar, 1-800-6081117, Ext. 2020. www.travelonly.ca

HYGIENITECH MATTRESS Cleaning & Upholstery Cleaning/Sanitizing Business. New “Green” Chemical-Free process removes bed bugs, dust mites, and harmful allergens. Big Profits/Small Investment. 1-888-999-9030 www.Hygienitech.com JEWELLERY SALES opportunity! New to Canada, trendy, affordable! Work from home, part or full-time, earn great money and vacations. Contact for catalogue and business information. 403909-4302

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES ABLE TO TRAVEL National Company Hiring Sharp People. Able to Start Today. Transportation & Lodging Furnished. NO EXPERIENCE Necessary. Paid Training. Over 18+ 888-853-8411 FAIR REALTY has openings for agents on Vancouver Island. We offer 100 percent commission with monthly fees, starting from $50.00/mo. Contact Bob Wilson bob@fairrealty.com

LOST SOMETHING? Call 310.3535

INFORMATION

INFORMATION

If you are new to the Neighbourhood call one of these representatives for your FREE Basket of Gifts. Community Welcome David Diana Milli

746-4236 246-4463 749-4419

Baby & Community Pat 748-6740 Milli 749-4419

Website: www.welcomewagon.ca

Windshield Replacement and Repair SAVE

Looking for a NEW employee? www.bcjobnetwork.com

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please come out and dance to the music of the COOKIE MONSTERS Moose Road, Sat. March 5th at 8:30 pm Doors open at 7:30 PM $15 ea / $25 couple Tickets @ Gallowglass Books or ph. 250-746-1991

$

00

With This Ad

DUNCAN COMMUNITY LODGE

The successful candidate will have a university or college education or two years of sales experience. The ability to build relationships with clients and offer superior customer service is a must. The winning candidate will be a team player and have the ability to work in a fast paced environment with a positive attitude. MEDICAL OFFICE Trainees Needed! Hospitals & Dr’s Need Medical Office & Medical Admin staff! No Experience? Need Training? Local Career Training & Job Placement also Available! 1-888-778-0459 POSITION AVAILABLE as resident caretaker of Eves Provincial Park in Westholme, BC. Applicants must be physically fit, self-reliant and have own transportation. Criminal record checks required. Interested parties contact Genevieve Singleton, twinflower@telus.net for application package. Applications and resumes accepted until Feb. 28/11 for May 1 commencement. RESIDENT BUILDING manager required. Must be bondable. Mature person with experience preferred. Fax resume & references to 1-250338-0556 SHAWNIGAN COBBLE HILL Farmers Institute has two positions available. #1 - Hall Coordinator, P/T on call position. # 2 - Janitorial, minimum of 4 hours per week. Must be a team player. Renumeration to be negotiated. Send resumes to: SCHFIAS, Box 148, Cobble Hill, BC V0R 1L0

SELL OLD STUFF

LIVE-IN MANAGER required for local motel. Must have experience. 3 bdrm suite provided. Call 250-701-8797

with a classified ad! Call 310.3535

Let’ss get personall… the right person is out there somewhere! let us help you find them...

We know there are hundreds of singles in our community. Advertise your single status seven times per week (up to 10 lines of text) for FREE! Don’t have an email address to publish in your ad? Rent one of our file numbers for $10/ month. *must be 19 years of age to participate

Ed

Justin

Ralph

Craig Lucas Mon.-Fri. 8-5 Sat. 9-1

Ingram St., Duncan GLASS Ltd. 186 ✃

www.dobsonsglass.com

250-746-4824

PERSONALS

PERSONALS

CAN’T STOP DRINKING? Cobble Hill Discussion Group Mon, Thurs & Friday 8:00 pm. 3141 Cameron Taggart Rd., Cobble Hill. (250)743-3863

OLD FRIEND would like to contact Carolynne (Kelly). Reply to Box A987 c/o #2 5380 Trans Canada Hwy, Duncan BC, V9L 6W4.

DATING SERVICE. Longterm/short-term relationships, Free calls. 1-877-297-9883. Exchange voice messages, voice mailboxes. 1-888-5346984. Live adult casual conversations 1on1, 1-866-3119640, Meet on chat-lines. Local single ladies.1-877-8045381. (18+).

SINGLE LADY (50’s, nonsmoking), would like to meet single man, (50’s - 60’s), who has good values and is seeking a good companion for conversation and outings. Please reply to “File 986” c/o The News Leader Pictorial, #2-5380 Trans Canada Hwy, Duncan, BC or email with File # 986 in the subject line to: pbs@cowichannewsleader.com

ENERGETIC, FIT, 20 year old female (N/S, single & no children) would love to meet a gentleman 24 to 30 who’s outgoing, likes outdoor activities, hockey & more. Call 250-7099599. FOOT CARE NURSE caring service in the comfort of your home. Call Charlotte, LPN 250-732-4784 GAY PHONE Chat. free trial. 1-877-501-1012 Talk to or meet desirable guys in your area 24/7. Where private, confidential fantasies come true! 1-877-501-1012 GayLiveNetwork.com 18+

FOUND SOMETHING? Call 310.3535

HELP WANTED

The Cowichan News Leader Pictorial has an immediate opening for a News Leader Daily Sales Representative.

Unit 2, 5380 Trans Canada Hwy., Duncan 250-746-4471

COMING EVENTS

In support of the

ACCOUNTING & PAYROLL Trainees Needed! Large & Small Firms Seeking Certified A&P Staff Now. No Experience? Need Training? Career Training & Job Placement Available. 1-888-424-9417 COOK. SMITTY’S RESTAURANT requires F/T cook, $13.66/hr. 250-748-0661 ext 100. Fax 250-737-1615. smittysrestaurant@shaw.ca

CLASS 1 OR 3 DRIVERS Terrific career opportunity with outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects using non-destructive testing. No Exp. Needed!! Plus Extensive paid travel, meal allowance, 4 weeks vacation and benefits pkg. Skills Needed Ability to travel 3 mos. at a time, Valid D.L. & High School Diploma or GED. Apply online at www.sperryrail.com under careers, Click here to apply, keyword Driver. DO NOT FILL IN CITY OR STATE

STAR FLEET TRUCKING HIRING! DRIVERS, FAMERS, RANCHERS & RETIREES needed with 3/4 Ton or 1-Ton pickup trucks to deliver new travel trailers & fifth wheels from US manufacturers to dealers throughout Canada. Free IRP plate for your truck and low insurance rates! Pref. commercial Lic. or 3 yrs towing exp. Top Pay! Call Craig 1877-890-4523. www.starfleettrucking.com

BE YOUR own boss with Great Canadian Dollar Store. New franchise opportunities in your area. Call 1-877-3880123 ext. 229 or visit our website: www.dollarstores.com today.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Love What You Do? We Do!

