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Bring Science Alivek 8th Grade Integrated

TCt


Unwrapping a TCI Segment


P R O G R A M

C O N T E N T S

Bring Science Alive! 8th Grade Integrated Segment 1 - The Speed of Objects and Waves Integrated Phenomenon: A person floating on a raft in the middle of the ocean will not move toward shore with the waves. But the wind could blow the raft toward shore. Create an initial model to explain this phenomenon.

Forces

Anchoring Phenomenon: A go-cart covers a certain distance in a given amount of time as it moves around a track. 1 Describing Motion

Phenomenon: Sitting in a train alongside other trains, you might look out the window and be unsure about which train is in motion.

2 Forces in Interactions

Phenomenon: It takes an enormous amount of fuel to launch a rocket.

3 Effects of Forces

Phenomenon: If an astronaut throws a wrench in outer space with no other forces acting on it, the wrench will continue moving forever. Engineering Challenge: Designing Safe Go-Carts Performance Assessment: Evaluating Modern Go-Carts Anchoring Phenomenon: A go-cart covers a certain distance in a given amount of time as it moves around a track.

Mechanical Waves

Anchoring Phenomenon: Waves are eroding the coastline near the Las Olas Hermosas Restaurant more than the surrounding beaches. 4 Types of Waves

Phenomenon: At many sporting events, members of the crowd stand up and lift their hands in a pattern that people call “doing the wave.�

5 Properties of Waves

Phenomenon: Huge waves form at Mavericks, and scientists, surfers, and weather forecasters can predict when they will occur up to 48 hours in advance.

6 Wave Energy

Phenomenon: Wave energy converters produce more electricity in some locations than in other locations.

7 Waves in Different Media

Phenomenon: The sound of your finger tapping on a desktop seems much louder and lower pitched when you press your ear to the desk. Engineering Challenge: Preventing Coastal Erosion Performance Assessment: Saving the Las Olas Hermosas Restaurant Anchoring Phenomenon: Waves are eroding the coastline near the Las Olas Hermosas Restaurant more than the surrounding beaches.

Using Your Model to Explain the Phenomenon

Return to the model created at the beginning of the segment, and revise it based on what you learned about forces and mechanical waves. Then, use your model to explain the Integrated Phenomenon.


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Segment 2 - Modeling Light in the Solar System Integrated Phenomenon: Sometimes in the last seconds before the sun dips under the horizon, you can see a small flash of green light. Create an initial model to explain this phenomenon.

The Earth-Sun-Moon System

Anchoring Phenomenon: Celestial objects appear to move in distinct patterns from Earth. 8 Earth’s Rotation and Revolution

Phenomenon: The sun appears to move across the sky during the day, and stars appear to move across the sky during the night.

9 Earth’s Tilted Axis

Phenomenon: Each year, trees sprout leaves which grow, change color, die, and fall off.

10 Phases of the Moon

Phenomenon: The appearance of the moon changes every night.

11 Eclipses

Phenomenon: Sometimes the sun appears to be blocked by the moon. Performance Assessment: Presenting a Model of the Earth-Sun-Moon System Anchoring Phenomenon: Celestial objects appear to move in distinct patterns from Earth.

Light Waves

Anchoring Phenomenon: Light creates effects that are not so easy to explain such as making diamonds sparkle, making lines at the bottom of a pool appear wavy, and making rainbows form near waterfalls. 12 The Wave Model of Light

Phenomenon: An optical illusion can make you see more fish than there really are.

13 Properties of Light Waves

Phenomenon: A single object can appear to be many colors depending on the filter you see it through. Performance Assessment: Designing a Light Art Piece Anchoring Phenomenon: Light creates effects that are not so easy to explain such as making diamonds sparkle, making lines at the bottom of a pool appear wavey, and making rainbows form near waterfalls.

Using Your Model to Explain the Phenomenon

Return to the model created at the beginning of the segment, and revise it based on what you learned about the Earth-Sun-Moon system and light waves. Then, use your model to explain the Integrated Phenomenon.


