Page 1

FALL 2007

bc social work LEAD THE WAY

BOSTON COLLEGE

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

GLOBAL COLL ABORATION |

inside this issue

diversity pg. 5

|

research pg. 19

community pg. 23


| C ONTENTS |

b y de a n a l b e r t o g ode nz i

F E AT U R E S

1 0 far afield Students of Global Practice experience how field placements transform their view of the world.

1 3 balancing acts GSSW faculty are honored with prestigious awards for their groundbreaking research.

SECTIONS 3

DIV E R S IT Y

7

GL OBAL

17

RE S E AR C H

21

CO MMU NIT Y

27

DONOR S

contributors: Penny Alexander, Eileen Doherty, Serena Heartz, Nicole Malec Kenyon, Ruth McRoy, Regina O’Grady-LeShane, Patricia Shuker, Sean Smith, Tom Walsh editorial: Vicki Sanders | Spence & Sanders Communications design: Susan Callaghan | SMCdesign Please send your comments and letters to: Boston College Graduate School of Social Work McGuinn Hall Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 E-mail us at: shuker@bc.edu Visit us on the Web at: www.socialwork.bc.edu/home Front cover: Penny Alexander, GSSW director of international programs, at a refugee camp in Tanzania.

2

THE IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL INCLUSION since i moved to the united states more than six years ago, some of my European friends and colleagues keep asking me when will I eventually see the light and return home to my office overlooking the Swiss Alps. Appreciating their concerns, I remind them that the German philosopher Ernst Bloch wrote his seminal book, Principle of Hope, during his years in exile in the United States (he had to flee from the Nazi regime). He lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and periodically earned his income as a dishwasher. Don’t get me wrong, I am not comparing myself to the eminent Bloch, though I live close to Cambridge and regularly do the dishes at home. However, I think it is no coincidence that Bloch wrote his book during his time in America. There is something about this part of the world that spurs one’s sense of hope. These days, my biggest hope is that we will revitalize our efforts to promote social inclusion. Amartya Sen, winner of the Nobel Prize for Economics, wrote that exclusion from social relations has the potential to lead to many forms of deprivations such as unemployment, poverty, or homelessness. Obviously, these are issues that are at the core of the field of social work. It is therefore imperative that our School continues to be dedicated to the study and practice of social inclusion. Over the past few years, we increased our long-term commitment to matters of diversity, race and social justice, to the challenges of globalization, and to the well-being of the elderly and people with disabilities. This magazine will share some of the compelling accomplishments that our faculty and staff, our students and alumni made in these areas. We take our School’s motto to “lead the way” very seriously, and we believe that every person has the potential to become a leader and a champion for social justice and peace. If our society as a whole wants to prosper, it is essential to develop initiatives that further the inclusion of populations such as refugees and immigrants and cherish rather than devalue differences among us. We can’t take social cohesion for granted and we know too well the consequences of division, hatred, and alienation. I find it telling when one of our students who recently returned from a field placement in Ghana struggled at home to pick up routine activities such as grocery shopping because she felt something was missing from her life. The welcoming and engaging community in Ghana may have been the kind of inclusive and hopeful community that Bloch enjoyed in the 1940s.

boston college | graduate school of social work |


DIVERSITY

&

QA

Frank Talk about Diversity McRoy uses multi-faceted approach to reshape School’s awareness consultant dr. ruth mcroy, a distinguished national expert on diversity issues in social work education and research, has played a major role this past year in GSSW’s efforts to heighten awareness of diversity at the School. A former professor and associate dean for research at the University of Texas School of Social Work at Austin, where she significantly enhanced the research profile, Dr. McRoy was the Ruby Lee Piester Centennial Professor in Services to Children and Families. She also served as the director of the Diversity Institute at the School of Social Work in Austin from 1997 to 2005.

Q. Diversity in education is a complex topic. How did the GSSW begin to address it? A. Early in the year, Professor Emerita Elaine Pinderhughes noted that diversity education at BC should be designed to give culturally competent social work professionals the skills to manage the implications of diversity and to understand the complexities of race, class, and power. She called for an examination of the curriculum to determine whether the School was giving the students the skills necessary to work with diverse populations. Thanks to Pinderhughes’ initiative and Dean Alberto Godenzi’s vision and commitment, we launched a very exciting diversity initiative at BCGSSW. Q. What concepts or ideas have you focused on with the faculty and staff ? A. So many schools just look at the numbers and make attempts to diversify the faculty and student body. That is just the beginning. In addition to structural diversity, you need to start with an openness to discussion about some uncomfortable topics. Faculty, staff, and students need to be encouraged to talk about the causes of oppression and racism and to consider how these factors have and are affecting not only us, but

also those whom we serve in this profession. We want to foster a climate that welcomes and supports diversity. Q. What kinds of messages and questions are raised in conversations about diversity? A. Some will ask, “Can’t we just put this race issue aside? Isn’t it better to be color blind? Is diversity just about race? What about class, sexual orientation, and gender?” Some will acknowledge, “I’m uncomfortable talking about these issues” or “I don’t want anyone to consider me a racist.” We are not all the same when it comes to power and privilege. You have to get out of your comfort zone. I think the GSSW has done an amazing job so far, and the fact that they see this as an ongoing process shows their commitment to changing the way the community understands diversity. Q. What outcomes do you expect of the learning process you initiated and will continue to facilitate at Boston College? A. I am hoping we can strengthen the School’s commitment to social justice; further diversify the composition of the faculty, staff, and student body; and have the implications of diversity become an automatic consideration in all school

activities. I also expect a greater commitment to working for social change and wish to increase knowledge, self-awareness, and understanding of the importance and breadth of diversity. It is equally important to increase comfort in acknowledging oppression and challenging and confronting bias. We want to better prepare our students to work with growing diverse populations and to strengthen awareness and understanding of the differential impact of social policies and practices on diverse populations. As Martin Luther King, Jr. said in 1963, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” We must remember and act on this belief. Q. Will the wider community benefit from these efforts? If so, how? A. Absolutely. The university campus as well as the surrounding community will be invited to participate in special events, including the Elaine Pinderhughes Diversity Lecture series and other sponsored events on issues of diversity and social justice. We have to go beyond sensitivity and awareness and focus on undoing disparities and oppression. This will definitely impact the greater community. For example, there is growing diversity in Massachusetts and especially in Boston. One in four Boston residents is foreign born. Through expanding course offerings and incorporating more content on diversity throughout the curriculum, BCGSSW students will be better prepared to work with the growing diverse populations. Also, through the implementation of service and experiential learning projects in the community, students as well as community members should benefit.

boston college | graduate school of social work | 3


BCGSSW | DIVERSITY |

WORK BEGINS ON STRENGTHENING DIVERSITY AWARENESS the boston college graduate school of Social Work held its first Diversity Retreat April 24 in Barat House on the Newton campus. The event, a mixture of presentations and talks by members of the BC social work community and outside experts, reviewed survey findings and addressed numerous goals set forth by the School’s Diversity Task Force. The goals were as follows: • To emphasize the commitment to enhance diversity at the GSSW.

• To review the evolution of diversity content in the School.

• To share student and faculty perceptions of diversity issues at the GSSW.

• To describe experiences and identify

challenges in teaching a required diversity course.

• To identify challenges and possible solutions to enhancing diversity awareness in classes, field, research, and in the BC community.

• To make commitments and plans for faculty and committees to continue the work after the retreat. The daylong retreat began with a presentation by Dean Alberto Godenzi on BC’s commitment to diversity. Professor Emerita Elaine Pinderhughes then set the stage for discussion by sharing a poem on the need for addressing diversity issues. Ruth McRoy, diversity consultant, gave a presentation on the evolution

F IE LD T R IP : G S S W s t u d e n t s t a k e a b r e a k d u r i n g a s er vi c e t r i p t o K a t r i n a - a ff e c t ed neighborhoods in New Orleans. Sixteen students spent a week in April 2006 gutting houses, serving meals, and supporting community rebuilding. They experienced hands-on how class, race, and power can influence the response to a natural disaster such as Hurricane Katrina.

4

boston college | graduate school of social work |

of multiculturalism in schools of social work. McRoy and Associate Professor Paul Kline, chair of the Diversity Task Force, presented the findings from faculty and student surveys on diversity. Assistant Professor Othelia Lee had surveyed faculty online to gather data on their perception of the importance of and comfort in teaching about such issues as race/ethnicity, social class, gender, aging, sexual orientation, disability, immigration, and religion/spirituality. Kline surveyed students about their experiences and issues with diversity at the School. Additional topics and presenters included: 1) creating an atmosphere for discussions about diversity (Professor Kevin Mahoney); 2) diversity in field instruction (William Keaney, director of field education); 3) an overview of issues for faculty teaching a required diversity course (Assistant Professor Lee); and 4) experiential learning strategies (Professor Nancy Boyd-Franklin of Rutgers University). A highlight was a two-and-a-half-hour presentation on “Undoing Racism” by Dr. Kimberley Richards and David Billings of the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond (PISAB). The institute helps organizations gain awareness of the symptoms of racism and overcome institutionalized oppression and inequities. Two staff from the Massachusetts Department of Social Services who had participated in the PISAB’s Undoing Racism training, shared the need for the continuation of this type of training. The Diversity Retreat was the result of an extensive planning process involving staff, faculty, student groups, and the Diversity Task Force in consultation with McRoy, Godenzi, Boyd-Franklin, Pinderhughes, and Lee.


BCGSSW | DIVERSITY | diversity is cornerstone of new pinderhughes lecture series

DID YOU KNOW? •

The Graduate School of Social Work was founded in 1936 by Father Walter McGuinn, S.J. The first classes were held in September 1936 at 126 Newbury St. in downtown Boston, and the initial enrollment was 40 students.

The School received its accreditation by the American Association of Schools of Social Work on June

• L-R: Alberto Godenzi, Elaine Pinderhughes, Nancy Boyd-Franklin, June Hopps, Ruth McRoy

Nationally acclaimed clinician and author Nancy Boyd-Franklin gave the inaugural address in the Elaine Pinderhughes Diversity Lecture series April 23 and offered exciting new clinical insights on engaging diverse populations in her talk, “The Treatment of African American Clients and Families.” The series was established by BC’s Graduate School of Social Work during the 2006-2007 academic year to honor Professor Emerita Elaine Pinderhughes, who retired in 2000. In her highly acclaimed book, Understanding Race, Ethnicity and Power, Pinderhughes highlighted her commitment to prepare students and clinicians to manage the dynamics of ethnicity, race, and power in ways that celebrate the differences among people and promote mutual understanding, empathy, and respect. The lecture series will annually feature a speaker whose work embodies this commitment. The former chair of the Clinical Sequence at the GSSW, Pinderhughes has extensive experience in private practice. She has lectured and conducted diversity training nationally and internationally in social agencies, mental health centers, educational institutions, corporations, and residency training programs in psychiatry and internal medicine. Her contributions to social work practice and social justice have earned her numerous awards. The inaugural event, which was held at the Yawkey Center on the Boston College campus, began with a breakfast for more than 100 community leaders, Boston College faculty and staff, and students. Dean Alberto Godenzi welcomed guests and remarked on the establishment of the lecture series. Ruth McRoy, professor emerita at the University of Texas School of Social Work at Austin, introduced speaker BoydFranklin, a Rutgers University psychology professor well known for her book, Black Families in Therapy: A Multisystems Approach. (Boyd-Franklin’s husband, A. J. Franklin, is the new holder of the Nelson Chair in the Lynch School of Education at BC.) Following the lecture, Dean Godenzi introduced special guest and former BCGSSW dean and professor emerita (1976-2000) June Hopps, who gave a moving tribute to Pinderhughes.

28, 1938.

A part-time program was introduced in 1943, and the tuition was $15

per course. Full-time tuition was $300 per year. •

In September

1944, GSSW Dean

Dorothy Book was the first woman appointed as a dean at Boston College.

The Graduate School of Social Work moved to the Chestnut Hill campus in September

1968. McGuinn Hall was named after Walter McGuinn, S.J., founding dean of the Graduate School of Social Work, and his brother, Albert McGuinn, S.J., who served many years as chairman of the Chemistry Department.

The Social Work Library is the only stand-alone social work library in New England and

1 of 10 in the United States. •

The Doctoral Program was established

.

in 1979

The opportunity for part-time study was expanded with an introduction of the OffCampus Program in 1981. The first site was Worcester (1980), followed by Plymouth (1981), Portland, ME (1983), and Chicopee (1989).

Dual degree programs were established in the

1980s: the MSW/MBA was initiated in 1980, the MSW/JD in 1988, and the MSW/MA in Pastoral Ministry in 1989.

boston college | graduate school of social work | 5


BCGSSW | DIVERSITY |

RACE EXPERT CALLS ON GRADUATES TO FIGHT INEQUALITY raising a challenge to “build more roads to college and fewer to jails,” 2007 commencement speaker Larry Davis warned of rising inequality in America and called upon the graduating class to be the voices of the voiceless and advocates for equality. Professor Davis is the dean and Donald M. Henderson Professor at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Social Work and the director and founder of the Center for Race and Social Problems. His areas of research and scholarship include interracial group dynamics; the impact of race, gender, and class on interpersonal relations; and youth and African American family formation. “It is my firm belief that for the 21st century, the defining problem will be inequality. Rarely have so few had so much and so many in comparison to those, so little, Davis said in his GSSW address. “America and,

Larry Davis

“AS SOCIAL WORKERS, YOU MUST HELP OTHERS TO SEE INEQUITY AND TO EXHORT THEM TO TAKE ACTION AGAINST IT …. PART OF YOUR MISSION WILL BE TO BE THE VOICE OF THOSE WHO MAY THEMSELVES BE VOICELESS.”

6 boston college | graduate school of social work |

indeed, the world is experiencing a dangerous transformation and increasing growth of inequality. [It] sustains the greatest gap between rich and poor of any other western country, and it also sustains the highest poverty rate of any of the industrial nations. Presently, the top 1 percent take home roughly one quarter of the earned income and possess 50 percent of the country’s wealth.” Davis explained that “economic disparities are linked at the root to a host of social problems confronting our society,” and posited three significant problem areas: 1) alarming rates of crime and imprisonment, 2) wide disparities in the education of our youth, and 3) the declining well-being of families in their efforts to afford food, housing, and health care. “America has more people incarcerated than any country in the world—1.3 million—due largely to inequitable opportunity structures. One in five adults is functionally illiterate in America and the rate in our nation’s capital is 30 percent,” Davis continued. Expenditures in school districts range from $2,000 to $10,000 per student, increasing the disparity between poor and affluent neighborhoods. Americans without health care coverage number 47 million. Davis encouraged the graduates to work for change. “As social workers, you must help others to see inequity and to exhort them to take action against it…. Part of your mission will be to be the voice of those who may themselves be voiceless,” he said. “You must advocate for equality.”


G L O BAL

Students of Global Practice attend the 24th Annual Social Work Day at the United Nations.