LEARN FROM home. Earn from home. CanScribe Career College offers courses in medical transcription and computers. Great work at-home opportunities. Enroll today! 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com info@canscribe.com

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

DRIVERS/OWNER operators wanted. Truck contractors need drivers with log haul experience and clean driver’s abstract. Owner operators needed with 6, 7, 8 axle log trailers. Visit: www.alpac.ca or call 1-800-661-5210 ext. 8173

HELP WANTED

SWM, Senior, widow, like car cruising, walking, outdoors, short trips, would like female companion. Please respond to file # A985, c/o Cowichan News Leader Pictorial, #2-5380 TCH, Duncan, BC. V9L 6W4. TOTALLY YOUTHFUL guy, 52, wishes to meet a lovely single woman, who is happy, well settled in life, who would like to visit me at my home at Lake Cowichan. Reply to File 982, c/o The News Leader Pictorial, #2-5380 Trans Canada Highway, Duncan, BC, V9L 6W4 or by email, with File A982 in the subject line to: pbs@cowichannewsleader.com

We offer a great working environment with a competitive base salary and commission plan coupled with a strong benefits package, please forward your resume with a cover letter by March 4 to: The Cowichan News Leader Pictorial Attn: Bill Macadam #2 5380 Trans Canada Hwy Duncan, BC V9L 6W4 email: publisher@cowichannewsleader.com A driver’s license, the use of your own vehicle and valid insurance are required. We thank all applicants for their interest but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

We Believe in You. Social Services are needed in Your Community. Become a Community Support Worker. } Child & Youth Care

Worker }Woman’s Shelter Worker }Family Practice Worker }Teen Pregnancy & Parenting Support Worker }Settlement / Newcomers Service Worker

Get In. Get Out. Get Working.

Call Our Call Ca Our DUNCAN DUN DUN UNCA CAN CA N Campus: Camp Camp Ca mpus us:: us

(250)

748-2700

www.sprottshaw.com JOIN US ON:

Your Community, Your Classifieds. Call 310-3535


Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 25 PERSONAL SERVICES

HELP WANTED

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD

TRADES, TECHNICAL

MEDITATION

Sunridge Place

ADVOCARE is currently looking for Cooks for our Duncan community location. To apply please send resume by email to susan.bellows@advocarehealth.com or fax to 250-597-2894.

Independant Truck repair shop seeking Experienced Mechanic. Heated floor shop. CVI ticket, Computer Diagnostics, & RV experience an asset. Send resume to vitrucktech@gmail.com or Call 250-245-3092.

Nichiren Buddha Society Meditation, Thurs 7pm Info www.penlan.com (250)710-7594.

A Residential Complex Care facility in Duncan is now hiring staff who are wanting to make a difference in the lives of seniors. Regular, temporary and casual positions available and include: Occupational Therapist or Physiotherapist Cook - Red Seal Recreation Programmer – RT diploma preferred Registered Nurse Licensed Practical Nurse Resident Care Attendant Food Service Worker Housekeeper Scheduler/Payroll Clerk (casual contract positions) Please send resume to apply@sunridgeplace.ca by March 4th, 2011 Thank you to all applicants for your interest in Sunridge Place, however, only those applicants selected for interview will be contacted.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

TRADES, TECHNICAL BANNISTER GM requires journeyman automotive and collision technicians. Situated at the foothills of the Rockies, 1.5 hours to Edmonton or Jasper, Edson offers outdoor enthusiasts a great living opportunity. Signing bonuses, moving allowances and top pay for the right candidate. Contact: dean@bannisteredson.com

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS! Call 310.3535

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

success prescription for

LMS REINFORCING Steel Group hiring infrastructure rebar placers for projects across Western Canada. Experience preferred, not mandatory. Long term full-time employment, competitive wage and benefits. Please fill out an on line application at: www.lmsgroup.ca Vancouver Island based truck dealership, in Duncan has the following Full/Time positions available: • Parts Representative Knowledge of Heavy Duty trucks required. •Heavy Duty & Commercial Transport Certified Tech. Possession of an Authorized Motor Vehicle Inspection ticket would be an asset. • Service Advisor Knowledge of Heavy Duty and Commercial vehicles / engines required. Excellent Wage and Benefit Package. Please e-mail resume michele@prwstar.com or Fax: 250-746-8064

VOLUNTEERS

Canada Safeway Limited is currently seeking a dynamic and motivated individual for the position of PHARMACY TECHNICIAN in DUNCAN, BC If you are seeking a professional, challenging and rewarding career in retail pharmacy, Safeway Pharmacy is looking for you! Candidates wishing to apply must have a pharmacy technician certificate from a recognized college. Interested applicants can apply at www.safewaypharmacy.jobs

Do you ever ask yourself How can _ I _ make a difference? Contact us, and together we can plant the seeds of change, because Volunteers Grow Community. 250-748-2133 www.volunteercowichan.bc.ca

WORK WANTED HUSBAND FOR HIRE. Nothing but the best. Carpenter, plumber, painter, electrician, pressure washing. Just ask my wife! Call 250-746-4493 or 250-709-1111

PERSONAL SERVICES www.safewaypharmacy.jobs

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HOLISTIC HEALTH FOOT CARE NURSE In home service. Senior discounts. Call Tilo (250)709-9426. NEW YEAR, New Life, your old body needs a massage! $40/hr. Call 250-510-1963.

BUYING OR SELLING? Call 310.3535

HELP WANTED

PETS AND LIVESTOCK PETS REMEMBERED

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES * Great bargains

FINANCIAL SERVICES

* All local, in COWICHAN!

DEBT CONSOLIDATION PROGRAM Helping Canadians repay debts, reduce or eliminate interest, regardless of your credit. Steady Income? You may qualify for instant help. Considering Bankruptcy? Call 1-877-220-3328 FREE Consultation Government Approved, BBB Member $500 LOAN, no credit refused. Fast, Easy and Secure. 1-877776-1660 www.moneyprovider.com. GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE STEEL BUILDINGS priced to clear - holding 2010 steel prices on many models/sizes. Ask about free delivery! Call for quick sale quote and free brochure 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170. STEEL BUILDING winter sale... $3.49 to $11/sq.ft. Immediate orders only. Free shipping, some exclusions. Up to 90 days to pay. Deposit required. Pioneer Manufacturers since 1980. 1-800-668-5422. See current specials www.pioneersteel.ca. WINE OF THE MONTH CLUB Send the gift of wine all year long! 2 Bottles each month from award-winning wineries around the world. Call 1-888751-6215 and get FREE SHIPPING!

REAL ESTATE ACREAGE

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits will lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit / age / income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

MEDICAL SUPPLIES ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE Talking Meter and diabetic supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 888-449-1321.

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed record removal since 1989. Confidential, fast, affordable. Our A+ BBB rating assures employment, travel and freedom. Call for your free information booklet. 1-8-NOWPARDON (1 866-972-7366).

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! 1-866-981-5991.

www.PardonServicesCanada.com

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

PETS

100% GUARANTEED Omaha Steaks - SAVE 64% on the Family Value Collection. NOW ONLY $49.99 Plus 3 FREE GIFTS & right-to-thedoor delivery in a reusable cooler.

PETS 3 PUREBRED Boxers, males, 13 wks old, with tails, first shots, vet checked. $500. Need good homes asap. (250)709-4623

A FREE telephone service Get your first month free. Bad credit, don’t sweat it. No deposits. No credit checks. Call Freedom Phone Lines today toll-free 1-866-884-7464.

F1B LABRADOODLE puppies, mainly hypo-allergenic & shed free. Ready to go March 15th. $1200. (250)710-2003 or email: tdcroswell@shaw.ca

A SAFE, proven “restless leg syndrome” and “leg cramps” cure that always gives you instant relief. www.allcalm.com 1-800-765-8660.

CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSET!

CAN’T GET up your stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift. Call 1-866-9816591.