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Segment 3 - Noncontact Forces Influence Phenomena Integrated Phenomenon: If an astronaut in orbit around a planet drops a power tool, it will move as the astronaut is moving—in orbit around the planet. Create an initial model to explain this phenomenon.

Noncontact Forces

Anchoring Phenomenon: Drones are able to overcome gravity. 14 Gravity

Phenomenon: When a piece of paper is placed on top of a book, and both objects are dropped together, they fall straight to the ground; the paper does not flutter.

15 Electricity

Phenomenon: Sometimes, you experience a shock or even see a spark as you reach for a doorknob.

16 Magnetism and Electromagnetism

Phenomenon: Headphones and speakers use wires and magnets to deliver sound to your ears. Performance Assessment: Investigating a Drone Motor Design Anchoring Phenomenon: Drones are able to overcome gravity.

The Solar System

Anchoring Phenomenon: Celestial objects in the solar system have similar characteristics which can be used to sort them into groups. 17 Gravity and the Solar System

Phenomenon: Planets revolve around stars while moons revolve around planets.

18 The Inner Solar System

Phenomenon: Astronomers believe that Mars would be an ideal place to build a colony. Engineering Challenge: Landing on Mars

19 The Outer Solar System

Phenomenon: There are millions of objects in our solar system, but we only call a few of them ‘planets.’ Performance Assessment: Classifying Planets Anchoring Phenomenon: Celestial objects in the solar system have similar characteristics which can be used to sort them into groups.

Using Your Model to Explain the Phenomenon

Return to the model created at the beginning of the segment, and revise it based on what you learned about noncontact forces and the solar system. Then, use your model to explain the Integrated Phenomenon.


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Segment 4 - Major Collisions in the History of Life Integrated Phenomenon: The fossil record suggests that an object from space hit the Earth and led to mass extinction, but a collision of this scale on Earth has never been witnessed by humans. Create an initial model to explain this phenomenon.

The Solar System and Beyond

Anchoring Phenomenon: Celestial objects in our solar system and beyond all follow distinct patterns of movement. 20 Formation of the Solar System

Phenomenon: Humans weren’t around to watch the solar system form, but we have observed patterns that may explain its formation.

21 Beyond the Solar System

Phenomenon: It’d be extremely difficult to fit a scale model of our Milky Way Galaxy in a classroom. Engineering Challenge: Engineering a Damping Device Performance Assessment: Writing a Gravity Adventure Scene Anchoring Phenomenon: Celestial objects in our solar system and beyond all follow distinct patterns of movement.

The History of Life on Earth

Anchoring Phenomenon: Similar fossils have been found in the same aged rock in fossil digs that are over 100 miles apart. 22 Earth’s History

Phenomenon: You would usually find shells by the ocean, but fossilized shells can be found in the middle of the desert.

23 Fossils and the History of Life

Phenomenon: Dinosaurs once roamed the earth, but now we do not find them alive anywhere. Engineering Challenge: Designing a Fossil Extraction Toolset Performance Assessment: Analyzing a Fossil Dig Site Anchoring Phenomenon: Similar fossils have been found in the same aged rock in fossil digs that are over 100 miles apart.

Using Your Model to Explain the Phenomenon

Return to the model created at the beginning of the segment, and revise it based on what you learned about outer space and the history of life on Earth. Then, use your model to explain the Integrated Phenomenon.


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Segment 5 - Evolution Explains Life’s Unity and Diversity Integrated Phenomenon: Faster cheetahs catch more food than slower cheetahs do. Create an initial model to explain this phenomenon.

The Evolution of Life

Anchoring Phenomenon: Whales live in water and look like big fish, but they have traits of land-dwelling mammals. 24 Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Through Natural Selection

Phenomenon: Darwin found many kinds of finches with different sized and shaped beaks on the different islands of the Galápagos.

25 Observing Natural Selection in Action

Phenomenon: In only 2 years, the average beak size of finches on Daphne Major got almost 1mm larger.

26 Genes and Natural Selection

Phenomenon: Lovebirds in captivity have unique colorations not found in the wild population.