Partnerships Enhance Learning Abroad Fieldwork is invaluable to understanding the graduate school of social work celebrated

partnerships on May 15 with four international relief and development agencies that provide field internships on several continents for the School’s Global Practice students. Representatives from Catholic Relief Services, Habitat for Humanity International, the International Rescue Committee, and Jesuit Refugee Service exchanged appreciation with social work students who had recently returned from three-month fieldwork internships in Africa, Asia, Central America, and Europe. “Our students have been transformed by these experiences,” said Alberto Godenzi, GSSW dean. “Through their hard work around the globe, they have shown the distinct value of the social work profession, and their deep commitment provides a shining example of BC’s mission of social justice.” The GSSW’s Global Practice concentration trains students for social work in international settings where they interact and collaborate with vulnerable populations across the world. The program requires a semester-long field intern-

ship with an international agency. “Living and working abroad is key to understanding the rigor and complexity of international work,” said Penny Alexander, director of international programs for the GSSW. “Without this experience, our students would not be prepared to serve as international social workers,” she said. Cutberto Garza, BC provost and dean of faculties, who signed partnership agreements with agency representatives at the event, emphasized that Boston College values the School’s commitment to international service. “A primary goal of our partnerships with these distinct agencies is to form highly skilled international social workers. At least as important is that we contribute in a positive and tangible way toward the agencies’ efforts and the people and communities in need,” said Dean Godenzi. “We expanded our ties with the international field because we are in a position, thanks to Boston College and the help of private donors, to commit necessary financial and personnel resources to ensure mutuality and sustainability.” boston college | graduate school of social work |

7


BCGSSW | GLOBAL |

FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND CONFERENCE DISCUSSES BEST PRACTICES

L-R: Juliana Laboube and Penny Alexander

the first international social work (ISW) conference, the academic social work community’s response to the growing importance of global issues, was hosted by the BC Graduate School of Social Work last March at the Omni Parker House Hotel in Boston. More than 90 schools from 35 states participated. “This conference was so different from any other event I have been to in many years,” one participant wrote on an evaluation sheet. “Everyone was actively engaged, and we were all focused on this one issue that excites our lives: international social work.” The goal of the conference was to present and discuss best practices of global collaboration. The format was deliberately small and selective to allow for focused conversations. Among the 150 participants were social work icon Katherine Kendall, who called the conference a milestone event for international social work, and renowned scholar James Midgley, who positioned

8

social work education, research, and practice in a global framework. Experts in specific areas of international social work led workshops, with participants choosing among sessions on infusion of international content into curricula, student and faculty exchange, international field placements, funding opportunities, partnerships, and international concepts and definitions. Participants also attended a reception at the Boston College Club, where BC Provost Cutberto Garza lauded their commitment to international issues. A growing number of social work programs in the U.S. have, in recent years, increased international opportunities for students and faculty.

In response, the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work (NADD) appointed a Task Force in 2003 to support the schools’ international efforts. A year later, the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) established the Katherine A. Kendall Institute for International Social Work Education. CSWE, NADD, and a dozen sister schools of social work co-sponsored the conference, which GSSW Dean Alberto Godenzi and Dean Kay Davidson of the School of Social Work at the University of Connecticut oversaw as co-chairs. The GSSW will host the second ISW conference at the Omni Parker House in Boston June 6-8, 2008.

Above L–R: Alberto Godenzi, Katharine Briar-Lawson, James Midgley, Kay Davidson, Katherine Kendall, Julia Watkins.

boston college | graduate school of social work |


BCGSSW | GLOBAL |

GATHERING EMPHASIZES SOCIAL HARMONY in a world ridden with conflict, how do individuals and communities find harmony and how do societies advance their well-being? Such was the central question of the 15th Annual Symposium of the International Consortium for Social Development (ICSD) hosted by the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in July. Amartya Sen, Nobel Laureate in Economics, struck a similar theme in his keynote address, “Unity and Discord in Social Development,” in which he argued that social development is just as crucial as economic development to improving the human condition. He emphasized that “we have to avoid the twin danger of assuming…that (1) economic development is all that ultimately matters in advancing human lives and freedoms, and that (2) the connections in social development are obvious enough to be invoked without adequate empirical examination.” The symposium, entitled “Seeking Harmony and Promoting Social Development in a World of Conflict,” drew more than 500 individuals from 40 countries. Not only was the GSWW a collaborator in this international event, the School was also well represented. Among those in attendance from BC were event co-chair and GSSW faculty member Ce Shen (co-chairing with Professor Angie Yuen Tsang of Hong Kong Polytechnic), GSSW faculty member Marcie PittCatsouphes, seven GSSW students, and Dean Alberto Godenzi, who provided support as ICSD’s Secretary General. The GSSW students participated in a post-conference tour of mainland China with stops in Hangzhou, Shanghai, and Beijing, as part of a course led by Professor Shen called “China and Social Development in a Transforming Society.”

L-R: GSSW students Marialina Garcia, Juliana Laboube, Bethanne Berish, Rita Kostiuk, Desiree Sanchez, Leslie Geer, and Melissa Zini with GSSW faculty member Ce Shen (middle) pause in front of the Forbidden City, Beijing.

One student wrote, “This course inspired me to become a better person and to learn as much as possible about the world around me.” Another said, “Professor Shen went out of his way to make sure we were all enjoying ourselves on the trip and even taught us Cantonese and how to make Chinese food.” Professor Shen was excited to show the students parts of the country where he grew up. When he left China 20 years ago, he was not sure about its future, especially after the devastating experiences of the Cultural Revolution. However, today’s China experiences rapid economic growth, an increased standard of living, and enhanced education, science, and technology. At the same time, China is a nation struggling with an enormous population, a strained environment, and increasingly unequal distribution of wealth and opportunity.

we have to avoid the twin danger of assuming …that (1) economic development is all that ultimately matters in advancing human lives and freedoms, and that (2) the connections in social development are obvious enough to be invoked without adequate empirical examination. —Nobel Laureate Amartya Sen

boston college | graduate school of social work |

9


FAR AFIELD A k ey co mp o nen t o f the G S S W’s Gl o bal P r ac tice

Concentration is the three-month international field placement during students’ final semester. After rigorous course work over the summer and fall semesters, students are placed in settings that match their skills and meet the needs of the agencies involved in the

Global placements teach powerful lessons

program. In 2007, 11 students experienced learning opportunities in 9 international locations: 6 in Africa: Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Senegal, and Zambia; 3 in Asia: India and South Korea; 1 in Europe: Belgium; and 1 in Central America: El Salvador. In 2008, 22 students will be placed in international agencies. Here are examples of what two students, Emily Greising and Elizabeth Auten, took away from their field placements.

EM I L Y G R E I SI NG Emily Greising was placed with Habitat for Humanity in Ghana. She created a mortgage-tracking system and trained staff in the use of it. In an effort to develop marketing resources, she also drafted stories about the beneficiaries and staff on behalf of Habitat for Humanity Ghana. Greising hopes to work as a social worker for public relations, sharing written and visual stories of organizations and the populations they serve from an empowerment and strengths-based perspective. Greising provided the following observations on her stay in Ghana. “It is not until one leaves his or her comfort zone that one is truly able to realize what is important. Traveling internationally is an incredible test for anyone looking for a personal challenge. After spending a semester in Ghana, I am constantly reminded of the differences existing between cultures. Some are subtle, while others are more apparent.

10

boston college | graduate school of social work |

Mother and child do laundry in Ghana.


Clockwise from top: Emily Greising enjoys a playful moment with children in Ghana. A classroom in Tanzania, and a snail vendor in a Ghanaian marketplace.

boston college | graduate school of social work | 11


As I settled into life in Ghana, I struggled to find my role in the daily routine. The first time the lights went out, I hurried around looking for some way to bring light into my room. It took awhile before I realized all I needed to do was go outside and appreciate my surroundings. There was a full moon illuminating the neighborhood. As my neighbors sat outside talking and laughing, I realized that contentment and satisfaction do not lie in the things we think we need, but rather they come from the beauty that surrounds us, the people and relationships we can rely on, even when there are no lights. Shopping in the Ghanaian markets is a communal experience, it is not about you the shopper; it is about the time you share with the people around you. As I was guided through the markets, the beauty that exists in these small winding paths was overwhelming: the neat piles of tomatoes, the heaps of defiant snails, and the tidy goods delicately stacked for easy viewing. However, the greatest beauty lies in the vendors’ smiles. As you buy their goods, they engage you in conversation and welcome you into their lives, even if just for a moment. When I came home, I avoided the grocery store for a time for fear of not finding similar opportunities. Now, as I wander down the aisles of Shaw’s Supermarket, I feel as though there is something missing. A task that was once so familiar, now feels very distant. As I spend afternoons in front of my computer, I find myself longing for something. The experience in Ghana was often a chaotic mess of sounds and activities—the innocent laughter of children, the gathering of animals, the preparations for dinner—yet it brought me comfort. Happiness washed over me as I sat watching the children engage in the art of conversation. These times allowed me to feel as though I were a part of something much greater than myself. Community is a powerful force and I miss the comfort afforded me by my Ghanaian neighbors.”

12

Elizabeth Auten makes friends with children in El Salvador.

ELIZABETH AU TEN As part of the global practice program, Elizabeth Auten completed her second-year field placement with Catholic Relief Services in El Salvador, where she provided counseling to HIV-positive community members and worked with a mothers’ group to rehabilitate youth gang members in their neighborhood. The experience solidified her desire to work with Latin American communities abroad to create better opportunities for their families. After graduating last May, Auten accepted a position as director of a small nonprofit in Trujillo, Peru. With the help of a local mothers’ club in one of the most impoverished and violent neighborhoods of Trujillo, she organizes an educational program for local children and provides support to their families. Auten has found that grant writing skills and an emphasis on culturally sensitive practice are just a few of the ways that her BC education has proved to be invaluable in her everyday work.

boston college | graduate school of social work |


I BALANCING

ACTS

TWO SCHOLARS HELP FAMILIES JUGGLE HOME–CARE, WORK–LIFE ISSUES

What is research if not a means to a greater end? When professor kevin mahoney’s belief that Medicaid patients should have a say in the delivery of their home health care grew from idea to model to reality, a new concept in the administration of services to the elderly and disabled was born. The same is true for professor marcie pitt-catsouphes. Quick to recognize the need for fresh thinking on how to balance work and family, she applied herself to discovering the factors that now define and power the new Work Life movement. Foreward-looking scholars such as Mahoney and Pitt-Catsouphes are the hope of a social work field constantly called upon to respond to dynamic social forces. Both were honored this year. Here are the stories of why.

boston college | graduate school of social work |

13


I BALANCING

ACTS

professor kevin mahoney By Sean Smith Foment: to instigate or foster; promote the growth or development of.

brian morri / 211 photography

F

oment is a favorite word of Kevin Mahoney, GSSW professor and director of the Center for the Study of Home and Community Life at Boston College, and with good reason. While he may not be out on the streets inciting revolution, for the past decade he’s spearheaded a populist, consumer-directed initiative that represents a significant turn in American health care. And for his efforts, he was awarded the prestigious 2007 Flynn Prize for Social Work Research.

“I am deeply honored to receive this award and to join such a remarkable group of past recipients,” Mahoney says. “It is particularly meaningful to be recognized for research with an impact on public policy. I am so pleased that our team’s research empowering the elderly and people with disabilities to direct and manage their own home- and community-based

Along the way, C&C has drawn praise from policymakers, social service professionals, advocates for the elderly and disabled, and, most of all, from those who have taken part in it. Having a vision is one thing, carrying it out is another, especially on a grand scale that is growing ever larger. In the world of health care and social services, the reward for trying

AS PROFESSOR MAHONEY SEES IT, ELDERLY AND DISABLED AMERICANS RECEIVING MEDICAID SHOULD DECIDE HOW TO MEET THEIR PERSONAL CARE NEEDS, RATHER THAN FACE THE LIMITS OF CONVENTIONAL HOME HEALTH CARE. THE CASH & COUNSELING (C&C) PROGRAM, OF WHICH HE IS NATIONAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR, DOES JUST THAT. services is getting such national attention.” As Mahoney sees it, elderly and disabled Americans receiving Medicaid should decide how to meet their personal care needs, rather than face the limits of conventional home health care. The Cash & Counseling (C&C) program, of which he is national program director, does just that—lets the consumer determine what care they need and want, and who will give it to them, whether a professional, a friend, or a family member. Since the program began in 1995, it has been piloted successfully in three states and is now being implemented in a dozen more. 14

boston college | graduate school of social work |

to implement an initiative like Cash & Counseling includes dealing with workers’ compensation guidelines or tax laws, for example, and myriad other necessary details. While Mahoney is by no means in this all by himself—and is quick to credit the many who make C&C possible—it is his name at the top of the organization, and in good times or bad he is the C&C go-to guy, as well as a prominent national figure in the home care approach. Colleagues and friends laud Mahoney’s temperament and patience in keeping focused on the big picture, and above all, embodying the compassion that


C&C upholds as its hallmark. “I’ve always found him an affable person, able to work with many different stakeholders,” says Robyn Stone, executive director for the Institute for the Future of Aging Services, a policy research institute within the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging. “There are a lot of logistics in managing a program like C&C, which involves both state and federal governments. You have to be able to compromise, avoid adversarial relationships, sell the program well in a way that’s positive—and still be able to achieve your goals. Kevin can do that, no question.” Mahoney believes a focus on gerontological social work is vital for the future needs of the profession, to say nothing of society itself. “There are still so many MSW candidates who come in interested in working with children,” he explains. “The students who want to work with elders tend to be those who have already had experience with them. So, perhaps what we’re doing through the Center, and C&C, will spark more interest in aging issues among people considering human and social services careers. “One thing is for sure: Given the growth we’ll be seeing in our elderly population over the next decade or so, there’ll be plenty of need for creative, dedicated people.” The Flynn Prize recognizes interdisciplinary research and scholarship that is distinguished by its rigor and creativity, focuses on severe and persistent problems of society, and has societal impact. It was established by Dean Marilyn Flynn from the School of Social Work at the University of Southern California. BC Vice Provost for Research and Rourke Professor of Physics Kevin Bedell, who did not want to miss the festive awards ceremony at the Beverly Hills Hotel in April, says, “Kevin has changed the way many states respond to the needs of the elderly and disabled. The way his research translates into policy has a huge impact. He is clearly deserving of this honor.” Excerpted and reprinted with permission from the Boston College Chronicle.

professor marcie pitt-catsouphes By Serena Heartz

I

t is a good thing for the social work field that the bath towel business was slow when Professor Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes was a high school student. Bored with her first job selling linens in a department store, she changed career paths, helped pioneer a new field of study, and recently won a Work Life Legacy Award at a ceremony in New York City for her outstanding achievements. The Work Life Legacy Award was created by the Families and Work Institute (FWI) to capture the history of the people who have created the work life movement and continue to facilitate its progress. “The award shines a spotlight on their achievements and, by doing so, shows how economic and social change really takes place,” said FWI President Ellen Galinsky. Following her short-lived retail career, Dr. Pitt-Catsouphes earned her undergraduate degree from Tufts and an MSP from BCGSSW. She worked for several years in an anti-poverty agency until she had her first child and began teaching. When her second son was born

L-R: Former IBM Vice President of Diversity and Work/Life Ted Childs, Professor Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes, Purdue University Professor and Associate Dean Shelley MacDermid, Families and Work Institute CEO and President Ellen Galinsky (holding Pitt-Catsouphes’ plaque). boston college | graduate school of social work |

15


I BALANCING

ACTS

“IN THE BEGINNING OF THE WORK FAMILY MOVEMENT, MANY PEOPLE LOOKED AT WORK FAMILY ISSUES AS BEING PRETTY MUCH A WOMAN’S ISSUE. IT DIDN’T TAKE TOO LONG FOR US TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP AND SAY, ‘MY GOODNESS, MEN ARE EXPERIENCING AND INTERESTED IN THIS.’” —MARCIE PITT-CATSOUPHES

with medical issues, she knew that she needed to think creatively and differently about balancing work and family. Her search for project-based work led to her employment at the Center for Work and Family, then at Boston University. There she began to realize the importance of the issue to her personally and to society at large. “In the beginning of the work family movement, many people looked at work family issues as being pretty much a woman’s issue. It didn’t take too long for us to take the next step and say, ’My goodness, men are experiencing and interested in this,’” Dr. Pitt-Catsouphes says. The revelation prompted her to earn her doctorate so she could continue her work in the emerging field. Toward that end, Dr. Pitt-Catsouphes helped establish the Work and Family Roundtable, a consortium of businesses, supported by the Boston College Center for Work and Family, that have made a commitment to responding to work family issues. She further advanced the field as director of the Sloan Work and Family Network, which brings together researchers from different arenas to exchange resources and expertise. “We decided the best way to share information was to start making it available on the internet,” Dr. Pitt-Catsouphes says. “It’s hard to believe this, but 10 years ago people told us, ’No one’s going to look there.” The transition from the Sloan Network to her current position with the Boston College Center on Aging and Work/Workplace Flexibility was a

16

boston college | graduate school of social work |

natural progression. A 2005 think-tank meeting sponsored by the Sloan Network focused on changing age demographics and older workers, and participants realized how unprepared society was for the shift. Soon Dr. Pitt-Catsouphes was busy creating the Center. It quickly became apparent that two distinct groups of researchers were studying issues facing the senior population: gerontologists and organizational studies experts. “We came up with a solution about how to address this challenge. We decided to create a job share with both sets of experiences represented at the senior level, says Dr. Pitt-Catsouphes, who co-chairs the Center with geriatric psychologist Dr. Mick Smyer. The Center’s goal is to inspire new ways to address issues facing aging and work and to respond to the opportunities and challenges that arise. As evidenced by the Work Life Legacy Award, Dr. Pitt-Catsouphes has already left an indelible mark on the work family field. While she acknowledges the vast advances that have occurred, she cautions against complacency. “Those of us who are older workers shouldn’t feel that our job is complete. Social change in the workplace needs to be a multi-generational effort,” she says. “I think that once we have made good progress, we begin to take that progress for granted. Although that’s a sign of success, we shouldn’t become distracted and forget about all the work that remains.”