Call us today to place your classified ad Call 310.3535 HELP WANTED

ARIZONA BUILDING LOTS FULL ACRES AND MORE! Guaranteed Owner Financing, No credit check $0 down - 0 interest. Starting at just $99/mo. Close to Tucson’s Intl. Airport. Hear free recording at 1-800-631-8164 Code 4001 or visit : www.sunsiteslandrush.com OWN 20 Acres $129/mo. $13,900 Near Growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free Map/Pictures. 1-866-2547755. www.sunsetranches.com OWN 20 acres only $129/mo. ..$295/down near El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Money back guarantee, no credit checks, owner financing, free map/pictures 1-800-3439444 www.20acreranches.com WE ARE looking for an acre or two to build a home, grow food, and raise kids rurally on. Do you have arable land in the Mill Bay-Cobble Hill area that you would sell to a young island family? We are interested in a private sale and are open to negotiating conditions. No commercial inquiries please. Call 250-370-7871 or email nevin.harper@gmail.com

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053

PERMANENT CARRIERS REQUIRED ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES: COWICHAN BAY

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

GOING...

Gone!! Gone

101360 – Buckingham, Hampton Pl/Rd, Kensington Pl/Rd (41 papers) 104500 – Roberts, Polkey, Allenby, Chaster – Koksilahclassified.com Industrial Park (112 papers) bcclassified bc .com

SEASONED 250-701-1964.

link

304130 – Alget, Lodgepole, Staats, Benko (50 papers)

SHAWNIGAN buyers LAKE and

sellers

354200 – Airbright, Linden, Merrifield, Sunnybrook, Sunny Glades (45 papers) 354350 – Bob O Link, Dundas, Jersey, Robin Hill, Thrush, Wallbank (70 papers) CALL LARA NOW 250-746-4471 Extension 224

310-3535

PERMANENT CARRIERS REQUIRED ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES: COBBLE HILL 203152 – Dougan Dr, Hutchinson Rd (50 papers)

COWICHAN BAY 253370 – Cherry Point, Chestnutt, Greenbrier, Lanes, Polo Field, Sparwood (75 papers)

CROFTON

MILL BAY eds Classifi

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

FUEL/FIREWOOD

253452 – Alderglen, George, Maple Glen, Ordano (61 papers)

DUNCAN GOING,

www.webuyhomesbc.com

503705 – Chaplin, Joan, King, Robert (52 papers)

MILL BAY

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords, fast delivery. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com or 1877-902-WOOD.

MORTGAGES

Your Community

Classifieds can find your friend!

304130 – Alget, Lodgepole, Staats, Benko (50 papers)

DISCONNECTED PHONE? Phone Factory Home Phone Service. No one refused! Low monthly rate! Calling features and unlimited long distance available. Call Phone Factory today! 1-877-336-2274. www.phonefactory.ca

HERITAGE Pawn Bargains! Honda 2” water pump, Klipsch 8.5 tower speakers, Pearl Rhythm Traveller drum kit, Marshall Ministack, Fender Bass, PRS electric guitar, KEF speakers, Nikko stereo. 430 Whistler, 250-746-9810. www.heritage pawnbrokers.com

SHAWNIGAN LAKE 354200 – Airbright, Linden, Merrifield, Sunnybrook, Sunny Glades (45 papers) 354350 – Bob O Link, Dundas, Jersey, Robin Hill, Thrush, Wallbank (70 papers) CALL LARA NOW 250-746-4471 Extension 224

WHOLESALE FACTORY DIRECT. Manufactured, Modular & Park models. Tremendous savings. Luxurious 1512 sq. ft home including delivery and installation only $ 109,950. Many other plans available. 877-976-3737 or 250-814-3788 www.hbmodular.com

FIREWOOD.

Call us today • 310-3535 •

STORAGE SHED, 10’x8’, with doors. Must be moved. $475. 250-929-4055.

BANK ON US! Mortgages for purchases, renos, debt consolidation, foreclosure. Bank rates. Many alternative lending programs.Let Dave Fitzpatrick, your Mortgage Warrior, simplify the process!1-888-711-8818 dave@mountaincitymortgage.ca

OTHER AREAS ALASKA GOLDMINE w/camp/equipment Known resource, large block, over 40 claims! $1.5M Firm. Serious/capable only! By owner dave.fpsak@hotmail.com FPS,P.O. Box 73087, Fai.AK. 99707

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO GRACIOUS LIVING 1 Bdrm top flr, 5 appls, guest suite, pet ok. $875. 250-746-7077.


26 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

HOMES FOR RENT

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

SUITES, LOWER

GRACIOUS LIVING 1Bdrm+ den 2nd flr, southern exposure balcony, 5appl, guest suite, pet ok. $900. 250-746-7077

DUNCAN: 1 & 2-bdrm, 5 appls, close to School, Hospital and bus route. $650-$800 utils. Lv msg: 250-597-4018.

PARKLAND PLACE 620 Dobson Road 250-748-0496

DUNCAN, 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 appl’s, 1900 sqft, secured garage, mature NS,NP. $1600 incl’s util. Available Feb 1st. (250)748-9059

DUNCAN, AVAIL April. 1, 3 bdrm, den, 3 bath, 2 decks, backing onto green belt and pond, upper flr: 2 bdrm, full bath, lrg open covered deck, lower flr: open concept kitch, liv rm, din rm, gas F/P, 4 stainless appls, Master bdrm w/ full ensuite and walk-in closet. Deck off living rm/bedroom. Lndry/powder rm w/ W/D, den, 18’ bright ent area, beautiful garden, great area. Refs req, $1600 mo + utils, N/S, N/P, lease avail, 250-217-3633.

DUNCAN- 1 bdrm available in 4300sq ft 7 bdrm luxury home. Hot tub, sauna, games room. Includes cable, hydro, internet & laundry. $600/mo per room. Available now. (250)709-9977.

LAKE COWICHAN waterfront, furn/unfurn, 1bdrm grnd lvl, n/s, w/d. $695 all incl. 778433-4567, candal@shaw.ca

DUNCAN: 2524 Lewis St. 2 bdrm condo, second floor, corner unit, 5 appls, new laminate floors. N/S. Avail. Feb. 15. $900./lease. Call (250)4778046, (250)883-3204. Duncan, 55+, large bachelor suite downtown behind post office. Quiet, secure apt. Ref. needed. N/S, N/P. $520/m (250) 715-1051 DUNCAN KIWANIS Village Society who provides seniors subsidized independent living is now taking applications for their newly reno’d building at 365 Day Rd., to be ready in the new year. Contact 250748-4135 for more info. DUNCAN: LARGE (850 sqft), 1 bdrm suite in quiet building, bright, spacious, balcony, W/D, F/S, D/W, downtown. NS/NP. Avail April. 1. $725 mo + utils. Call (250)701-7178. BRIGHT 2BDRM condo, close to hospital, f/s, dw, w/d, secure bldg. w/ elevator. (Now) ns/np, $875+utils. 250-710-0881. CENTRAL LOCATION, Bachelor, 1 & 2 bdrms, balcony, F/S, hot water, parking, pet considered, $525-$850/mo. Call 250-748-7764. CROFTON, BRIGHT, 1 bdrm, ground level, quiet bldg, W/D in suite, $700/mo + utils. Avail Mar 1. Call (250) 416-0053 after 6pm.

LADYSMITH, 1550 sq ft, 3 bdrm condo, fab ocean view from 2 decks, 5 appls, pet friendly, too many perks to list, March. 15 or Apr. 1, $1395 mo/13th mo free, 250-2458997 or 250-732-2507.