27 Evolutionary Relationships

Phenomenon: Crayfish, spiders, and dragonflies may seem very different at first glance, but they have many similarities. Performance Assessment: Evolutionary History of Whales Anchoring Phenomenon: Whales live in water and look like big fish, but they have traits of land-dwelling mammals.

Kinetic and Potential Energy

Anchoring Phenomenon: One small action in a Rube Goldberg machine causes a chain reaction of effects. 28 Forms of Energy

Phenomenon: A pendulum boat ride cannot swing forever under the force of gravity.

29 Measuring Kinetic Energy

Phenomenon: A wrecking ball causes more damage when it’s bigger or swung from further away.

30 Potential Energy in Systems

Phenomenon: A firework transforms from a small cardboard covered object to a large explosion of fire in the sky. Engineering Challenge: Designing Musical Instruments Performance Assessment: Analyzing a Chain Reaction Machine Anchoring Phenomenon: One small action in a Rube Goldberg machine causes a chain reaction of effects.

Using Your Model to Explain the Phenomenon

Return to the model created at the beginning of the segment, and revise it based on what you learned about the evolution of life and kinetic and potential energy. Then, use your model to explain the Integrated Phenomenon.


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Segment 6 - Sustaining Local and Global Diversity Integrated Phenomenon: Tracking information suggests that polar bear population size is increasing in some areas while decreasing in others. Create an initial model to explain this phenomenon.

Human Impacts on Evolution

Anchoring Phenomenon: Moreton Bay in Australia is rapidly declining in health due to increases in population around the bay. 31 Artificial Selection

Phenomenon: Bulldog skulls have dramatically changed in shape over the past 150 years.

32 Genetic Engineering and Society

Phenomenon: Before 1922, diabetes was a death sentence. However, by the early 1990s, people with diabetes could live long and relatively normal lives.

33 Human Population and Global Change

Phenomenon: The Aral Sea shrunk to a quarter of its size in only 50 years. Engineering Challenge: Redesigning “Trash” to Reduce Environmental Impact

Performance Assessment: Bioethics Debate Anchoring Phenomenon: Moreton Bay in Australia is rapidly declining in health due to increases in population around the bay.

Thermal Energy

Anchoring Phenomenon: Jackrabbits’ ears help them survive in the extreme heat of the desert. 34 Thermal Energy and Heat

Phenomenon: A heater in a classroom provides heat, but the temperature in the room stays the same.

35 Thermal Properties of Matter

Phenomenon: Deserts are hot during the day, with average daytime temperatures of 38°C, but they can be as cold as -4°C at night. Performance Assessment: Designing, Constructing, and Testing a Thermos Anchoring Phenomenon: Jackrabbits’ ears help them survive in the extreme heat of the desert.

Waves for Information Transfer

Anchoring Phenomenon: In the past 50 years, the vast majority of analog devices have been replaced with digital equivalents. 36 Sending Information Using Wave Pulses

Phenomenon: When a message is whispered repeatedly during a game of telephone, it changes over time. Engineering Challenge: Designing a Multi-frequency Communication System

37 Analog and Digital Information

Phenomenon: A Digital Signal Sender is a more reliable way of communicating a phone number than an Analog Signal Sender.

Performance Assessment: Selling Digital Anchoring Phenomenon: In the past 50 years, the vast majority of analog devices have been replaced with digital equivalents.

Using Your Model to Explain the Phenomenon

Return to the model created at the beginning of the segment, and revise it based on what you learned about human impacts on evolution, thermal energy, and waves for information transfer. Then, use your model to explain the Integrated Phenomenon.


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P H E N O M E N A

A Phenomena-Rich Program TCI believes that phenomena makes science more meaningful for students. Bring Science Alive! provides many opportunities for students to engage with, investigate, and make sense of natural phenomena in their own lives.

Integrated Phenomenon The integrated phenomenon ties together multiple disciplines. Students come up with an initial model to explain the phenomenon and revise it throughout the segment.

Anchoring Phenomenon The anchoring phenomenon encourages students to make connections with the world around them. Students then further explore the phenomenon during the Performance Assessment.