R E S E A R CH

CASEY AWARDED $1.4 MILLION FOR SLOAN WORK–FAMILY NETWORK after a decade of success in the work family arena, the Sloan Work and Family Research Network at Boston College received an additional $1.4 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in June. Created in 1997, the Network is the leading web destination for free credible, current information on work family issues. A highly valued resource in the work family community, the Network has developed an extensive cadre of resources representing 3.16 gigabytes of content. “Our biggest accomplishment is not simply the collection of high quality, credible information, but the way in which we have successfully packaged the research into formats that can inform academia, state policy, and workplace practices,” says Judi C. Casey, principal investigator and director of the Network. “Given the quality resources that now exist, it is critical to grow and expand our user groups.” “The Sloan Work and Family Research Network is an amazing success story,” says Dean Alberto Godenzi. “Initiated by GSSW faculty member Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes, it anticipated the need for comprehensive information on work and family issues. At a time when the public started to become acquainted with the internet, Marcie and her colleagues launched a virtual network that provided easily accessible resources. The new director, Judi Casey, builds on this success and has significantly expanded the scope of the project and the funding through the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.” The Sloan Work and Family Research Network serves a global community of individuals from more than 100 countries interested in work and family research. It does so by providing resources, building knowledge, and sharing information. The site has over 8,600 literature citations, a statistics database, fact sheets, an encyclopedia, glossary, and other resources. “The new grant will allow the Network to expand its reach to the state policy audience by developing reciprocal relationships with policy/advocacy associations and encouraging them to distribute information about the Network’s resources to their constituents,” Casey explains. “In particular, they will find the Bills & Statutes Database and the Policy Leadership Series to be useful in their work.”

doctoral fellowship program thrives under professor lubben The Hartford Doctoral Fellows (HDF) program, the largest private source of fellowships for social work doctoral students in the United States and now in its seventh year, is enjoying continued growth and success under the leadership of james lubben, professor and holder of the Louise McMahon Ahearn Chair at BCGSSW. To date, 62 students have received a Hartford Doctoral Fellowship and they come from 21 states and 28 different universities. Lubben was the founding director of the program, which was established in 2000 with funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation of New York City. Qualifying students’ dissertation research must substantively analyze a set of questions dealing with the health and well-being of older adults, their families, and their caregivers. The Fellowship offers a diverse package of support, including dissertation grants, professional development institutes, academic career counseling, and a series of activities designed to foster peer networking and support. The combined value of the professional development activities and the dissertation grant makes a Hartford Doctoral Fellowship worth more than $100,000 to the social work doctoral student. Besides these highly competitive fellowships, the HDF program offers small travel grants to doctoral students at the pre-dissertation stage of their studies. To date, the HDF has made 60 pre-dissertation awards. This aspect of HDF identifies a group of students early in their doctoral studies and takes them to the annual scientific meeting of the Gerontological Society of America. Both components of the Hartford Doctoral Fellowship are designed to ensure that there will be adequate faculty to train the next generation of social workers to care for the growing population of older adults and their families. “The HDF program is a perfect example of how a foundation can have a major impact on a huge societal issue by partnering with institutions of higher education,” said Dean Alberto Godenzi. “This collaboration will enhance the skills of generations of social workers who will benefit from the expertise of their teachers and the evidence provided by research. Most important, it will improve the lives of countless older adults. It is a privilege and an honor that one of our own, Jim Lubben, is leading this effort.”

boston college | graduate school of social work |

17


BCGSSW | RESEARCH |

FACULTY PUBLICATIONS Here are highlights from among the many accomplishments of the full-time faculty in the 2006-2007 academic year. BERZIN

BLYTHE

GODENZI

Berzin, S. C., Cohen, E., & Thomas, K. L. (forthcoming). Does family group decision making affect child welfare outcomes? Findings from a randomized control study. Child Welfare.

Kayser, K. & Johnson, J. (forthcoming). Divorce. In T. Mizrahi & L. Davis (Eds.). Encyclopedia of Social Work, 20th Ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

Berzin, S. C., DeMarco, A. C., Shaw, T. V., Hogan, S. R., & Unick, G. J. (2006). The effect of parental work history and public assistance use on the transition to adulthood. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 33(1), 141-161.

Kayser, K. & Rao, S. (2006). The process of disaffection in relationship breakdown. In M. Fine & J. Harvey (Eds.), Handbook of divorce and relationship dissolution (pp. 201-222). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Bodenmann, G., Pihet, S., & Kayser, K. (2006). The relationship between dyadic coping, marital quality and well being: A longitudinal study within two years. Journal of Family Psychology, 20, 485-493.

Kranz, K. & O’Hare, T. (2006). The Substance Abuse Treatment SelfEfficacy Scale: A confirmatory factor analysis. Journal of Social Service Research, 32, 109-121.

Conley, T. & O’Hare, T. (2006). Comparing the factor structure of the AUDIT with DWI offenders and college students. The Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, 6, 25-36. Damron-Rodriguez, J. A., & Lubben, J. E. (2006). Family and community health care for older persons. In S. Carmel, F. Torrres-Gil, & C. Morris (Eds.), The art of aging well: Lessons from three nations (pp. 63-69). New York: Baywood Publishing Co.

KAYSER

Iatridis, D. (2006). Social policy for the development of health and welfare agencies. Athens, Greece: Hellenic Grammata.

Berzin, S. C. (2006). Using sibling data to understand the impact of family group decision-making on child welfare outcomes. Children and Youth Services Review, 28(12), 1449-1458.

Cohen, N. A., Tran, T. V., & Rhee, S. Y. (2007). Multicultural approaches in caring for children, youth, and their families. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

IATRIDIS

Iatridis, D. (forthcoming). Globalization and social exclusion. In H. Economou (Ed.), Social policy and social exclusions. Athens, Greece: Pantios University Press.

Doty, P., Mahoney, K. J., & SimonRusinowitz, L. (2007). Designing the Cash and Counseling demonstration and evaluation. Health Services Research, 42, 378-396. Hoffman, K. & Godenzi, A. (2007). Increasing our impact through unification (Guest Editorial). Journal of Social Work Education, 43(2), 181-185.

KLINE 18 boston college | graduate school of social work |

Lee, E. O. (2007). Religion and spirituality as predictors of well-being among Chinese American and Korean American older adults. Journal of Religion, Spirituality, and Aging, 19(3), 77-100. Lee, E. O. & Barrett, C. (2007). Integrating spirituality and social justice in social work practice and education. A pilot study. Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work, 26(2), 1-21. Lee, E. O. & Sharp, T. (2007). Understanding spiritual coping and support resources among African American older adults: A mixed method approach. Journal of Religion, Spirituality, and Aging, 19(3), 55-75. Lee, E. O. & Brenan, M. (2006). Stress constellation and coping styles of older adults with age-related visual impairment. Health & Social Work, 31(4), 289-298. Lee, E. O. & Waites, C. (2006). Infusing aging content: Innovation in baccalaureate social work education. Journal of Social Work Education, 42(3), 371-388.

Lee, E. O., Collins, P., Mahoney, K., McInnis-Dittrich, K., & Boucher, E. (2006). Enhancing social work practice with older adults: The role of infusing gerontology content into the Master’s of Social Work foundation curriculum. Educational Gerontology, 32(9), 737-756. Levy-Storms, L. & Lubben, J. E. (2006). Network composition and health behaviors among older Samoan women. Journal of Aging and Health, 18, 814-836. Lombe, M. & Ssewamala, F. (in press). The role of social capital in micro-savings mobilization. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 34(3). Lombe, M. & McBride, A. (2006). Civic service worldwide: Operationalizing service and the status of research. In A. McBride & M. Sherraden (Eds.), Civic service worldwide: Impacts and inquiry (pp. 3-16). Memphis, TN: Sharpe Publications. Lubben, J. E. (2006). Abbreviated and targeted geriatric assessment. In B. Berkman, (Ed.), Handbook of social work in health and aging (pp. 729-735). New York: Oxford University Press. Lubben, J. E. (Section Editor) (2006). International social work and care of older adults. In B. Berkman (Ed.), Handbook of social work in health and aging (pp. 937-983). New York: Oxford University Press. Lubben, J. E. & Damron-Rodriguez, J. (2006). World population aging. In B. Berkman, (Ed.), Handbook of social work in health and aging (pp. 939-944). New York: Oxford University Press. Lubben, J. E., Blozik, E., Gillmann, G., Iliffe, S., Kruse, W. R., Beck, J. C., & Stuck, A. E. (2006). Performance of an abbreviated version of the Lubben Social Network Scale among three European community-dwelling older adult populations. The Gerontologist, 46(4), 503–513. Mahoney, K. J., Fishman, N. W., Doty, P., & Squillace, M. R. (2007). The future of Cash and Counseling: The framers’ view. Health Services Research, 42, 550-566.


BCGSSW | RESEARCH |

Mahoney, K. J. & Zgoda, K. (2006). Approaches to empowering individuals and communities. In B. Berkman (Ed.), Handbook of social work in health and aging (pp. 809-816). New York: Oxford University Press. Mahoney, K. J. & Simone, K. (2006). History of and lessons from the Cash and Counseling demonstration and evaluation. In S. Kunkel & V. Wellin (Eds.), Consumer voice and choice in long-term care (43-56). New York: Springer Publishing Company. Mahoney, K. J., Simon-Rusinowitz, L., Simone K., & Zgoda, K. (2006). Cash and Counseling: A promising option for consumer-direction of home and community-based services and supports. Care Management Journals, 7(4), 199-204 McInnis-Dittrich, K. (2006). Cognitivebehavioral interventions with older adults and their families/caregivers. In B. Berkman (Ed.), Handbook of social work in health and aging (pp. 749-756). New York: Oxford University Press. McInnis-Dittrich, K. & Lubben, J. E. (Section Editors) (2006). Assessment and intervention with older adults and their families/caregivers. In B. Berkman (Ed.), Handbook of social work in health and aging (pp. 719-822). New York: Oxford University Press. McInnis-Dittrich, K. & Lubben, J. E. (2006) Assessment and intervention with older adults and their families/caregivers. In B. Berkman (Ed.), Handbook of social work in health and aging (pp. 719-722). New York: Oxford University Press.

Mizrahi, T. & Lombe, M. (2007). Perspectives from women organizers: Views on gender, race, class and sexual orientation in two timeframes. Journal of Community Practice, 14(3), 93-118. Nebbitt, V. & Lombe, M. (forthcoming). Environmental correlates of depressive symptoms among AfricanAmerican adolescents living in public housing. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment. O’Hare, T. & Sherrer, M. V. (2006). Stress, recent changes in alcohol consumption level and problem drinking in freshman first offenders. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 13, 33-50. O’Hare, T. & Sherrer, M. V. (2006). Measuring practice skills with community clients. Best Practices in Mental Health: An International Journal, 2, 31-42. O’Hare, T., Sherrer, M. V., & Shen, C. (2006). Subjective distress from stressful events and high risk behaviors as predictors of PTSD symptom severity in clients with severe mental illness. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3, 375-386. Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Matz-Costa, C., & MacDermid, S. (in press). HRD responses to work-life stressors. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 9(4). Pitt-Catsouphes, M. & Hudson, R. (Special Editors) (2007). The aging workforce: Are we ready? Generations (Special Issue), 31(1).

GSSW SPONSORED PROGRAM FUNDING FY98 – FY07 (Dollars in thousands) $4000 $3,500 $3,000

Pitt-Catsouphes, M. & Hudson, R. (2007). The aging workforce: Ready or not? Generations (Special Issue), 31(1), 6-8. Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2007). Between a Twentieth and a Twenty-First Century workforce: Employers at a tipping point. Generations (Special Issue), 31(1), 50-56.

LEE

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., Kossek, E. & Sweet, S. (Eds.). Work and family handbook: Multi-disciplinary perspectives. Mahway, NJ: Erlbaum. Pitt-Catsouphes, M. & Swanberg, J. (2006). Connecting social work perspectives to work-family research and practice. In M. Pitt-Catsouphes, E. Kossek, & S. Sweet. (Eds.). Work and family handbook: Multi-disciplinary perspectives (327-359). Mahway, NJ: Erlbaum.

LOMBE

Pitt-Catsouphes, M., MacDermid, S., Matz, C., & Swartz, R. (2006). Community contexts: The perspectives and adaptations of working parents. American Behavioral Scientist, 49(10), 1400-1421. LUBBEN

San Antonio, P. M., Simon-Rusinowitz, L., Loughlin, D., Eckert, J. K., & Mahoney, K. J. (2007). Case histories of six consumers and their families in Cash and Counseling. Health Services Research, 42, 533-549 Secret, M., & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (forthcoming). Introducing work-family scholarship to social work students: The development and assessment of an online reading seminar. Journal of Teaching in Social Work. Secret, M. & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2006). Introducing work-family scholarship to sociology students: An online reading seminar. In S. Sweet, M. PittCatsouphes, J. Mumm, J. Casey, & C. Matz (Eds.), Teaching work and family: Strategies, activities, and syllabi (pp. 1422). Washington, DC: American Sociological Association.

MAHONEY

MCINNIS-DITTRICH

$2,500

Shen, C. (forthcoming). A structural analysis of determinants of corruption in less developed countries: A crossnational comparison. Social Development Issues.

$2,000 $1,500 $1,000 $500 $0 1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

MITCHELL

boston college | graduate school of social work |

19


BCGSSW | RESEARCH |

O'HARE

Shen, C. & Williamson, J. B. (2006). The necessity, feasibility, and potential social benefits of an old-age universal non-contributory social pension scheme for rural China. Chinese Rural Economy, 8, 50-55.

Tran, T. V. (forthcoming). A measure of English acculturation stress and its relationship with psychological and physical health status in a sample of elderly Russian immigrants. Journal of Gerontological Social Work.

Shen, C. & Williamson, J. B. (2006). Does a universal non-contributory pension scheme make sense for rural China? Journal of Comparative Social Welfare, 22(2), 143-153.