MAPLE GROVE APTS. 3271 Cowichan Lake Rd 2 & 3 Bedroom Units

FREE Heat, hotwater & parking. Low hydro. Walking distance to: Shopping, Restaurants, Malaspina College, Pubs, Chances Casino. Quiet building with video security. Adjacent to 27 acres of parkland including playing fields, walking trails, swimming holes & fishing. APARTMENTS FURNISHED LAKEFRONT CONDO. Beautiful, fully furnished and equipped 1 bedroom unit on Shawnigan Lake. Indoor pool, beach, boat dock, utilities, digital cable & wireless internet incl’d. $1200. (250)743-6801.

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL Available immediately, 2000sq’ shop or warehouse w/ overhead door, office & reception area, highway frontage, ample parking. 250-748-9622

_____________________

*Heat & Hot water included *Family oriented *Clean & quiet *Renovated units *Indoor Pets welcome *Onsite Laundry Facilities

DUNCAN, 5000 sqft for Lease, inc. overhead door, office space w/ac 250-748-9622

MILL BAY, country, 1 bdrm, NS, $650/mo incl’s Cable TV, Internet. Ref’s. (250)743-2207

WILDROSE 1 bdrm, main floor, extra large closet. Lots of storage. $645. Lrg 2 bdrm, 2nd flr corner unit. $765. Mar 1. Quiet bldg. Heat & hotwater included. 250-748-1304. YOUBOU 2BDRM $600 incl. cable & laundry, bright, available now. (250)210-0756

HUGE SUITE in Duplex, Duncan area. Large yard, 4 bdrms, F/P. $1250. + util. 1(250)7041251.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR RENT PREMIUM FLOATHOME for Rent! One of the most idyllic locations in the Cowichan Valley! Try ocean life for yourself! Approx.1200sqft. exec. 1 bdrm w/loft, 1.5bath, w/d, stove/oven, fridge, micro, dw, hottub, plasma 50” TV & built-in surround sound throughout. Ref. req’d. Available now. View at www.bcfloathomeforsale.com $1,200/mo. 250-732-6260.

HOMES FOR RENT A.M.C. Home Improvements Need maintenance on your rental? Call (250)743-9920 AVAIL APRIL 1, Duncan (Osborne Bay Rd area), 1 yr old 2 bdrm, 2 bath home, very priv on acreage, lovely, bright energy efficient, 5 appls, vaulted living room, lrg deck, gas F/P. NS/NP, $1300 mo + utils. Call (250)746-4874.

COTTAGES

COBBLE HILL, 3 bdrm rancher, 2 bath, private fenced yard. F/S, W/D hookup, wood/elec, $1300 + hydro. Mar 1st. (250)743-9729

DUNCAN- AVAIL Mar 1. Recently reno’d 1 bdrm cottage, F/S, W/D, all new appls. Storage. Minutes from downtown. NS/NP. Refs req’d. $750/mo. By appt only. Days (250)7371876, Eves, 250-748-6483.

COBBLE HILL/SHAWNIGAN 2 bdrm, attractive & clean accommodation, beautiful, quiet, forested setting with private pond. All appl’s and power incl’d. NS/NP, min 1 yr lease, $975/mo. 250-743-9882

DUNCAN, COZY cottage, newly reno’d, 1 bdrm, quiet location, near hospital, N/S, N/P, woodstove, cable incl, $700 mo + utils, 250-746-6243.

DUNCAN 3 bdrm, completely reno’d. New kitchen incl’s. 4 new appl’s, hardwood floors throughout, large lot, with fenced vegetable garden, 5 min walk to town. N/S, $1100/mo. 250-246-7928

_____________________

Call (250) 710-7515 to view

DUNCAN, new s/s 4-bed, 2 bath, F&S, W&D hookup, N/P, N/S. Mar 1st. $1250. Ref req. 250-746-1956

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES CHEMAINUS: 3 bdrm sxs duplex in quiet neighbourhood near schools. W/D hookup, F/S, D/W, 1.5 bath. Avail. now. $1050. mo. (250) 245-5207.

DUNCAN, Available now. Smaller home for rent, W/D, F/S, woodstove, in ceiling speakers, nicely finished, private, close to the new university. N/S, Incl’s internet & cable. $800/mo 250-748-9679

DUNCAN- NEAR hospital, log house in country setting. 2 bdrm, F/S, wood stove. N/S. $1000, W/D, storage, horse paddock extra. 250-510-6726. LAKE COWICHAN- updated 3 Bdrm+ den, 2 bath, 5 appls, near town, scenic. $1100 + utils. Avail now. 250-749-4090, 250-701-5805. SALTAIRE, 2 bdrm + office, sunny, private, level entry, hdwd, W/D, D/W, $1100 + hydro, Mar. 1, 1-250-658-1656. SHAWNIGAN LAKE, 3 bdrm log home with acreage, across lake, N/S, no dogs, March. 1, $1400 mo, 250-334-1069. SHAWNIGAN LAKE: Beautiful 1 bdrm carriage house on hobby farm. Hardwoods, vaulted ceilings, gas F/P, 2 yrs new. NS/NP. $850. Avail Mar. 1st. Call 250-743-7884. SKUTZ FALLS, 15 min W of Duncan off highway 18, unique A frame on quiet acreage, 3 small bdrms, F/S, W/D, wood electric heat, $1200 incl hydro, N/S, pets neg, DD & refs, 250-701-1978.

OFFICE/RETAIL DOWNTOWN DUNCAN 2500sq.ft. 6 separate offices, reception, conference area & kitchen, 2nd floor, AC,. $1100/mo. 250-715-6880. DUNCAN: STORE front. Approx 950 sqft of newly reno’d office space. Incld’s 3 offices, lrg reception, wheel chair acess, storage. Avail. March 1, $1294/mo. (250)709-5271.

SHARED ACCOMMODATION 4-BDRM Large suite. 1 bdrm avail: $350. Wood f/p. F/S, W/D. NS/NP. Avail. March 1st. Call (250)740-5619.

SUITES, LOWER 2 BDRM., level entry, Berkey’s Corner area. F&S. N/P. Ref’’s $800/m includes hydro/heat/water. Available now. 250-710-8612

2 OR 3 Bdrm bsmt suite for rent. F/S, blinds, W/D hookup. N/P. (250)748-4383; 709-8880 CHEMAINUS: BACHELOR with kitchenette, W/D, private bath & ent., walk to town. $650 util’s incld’d. (250)246-1546. COBBLE HILL 1 bdrm suite in lovely country setting. $750 includes utilities. N/S. Avail. March 1st. (250)743-5976 CROFTON, 2 bdrm, 1 bath suite, tile & lam throughout, N/S, N/P, $800 incls hydro, avail March. 1, 250-701-2434. DUNCAN 1 BDRM suite- grd lvl, hardwood flrs, separate ent, shared lndry, lrg shared yard, near hospital, schools. N/S. $600+utils. 250-710-9769 DUNCAN, 6128 Pinnacle Rd. 1bd $725 & 2 bd.$1000. incl;W/D all util’s. NS, NP. Mar 1. Ref’s req (250) 748-7119 DUNCAN, AVAILABLE immediately, good neighbourhood, 3Bdrm suite, W/D, utilities incl. $1100 mo. (250)510-0993. DUNCAN BACHELOR. Private, level entry, nice views. F/S, cable. Quiet, responsible, NS/NP. Refs req’d. $675. Avail March. 1. 250-597-3851. DUNCAN, large 2 bdrm suite, level entry, 4 appl’s, N/S, small pet considered. $800 incl’s util’s. April 15. (250)748-2855 DUNCAN: LARGE bright and private 1 bdrm, Maple Bay Rd. Hydro/water incld’d, $750/mo. Avail immed., (250)746-7935. DUNCAN, MARCH. 3, 2 bdrm, grd level, no stairs, close to shopping, 482 Chesterfield, $595 mo, 250-896-4248. DUNCAN Split level hse sized apt, pvt entrance. 1 bdrm, W/D, F/S, some heat incl. N/S, N/P, N/partiers, mature applicants only. $850/m + DD. Ref’s will be checked. Call Kim 250-746-6731 to book appt to view & p/u application.