Lesson Phenomenon

Local Phenomenon

Each lesson begins with an investigative phenomenon that is used to pique students’ interest and drive instruction throughout the investigations. At the end of a lesson, students use what they learned to make sense of the phenomenon.

Students build a deeper, personal connection to the phenomenon through direct observation or by conducting research to find out more about the phenomenon in their local area.


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Bring Science Alive! covers a variety of phenomena topics to engage every student.

Multimedia Phenomena

Phenomena are presented through videos, images, and hands-on observations.

Rich multimedia throughout the program provide easy ways for students to interpret the phenomena.


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Three-Dimensional Learning Students set forth to investigate each lesson’s phenomenon. Each carefully-designed investigation guides students through mastering the lesson’s science practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas.

Lessons are broken out into modules so that teachers can pick and choose what works for their classroom.

Lessons are presented in an easy-to-use, customizable slideshow format.

Pacing is provided for teachers to plan in advance.

Each and every lesson focuses on at least one Science and Engineering Practice, one Disciplinary Core Idea, and one Crosscutting Concept.

Investigations are designed to meet Math and ELA Common Core standards as specified by NGSS.


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Material Kits are prepared and organized to seamlessly integrate into each lesson.

Consumable Materials can easily be ordered online.

Everything needed for one lesson is grouped together into a clearly labeled bag.


Adaptations Materials Kit

AP-20-1

Item #LM-0609

Materials List Bin 1 Engineering Challenge: Designing a Fossil Extraction Toolset

Earth’s History Oval bottle with cap, 12oz

1

Truffle mold, silicone

2

Pony beads, blue, pkg/480

1

Tempera paint, powdered, brown

1

Pony beads, green, pkg/480

1

Chisel set, pkg/3

2

Bag, zip lock, 6x6”

6

Chip brush, 1”

8

Measuring cup, 2 cup

1

Paint brush, synthetic

8

Graduated beaker, 200mL

8

Toothbrush

8

Fossil model, set

3

Drill bit, 1/16”, set/7

1

Draw string pouch, pkg/25

2

Toothpick, red

8

String

1

Pushpins, pkg/100

1


Adaptations Materials Kit

AP-20-1

Item #LM-0609

Engineering Challenge: Designing a Fossil Extraction Toolset continued

Materials List Bin 1 Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Through Natural Selection continued

Chopsticks, pair

12

Slip joint pliers

8

Sandpaper, coarse

10

Boxwood pick, bundle

2

Nail

8

Test tube, 10mL with cap

8

Powder funnel

8

Jar, 10g

8

Foam balls, small

1

Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Through Natural Selection

Tweezers

8

Scoops and spoons, assorted, set

4

Dry beans, assorted, 1lb

1

Marble, 5/8”, pkg/200

1

Box, 4.5x4.5x5.5”

8

Skewers, bamboo, pkg/100

1

Flashlight, keychain

8

Fingernail clippers

8

Acetate sheet, red

1

Observing Natural Selection in Action


Adaptations Materials Kit

AP-20-1

Item #LM-0609

Observing Natural Selection in Action continued

Acetate sheet, blue

1

Human Population and Global Change Counting chips, pkg/1000

2

Loose In This Bin

Materials List Bin 1 In Box 2, continued Sand, fine, 4 cups

1

Soil, 4 cups

1

Sand, ultra fine, 4 cups

1

Sand, navy blue, 1lb

2

Cup, plastic, 9oz, pkg/50

4

Sand, light blue, 1lb

1

TCI Adaptations poster

1

Sand, green, 2lb

1

Hand drill

4

Sand, grey, 1lb

2

Rubber mallet, 16oz

4

Sand, brown, 2lb

1

In Box 2 Sand, coarse, 4 cups

In Box 3 1

Plaster of paris, 25lb box

1


Space Materials Kit

Materials List Bin 1

Item #LM-0722

Loose In This Bin continued

Common Materials Measuring tape

16

Mirror, 3”x5”