Tran, T. V. (2007). Nonlinear relationship between length of residence and depression in a community-based sample of Vietnamese Americans. The International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 53(1), 85-94.

Shen, C. (2006). Factors associated with crossnational variation in mathematics and science achievement: Based on TIMSS 1999 data. In S. J. Howie & T. Plomp (Eds.), Contexts of learning mathematics and science: Lessons learned from TIMMS (pp. 387-404). New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. PITT-CATSOUPHES

Simon-Rusinowitz, L., Marinez, G., Martin, D., Sadler, M. D., Tilly, J., Marks, L. N., Loughlin, D. M., & Mahoney, K. (forthcoming). Hiring relatives as caregivers in two states: Developing an education and research agenda for policymakers. Journal of Health & Social Policy. Smyer, M. A. & Pitt-Catsouphes, M. (2007). The meanings of work for older workers. Generations (Special Issue), 31(1), 23-30.

ROWLAND

SHEN

TOHN

Ssewamala, F., Lombe, M., & Curley, J. C. (2006). Using individual development accounts for microenterprise development in the United States. Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, 11(2), 117-131.

Waites, C. & Lee, E. O. (2006). Strengthening aging content in the Baccalaureate social work curricula: What students have to say. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 48(1/2), 47-62. Wind, L. H., Brooks, D., & Barth, R. P. (forthcoming). Adoption services use: Influences of child and family characteristics, risk history, and pre-adoption preparation. Family Relations.

Xu, Q. (in press). A child-centered refugee resettlement program in the United States. Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies, 5(3). Xu, Q. (2007). Globalization, immigration and the welfare state: A cross national comparison. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 34(2), 87-106.

Stone, S. I., Berzin, S. C., Taylor, S., & Austin, M. J. (in press). Human behavior and the social environment: Exploring conceptual foundations. In B. A. Thyer (Ed.), Comprehensive handbook of social work and social welfare. Volume 2: Human Behavior in the Social Environment.

Xu, Q. (2006). Defining community and the principles of community social work. In M. Y. Yan & J. Gao (Eds.). Community social work: An insider-outsider exchange of perspectives (pp. 319). Beijing, China: Chinese Social Science Press.

Sweet, S., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Mumm, J. (2006). Advancing the teaching of work and family. In S. Sweet, M. Pitt-Catsouphes, J. Mumm, J. Casey, & C. Matz (Eds.), Teaching work and family: Strategies, activities, and syllabi (pp. 1-4). Washington, DC: American Sociological Association.

Yoon, D. P. & Lee, E. O. (2007). The impact of religiousness, spirituality, and social support on psychological well-being among older adults in a rural area. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 48(3/4), 281-298.

20 boston college | graduate school of social work |

WARSH

Xu, Q. (2006). Defining international social work: A social service agency perspective. International Social Work, 49(6), 679-692. Xu, Q. & Chow, J. (2006). Urban community in China: Service, participation, and development. International Journal of Social Welfare, 15(3), 199-208.

TOURSE

VEEDER

Xu, Q. (forthcoming). Community participation in urban China: Identifying mobilization factors. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly.

Stones, S. I., Austin, M. J., Berzin, S. C., & Taylor, S. (forthcoming). Theoretical perspectives for understanding reciprocity: Implications for HB&SE knowledge base and curriculum development. Journal of Human Behavior and the Social Environment

Sweet, S., Pitt-Catsouphes, M., & Mumm, J. (2006). Course designs and syllabi: Summaries and introductory comments. In S. Sweet, M. Pitt-Catsouphes, J. Mumm, J. Casey, & C. Matz (Eds.), Teaching work and family: Strategies, activities, and syllabi (pp. 5-8). Washington, DC: American Sociological Association.

TRAN

WILLIAMS

WIND

The multitude of presentations made by GSSW faculty at scholarly conferences in the U.S. and abroad are n ot in cluded in this mag azin e. Though these are very important scholarly activities, they could not be referenced due to space limitations.

XU


C O M M UNIT Y

COMMUNITY

Taking the Reigns McClain heads Massachusetts Department of Social Services

governor deval patrick appointed dr. angelo mcclain as commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Social Services (DSS) on May 23. Dr.

“he was very hardworking and focused. he was unusually gifted, and we all knew it.” —elaine pinderhughes

McClain earned his Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Social Work in 2001. The Department of Social Services is charged with strengthening families and protecting children from abuse and neglect. Its programs include foster care and adoption, as well as adolescent and domestic violence services. More than 40,000 children, 10,000 of whom are in foster care, are served by DSS. Commissioner McClain credits his BC education with helping him rise to his prominent position. The knowledge of theory building and research methods acquired at GSSW has been an asset in his professional career. Also important, however, were some of the intangible lessons. He remembers that he had expected Professor Elaine Pinderhughes, a member of his dissertation committee, to offer unconditional accolades after his dissertation was accepted. Instead, she urged him to strengthen his writing skills. As a result of her high standards, he adopted the adage, “Good enough is not good enough.” Dr. Pinderhughes, now retired from GSSW, has nothing but praise for her former student. “He was very hard-working and focused. He was unusually gifted, and we all knew it,” she said. Dr. Thanh Tran, dissertation committee chair, agreed, saying, “He was calm and low-key, yet showed a great sense of self-confidence.” Before attending BC, Dr. McClain was employed at Children’s Services of Roxbury as a social worker and supervisor. While pursuing his graduate degree, he worked for the Child/Adolescent Division of the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health. He later joined the Massachusetts Behavioral Health Partnership as vice president for network management and regional operations. For the past five years, he was executive director of ValueOptions New Jersey, which administers $400 million in services for New Jersey children. McClain is credited with establishing relationships with other agencies to eliminate bureaucracy in that state’s child services delivery system. DSS has achieved many successes under the leadership of former Commissioner Harry Spence. With Dr. McClain’s solid reputation and extensive expertise, it promises to realize many more.

boston college | graduate school of social work |

21


BCGSSW | COMMUNITY |

ALUMNI NEWS to post an update, email gsswalumni@bc.edu or call 617-552-4020.

angela m. bouchard, msw ’04, is the lead counselor for the Steppingstone Foundation in Boston, MA. She recently became engaged to Dan Madore; a May 2008 wedding is planned in Maine. Bouchard and Christine Laskowski, MSW ’04 (see below), continue their close friendship and still their Thursday “BC friendship andenjoy still enjoy their Thursday Babes Girls’ Night Out,” which they began “BC Babes Girls’ Night Out,” which they while in graduate school. began while in graduate school. audrey mcallister boucher, msw ’83, is the youth services director for the Brockton Area Workforce Investment Board (BAWIB), one of 16 such boards

in Massachusetts and part of a national initiative mandated by the Workforce Investment Act. She is responsible for the programmatic oversight of federal, state, and other grant funds that come into the region. These monies are directed to youth ages 14 to 21 who are at risk of dropping out of school. The funds are intended to help youth succeed in an education that leads to self-sustaining careers and community leadership. Boucher was also recently elected to the BCGSSW Alumni Board.

CALLING ALL ALUMNI How you will benefit by staying connected to the School A new school year is under way at the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work. What does this mean for alumni? It means there are lots of ways to get involved. Perhaps you thought that after graduation there was not much more the School could offer you, that only current students needed to stay connected. Not so. There are many opportunities available to learn about current trends in the field, advance your career, and help current students. The Alumni Association is your gateway to getting involved with the BCGSSW again. This past year the Alumni Association oversaw a number of new and continuing activities. Ongoing activities included the ever-popular networking events for current students and alumni, new-student recruitment with the Admissions Office, and work with the Field Education Department to develop quality field work experiences. New activities included the implementation of a year-end social event for students and alumni to encourage stronger connections with recent graduates. Modifications to the annual dinner and a new electronic election process for the slate of board candidates were also carried out. These initiatives (along with a new alumni-led conference) will continue and be expanded in the coming year. Alumni participation in these activities is essential and I encourage you to look for event dates on the GSSW website, http://socialwork.bc.edu/alumni/, or contact the School’s liaison to the Alumni Board, Patricia Shuker, at 617-552-4095 or shuker@bc.edu for more details if you are interested. As alumni, you should know that the School and its resources are here for you. By staying involved with the GSSW, you will learn of terrific opportunities to participate that can make a difference in your life, the field, and the career of new students. I encourage you to find out more by connecting with the GSSW Alumni Association this year.

—Susan Moriarty, MSW ’99, GSSW Alumni Association President

22

boston college | graduate school of social work |

andrea cohen, msw ’84, co-founder and CEO of HouseWorks, a Newton, MA,based home care company, is expanding her business. This November, HouseWorks will open an office in Bethesda, MD, to provide innovative and quality home care services in Washington, DC. HouseWorks was chosen as a strategic partner in The Watergate Initiative and will be providing services to residents of the Watergate building. Cohen can be reached at acohen@sb-ventures.com. christine laskowski, msw ’04, is the director of social services for the Goddard House in Jamaica Plain, MA. She and Mark Bouchard will be married in October 2007 in Detroit, MI. laura kendrick-little, msw ’01, is a community-based social worker for Optima Health Plans, Virginia Beach, VA. She assists medically compromised health plan members with social issues. After graduating with a clinical concentration from Boston College, she worked as a family therapist for Caring Family Network in Raleigh, NC. Laura is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in strategic leadership at Regent University in Virginia Beach. kathy kurtz, msw ’91, works at Gilda’s Club Western New York as program manager and Noogieland coordinator. Gilda’s Club WNY is one of 21 affiliates across the country that offers social and emotional support to anyone who has felt the impact of cancer. Kurtz recently received one of Buffalo’s “40 Under 40” awards, which recognize professional and volunteer involvement in the local community. In November, Kurtz and Tricia Weldon, msw ’91, spent a week in New Orleans volunteering with an organization that guts houses damaged by Hurricane Katrina. They report that there is still a huge need for volunteers in Louisiana and Mississippi. They are happy to talk with anyone interested in learning more about how to become involved. roderick waters, msw ’03, was accepted to the EdD program at the University of San Francisco and will start his studies in international and multicultural education this fall.


BCGSSW | COMMUNITY |

Finding Creative Solutions Alumni honored for innovative contributions

L-R: Karen Wolk Feinstein and Eleanor Dowd

EACH YEAR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION HONORS TWO ALUMNI FOR THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE FIELD OF SOCIAL WORK. THE DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI FOR 2007 ARE ELEANOR DOWD, MSW ’68, AND KAREN WOLK FEINSTEIN, MSW ’69. since graduating from bc with her msw in 1968, Eleanor Dowd has had a distinguished career helping children and families. She recalls that former GSSW Dean Edmund Burke taught her to question everything and to challenge government policies and procedures that hindered the well-being of her clients. She put those lessons to good use. She has had many notable professional achievements, but she is most proud of her leadership in implementing the Permanency Planning Project in Massachusetts. Modeled after a program developed in Oregon, the project identifies children who have languished in foster care and gives social workers the tools to place them in permanent homes. The philosophy behind the initiative—that every child deserves an enduring family environment—was the basis of legislation establishing the Department of Social Services (DSS) in 1980.

Dowd was appointed the area director of the DSS Waltham Area Office that same year, and rose to become the metro regional director, overseeing five Greater Boston Area Offices. Although she officially retired in 2003, she currently serves as a consultant for the Teaming Initiative, which pairs teams of social workers (as opposed to individual social workers) with families in need. The program, which won the 2006 National Award for “Innovations in Government,” is another example of Dowd’s continuing commitment to finding permanent solutions for children in need. Dr. Karen Wolk Feinstein earned her MSW from BC in 1969. In 1991 she was selected as the first CEO of the Jewish Healthcare Foundation of Pittsburgh (JHF). The mission of JHF is to support and foster the provision of health care services and education, and to respond to the health-related needs of the elderly, indigent, and underserved populations in Western Pennsylvania. “My instructions were to be creative and proactive,” Feinstein says, “to find out what needs the community had, to do what I could to meet them, and to develop a unique identity for the foundation.” Through its supporting organization, the Pittsburgh Regional Health Initiative founded by Feinstein, JHF developed the Perfecting Patient Care™ curriculum, which aims to eliminate errors, inefficiency, and waste in complex systems through continuous improvement and standardization of work practices. It is an intensive four-day program that adapts engineering principles from the Toyota Production System to health care delivery services. Feinstein also founded Health Careers Futures, a subsidiary of JHF, to assist the industry in attracting and retaining health care employees. Feinstein received her Ph.D. in Social Welfare Policies and Economics from Brandeis University. She previously held posts at the United Way and served on the faculties at Carnegie Mellon University and Boston College Graduate School of Social Work.

boston college | graduate school of social work |

23


BCGSSW | COMMUNITY |

TARA EARL, MSW, PHD

THOMAS CREA, MSW, PHD

RENÉ OLATE, MSW, ABD

NEW FACES ON THE FACULTY a man of many talents

when passion meets competence

a world of experience

Thomas Crea, Ph.D., joined the GSSW’s Children, Youth, and Families concentration in the fall of 2007. Prior to establishing his career in social work, Dr. Crea toured the country as a drummer in a nationally recognized rock band. He later transitioned to a supervisory role at a special needs adoption agency and earned his doctorate at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The Search Committee was especially impressed with his innovative research on Team Decision Making (TDM) and how the process has an impact on the delivery of social services. Dr. Crea’s experience as a researcher and practitioner persuaded him that effective social work practice is not only based on individual expertise and education but also on organizational factors that can impede or facilitate individual action. Dr. Crea’s primary research interests include foster care placement decisionmaking for children as well as decisions related to approving prospective resource families. As a faculty member he will draw on both his practice experience and empirical evidence to evaluate social interventions to improve the lives of disadvantaged children. He looks forward to engaging his students to follow suit.

BCGSSW will welcome Tara Earl, MSW, Ph.D., as a new faculty in the Health and Mental Health concentration effective in the fall of 2008. Dr. Earl earned her MSW at the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Texas at Austin. Currently, she is a research associate and postdoctoral fellow with the Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research, a division of Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Health Alliance. The focus of her dissertation was on the examination of care-giving practices of siblings caring for a brother or sister diagnosed with a severe mental illness and the importance of race and ethnicity in these practices. Dr. Earl published in the Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, the Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, and the International Journal of Epidemiology. Her goal as a faculty member is to deepen the understanding of African Americans in mental health specialty settings through interdisciplinary and innovative research. A self-described “foodie” who likes experimenting with different recipes, Dr. Earl also enjoys traveling, but her favorite pastime is playing with her two Yorkshire Terriers.

In January 2008, René Olate, MSW, ABD, will join the GSSW’s Children, Youth, and Families concentration. Olate’s interest in social work is global and interdisciplinary. Originally from Chile, he earned his bachelor of social services from the Universidad de Concepción and his masters in social science from the Pontificia Università Gregoriana in Italy. He is preparing his dissertation defense at George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University, where he is a research associate in its Center for Social Development. His most recent work on the integration of capabilities, social capital, and institutions at the local level was published in one of the oldest social work journals in Latin America, the Revista de Trabajo Social. Olate’s areas of interest include international social development, youth and community development, and nonprofit organizations. The subject of his dissertation is a cross-national study of youth volunteer programs in 12 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition to his interest in Latin American politics, Olate runs half marathons and referees soccer matches.