SALTAIRE- BRIGHT modern 1 bdrm, deluxe setting. $700 inclusive. Call (250)658-1656. SALTAIRE: FURNISHED bachelor suite in newer home. Bright, new paint, own entrance, quiet area, heat incl. N/S, N/P. $550/mo. Avail now. Call (250)245-2955. SHAWNIGAN LAKE, new 1 bdrm, furnished suite, gorgeous lake front view, lake access, hrwd flrs, flat screen TV, stainless appls, W/D, March. 1, $1000 mo, incls cable/high speed/heat. 604-876-5058 or kpemberton@shaw.ca SHAWNIGAN LAKE newer deluxe 2Bdrm, sep entrance, f/s, dw, w/d hookup, woodstove, ns/np, avail. now, $800 + hydro. (250)743-1465. SPACIOUS BACHELOR suite, all inclusive, shared laundry, patio, N/S,N/P. Ref’s req. Available now. $600 (250)715-0894

SUITES, UPPER CROFTON 2 BDRM apartmentQuiet, above heated mini-storage. 5 appls. Avail Apr 1. Prefer NS/NP. $750+ utils. Storage lockers avail. 250-246-2473. Refs required. CHEMAINUS, Vic. Rd. Large 1-Bdrm upper. 5 Appl’s, Partial Ocean view. Unfurnished/Furnished. $800./$1000. N/P, Ref’s. Call (778)227-2704. COBBLE HILL- 1 bdrm, main floor, F/S, WD hookup, NS/NP. Avail now. $650/mo incl’s utils. Refs req’d. 250743-3976, 250-881-4454. COWICHAN BAY. 1 bdrm, 1300 sq.ft suite. $850. includes water, heat, hydro and internet. N/S, 1 indoor cat ok. Avail now. (250) 514-3071. DUNCAN- 2 BDRM, lrg deck covered prkg, lndry, HD tv, close to town. $950 + shared utils. March 1st. 250-709-2039 DUNCAN- NEW 1 bdrm+ office over triple garage, 15 acres w/streams & trails in town. D/W, W/D, utils incld. Refs req’d. NS/NP, quiet tenants. $1150. (250)746-4560.

Service Directory 9OURCOMPLETEGUIDETO0ROFESSIONAL3ERVICESINTHE#OWICHAN6ALLEY

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CLEANING SERVICES

COMPUTER SERVICES

DRYWALL

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

HANDYPERSONS

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

ABLE COMPUTER REPAIR Problem solved or no charge. In-home service. Senior Discount. Troubleshooting, tutorials & networking. Call Nico (250)746-6167 www.ablecomputerrepair.com

Drywall, Taping, framing, Com; or residential. 25 Yrs exp. Ref’s. John, 250-510-5315

PACIFIC ONE BOBCAT, Miniexcavator, trucking, grade, dig, haul. No job too small. 250743-7972

ALL RUBBISH removal, small renovations, deck work, carpentry, painting, plumbing, evestrough cleaning and small moving jobs. Seniors discount. Ian or Sarah 250-743-6776.

STONE WORK, retaining walls & repairs. Quality landscape construction Call 250701-8319. Visit our website:

EXCEL BOOKKEEPING SERVICES. Small to medium businesses. (250)597-1313. INCOME TAX & Professional Bookkeeping and Accounting. Year ends prepared for small businesses. Contact Lindsay Burton (250)597-2420.

CONTRACTORS

CARPENTRY A&A CONTRACTING 250746-9633. Professional, Qualified and Reliable Carpenters for all your building needs. Licensed, insured and guaranteed workmanship. HOME RENOVATIONS. Finish carpentry, cabinets, custom furniture & painting. Journeyman 35 yrs. 250-748-2554.

Your Community, Your Classifieds Call 310.3535

DAVID GALE CONSTRUCTION Island Domestic Services “Quality Service at Affordable Rates”

✶ Cleaning & Laundry ✶ Shopping ✶ Bonded & Insured ✶ Reg with DVA

Additions - renovations decks, doors, windows, kitchen, bathrooms, basement suites, foundations, drywall, plumbing, electrical. ALL CERTIFIED TRADES Trained Architectural Technologist

20 years in Valley Free Estimates, Plans

250-746-9956 leave message www.davidgaleconstruction.com

--------------------------------------

Ph: (250) 710-0864 Office 1-866-749-0213 SELL OLD STUFF! Call 310.3535

DRAFTING & DESIGN DRAFTING of house plans in the Valley. Call (250)597-7274 www.aplusdrafting.org

ELECTRICAL A1 ELECTRICIAN, licenced, bonded, Small Jobs Specialist, panel upgrades and renos. All work guaranteed since 1989. Rob at 250-732-PLUG (7584). ELECTRICIAN LICENSED and bonded. Reasonable rates. Call Kelly 250-7430326.

FENCING DAVE’S FENCING & Tractor Service. Specializing in farm, deer & horse fences. Also board, chainlink, panel installations & repairs. 20 Years experience. 250-743-9089

KEVLAR SYSTEMS for large & small ELECTRICAL WORK • • • • •

Licensed & Bonded Quick Service Great Rates Seniors Discount Positive Attitude #105312. Call Kyle today! 1-250-732-6349

GARDENING

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

www.islandpacificlandscaping.ca

PLUMBING

IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-709-7086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com

A SERVICE PLUMBER. Licence, Insured. Drains, HWT, Reno’s, Repairs. Senior Discounts. After Hour Service. Call Coval Plumbing, 250709-5103.

HOUSEHOLD SERVICES

RUBBISH REMOVAL

* Gutters * Windows * Siding * Moss treatment * Pressure washing

PEAR TREE Landscaping Feb special yard clean-up. Senior disc. Call Paula 250-715-0073

Mill Bay/Duncan 250-743-3306 Chemainus/Ladysmith 250-324-3343

Your Community, Your Classifieds. Call

310-3535

CLASSIFIEDS WORK HARD! Call 310.3535


Wednesday, February 23, 2011 RENTALS

MARINE

SUITES, UPPER

BOATS

RURAL CHEMAINUS, 1 bdrm + den, bright, W/D, F/S, N/S, $725 mo + utils, March. 1, 250-246-9669.