6

Globe, inflatable

1

LED bulb

1

Protractor

16

Masking tape, red

1

Yarn

1

Loose In This Bin Extension cord

1

Stress ball, globe

16

Socket with cord

1

Skewers, pkg/100

1

Flashlight with batteries

8

TCI Space poster

1

Ball, polystyrene, 3”

16

Ball, polystyrene, 3” with hole

1

Hula hoop, segmented

6


Space Materials Kit

Materials List Bin 2

Item #LM-0722

Beyond the Solar System

Gravity and the Solar System

Yarn

1

Plastic cone

1

Marble

1

Tennis ball

1

Mass (2lb medicine ball)

2

Balloon, pkg/100

1

Tent pole, Set/4

4

Ball on string

1

Formation of the Solar System Black spandex, 60�x72�

2

Marble, large

8

Marble, small

32

Loose In This Bin


Space Materials Kit

Materials List Bin 3

Item #LM-0722

Engineering Challenge: Landing on Mars

Engineering Challenge: Engineering a Damping Device continued

Cup, paper, 3 oz

8

Straws

60

Rubber bands, #54, 1/4 lb bag

1

Rubber band, #54, 1/4 lb bag

1

Straws

60

Assorted feathers, pkg

1

String

1

Cotton balls, pkg/300

1

Ball, rubber

8

Cup, paper, 3 oz

40

Index cards, pkg/100

1

Craft sticks, pkg/100

1

Jar, plastic with lid

8

Paper plates, pkg/30

1

Packing peanuts, 1 cup

8

Engineering Challenge: Engineering a Damping Device Bags, plastic sandwich size, pkg/100

1

Loose In This Bin


Forces and Energy Materials Kit Item #LM-0784

Materials List Bin 1 Common Materials continued

Common Materials Hall’s carriages

8

Bar magnets, pkg/2

8

Measuring tape

6

Magnet, neodymium

8

Masking tape

8

Balls, nylon, 1”

8

Pipe insulation

1

Balls, hollow, 1”

8

Protractor

1

Balls, solid, 1”

8

Rubber bands, #33

1

Paper clips, box/100

2

Balloons, pkg/25

1

Batteries, size D, pkg/8

1

String

1

Cups, plastic, 16oz, pkg/13

1

Straws, pkg/16

1

Containers, plastic shoebox

8

Cloth, wool

1

Centimeter cubes, pkg/100

2


Forces and Energy Materials Kit Item #LM-0784

Common Materials continued Paper, graph, pkg/60

2

Balls, stress

8

Thermometer

8

Beaker, 250mL

6

Oven mitt

2

Bath towel

1

Digital scale

1

In This Box (Outside of Bin 1) Cardboard

1

Materials List Bin 1


Forces and Energy Materials Kit Item #LM-0784

Materials List Bin 2 Magnetism and Electromagnetism continued

Engineering Challenge: Designing Safe Go-Carts Test tubes with caps, 10mL

8

Wire, 22 gauge, 100ft

1

Cotton balls

1

Earbuds

1

Pliers, needle nose

1

Electricity Bubble Solution

2

Bolts

8

Iron filings, 200g

1

Flashlight, hand crank

1

Lights, LED

6

Screwdriver, phillips head

1

Alligator clip leads, pkg/2

2

Cups, souffle, 2oz, pkg/8

1

Magnetism and Electromagnetism Markers, permanent, black

12

Battery, AA, pkg/8

1


Forces and Energy Materials Kit Item #LM-0784

Thermal Energy and Heat

Forms of Energy Ball, rubber, 2”

Materials List Bin 2

1

Oil, vegetable, 16oz

1

Thermal Properties of Matter

Potential Energy in Systems Hydrogen peroxide, 16oz

1

Conductometer

1

Yeast, 1lb

1

Candle, tealight

1

Tablespoon

2

Matches

1

Teaspoon

1

Sand, fine

1

Engineering Challenge: Designing Musical Instruments

Loose In This Bin

Bells, jingle, 10mm

8

PVC pipe, 2ft

4

Bells, jingle, 1”

8

TCI Forces and Energy poster

1

Bells, jingle, 2”