24 boston college | graduate school of social work |


BCGSSW | COMMUNITY |

STUDENT AWARDS & FELLOWSHIPS MS W PR OG R AM

Najiba Akbar

Boston Schweitzer Fellowship

Melissa Canuto

Deborah Feldstein Bartfield Memorial Scholarship

Jana Tarpinan

William Ervant Doctor Educational Fund

Ming Nagasawa

Roothbert Foundation

P HD PR OG R AM

Mary Byrne

Irene Stiver Dissertation Award

Jacqueline Dyer

CSWE* Minority Fellowship

Jessica Johnson

Hartford Doctoral Fellowship

Tanya Sharpe

CSWE* Minority Fellowship

Tanya Sharpe

Sarah Haley Memorial Dissertation Award

Sandee Shulkin

Family Policy Section Internship Award National Council on Family Relations

GSSW ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD MEMBERS 2007-2008 The mission of the GSSW Alumni Association is to represent Boston College Graduate School of Social Work alumni and to serve their needs and interests in order to foster their continu ing commitment to, and involvement in, the activities and direction of the School, the social work profession, and the social welfare field. For more details and resources for alumni, visit w w w.bc.edu/gssw/alumni.

President Susan Moriarty, MSW ’99

GR ADU AT E S T U D E N T A SSO C I A T I O N A WA R DS

Vice President

Madeline Howe

Contribution to Community Award

Cheryl Snyder, ’83

Cindy Lawlor

GSSW School Award

Secretary

Rocio Calvo Vilches

Mentoring Excellence Award

Erin Boles, ’01 Lisa Alexander, MSW ’97

CO M ME NC E ME N T A WA R D S

Lisa Bello, MSW ’97

Najiba Akbar

Leo P. Haley & Reverend John Essien Memorial Award

Susan Bernstein, ’97

Philipp A. Amaral

Matthew L. Pisapia Memorial Award

Angela Bouchard, ’04

Catriona Cameron

M. Rita Walsh Memorial Award

Audrey Boucher, ’83

Sarah Montigny

Helen J. Crowley Memorial Award

Julie Christenson, ’00 Andrea Cohen, ’84 Martha Douty-Perez, ’03

CLAS S OF 2 0 0 7 F E LLO WSH I P S

Corona Benson

Kate Durrane, ’04

Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates Behavioral Health Fellowship

Mary D’Alessandro

Harvard Health Services Social Work Fellowship

Katherine Lindy

Children’s Hospital-Palliative Care Social Work Fellow

Molly Magill

Brown Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship

Paulo Fulton, ’01 Andrea Gieryic, ’00 Jim Hardeman, ’73 Heidi Hart-Gorman, ’03 Lynda Ketchman, ’92 Anita McLoughlin, ’98 Tom Mele, ’04

* Council on Social Work Education

boston college | graduate school of social work |

25


BCGSSW | COMMUNITY |

STAFF COMINGS & GOINGS sally berry,, formerly a student support specialist in the Office of Student Services at Boston College, joined the GSSW Admissions Office in December 2006 to work as a senior admissions assistant for the director of enrollment. Berry received her BA from the College of Advancing Studies this past June. betty cohen, head librarian of the Social Work Library, left her position in June. Over her seven-year tenure, the GSSW benefited greatly from her technology innovations. Cohen will work on a parttime basis as a consultant for the Boston College Center on Aging and Work. jane morris assumed Cohen’s role in July. She joins the School from the Ginn Library at Tuft’s Fletcher School where she was associate director of public service and acting director. harry dumay, associate dean, finance, research, and administration, resigned in December 2006 to become associate dean and chief financial officer of Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. eileen doherty assumed Dumay’s role in March, rejoining Boston College after a three-and-ahalf-year stint in the Finance Office of Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Doherty also served as a financial analyst in the Office of the Executive Vice President at Boston College and as a special assistant for financial analysis in the Office of the Academic Vice President. nicole malec kenyon, the GSSW director of marketing and communications, departed in early August to assume the role of director of communications for the MIT Resource Development Office. A search committee has been established to seek a replacement.

26

nicole roberts jones, formerly an adjunct lecturer at Boston University and the University of Southern California, was hired in the spring as a field education specialist to focus on students interested in macro placements. Jones is a graduate of San Diego State University, and earned her MSW at USC. She spent five years with Prototypes in Culver City, CA, as a clinical director, deputy director of training, and development project coordinator. linda robichaud recently became the School’s first data and technology manager. She is a Boston College graduate and began her career working in the BC President’s Office. She has an extensive background in programming and technical writing, having worked as a senior systems analyst for the Bank of Boston and as a documentation developer for Longwood Software, Inc., and Manufacturing Applications eXperts, Inc. (MAX). Most recently she was a programmer/analyst for MAX. linda doucette rosa, a field education specialist handling clinical placements and advisement, left the GSSW at the end of the summer to take a position as a school adjustment counselor in the Billerica Public Schools. In addition to her role in the Field Office, Linda served for a number of years as the School’s liaison to the GSSW Alumni Board. teresa schirmer joined the Field Office last fall as a field education specialist. She obtained her undergraduate degree at Boston College and her MSW at Boston University. Her former position was manager of social work and interpreter services at Caritas Holy Family in Methuen, where she also was a field supervisor for

boston college | graduate school of social work |

a number of GSSW students at Caritas. Schirmer took over sue coleman’s former position. Coleman was promoted to assistant director of field education. patricia shuker was hired in January as a communications/staff assistant, splitting her time between the GSSW Admissions Office and Marketing and Communications. Shuker was most recently employed as a faculty support specialist in the Biology Department at Boston College. She is currently enrolled in the College of Advancing Studies. michelle taylor, the GSSW fiscal specialist, moved to Harvard in May as a human resources coordinator in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. rita vatcher, formerly a senior administrative assistant in the Office of the Associate Dean for Finance and Administration at Boston College Law School, became the new GSSW fiscal/administrative specialist in June.

SAVE THE DATE 2008 GSSW ANNUAL ALUMNI DINNER

This annual event is open to all GSSW alumni near and far. It is a wonderful opportunity to network, earn CEUs, support our distinguished award winners, gather with your classmates, and enjoy a nice meal. When: Thursday, April 24, 2008 Location: The Heights Room on Lower Campus Time: CEU presentation at 5:30 p.m. & dinner at 6:30 p.m. Cost: $25 dinner, $5 presentation Consider planning a reunion with members of your class. We would be happy to reserve a table for your group. We hope to see you there. Questions? Contact Patricia Shuker at the GSSW at gsswalumni@bc.edu or 617-552-4020.


D O NO RS

REPORT ON GIVING THANK YOU! Donations have risen again. This means more financial aid for our students and more optimism regarding the strength of the GSSW community. Every gift, large or small, benefits the future of social work. We worked hard to make this list as accurate as possible; if your name or degree is listed incorrectly or omitted, please accept our apologies and let us know so we can make a correction. If you would like to make a gift, visit www.bc.edu/ friends/give. Select “GSSW” if you would like your gift to be designated to the School. Donations made after May 31, 2007 will be acknowledged next fall. If you need to report an error or omission, please call Patricia Shuker at 617-5524095 or email shuker@bc.edu. GSSW GIFTS: JUNE 1, 2005 TO MAY 31, 2006 FIDES GIFT SOCIETY ($1,000–$2,499) † Paul X. Bouzan, MSW ’62 Agnes Cox M. Carson, MSSW ’41 Cassandra M. Costa, MSW ’68 Jean Dunsmuir Donahue, MSW ’61 Elizabeth Dromey Ted S. Gladstone William H. Keough, BSBA ’59 Maureen Quinn McKenzie, BS ’75, MSW ’95 & Peter C. McKenzie, BA ’75 Margaret M. Reiser, MSW ’68, DSW ’93 Ellen Dalton Scannell, MSSW ’42 & William H. Scannell, Jr., BA ’38 Lucy Irene Sherman, BA ’68 & William A. Sherman, BS ’59 Frances Shirley Medical Care Development, Inc Sherman Charitable Fund Rochester Community Fund Verizon Foundation GENERAL GSSW GIFTS Mark S. Abelman, MSP ’79 Jane Malick Alden, MSW ’80 Sarah Alexander, MSW ’93 Ella G. Alfano, MSW ’79 & Louis F. Alfano, BS ’43 William J. Allen, MSP ’71 Carol Freiberg Almasi, MSW ’65 Mary A. Altrui, MSW ’79 James W. Alves, MSW ’80 Amy Amatangelo, MSW ’93 Ilana Amrani-Cohen, PHD ’99 Claudette G. Apicella, MSW ’65 William F. Appicelli, MSW ’70 &

Maryann Reilly Appicelli, BS ’64 Laura B. Archambault, MSW ’82 Peter D. Archey, MSW ’67 Maximo Arias, Jr., MSP ’79 & Dolores May Arias, MSW ’79 Martha Addison Armstrong, MSW ’72 Gretchen B. Arntz, MSW ’82 Karen Aronoff, MSW ’89 Nancy L. Ayotte, MSW ’91 Samuel A. Azza, Esq., MSW ’71 & Marie King, MED ’79, PHD ’86 Douglas G. Babkirk, MSP ’77 Alberta Jean Baccari, MSW ’89 Susan Balder, MSW ’79 Stephanie Nevels Baptist, MSW ’94 John C. Barber, Jr., DL ’94 W. Brian Barr, MSW ’63 Elizabeth Barron, MSW ’72 Christopher A. Bean, BS ’02 John F. Bean, Jr., MSW ’42 † Mary Murphy Bean, MS ’42 Diane A. Bica Bedell, MSW ’78 Kathleen K. Bedula, MSW ’82 Robert N. Belle, MSP ’76 Judith B. Bello, MSSW ’72 Carolyn Bergen, MSW ’94 Linda Rene Bergeron, PHD ’98 Andrew Nelson Berglund, MSW ’96 Horace M. Besecker, Jr., MSW ’60 Zofia Bibeault, MSW ’86 Denise Gearan Bilotta, MSW ’84 Mary Bilotta, MSW ’94 Laura M. Black, MSW ’77 Anne Marmion Blenk, MSW ’83 & Michael G. Blenk William L. Blout, MSW ’75 John M. Bobola &

Mary Bobola, MSW ’94 Eugene W. Boehne, Jr., MSW ’64 Marcia King Boiros, MSW ’69 & George J. Boiros, MSW ’68 Edward A. Bonenfant, MSW ’62 Sara S. Booth, MSW ’79 Mary F. Bordes, MSW ’87 Mary T. Brackett, MSW ’74 Mary Brainerd, PHD ’02 Kenneth J. Branco, MSW ’76, PHD ’86 Lisa Bray-Sinclair, MSW ’83 Patricia M. Broderick, MSW ’59 Marilyn Bronzi, MSW ’90 Roxanna Brophy, MSW ’03 Carol Barr Brown, MSW ’71 Donna R. Brown, MSW ’85 Maureen Kleponis Brown, MSW ’79 Victoria Brown, MSW ’94 Patricia Ann Bruno, MSW ’88 Debra Ehrlich Brush, MSW ’82 Jean Walsh Bryant, AA ’54 & Edward C. Bryant, BA ’50 Julie Buckley, MSW ’01 Patricia Daley Buckley, MSW ’71 Ann K. Bumpus, MSW ’03 Peter H. Bunnell, MSW ’00 Marilyn A. Bunnewith, MSW ’68 Aimee M. Burke Valeras, BA ’01, MSW ’02 Kristin Desimone Burns, MSW ’83 Mary Crudden Byrne, MSW ’55 Peter M. Caesar, MSW ’82 James J. Callahan, Jr., MSW ’59 Jennifer R. Campbell, MSW ’82 Ambrose R. Canty, MSW ’64 Joseph P. Capuchino, BA ’57, MSW ’59 Gerald A. Carmichael, MSW ’80 Rosemary Carney, MSW ’95 Patricia E. Carroll, MSW ’90 Virginia A. Carter, MSW ’77 Matthew G. Caruso, MSW ’84 & Elyse Cotton Caruso, MSW ’84 Anne S. Castelline, MSW ’83 Lisa Catalano, MSW ’05 Phyllis B. Cater, MSP ’79 Mark Daniel Caton, MSW ’93 Ronald John Celio, MSW ’77 Carol A. Chandonnet, MSW ’87 † Paul F. Chantal, MSW ’62 James Stewart Chaplin, MSW ’88 Marcel Charpentier, MSW ’73 Geraldine Chase, MSW ’73 Seana Kelley Chase, MSW ’95 Joan E. Christel, MSW ’00, MBA ’00 Robert D. Clark, MSW ’52 Patricia M. Clifford, MSW ’72 Marylyn Dunlap Colburn, MSW ’84 Anita Lanciaux Collins, MSW ’65 Joseph M. Collins, MSW ’86 † Anna T. Connor, MSSW ’39 Arthur J. Connors, MSW ’56 Clement E. Constantine, MSW ’48 Elizabeth O’Neal Conway, MSW ’88

Mary T. Cook, MSW ’80 Nancy Ryan Cook, MSW ’71 Bruce L. Coopersmith, MSW ’86 Myrna W. Cooperstein, MSW ’66 Wendy Cordeiro, MSW ’94 Joy E. Corey, MSW ’98 Karen Metzger Corliss, MSW ’67 Adelaide Corvelle, MSW ’72 Joseph M. Costa, MSW ’86 Barbara M. Cotter, MSW ’66 E. Carol Cotter, MSW ’59 Maribeth Coughlin, MSW ’77 Myrtle Rivers Crawford, MSW ’57 Leigh A. Cronin, MSW ’94 Lillian Helen Cronin, MSW ’80 Edward Cunningham, MSW ’91 Margaret M. Curran, MSW ’92 Ellen MacIntosh Curri, MSW ’87 Kenneth A. Cwikla, MSW ’67 Thomas M. Dallamora, MSW ’79 Peter Danek, MSW ’70 Gary A. Dauer, MSW ’82 Nancy A. Davis, MSW ’02 Patricia H. Davis, MSW ’80 Marceny Deardorff Bourne, MSW ’95 Margaret M. DeFrancisci, MSW ’91 Luigi A. Del Gaudio, MSW ’72 Carol Hathaway DeLemos, MSW ’61 Donald R. Delery, MSW ’73 Mary Louise Dell’Olio, MSW ’67 Audrey Young DeLoffi, MSW ’74 & Thomas V. DeLoffi Denis G. Demers, MSP ’75 Maurice A. Demers, MSW ’68 Joseph T. Devlin, BA ’45, MSW ’49 Marc A. Dionne, MSW ’05 Peter L. Dionne, MA ’63 & Mary Frances Dionne, MSW ’63 Barbara A. DiRusso, MSW ’69 Gail L. Doherty, MSW ’79 & Paul C. Doherty, MSW ’79 Cecilia A. M. Dohrmann, MSW ’93 Barbara Ryan Dolan, MSW ’51 Ellen R. Dolgin, MSW ’69 Mary Henrietta Domingo, E.H.J., MSW ’96 Alvera E. Donatelle, MSW ’67 Anne F. Donnelly, MSW ’80 † Edward T. Donovan, BS ’63, MSW ’70 Marion Conran Donovan, MSSW ’50 & Francis J. Donovan, BA ’45 William T. Dowling, Jr., MSW ’71 John E. Doyle, MSW ’68 James W. Drisko, DSW ’83 & Marilyn C. Carey, MSW ’78 Angeline R. Duane, MSW ’99 Ellen M. Heffernan Dugan, MSW ’89 Gloria Spaulding Dugan,