SHARED OWNERSHIP late model 40’ - 60’ cruising yachts moored on Vancouver Island and Lower Mainland. Sail and power. Professionally maintained. 604-669-2248. www.one4yacht.com

TOWNHOUSES DUNCAN 2BDRM townhouse. Large yard, parking. F/S, W/D hook-up. Avail now. $900. 250-748-4484, 250-732-1756. DUNCAN 3-BDRM townhouse. Large yard, parking. F/S, W/D hook-up. $1000. 250-748-4484, 250-732-1756. DUNCAN 3 Bdrm townhouse, quiet area, yard, parking, F/S, W/D hookup. $990 incl’s cable. (250)748-2727 or 748-7992 DUNCAN- lrg 3 bdrm, 2 bath, fenced yrd, F/S, new paint, windows, flrs. NS/NP. $1075. (250)715-1177, 250-885-8500.

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING $0 DOWN & we make your 1st payment at auto credit fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877792-0599. DLN 30309. www.autocreditfast.ca.

Need a Car? Poor Credit? Past Bankruptcy?

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Call AutoApprovalBC today

250-737-2222

CARS 2002 FORD Focus station wagon. Re-built engine, clean, great fuel economy. A/C, keyless entry, auto. $4700. (250)701-3338. 2006 ACURA CSX Premium. 172,000 hwy km. 5 speed, fully loaded. Heated leather seats, moon-roof, cruise, power group, 6-disk CD player. No accidents. Recently serviced w/newer brakes/new battery. Service records avail. $8995. (250)710-3568

SPORTS & IMPORTS 1994 MERCEDES C280, 180,000km, auto, excellent condition, well maintained. Asking $5500. (250)246-7939 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

2009 37’ Cardinal 5th Wheel, 4 push-outs. 0 miles. A home on the road or permanent residence. $47,000. 250-929-4055

LOOKING FOR AN AUCTION BEDROOM SUITE COUCH DELI ESTHETICS FUEL GARAGE SALE HOUSE INVESTMENTS JUNGLE GYM KILN LIVING ROOM SUITE MOVING COMPANY NAIL CARE OPEN HOUSE POULTRY QUILT ROLLING PIN SAIL BOAT TELEVISION UMBRELLA VENETIAN BLINDS WINDOW WASHER XYLOPHONE YARD WORK ZEBRA

310-3535

Slim losses end T-Bird girls’ bid Spirited efforts: Overtime setback to Vanier the start of a tough north island playoff Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

N

orth island playoffs ended the season for the Cowichan Thunderbird girls and the boys are hoping they don’t meet the same fate. The girls failed to advance following the north island ¿nals at Dover Bay. “It was tight,’’ said Cowichan coach Mike Dunn. “The girls played well.’’ Cowichan and Vanier went to overtime in the ¿rst game after being locked in a 48-48 regulation tie. Cowichan went ahead 55-49 in overtime and “then it just kind of got away from us after that,’’ said Dunn. Vanier stormed back to win 61-60. Sam Jory led the scoring with 13 points, Sophie Cutt added 12 in her ¿rst effort during a fantastic weekend and player of the game Chantal New chipped in 10. Cowichan ran away from Brooks of Powell River in its second game, winning by 40 points. Jory was player of the game with 19 points. That put Cowichan into a battle with Port Alberni for an island tournament berth. “They’re a good team, so is Vanier,’’ said Dunn. “They’re quite big and fairly athletic.’’ Cowichan came close but lost 40-37, with Emilee Butler scoring 13 points and Jory 11. “We had a good season,’’ said Dunn. “We were in pretty much every game we played against some really good basketball teams.’’

DCS posts easy win Duncan Christian School Chargers boys closed out their home basketball schedule by beating Nanaimo Christian 68-47. Josh Klassen led the way with 40 points and Lauris Van Wingerden had 11 points and 13 rebounds. Eric Seo played great defence with seven steals.

Andrew Leong

Doug Groenendijk of DCS drives hard to the hoop defended by Nanaimo’s John Foster.

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL FREE SCRAP Vehicle Removal. Also offering affordable towing. Bear Lake Salvage. Cell # 250-710-7278

COME PLAY WITH US

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $3.00 each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES 2002 FORD Escape LTD, 4x4, black with leather interior, fully loaded, excellent condition, $7200 obo. (250)743-3524.

TOWING BEAR LAKE SALVAGE

$$$ CASH $$$ For Scrap Cars also free scrap metal removal

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Your 55 + Games

BC Seniors Games

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August 16 to 20, 2011

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Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 27

To find out more information go to our website:

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Archery Badminton Bocce Bridge Carpet Bowling Cribbage Cycling Darts Dragon Boat Racing Equestrian Five Pin Bowling Floor Curling Golf Horseshoes Ice Curling Ice Hockey Mountain Bike Racing One-Act Plays Pickleball Slo-Pitch Soccer Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Track & Field Whist

Don Bodger

Push leads to shove, with Cowichan newcomer Ian McEwen in the middle of heated action against Castaways Wanderers Saturday at the Herd Road Grounds.

Castaways too powerful Rugby rout: Cowichan doesn’t have the personnel to keep pace Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

C

owichan Dodd’s Lumber Piggies are clearly the David of the Canadian Direct Insurance Premier Rugby League against the Goliath Castaways Wanderers. There was no miraculous slaying of the big boys Saturday at the Cowichan Rugby Club in a 77-5 Cowichan defeat. “It was just so one-sided,’’ said Cowichan coach Chris Evans. “The odds are really stacked against us now. We just lost so many quality players in our back division.’’ Already without Pat Fraser, injured Peter Budina and Mike Roberts who’s left the area to ¿nd work, Cowichan lost Josh Hart during the game after he was knocked unconscious. Andrew Gudmundseth is also out with an injury.

“There’s nothing much to pull on from the First Division,’’ said Evans. “That’s where the problems really lie outside the pack. The pack fought their hardest but I think really we were up against an exceptionally good Castways team. “It was all one-way traf¿c, apart from that one glimmer of hope.’’ Cowichan scored at 14 minutes when Hart made a brilliant run prior to his injury and then the ball was fed to J.T. Rowbotham for an unconverted try after a good phase of play. It was 39-5 at halftime and Castaways added six tries and four converts in the second half. “I just feel for the guys because I can’t believe for one minute any of them are enjoying their rugby at the moment,’’ said Evans. The Cowichan Third XV played a round robin tournament, beating Peninsula and Powell River.

cowichan

Good Life magazine

Watch for the Spring Issue

Coming in March! Advertisers: contact your Sales Representative 250-746-4471


28 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Blitz by Bays decides issue

Stuck in the middle of Victoria Cougars’ goalie Corey Koop and defenceman Scott Mellett prevents Kerry Park Islanders’ Jason Austin from getting a good shot away from close range. The Islanders closed out the regular season with a 5-1 loss to the Cougars, but there’s no margin for error now as they head into the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League playoffs. Andrew Leong

Soccer showdown: League leaders put three goals on the board in six minutes to subdue Cowichan hopes

 

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Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

C

Islanders battle Generals Playoff pairing: Interesting series expected in a best-of-ďŹ ve between evenly-matched teams Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