8


Waves Materials Kit

Materials List Bin 1

Item #LM-0845

Unit: Mechanical Waves Materials

Engineering Challenge: Preventing Coastal Erosion

Slinky, metal

8

Clay, modeling, pkg/4

3

String

1

Craft sticks, pkg/100

1

Coupling nut

16

Types of Waves Bottle, plastic, 8 oz

8

Hex nut

40

Food coloring, set/4

1

Rubber band, #54, 1/4 lb bag

1

Index cards, pkg/100

1

Plastic plate, square

8

Toothpicks, box/800

1

Properties of Waves Post-it notes

8

Stopwatch

8

Measuring tape

8


Waves Materials Kit

Materials List Bin 1

Item #LM-0845

Loose In This Bin Shoebox

8

Vegetable oil, 16 oz

1

Mesh fiberglass

1

TCI Waves poster

1

Page 2


Waves Materials Kit

Materials List Bin 2

Item #LM-0845

The Wave Model of Light

Properties of Light Waves continued

Beaker, 600mL

3

Cellophane sheet, pkg/48

1

Construction paper, pkg/50

1

Spectroscope

2

125W bulb

1

Protractor

8

Markers

2

Post-it notes

1

Mirror holder, pkg/20

2

Test tubes

3

Blue LED keychain

6

Test tube rack

1

Red LED keychain

6

Thermometer, plastic

12

Green LED keychain

6

LED flashlight keychain

8

Properties of Light Waves Box, cardboard

2

Units: Light Waves and Waves for Information Transfer Common Materials


Waves Materials Kit

Materials List Bin 2

Item #LM-0845

Units: Light Waves and Waves for Information Transfer Common Materials continued

Analog and Digital Information

Acrylic prism

8

Transparency film, sheet

16

Mirror

4

Brass fasteners, pkg/100

1

Color filters, pkg/5

2

Double convex lens

4

Box, cardboard

8

Double concave lens

4

Lamp, clamp

1

Vegetable oil, 16 oz.

1

Sending Information Using Wave Pulses

Loose In This Bin

Plastic dish cone

18

Plastic whistle

1

Aquarium gravel, 5lb

1

Stopwatch

1

Tile, 1sq. ft

1

Sand, coarse, 1 cup

16

In Box 3


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Thinking Like an Engineer Engineering Challenges throughout the program allow for students to think like engineers as they solve real-world problems related to the Anchoring Phenomenon.

Students are assigned roles and come together to solve an engineering problem. This mirrors a real-world engineering team.

Teams develop solutions, conduct iterative testing, and use data (or results) to improve their solutions.

Students come up with their own metrics to measure the success of their design solution.


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Rubrics detail what is expected at each achievement level.

Engineering Challenge Rubric

Students go through the engineering design process for each challenge.

Rubrics are provided for the students so that they can thoughtfully answer questions knowing what they will be graded on.


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Checking Student Progress Bring Science Alive! offers a variety of assessments types to evaluate student learning.

Formative Assessment

Lesson Game In a Lesson Game, students answer selectedresponse questions about the lesson. Results are automatically tracked in your gradebook.

Key Science Concepts Videos, diagrams, and detailed illustrations provide an additional check for students’ understanding.

Notebook Monitor students’ progress in their notebooks as they go through the lesson and investigations.

Interactive Tutorials Students can check their own understanding of main ideas with Interactive Tutorials.

Simulations Students explore scientific concepts through an interactive game-like environment, which allows them to check and evaluate predictions.

Wrap-Up Slides Lead a culturally-responsive discussion with carefully designed three-dimensional questions.


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Summative Assessment Assessment items evaluate mastery of all three NGSS dimensions. Questions range in Depth of Knowledge levels 1-4.

Interactive stimuli engage students and prepare them for digital state tests.

A series of discrete items and performance tasks create a well-rounded assessment.

Performance Assessment

Students work collaboratively or individually to complete the tasks.

Analytical rubrics are provided to assess student work individually.

Hands-on Performance Assessments provide opportunities to check student understanding of the Performance Expectations.