MSW ’64 Linda Dunbrack, MSW ’92 Doreen M. Dunton-Brooks, MSW ’87 Mary Ellen Reynolds DuVarney, MSW ’64 Margaret Ann Dwyer, MED ’56, HON ’98 Jacqueline T. Dyer, MSW ’91 James L. Economou, MSW ’91 Kathleen M. Egan, MSW ’85 Richard W. Elliott, MSW ’84 Donald J. Emond, MSW ’62 Patricia Siragusa Engdahl, MSW ’91 Michelle Fagnano, MSW ’83 George E. Fahey, MSW ’67 Patricia Fair, MSW ’89 Robin A. Famighetti, MSW ’80 Maria E. Faria, MSP ’77 Linda K. Feinberg, MSW ’75 Helen Guiney Feleciano, MSW ’48 Eulalie Mcfall Fenhagen, MSW ’77 Cheryl A. Ferguson, MSW ’84 Stacy E. Stickne Ferguson, MSW ’92 Jean M. Ferrovia, MSW ’74 Marianne E. Ferry, MSW ’88 Averil C. Fessenden, MSW ’90 Kathleen Marion Fink, MSP ’78 Elaine Marie Finneral, MSW ’89 Eileen Harris Fiori, MSW ’80 Wayne M. Firstenberg, MSW ’83 Ann McClorey Fisher, MSW ’80 John F. Fitzgerald, MSW ’60 John R. Fitzgerald, Jr., MSW ’69 Andrea C. Flint, MSW ’91 Madeleine L. Flynn, MSSW ’72 & William J. Flynn, Jr., BS ’67, MBA ’72 Jillian D. Foley, BA ’01, MSW ’07 Kathryn E. Foley, MSW ’05 Thomas G. Foley, MSW ’62 Karen Lind Folland, MSSW ’72 Michelle Cote Fontaine, MSW ’82 Carol Senopoulos Forbes, MSW ’74 Daniel F. Forbes, MSW ’85 Gerard M. Forrest, MSW ’90 Loretta Helfrich Fowler, MSW ’47 Carol A. Freedman, MSW ’70 Kenneth L. Freedman, MSW ’76 Rosemarie G. Frydman, MSW ’74 Marie Fuhrman, MSW ’90 Jacqueline M. Gagnon, MSSW ’49 Ellen M. Galligan, MSW ’74 Constance S. Garbutt, MSW ’54 Melinda A. Taranto Garnis, MSW ’81 Lillian Gaskill, MSSW ’45 Laurie A. Gates, MSW ’97 Lynn Gaulin, MSW ’81

† = Deceased

boston college | graduate school of social work | 27


BCGSSW | DONORS |

Marylou P. Gauvin, MSW ’79 Victor A. Giallella, MSW ’77 Ronald J. Giard, MSW ’57 Paul Allen Gilbert, MSW ’89 Jane Gilman, MSW ’92 Margaret A. Goode, MSW ’82 Susan Reynolds Gould, MSW ’88 Francis Grady, MSW ’73 Karen Alix Grant, MSW ’84 Elizabeth Cox Gravelle, MSW ’67 Alice Murray Gruba, MSW ’73 Katherine Guay, MSW ’02 Amy Chin Guen, MSW ’52 Mary Jolene Guerra, MSW ’69 Denise E. Guilbeault, MSW ’80 Jina S. Guimond, MSW ’87 Ann Verdesca Gullion, MSW ’53 Thomas M. Gunning, MSW ’84 Joanne Guthrie, MSW ’97 Michael E. Gutierrez, MSW ’82 Cindy Hackett, MSW ’01 Ginger Montenegro Hadley, MSW ’79 Felicia A. Hagberg, MSW ’85 & Peter K. Hagberg Cyrus Hagge & Patricia H. D. Hagge, MSW ’88 Mary Jo Burns Haggerty, MSW ’76 Sue George Hallowell, MSW ’81 Meredith R. Hamer, MSW ’87 Suki Hanfling, MSW ’73 Judith A. Hanlon, MSSW ’72 Rosemary Harbeson, MSW ’01 Claire Becotte Harrison, MSW ’92 Elizabeth Harrison, MSW ’92 Robert F. X. Hart, BA ’60, MSW ’62 & Alice Noonan Hart, MSW ’62 Sara W. Hartman, MSW ’75 Sharon K. Hays, MSW ’88 Francis J. Helverson, MSW ’63 Paula Henry, MSW ’04 Kristine S. Hersey, MSW ’93 Kristina D. Hevenor, MSW ’91 Eugene P. Hickey, MSW ’71 Diana L. Hilberman, MSP ’76 Mary S. Hockmeyer, MSW ’86 Nicholas D. Holahan, MSW ’04 Ann Bernice Holleran, MSW ’90 Nancy M. Hoover, MSW ’01 Judith A. Houghton, MSW ’80 Thomas E. Houllahan, MSW ’64 Robert C. Hubbell, MSP ’74 Mary Gavin Hull, MSW ’58 Elizabeth Murphy Hunt, MSW ’65 Renee Michele Hunter, MSW ’96 William A. Hunter, MSW ’70 Phyllis N. Hurley Davis, MSW ’50 Robert J. Hurley, MSW ’73 Angela K. Ingriselli, MSW ’05 Jocelyn Irvine, MSW ’05 Charles E. Ivers, MSW ’82 Melissa I. Ives, MSW ’86 Joseph F. Janas, MSW ’79 Sheryl Jaynes-Andrews, PHD ’02 Dorothy Ayers Jeffress, MSW ’96

Theresa E. G. Jeraldi, MSW ’78 Betsy John, MSW ’79 Anna W. Johnson, MSW ’87 Carol Drewiany Johnson, MSW ’75 Richard A. Johnson, MSW ’69 & Sheila Decoteau Johnson, BS ’67 Lois M. Jones, MSW ’92 Ann Maguire Joyce, MSW ’47 Mary L. Kabat, MSW ’76 Leslie M. Kasper, MSW ’91 Nancy K. Kaufman, MSP ’76 Michael E. Kay, MSW ’77 Joan M. Keefe, MSSW ’60 Eileen J. Keegan, MSW ’98 Hannah M. Keevil, MSW ’88 Robert H. Kelley, MSW ’67 Francis J. Kelly, MSW ’58 Pat Murray Kelly, MSW ’60 Martin Edward Kenney, BA ’74, MSW ’78 & Joann Spellman Kenney, BA ’77 Barbara F. Kenworthy, MSW ’79 Maryellen Kernen, MSW ’88 Lynn T. Kerner, MSW ’83 Kathleen Kiernan, MSW ’05 Christopher J. Kilroy, MSW ’95 Mary Coyle King, MSW ’64 Walter C. King, MSW ’89 Carol A. Klein, MSW ’66 Paul M. Kline, MSW ’81, PHD ’90 & Rosemary Kline Theresa Kenny Kline, MSW ’82 Pamela Johnson Kovacs, MSW ’79 Cynthia B. Kramer, MSW ’84 Linda Lee Kreicher, Esq., MSW ’75 Bernita M. Krueger, MSW ’85 Gail Wagner Kuist, MSW ’88 Yayoe Kuramitsu, MSW ’70 Janet D. LaBelle, MSW ’95 Ann M. Laliberte, MSW ’97 Susan Rodrian Lambert, MSW ’70 Martin B. Lane, MSW ’65 & Jacqueline M. Lane, MSW ’65 Robert P. Latkany, BS ’59 Michael Laudati, BA ’96, MSW ’97 Denise M. Lavallee, MSW ’86 Marie A. Lee Timothy Gartland Lena, MSW ’88 Lois Leonard Stock, MSW ’04 † M. Jeannette Levangie, MSW ’61 Bruce E. Levison, MSW ’69 Amy H. Li, MSW ’64 Sharon Kay Badgett Lichten, MSW ’84 Patrice C. Lichtman, MSW ’93 Nance Kulin Liebgott, MSW ’73 Patricia Lindsey, MSW ’04 Amy D. Line, MSW ’04 Mark H. Lipof, MSW ’91 Jean M. Lochiatio, MSW ’81 Mary R. Love, MSW ’48 Meghan Kathleen Lowney, BA ’89 Pauline R. Ludwig, MSW ’90 Betsy L. Lundell, MSW ’83 Cynthia J. Lundquist, MSW ’80

Edith Snyder Lyman, MSW ’04 Katherine M. Lynch, BS ’74 Carolyn D. Lynes, MSW ’96 Patricia B. Macchioni, MSW ’05 Cynthia R. MacDougall, MSW ’76 Donald MacGillivray, MSW ’73 Patricia E. MacKay, MSW ’95 Julie MacKinnon-Magulak, MSW ’74 Elizabeth L. Mackler, MSW ’68 Elizabeth A. MacLeod, MSW ’82 Rita Maco, MSW ’81 John N. MacPhee, MSW ’69 Doris F. MacPherson, MSW ’96 Christine M. MacWade, MSW ’86 Edward P. Madaus, MSW ’75 Anne Marie Magill, MSW ’99 Kathleen Magnant, MSW ’91 Elizabeth A. Maguire, MSW ’48 Elizabeth M. Maguire, MSW ’05 John J. Mahoney, Jr., MSW ’55 Mary T. Mahoney, MSW ’68 Sally Mahoney, MSW ’93 Alberta Maineri, MSW ’02 Francis David Mainville, MS ’93 Sarah B. Mandel, MSW ’61 Ellen Manning, MSW ’67 Margaret L. Marcotte, MSW ’69 Claire E. Markowitz, MSW ’52 Linda M. Marot, MSW ’86 Paul M. Marsh, MSW ’83 John F. Marshall, MSW ’95 Adele Hanna Martz, MSW ’54 Jerry D. Marx, MSW ’84 Frederick G. Masteka, MSW ’82 Marianne Matarazzo, MSW ’76 Carole Anne Mathews, MSW ’83 Laura Matthews, MSW ’01 James Samuel Mattimore, MSW ’94 Katherine L. May, MSW ’74 Helene Caryl Mayer, MSW ’82 & Kenneth E. Virgile Mary-Elizabeth Maynard, MSW ’89 Gabrielle B. Mazza, MSW ’82 Judith A. McAllister, MSW ’66 Anna C. McAuley, MSSW ’61 Margaret Putney McCall, MSW ’59 Alice O’Hara McCarter, MSW ’97 Moira McCarthy, MSW ’91 Philip C. McCartin, Jr., MSW ’83 Susan Maguire McClory, MSW ’65 & Francis J. McClory, BA ’61 Marjorie McDonald-Dowdell, MSW ’89 Amy McFarland, MSW ’91 Maureen Robb McGeehan, MSW ’71 Katherine E. McGillivray, MSW ’62 Brenda G. McGowan, MSW ’66 Mary Ellen Flynn McGowan, MSW ’68 Mary Elizabeth McGrath Durkin, MSW ’82 Dennis McGrath, MSW ’73

Joseph W. McGreal, MSW ’64 Lauren E. McKenna, MSW ’04 Carmen M. McNamara, BS ’63 Eugene P. McNamara, MSW ’65 Ryan McNulty, MSW ’02 William T. McNulty, MSW ’62 Linda D. Meehan, MSW ’81 Terry L. Melanson, MSW ’86 Rosemarie Downing Mello, MSW ’69 Stephany Melton, MSW ’05 Carmen M. Mercer, MSW ’91 Linda K. Mertz, MSW ’90 Dawn C. Metcalf, MSW ’77 Sylvia I. Mignon, MSW ’75 Manja Krieks Miles, MSW ’95 Ann H. Miller, MSW ’83 John Marmelo Mimoso, MSW ’89 Venise Cote Minkowsky, MSW ’90 John E. Molan, MS ’62 Michael P. Monaghan, MSW ’99 Rose M. Mooney, MSW ’68 Deirdre Deborah Moraes, MSW ’89 Debra Lussier Morgan, MSW ’83 & Thomas K. Morgan, Esq., JD ’84 Daniel A. Moriarty, MSW ’76 Delia Morrissey, MSW ’04 Edward F. Morrissey, MSW ’58 Anne E. Moseley-Wiss, MSW ’79 Daniel J. Moynihan, Jr., MSW ’66 Ellen M. Mullane, MSW ’84 Jane Finan Mullin, MSW ’79 Walter Mullin, PHD ’00 & Kathleen P. Mullin Gail S. Murphy, MSW ’86 Gwendolyn H. Murphy, MSW ’63 Jennifer Cowen Murphy, MSW ’94 Kenneth C. Murphy, MSW ’61 Michael J. Murphy, MSW ’61 Paula M. Murphy, MSW ’81 Susan Murphy, MA ’73 Thomas M. Murphy, BS ’50, MSSW ’56 Daniel S. Nakamoto, MSP ’77 Michael A. Nardolillo, MSW ’60 Cathy A. Neidich, MSW ’80 Tema C. Nemtzow, MSW ’86, MBA ’86 Frances J. Newcombe, MSW ’82 Eugene R. Nigro, MSW ’54 Laurence F. Noonan, Jr., MSW ’69 Lorraine Noone, MSW ’48 Barbara Nordstrom, MSW ’93 Anne M. Norman, MSW ’79 Gina A. Nunziato-Smith, MSW ’86 Robert Louis Nutt, MSW ’89 Paul J. Oates, BS ’59 Edward J. O’Connell, Jr., MSW ’67 Noreen F. O’Hear, MSW ’87 John William O’Keefe, & Margaret Farrell O’Keefe, MSW ’73

Phyllis Finnegan O’Keefe, MSW ’81 & Luke F. O’Keefe Rhonda M. Ollquist, MSW ’82 Mark R. Olson, MSW ’69 Eileen O’Meara Gregory R. O’Meara Jennifer M. Orcutt, MSW ’91 Ellen R. Orlen, MSW ’59 Claire O’Toole, MSW ’49 Robert F. Ott, Jr., MSW ’66 & Rosalinda J. Ott Richard F. Papalia, MSW ’62 Jane M. Parker, MSW ’80 Antonie J. Parmenter, MSW ’87 Abby Patterson, MSW ’97 Anne Voss Pearlstein, MSW ’79 Denise Roberge Pepin, MSW ’79 & Frederic Pepin Leslie Pereira, MSW ’92 Shirley T. Perry, MSW ’60 Stacey Peters, MSW ’99 Marilyn Pevear, MSW ’77 Joseph H. Pickering, Jr., MSW ’65 & Theresa Duclos Pickering, MSW ’65 Priscille Cote Piper, MSW ’82 Heather K. George Pistell, MSW ’77 Jeanette Polito, MSW ’51 Robert J. Porta, MSW ’99, MBA ’99 David J. Porter, MSW ’71 Deborah Potee, MSW ’03 Joan Langhorn Power, MSW ’59 Kathleen O’Brien Powers, MSW ’70 & Joseph P. Powers, MA ’81, PHD ’84 Malee Prete, MSW ’98 Carey Baumgarten Price, MSW ’88 Denis P. Pringle, MSW ’95 Laverne Hudson Pritchett, MSW ’49 Janice M. Prochaska, PHD ’98 Mary O’Brien Provencher, BS ’63, MSW ’66 & Paul J. Provencher, MSW ’64 Marianne Pugatch, MSW ’98 Francis J. Quinn, Jr., MSW ’75 & Ruth A. Hensley, MSSW ’72 Sara M. Ramirez, BA ’81, MSW ’84 Kathleen Houlihan Rao, MSP ’74 Nancy Reiche, MSW ’77 Melanie Renaud, MSW ’98 Virginia G. Rice, MSW ’95 Rebekah K. Richardson, MSP ’74 Robert J. Ridick, MSW ’59 Donald P. Riley, MSW ’63 & Priscilla Riley, MSW ’64 Nancy Patton Robb, MSSW ’72 & Martin J. Robb, MSP ’72 Virginia W. Robinson, MSP ’74 † William A. Rodgers, MSW ’53 Dena B. Romero, MSW ’82 Linda Rosa, MSW ’84 Nicole M. Rosa, MSW ’97 Roland L. Rose, MSW ’75 † = Deceased