C

omparisons between the Kerry Park Islanders and Oceanside Generals arrive at the same conclusion. The Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League playoff series between the two that started Tuesday night at Kerry Park is considered a toss-up. Both teams Âżnished with 42 points, Kerry Park with a 20-22-2 record and Oceanside at 19-21-4. The Islanders won the tiebreaker by virtue of having more wins. “We were able to secure home-ice advantage,’’ said Islanders’ coach Brad Scafe. “That’s kind of nice in a best-ofÂżve series.’’ Game two is Wednesday in Parksville and game three Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at Kerry Park Arena. The ‘if necessary’ games are Sunday at Parksville and next Tuesday at Kerry Park. “I think it’ll be a different kind of series,’’ said Scafe. “With a best-of-seven, if you had a rough couple of games, you

could recover and keep a series going.’’ Kerry Park and Oceanside beat each other once handily during the season. The rest were all decided by a goal and in overtime or shootouts. “I would expect it to be fairly even,’’ conceded Scafe. “We’ve got some veteran guys who are ready to play playoffs. If we can get solid goaltending, we should put a solid showing forward.’’ The Islanders didn’t show their hand in the Âżnal four games, including a 5-4 shootout win at Campbell River and a 5-1 loss to the Victoria Cougars at Kerry Park Arena to conclude the regular season. “We haven’t necessarily played the systems we’re going to play in the playoffs the last four games,’’ said Scafe. “We’re going to do something we haven’t done yet so we catch Oceanside on it. Hopefully, things go well and we can win the Âżrst two. “I think we’ve got a team that teams don’t want to play us. We’re going to pound the body, pretty simple stuff. There’s really no pressure on us. We can just go about our business.’’

Youth Athlete of the Week

owichan LMG Pringle’s battle with Âżrstplace Bays United Liquor Plus turned dramatically in the span of six short minutes near the end of the second half. The Ă€urry started at 39 minutes and it was 3-0 for Bays by halftime of the Div. 1 Island Soccer League tilt Friday at the Ladysmith Turf. Cowichan eventually lost 4-2. “We’d just been shellshocked, 3-0 at the half, and we thought we’re playing pretty good,’’ said Cowichan coach Glen Martin. Martin elected to start Darian Achurch in goal to save Kevin James, who’s nursing a minor injury, for the Âżrst round of the Jackson Cup. Other than the Âżrst goal when Achurch made a bad decision and Peter Richmond Ă€icked the ball on to an empty net, he couldn’t be faulted on the Bays’ scoring plays. The ball barely slipped over the line for a second tally by Richmond and things went from bad to worse for Cowichan when Bays scored a controversial goal. Martin said a

Josh Klassen Josh Klassen is a scoring machine in Island A senior boys’ basketball. Klassen, a Grade 10 student who turns 16 on April 11, has hit the 40-point mark or better in an amazing four games this season for the Duncan Christian School Chargers. Dwight International School couldn’t stop him from scoring 47 and 42 points in two meetings. Klassen added another 40 in recent games against Nanaimo Christian and Chemainus and netted 39 against Pacific Christian juniors. He’s showing the benefits of starting on the senior team in Grade 9. “Last year, obviously, it was more physical — bigger and faster players,’’ he said. “I could step into more of a leadership role this year.’’ Klassen honed his skills in the Duncan Basketball Association during Grades 2-3 and 5-9. Andrew Leong

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Bays player was easily Âżve yards offside when the ball was kicked. Martin hadn’t seen the guys so quiet in the changeroom at the half, but James pumped them up with an inspirational speech. “We came out and showed a lot of pride,’’ said Martin. He made three changes at the half, bringing in Remington Achurch, Stefan Shaw and Dave Seager to provide some spark. Jesse Winter got one goal back with a header off a corner kick, but any momentum Cowichan hoped to build was quickly snuffed out moments later. “They got us on a counterattack,’’ said Martin. Cowichan at least won the second half with a record-setting goal scored on a header by Ryan Andre. That gave Andre a single-season Cowichan record in Div. 1, surpassing Kevin Michieli’s mark. “We Âżnished hard right till the end,’’ said Martin. The game was Âżlled with plenty of emotion. Cowichan received Âżve yellow cards and Bays picked up just one less, but had a player red-carded after a second yellow in the late stages. “There’s no love lost between the two teams,’’ said Martin. Cowichan goes into the Âżrst round of the Jackson Cup against Nanaimo Div. 2 coached by Scott Davison — formerly of the Cowichan U21s. The game is Saturday at 2:15 p.m. at the Cowichan Sportsplex. “Right now, they’re in second place in Div. 2,’’ observed Martin. “They’re Div. 1 quality. They’re going to be all we can handle. “We should win. But there’s no guarantees.’’ Cowichan has been scoring goals at a high rate all season, a big advantage over last season. Meanwhile, Cowichan U21s opened George Smith Cup action with a 4-1 win over Gordon Head SK. Cowichan Sports Traders played to a 1-1 tie at Salt Spring Island in a Div. 2 league game. Darian Achurch helped preserve the tie by stopping a penalty shot.


Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 29

Cooper, Heard earn Canada Winter Games medals Mission accomplished: Competition in Halifax a great experience for athletes Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

D

uncan athletes basked in the glory of winning medals during the Âżrst week of the Canada Winter Games at Halifax. Hockey player Steen Cooper struck gold with Team B.C.’s Under 16s while freestyle skier Max Heard landed a gold and silver medal from Games competition. Cooper, 15, a Grade 10 student, was back at Cowichan Secondary School Monday after a memorable hockey experience and a whirlwind trip home. “It’s unbelievable actually,’’ he said of the experience. “It still hasn’t really sunk in.’’ B.C. lost its Âżrst game 5-4 in a shootout to Quebec, beat Nova Scotia 8-3 and then lost 5-1 to Ontario to Âżnish 1-1-1 in the round robin. Once the playoff round began, there was no stopping B.C. with three wins leading to the gold medal — 4-2 over Manitoba in the quarterÂżnal, 5-2 over Ontario in the semis and 7-4 over Quebec in the Âżnal. “I think we were probably the closest team as a group there,’’ said Cooper. “Lots of guys knew each other. We all clicked pretty good.’’ Big crowds created a great atmosphere for the games, he added. The Halifax Metro Centre seats 10,500 for hockey. Some games were available for viewing on webcasts and the Âżnal was televised on TSN2. “Every other game was a pretty good crowd and the Âżnal was sold out,’’ said Cooper. “It was exciting. All the nerves got out in warm-up. You didn’t really think about being on TV or the crowd when you were on the ice.’’

Cooper is pleased about his own personal contribution to the team. “I think I did what the coaches wanted me to do,’’ he said. “I played my role. “I was basically a defensive player. Our line had to get hits.’’ It was a long and involved process for Cooper to make the team through regional tryouts, the B.C. Cup in Prince George and provincial camp in Penticton that determined the short list before the Âżnal roster was selected at Christmastime. “I think getting on that short list really boosted my conÂżdence for the season,’’ said Cooper. It’s the Âżrst gold medal for B.C. in the Games using U16 high performance players. Team B.C. last won gold in 1979 at Brandon, Manitoba using Junior B players. (Editor’s note — News Leader Pictorial sports editor Don Bodger was a member of that 1979 team). Just being part of the Games experience is something Cooper will never forget right from the opening ceremonies to the gold medal Âżnish. Heard concurred. “It was an experience of a lifetime, something I’ll remember forever,’’ he indicated. “I have never been to anything like it before, going to competitions where I had to live on the bare minimal sources and then going to the Winter Games.’’ At Âżrst, it was a bit hectic due to the bed bug situation. “We had to go to four different hotels within two days,’’ Heard noted. “Once we had it all Âżgured out, it was amazing.’’ Heard Âżrst won a silver medal in the men’s halfpipe competition. “I learnt some tricks the day before and the day of the competition so I was just hoping I could

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put down a solid run with them. And then I actually did really well.’’ Heard followed with gold in men’s aerials. “Everybody was killing it so I was actually pretty nervous to even do well in it, but once I Âżnished Âżrst in qualiÂżers it hit me that I could potentially do well in this event, too,’’ he indicated. “So I just did the same thing as I did in qualiÂżcation and it paid off. I actually had no intentions of winning medals at the Games, just was hoping to get top Âżve in my two events, and top 10 in the other two events that I haven’t been training much in.’’