28

boston college | graduate school of social work |


BCGSSW | DONORS |

Sandra E. Rosenblum, MSW ’76 Mary Jane Rosenfield, MSW ’99 Alice Rotfort, MSW ’92 Colette M. Rowland, MSW ’95 Anne R. Rowley, MSW ’87 Sherry G. Rubin, MSW ’76 Barbara Naglin Ruchames, MSW ’72 Nora Rushford, MSW ’87 Virginia Ryan, MSW ’73 Thomas M. Sadtler, MSW ’77 Susan Saltzburg, PHD ’01 Carmen Meehan Sanders, MSW ’47 Nancy J. Sanders, MSW ’74 Nancy Gould Sandman, MSSW ’72 Linda Ann Saucier, MSW ’83 Nancy Dalsheimer Savage, MSW ’86 Marie C. Savinelli, MSW ’79 Nancy S. Schatzberg, MSW ’75 Ann F. Schwartz, MSW ’01 Jill Jackson Scoglio, MSW ’82 & Paul J. Scoglio, MSW ’83 Douglas B. Scott, MSW ’04, MA ’04 Lynne Davis Scoville, MSW ’96 Kristy Zajac Seagren, MSW ’03 Lisa Sechrest-Ehrhardt, MSW ’84 Nancy S. Segal, MSW ’83 Grace Murray Sexton, MSW ’48 Leticia A. Shands, MSW ’83 Patricia Stafford Shanks, MSW ’83 Karen A. Shaw, MSW ’79 Francis B. Shea, MSW ’53 J. Gregory Shea, MSW ’66 Pamela M. Shea, MSP ’72 Margaret A. Sheehan, MSW ’88 Mary Elizabeth Sheehan, MSW ’98 Philip T. Sheerin, MSW ’65 Richard R. Sherlock, MSW ’71 Catherine Fennelly Sherwood, MSW ’64 Esther Dickinson Shott, MSW ’47 Kathleen H. Shouvlin, MSW ’83 Harry Shulman, MSW ’69 Susan M. Shwom, MSP ’79 Barbara Franconi Smith, MSW ’76 Katharin G. Smith, MSW ’77 Kimberly J. Smith, MSW ’90 Michelle Smith-Packard, MSW ’97 Janet S. Sneath, MSW ’77 Annabelle Chu Snyder, MSW ’93 Michelle M. Sogolow, MSW ’88 Theresa Sweeney Sorota, MSW ’71 Susan Munce Soucy, MSW ’68 Roger P. Souza, MSW ’71 Lenore Spanger, MSW ’85 Robert F. Spaziano, MSW ’69 Gerald C. St. Denis, MSW ’53 Margo W. Steinberg, MSW ’04 Heidi L. Steinert, MSW ’97 Andrea P. Stidsen, MSW ’81 Kathleen Stimson, MSW ’99 Lois Sulahian, MSW ’92 Elizabeth Daulton Sulin, MSW ’88 Denise Sullivan Flaherty,

MSW ’89, MBA ’89 Gary S. Sullivan, MSW ’84 Jacqueline B. Sullivan, MSW ’76 Carol A. Sunde, MSW ’82 Nancy Nichols Sundeen, MSW ’83 Pamela S. Surratt, MSW ’71 Victoria Ann Sutton, MSW ’96 Colleen Cornish Swan, MSW ’93 Louis M. Swan, MSW ’76 Anne S. Sweeney, MSW ’63 Karen L. Swicker, MSW ’81 Katherine Barker Swindell, MSW ’93 Mary Trepanier Sylvia, MSW ’56 Gloria Tambor-Smith, MSW ’69 Lisa M. Tarashuk, MSW ’87 Paul J. Tausek, MSW ’69 James R. Taylor, MSW ’64 Christyn Thompson, MSW ’03 Eugene Thompson, MSW ’73 Jane K. Thompson, MSW ’64 Sheila A. Thornton, MSW ’79 William R. Tietjen, MSW ’72 & Maryilyn Tietjen Therese A. Todd, MSW ’59 James E. Tooley, MSW ’76 Katherine Topper, MSW ’92 Normand Tremblay, MSW ’65 Karen A. Turgeon, MSW ’01 Kelly Turley, ’06, MSW ’02 Mary A. Turvey, MSW ’76 Janet Urman, MSW ’70 Joseph W. Valentine, MSW ’63 Dale L. Van Meter, MSW ’65 Kimberly Veira, MSW ’01 Rosemarie Sacco Verderico, MSW ’69 Eva Victor, MSW ’81 & Steven Lessin Delores S. Vincent, MSW ’97 Katherine Volpe, MSW ’05 Wayne K. Walker, MSW ’69 Margaret M. Wall, MSW ’52 Annabelle Q. Wallace, MSW ’85 Lisa Petra Wallace, MSW ’96 Frank J. Walsh, MSW ’80 Lois Vachon Ward, MSW ’73 Loretta L. Warren-Barnes, MSW ’86 Cynthia S. Wasserman, MSW ’80 Marguerite A. Waterman, MSW ’87 Susan Abbott Weaver, MSW ’77 Clara M. Weeks-Boutilier, MSW ’72 Christine Weitzel, MSW ’97 Roberta Wentworth, MSW ’72 Judith Dio Wentzell, MSW ’85 Elaine Penn Werby, MSW ’66 Genevieve Madison West, MSW ’53 Christine M. Whalen, MSW ’84 Jerome J. Wild, MSW ’62 Norline R. Wild, MSW ’03 & Jason H. Wild, BA ’00 Allison Marie Williams, MSW ’96 Marianne Willett Wilson, MSW ’65 William R. Wilson, MSW ’58 &

Patricia Fay Wilson, MSW ’58 John J. Winchester, Jr., MSW ’65 Nancy D. Winslow, MSW ’95 Sean Withington, MSW ’93 Hans Woicke, MSW ’05 Laura Woods, MSW ’91 Joan O’Sullivan Wright, MSW ’80 Rose M. Wright, MSW ’81 Jill M. Wussler, MSW ’93 Margot V. Youngs, MSW ’80 Donald S. Zall, MSW ’69, PHD ’92 Joanne D. Zannotti, MSW ’68 Marianne C. Zasa, MSW ’70 Katherine A. Zeisler, MSW ’83 Ling Zhang, MSW ’92 Julie H. Zocchi, MSW ’80 Elisabeth Zweig, MSP ’77, MSW ’77, DHL ’02 Clinical Resources, P.A. Fidelity Investments General Electric Company HSBC IBM Corporation Kennametal Foundation K. P. M. G. Foundation North River Counseling, Inc Northwestern Mutual Life United Way of Rhode Island Carol M. Volpe & Louis J. Volpe Foundation

GSSW GIFTS: JUNE 1, 2006 TO MAY 31, 2007 GASSON GIFT SOCIETY ($10,000 +) Estate of Mary L. Dillon, MSSW ’41 FIDES PATRON ($2,500-$4,999) Lynn H. Stahl, MSW ’79 The Stahl Family Foundation, Inc FIDES GIFT SOCIETY ($1,000-$2,499) Agnes Cox M. Carson, MSSW ’41 Cassandra M. Costa, MSW ’68 Jean Dunsmuir Donahue, MSW ’61 Margaret Ann Dwyer, MED ’56, HON ’98 Denis V. Minihane, BS ’59 Margaret M. Reiser, MSW ’68, DSW ’93 Ellen Dalton Scannell, MSSW ’42 & William H. Scannell, Jr., BA ’38 Lucy Irene Sherman, BA ’68 & William A. Sherman, BS ’59 Helen M. Stanton, MSW ’43 Fidelity Charitable Gift Verizon Foundation Carol M. Volpe & Louis J. Volpe Foundation GENERAL GSSW GIFTS Paul A. Abrahamson, BS ’54 Barbara Barron Adler, MED ’68 Merrill B. Adler, MSW ’73

Nadira Iftikhar Ahmad, MSW ’68 Sarah Alexander, MSW ’93 Ella G. Alfano, MSW ’79 & Louis F. Alfano, BS ’43 Patricia Allard, MSW ’03 Jeanne McCarthy Allbee, BS ’61 William J. Allen, MSP ’71 Carol Freiberg Almasi, MSW ’65 Amy Amatangelo, MSW ’93 Jennifer Amaya, MSW ’04 Ilana Amrani-Cohen, PHD ’99 Jeane W. Anastas, MSW ’78 Janice B. Anderson, MSW ’79 & Thomas J. Anderson, MA ’75 William F. Appicelli, MSW ’70 & Maryann Reilly Appicelli, BS ’64 Richard Appleyard, BA ’63 Laura B. Archambault, MSW ’82 Maximo Arias, Jr., MSP ’79 & Dolores May Arias, MSW ’79 Barbara Harmonay Armiento, MED ’75 Douglas G. Babkirk, MSP ’77 Paul F. Bailey, MSW ’62 Gregory Bayse, MSW ’03 Diane A. Bica Bedell, MSW ’78 Kathleen K. Bedula, MSW ’82 Robert N. Belle, MSP ’76 Deborah S. Benjamin, BS ’84 Li W. Bensley, MSW ’01 Nicole F. Bernstein, PHD ’76 Christopher Ellis Berry, MSW ’89 Steven Berube, MSW ’98 Horace M. Besecker, Jr., MSW ’60 Denise Gearan Bilotta, MSW ’84 Mary Bilotta, MSW ’94 Elizabeth R. Bishop, MSW ’76 Rita M. Bleakney, MED ’58 William L. Blout, MSW ’75 Eugene W. Boehne, Jr., MSW ’64 L. Michael Bohigian, BA ’99 Marcia King Boiros, MSW ’69 & George J. Boiros, MSW ’68 Edward A. Bonenfant, MSW ’62 Sara S. Booth, MSW ’79 Patricia D. Boynton, BA ’76 Mary T. Brackett, MSW ’74 Jeanine Brescia, PHD ’81 Patricia M. Broderick, MSW ’59 Roxanna Brophy, MSW ’03 Donna R. Brown, MSW ’85 Maureen Kleponis Brown, MSW ’79 Patricia Ann Bruno, MSW ’88 Edward C. Bryant Julie Buckley, MSW ’01 Leo S. Buckley, BS ’50, MSW ’52 & Pauline Hurley Buckley, MSW ’50 Patricia Daley Buckley, MSW ’71 Kimberly Handel Bulkley, BA ’83 Joseph Burack, MSW ’50 Dianne Lockhart Burke, MSW ’73 Lois A. Burke, BA ’79 Mary Crudden Byrne, MSW ’55 William Joseph Cadigan III, BA ’99 & Noreen Siobhan F.

Cadigan, BA ’99 Adrianne Cady, MSW ’76 Peter M. Caesar, MSW ’82 Joseph Leo Caffrey III, BA ’80 Jacqueline C. Caisse, MSW ’06 Ambrose R. Canty, MSW ’64 Barry J. Capella, MA ’73 Leida Cartagena, MSW ’04 Virginia A. Carter, MSW ’77 Nancy A. Cartier, BA ’83 & Mark P. Cartier, BS ’81 Matthew G. Caruso, MSW ’84 & Elyse Cotton Caruso, MSW ’84 Wendy Bosworth Case, MSW ’74 Kevin M. Casey, MSW ’86 Anne S. Castelline, MSW ’83 Winnie Chan, MSW ’02 Stella A. Chao & Roberto Chao James Stewart Chaplin, MSW ’88 Marcel Charpentier, MSW ’73 Geraldine Chase, MSW ’73 Seana Kelley Chase, MSW ’95 James Ciaccio, BS ’74 Amy Cohan, MSW ’97 Diana S. Cohen, MSW ’87 Anita Lanciaux Collins, MSW ’65 John P. Collins, MA ’58, PHD ’73 Joseph M. Collins, MSW ’86 Clement E. Constantine, MSW ’48 Elizabeth O’Neal Conway, MSW ’88 Mary T. Cook, MSW ’80 Wendy Cordeiro, MSW ’94 Joseph M. Costa, MSW ’86 Barbara M. Cotter, MSW ’66 Myrtle Rivers Crawford, MSW ’57 Tara Maureen Cristalli, BA ’94 Leigh A. Cronin, MSW ’94 Lillian Helen Cronin, MSW ’80 Diane Casey Crowley, MSW ’97 Karen T. Cummings Lilly & Everett A. Lilly, MSW ’70 Margaret M. Curran, MSW ’92 Cindy Bibbo Currier, BA ’78 Kenneth A. Cwikla, MSW ’67 James V. D’Agostino, BA ’60 Noelle M. Daigneault, MSW ’99 Peter Danek, MSW ’70 Stanley A. Dash, BA ’71 Gary A. Dauer, MSW ’82 Nancy A. Davis, MSW ’02 Patricia H. Davis, MSW ’80 Maureen De Ponte, BA ’81 Anthony F. DeDomenico, BS ’54 Margaret M. DeFrancisci, MSW ’91 Eve Erwin Deitch, BA ’81 Kevin P. Delano, BA ’69 Carol Hathaway DeLemos, MSW ’61 Donald R. Delery, MSW ’73 Denis G. Demers, MSP ’75 Maurice A. Demers, MSW ’68 Susan H. Deschenes, BA ’02, MSW ’05 Ronald G. Desnoyers, MSW ’81

† = Deceased

boston college | graduate school of social work |

29


BCGSSW | DONORS |

Joseph T. Devlin, BA ’45, MSW ’49 Barbara E. DiCocco, MSW ’71 Peter L. Dionne, MA ’63 & Mary Frances Dionne, MSW ’63 Gail L. Doherty, MSW ’79 & Paul C. Doherty James N. Doherty, Jr., BA ’91 Alvera E. Donatelle, MSW ’67 Margaret A. Donnelly, MED ’61 Nora M. Donoghue, MSW ’54 Margaret Donovan, MSW ’51 William T. Dowling, Jr., MSW ’71 John E. Doyle, MSW ’68 William J. Doyle, BED ’71 James W. Drisko, DSW ’83 & Marilyn C. Carey, MSW ’78 Susanne Barrett Dudley, BA ’76 Gloria Spaulding Dugan, MSW ’64 Kathleen M. Egan, MSW ’85 Patricia Eklund, MSW ’02 Donald J. Emond, MSW ’62 Deborah Wallace Essig, MSW ’78 Michelle Fagnano, MSW ’83 Robin A. Famighetti, MSW ’80 John F. Farrell, BA ’70 & Jane Emerson Farrell, BS ’70 Kathleen M. Fay, MSSW ’72 Helen Guiney Feleciano, MSW ’48 Cheryl A. Ferguson, MSW ’84 Edouard J. Fernandez, BS ’87 Patricia A. Ferrara & Philip Ferrara, BA ’71 Jean M. Ferrovia, MSW ’74 Averil C. Fessenden, MSW ’90 Timothy J. Fidler, BA ’81 Elaine Marie Finneral, MSW ’89 Wayne M. Firstenberg, MSW ’83 Ann McClorey Fisher, MSW ’80 Sarah M. Fisher, BA ’74 John F. Fitzgerald, MSW ’60 John R. Fitzgerald, Jr., MSW ’69 Irene H. Flaherty, BS ’66 Madeleine L. Flynn, MSSW ’72 & William J. Flynn, Jr., BS ’67, MBA ’72 Thomas G. Foley, MSW ’62 Carol Senopoulos Forbes, MSW ’74 Daniel F. Forbes, MSW ’85 Malcolm W. Foster, Jr., BA ’70 Lesley Frederick, MSW ’01 Carol A. Freedman, MSW ’70 Kenneth L. Freedman, MSW ’76 Jill T. Freese, BA ’83 Ellen M. Galligan, MSW ’74 Francis X. Galligan, MSW ’85 Timothy J. Gauntner, Esq., MSW ’65 Marylou P. Gauvin, MSW ’79 Victor A. Giallella, MSW ’77 Andrea M. Gieryic, MSW ’00 John F. Giglio, BS ’84 & Dawn A. Giglio, BA ’86