HUGE S MAS

Steen Cooper returns to Cowichan Arena Monday with his Canada Winter Games gold medal and autographed jersey, left. Max Heard, above, stands atop the podium. Below, a close-up of Heard’s silver and gold medals.

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30 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Wheeler the real deal in the world of ice-making assignments

Got a sports story? e-mail sports@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

SPORTS WATCH

Fuller Lake’s Kevin Wheeler is becoming famous for his icemaking skills. Wheeler, pictured, was in Calgary for the days leading up to the Heritage Classic National Hockey League game between the Calgary Flames and Montreal

It’s all over for the Caps

Boys’ basketball: Brentwood, Shawnigan advance Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

T

Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

P

Marrs hits fast pace Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

T

homas Marrs raced to 17th overall in the Cedar 12K, the third race in the Frontrunners Island Race Series. He led the 20 CeeVACs participants, Âżnishing in a time of 43:40. Marrs was only six and a half minutes back of overall winner Jim Finlayson. Richard Light clocked 44:58, Peter Langelo 51:13, Gary Vermette 53:53 and Lisa De Lusignan 56:51.

between the Calgary Hitmen and the Regina Pats. Heavy-duty assignments are becoming commonplace for Wheeler. Last year, he drove the Zamboni during hockey games at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

Island Ă„nalists set

Out of chances: Playoff hopes dashed after overtime loss to highying Powell River laying with Âżre too long resulted in the Cowichan Valley Capitals getting burned. The Caps went into their Âżnal game of the regular season Friday night tied with the Coquitlam Express for the last playoff spot in the B.C. Hockey League’s Coastal Conference. But a 6-5 overtime loss to the Powell River Kings at Cowichan Arena, combined with a 7-4 Coquitlam win over Surrey, left the Caps out of the playoff picture. “It’s just tough not being able to make it being that one team,’’ said Caps’ veteran forward Jordan Grant, who had a three-point night against Powell River to temporarily take over the league scoring lead. Grant eventually Âżnished tied for second in scoring with Surrey’s Bradley McGowan behind former Capital Mike Hammond of Salmon Arm. “It kind of didn’t mean anything if we’re not playing in playoffs,’’ said Grant.

Canadiens to help prepare the best possible ice in trying conditions. Wheeler stuck around after the Flames blanked the Canadiens 4-0 to help resculpture the ice at McMahon Stadium for a Western Hockey League game Monday

Andrew Leong

Batting at the puck in front of Powell River goalie Michael Garteig is the Caps’ Clayton Chessa, closely guarded by defenceman Chris Williams. The Caps knew they were in tough against Powell River, the league’s best defensive team, but scoring against the Kings hasn’t been a problem. That proved true again, but holding down the Kings’ offense at the same time was quite another matter. Caps’ captain Tyler Matheson opened the scoring in the ¿rst two minutes and closed it with 10 seconds remaining in regulation time — both on power plays — during a game where the momentum swung back and forth. The Caps trailed 2-1 after the ¿rst, but knotted the game at 3-3 after the second on goals by Grant and Troy Paterson. Chase Kaiser gave the Caps the lead 1:37 into the third period on a power play. Brenden Forbes tied it again midway through the third and the Caps appeared sunk when Justin Dasilva scored on a power play with only 2:21 left on the clock.

But Chad Niddery’s tripping penalty with 44 seconds left put the Caps on a late power play and Matheson cashed in. Hopes of staying in a tie with the Express and maintaining the Âżnal playoff spot by virtue of most wins heading into the Âżnal day of the regular season ended when Matt Garbowsky scored for the Kings three minutes into overtime. “It was kind of rough — getting that close, too, especially,’’ said Grant. The Caps had checked out the Coquitlam score after the second period and knew they were going to need to beat Powell River to remain in playoff contention. “They’re a good team,’’ said Grant, who formerly played for the Kings. “We played a good hockey game (Friday) night. It’s just disappointing we came up short like that.’’ Grant said it just shows the importance of not leaving ev-

erything till the last moment. “We just got on a losing streak and it carried over,’’ he said. “Every game means something.’’ Despite the Caps’ misfortunes as a team, Grant had a phenomenal season with 38 goals and 51 assists for 89 points. That far surpassed last year’s total of 63 with the Kings. There was some doubt about Grant’s ability to put up those kinds of numbers in his 20year-old season, but he proved his detractors wrong. “It’s been a good year for me personally,’’ he conceded. “Our team’s had our ups and downs all season.’’ Ladysmith product Grant still doesn’t regret the decision to complete his BCHL career in the Cowichan Valley. “I just wanted to play in a Cowichan jersey my whole life,’’ he said. The Caps held their year-end awards banquet Tuesday.

he warm-up is over and the real games are about to begin. The south island tournament placement games for AA senior boys’ high school basketball at Lambrick Park left Brentwood College third and Shawnigan Lake fourth. Lambrick utilized the home Ă€oor advantage for Âżrst and St. Michael’s University took second. The big four from the south will go into battle again Thursday through Saturday against the best four from the north in the island championships at Ladysmith. Brentwood had a bye in the Âżrst round when Parkland pulled out and went into action against Lambrick Friday, losing 65-56. Brentwood closed it out Saturday with a 77-41 rout of Esquimalt before beating archrival Shawnigan Lake 61-48 for third. Shawnigan’s tourney journey featured a 56-47 victory over Esquimalt Thursday. A 65-55 defeat against St. Michael’s University School sent Shawnigan to the loser’s side of the draw where it bounced back to beat Gulf Islands 48-39 and then fell to Brentwood. “I thought we actually played pretty well,’’ said Brentwood coach Blake Gage. “I thought we did most of the things we wanted to.’’ The Lambrick game was

obviously the crucial one for Brentwood. Gage was pleased how his team clawed back from a 16-point deÂżcit to within Âżve at one stage. “We just couldn’t quite get over the hump,’’ said Gage. David Lawrence had 21 points and Victor Anderson played his best game of the season to score 14 while Ben Hindson exhibited pressure defence. By the time the Shawnigan game rolled around, berths in the island tournament were already secured and “probably both teams were a little tired,’’ said Gage. “Our bench outplayed their bench,’’ he offered as the difference. “We just played loose,’’ said Shawnigan coach Vito Pasquale. “We both played all our bench.’’ Shawnigan doesn’t have Pat Eadie due to a B.C. School Sports eligibility issue. “You’ve just taken 20 points a game out of our lineup, potentially more,’’ said Pasquale. “That doesn’t mean we haven’t been successful.’’ With Lukas Balkovec in some foul trouble, the St. Michael’s game was a struggle. “We played at their pace, run the Ă€oor up and down,’’ said Pasquale. “We struggled for a good half of the game against Gulf Islands, but eventually put them away.’’ Brentwood has drawn Ballenas and Shawnigan faces Woodlands in the Âżrst round of the island tournament.

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial 31

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Wednesday, February 23, 2011 32 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial


Cowichan News Leader Pictorial Feb23_2011