Jane Gilman, MSW ’92 Richard L. Glossa, BS ’50 Frederick J. Glynn, MSW ’41 Alberto Godenzi Mary Finn Goggin, MSW ’56 Richard F. Goggin, MSW ’90 Nancy J. Goldberg, MSW ’81 Margaret A. Goode, MSW ’82 Francis Grady, MSW ’73 Elizabeth Cox Gravelle, MSW ’67 Christina Grimes, BA ’97 Katherine Guay, MSW ’02 Amy Chin Guen, MSW ’52 Mary Jolene Guerra, MSW ’69 Francis X. Guilfoyle, MSW ’57 Ann Verdesca Gullion, MSW ’53 Thomas M. Gunning, MSW ’84 Joanne Guthrie, MSW ’97 Leila J. Habib, BS ’74 Felicia A. Hagberg, MSW ’85 & Peter K. Hagberg Cyrus Hagge & Patricia H. D. Hagge, MSW ’88 Mary Jo Burns Haggerty, MSW ’76 Jeremy W. Y. Hall, MSW ’80 Ralph Halpern, MSW ’79 John J. Halvey, BS ’50 Judith A. Hanlon, MSSW ’72 James A. Hardeman, MSW ’73 Linda Harder, BA ’80 Robert F. X. Hart, BA ’60, MSW ’62 & Alice Noonan Hart, MSW ’62 William R. Hart, BS ’54 Sara W. Hartman, MSW ’75 Theresa Hayden, MSW ’94 Jennifer Hayes, MSW ’03 Sharon K. Hays, MSW ’88 Francis J. Helverson, MSW ’63 Paula Henry, MSW ’04 Patricia Hergott, MSW ’98 Kristine S. Hersey, MSW ’93 Eugene P. Hickey, MSW ’71 Diana L. Hilberman, MSP ’76 Mary S. Hockmeyer, MSW ’86 Mary L. Hogan Ann Bernice Holleran, MSW ’90 Nancy M. Hoover, MSW ’01 Judith A. Houghton, MSW ’80 Jodie A. Hubert, MSW ’86 Paul J. Hulsman, MA ’74 † Frances L. Hurley, MSW ’53 Robert J. Hurley, MSW ’73 Anne Kathleen Hutton, BA ’96, MSW ’99 Susan A. Ivie, BA ’81 Ziva V. Izenberg, MSW ’65 Joseph F. Janas, MSW ’79 Marie E. Jennings, MSW ’79 Theresa E. G. Jeraldi, MSW ’78 Carol Drewiany Johnson, MSW ’75 David E. Johnson, BA ’81 & Laurie J. Johnson, BA ’80 Lois M. Jones, MSW ’92 Ann Maguire Joyce, MSW ’47 Leslie M. Kasper, MSW ’91 Lisa R. Kasprzak, BA ’84 Michael E. Kay, MSW ’77 Joan M. Keefe, MSSW ’60 John J. Keegan, MSW ’61 &

Mary G. Keegan, MA ’80 Robert H. Kelley, MSW ’67 Pat Murray Kelly, MSW ’60 William H. Keough, BSBA ’59 Lynda M. Kerdasha, BA ’86 Maryellen Kernen, MSW ’88 Mary O’Toole Kerrigan, MSW ’52 Pauline Keshishian, MSW ’01 Eleanor D. Kilbourn, MSW ’51 Mary Coyle King, MSW ’64 Walter C. King, MSW ’89 William John Kirkpatrick, MSW ’78 Carol A. Klein, MSW ’66 Theresa Kenny Kline, MSW ’82 Pamela Johnson Kovacs, MSW ’79 Cynthia B. Kramer, MSW ’84 Jeannine Kremer, MSW ’95 Bernita M. Krueger, MSW ’85 Elaine Kunigonis, MSW ’91 Susan Rodrian Lambert, MSW ’70 Myrna K. Landay, MSW ’95 Robert P. Latkany, BS ’59 Denise M. Lavallee, MSW ’86 Thomas W. Leavitt, BS ’51 Rita Gonzales Levine, MSW ’76 Bruce E. Levison, MSW ’69 Carolyn T. Lewis, MSW ’70 Thomas C. Lewis, BS ’69 Amy H. Li, MSW ’64 Sharon Kay Badgett Lichten, MSW ’84 Nance Kulin Liebgott, MSW ’73 Everett A. Lilly, MSW ’70 & Karen T. Cummings Lilly Patricia Lindsey, MSW ’04 Bessie Litwack & Hyman Litwack Mary Ellen Loar, MSW ’91 Pauline R. Ludwig, MSW ’90 Betsy L. Lundell, MSW ’83 Lisa R. Luxemberg, MSW ’91 Katherine M. Lynch, BS ’74 Lincoln D. Lynch, DED ’76 Carolyn D. Lynes, MSW ’96 Cynthia R. MacDougall, MSW ’76 Donald MacGillivray, MSW ’73 Patricia E. MacKay, MSW ’95 Elizabeth L. Mackler, MSW ’68 Elizabeth A. MacLeod, MSW ’82 John N. MacPhee, MSW ’69 Colleen M. MacVarish, BA ’86 Anne Marie Magill, MSW ’99 Kathleen Magnant, MSW ’91 Elizabeth A. Maguire, MSW ’48 John J. Mahoney, Jr., MSW ’55 Mary T. Mahoney, MSW ’68 Sally Mahoney, MSW ’93 Liberato Mangione, MSW ’60 David L. Manning, BS ’59 Ellen Manning, MSW ’67 Susan T. Marinaro, MED ’71 Linda M. Marot, MSW ’86 Robert L. Marot, MSW ’60 John F. Marshall, MSW ’95 Beth Westfall Martin,

MED ’89 Sherry Masse, MSW ’01 Carol G. Masshardt, MSW ’82 Frederick G. Masteka, MSW ’82 Carol A. Mastronardi, BA ’76 Laura Matthews, MSW ’01 David W. May, MSW ’99 Helene Caryl Mayer, MSW ’82 & Kenneth E. Virgile Mary-Elizabeth Maynard, MSW ’89 Gabrielle B. Mazza, MSW ’82 Anna C. McAuley, MSSW ’61 Margaret Putney McCall, MSW ’59 Alice O’Hara McCarter, MSW ’97 Carol Lemay McCarter, MSW ’79 & Francis P. McCarter, MSW ’79 Joseph A. McCarthy, BA ’40 Mildred A. McCarthy, MSW ’40 Moira McCarthy, MSW ’91 John W. McClain, MSW ’72 Edward Vincent McDonald, BA ’90 Heather A. McDonald, MSW ’85 Dianne McDonough, MSW ’04 Katherine E. McGillivray, MSW ’62 Brenda G. McGowan, MSW ’66 Mary Ellen Flynn McGowan, MSW ’68 Joseph W. McGreal, MSW ’64 Paul E. McGuinness, MSW ’65 Mary McLaughlin, MSW ’89 Carmen M. McNamara, BS ’63 Linda D. Meehan, MSW ’81 Carmen M. Mercer, MSW ’91 Linda K. Mertz, MSW ’90 Eddy R. Mieses, BS ’88 Sylvia I. Mignon, MSW ’75 Ann H. Miller, MSW ’83 John Marmelo Mimoso, MSW ’89 Venise Cote Minkowsky, MSW ’90 Anthony J. Minnichelli, BS ’51 Michael P. Monaghan, MSW ’99 Susan Zebley Morang, MSW ’76 Sarah Morrill, BA ’88 Edward F. Morrissey, MSW ’58 Anna Y. Moynahan, ’04 MSW Ellen M. Mullane, MSW ’84 Kathleen P. Mullin & Walter Mullin, PHD ’00 Gwendolyn H. Murphy, MSW ’63 Jennifer Cowen Murphy, MSW ’94 Kenneth C. Murphy, MSW ’61 Paul M. Murphy, BSBA ’58 Paula M. Murphy, MSW ’81 Thomas M. Murphy, BS ’50, MSSW ’56 Nancy Elizabeth Myerson, MSW ’78 Paula Beebe Nannicelli, MSW ’74 Michael A. Nardolillo, MSW ’60 Cathy A. Neidich, MSW ’80 Tema C. Nemtzow, MSW ’86, MBA ’86 Janet A. Neuhauser, BA ’91 &

Kenneth S. Neuhauser, BA ’91, MA ’95 Eugene R. Nigro, MSW ’54 James C. Nolan, BA ’55, MSW ’61 Lorraine Noone, MSW ’48 Barbara Nordstrom, MSW ’93 Anne M. Norman, MSW ’79 Gina A. Nunziato-Smith, MSW ’86 Paul J. Oates, BS ’59 Kimberly H. M. O’Brien, MSW ’05 Edward J. O’Connell, Jr., MSW ’67 Mark L. O’Connell, MSW ’68 Noreen F. O’Hear, MSW ’87 Phyllis Finnegan O’Keefe, MSW ’81 & Luke F. O’Keefe Mark R. Olson, MSW ’69 Gregory R. O’Meara Jennifer M. Orcutt, MSW ’91 Ellen R. Orlen, MSW ’59 Rodrigo F. Ortiz Meoz, BS ’03 Claire O’Toole, MSW ’49 Pietrina M. Owen, MSW ’86 Walter J. Pacek, MSW ’52 Richard F. Papalia, MSW ’62 Andrea Parada, MSW ’94 Jane M. Parker, MSW ’80 Pamela Rodman Paro, MSW ’83 Anne Voss Pearlstein, MSW ’79 Julie Pearson, MSW ’92 Shirley T. Perry, MSW ’60 Michael R. Petit, MSW ’70 Marilyn Pevear, MSW ’77 John J. Piekarski, Jr., MSW ’76 Sonia T. Pinnock, MSW ’78 Jeanette Polito, MSW ’51 Robert J. Porta, MSW ’99, MBA ’99 Valerie Marshall Potter, MSW ’68 Joan Langhorn Power, MSW ’59 Kathleen O’Brien Powers, MSW ’70 & Joseph P. Powers, MA ’81, PHD ’84 Denis P. Pringle, MSW ’95 Francis R. Proctor, Jr., BS ’54, MSW ’61 & Janet E. Proctor, MSW ’65 Mary O’Brien Provencher, BS ’63, MSW ’66 & Paul J. Provencher, MSW ’64 Marianne Pugatch, MSW ’98 Jesse Quam, MSW ’05 Francis J. Quinn, Jr., MSW ’75 & Ruth A. Hensley, MSSW ’72 Sara M. Ramirez, BA ’81, MSW ’84 Kathleen Houlihan Rao, MSP ’74 Andre Raoul Ravenelle, MED ’90 Nancy Reiche, MSW ’77 Elizabeth S. Reidy, MSW ’52 Marilyn J. Reynolds, MSW ’88 Anthony F. Ricciardi, MSW ’81 Robert J. Ridick, MSW ’59 Scott S. Ritvo Nancy Patton Robb, MSSW ’72 & † = Deceased

30

boston college | graduate school of social work |


BCGSSW | DONORS |

Martin J. Robb, MSP ’72 Mayra Rodriguez-Howard, MSP ’77 & William C. Howard III, MSW ’76 Dena B. Romero, MSW ’82 Roland L. Rose, MSW ’75 Sandra E. Rosenblum, MSW ’76 Richard C. Roth, MSW ’62 Diana M. Hamilto Rousseau, MSW ’86 Marie Rowe, BS ’86 Colette M. Rowland, MSW ’95 Anne R. Rowley, MSW ’87 Cynthia Noone Rubera, BA ’76 Carole Zubicki Rubin, BS ’84 Sherry G. Rubin, MSW ’76 Barbara Naglin Ruchames, MSW ’72 Mary W. Ruell Marissa Rumasuglia, MSW ’04 Patrick A. Ryan, BA ’97, MBA ’04, MSW ’04 Nancy J. Sanders, MSW ’74 Phyllis Ackerman Sands, MSW ’77 Linda Ann Saucier, MSW ’83 Nancy Dalsheimer Savage, MSW ’86 Mary M. Scanlan, MSW ’56 Ann F. Schwartz, MSW ’01 Jill Jackson Scoglio, MSW ’82 & Paul J. Scoglio, MSW ’83 Lynne Davis Scoville, MSW ’96 Dorothy J. Scrimgeour, MSW ’80 Kristy Zajac Seagren, MSW ’03 Nancy S. Segal, MSW ’83 Paul L. Segal, MSW ’66 John Semenuk, BS ’56 Grace Murray Sexton, MSW ’48 Francis B. Shea, MSW ’53 J. Gregory Shea, MSW ’66 Pamela M. Shea, MSP ’72 Mary Elizabeth Sheehan, MSW ’98 Helen M. Sheerin † Philip T. Sheerin, MSW ’65 Catherine Fennelly Sherwood, MSW ’64 Daniel E. Short, MSP ’71 Esther Dickinson Shott, MSW ’47 Harry Shulman, MSW ’69 Mario L. Simeola, Esq., BS ’54, JD ’59 Kenneth L. Sipe, MSW ’77 Matthew J. Slade, BA ’80 Barbara Franconi Smith, MSW ’76 Katharin G. Smith, MSW ’77 Patricia Collins Smith, MSW ’63 & James F. Smith, MSW ’63, BA ’61 Michelle Smith-Packard, MSW ’97 Janet S. Sneath, MSW ’77 Annabelle Chu Snyder, MSW ’93 Michelle M. Sogolow, MSW ’88 Brenda Miele Sores, MSW ’85 Theresa Sweeney Sorota, MSW ’71 Robert F. Spaziano, MSW ’69 Adeline Hintlian Spivey, MSW ’50

Gerald C. St. Denis, MSW ’53 Margo W. Steinberg, MSW ’04 Alan C. Stewart, MSW ’67 Andrea P. Stidsen, MSW ’81 William Street & Lorraine Hassan-Street Florence Vitale Sullivan, MSW ’59 Katherine M. Sullivan, MED ’53 Pamela S. Surratt, MSW ’71 Victoria Ann Sutton, MSW ’96 Louis M. Swan, MSW ’76 Anne S. Sweeney, MSW ’63 Karen L. Swicker, MSW ’81 Mary Trepanier Sylvia, MSW ’56 Gloria Tambor-Smith, MSW ’69 Paul J. Tausek, MSW ’69 John J. Tennant, BS ’84 Jane K. Thompson, MSW ’64 Crystal E. Thorpe, MSW ’96, MBA ’96 Joann Thrasher, MSW ’76 Mary B. Toland, MSW ’68 James E. Tooley, MSW ’76 Loretta Levins Tracy, MSSW ’72 Normand Tremblay, MSW ’65 Deborah Lynn Trevarrow, MSW ’96 Mary A. Turvey, MSW ’76 Dale L. Van Meter, MSW ’65 Rosemarie Sacco Verderico, MSW ’69 Eva Victor, MSW ’81 & Steven Lessin Delores S. Vincent, MSW ’97 Kenneth E. Virgile & Helene Caryl Mayer, MSW ’82 Wayne K. Walker, MSW ’69 John T. Wall, BS ’59 Annabelle Q. Wallace, MSW ’85 Lisa Petra Wallace, MSW ’96 Frank J. Walsh, MSW ’80 John Coleman Walsh, Esq., MED ’71 Kathleen A. Walsh, BA ’88 Lois Vachon Ward, MSW ’73 Loretta L. Warren-Barnes, MSW ’86 Cynthia S. Wasserman, MSW ’80 Mark C. Watson, BA ’83 & Colleen M. Watson Mary Weatherley, MSW ’75 Sheila Q. Weimer, BA ’91 Christine Weitzel, MSW ’97 Judith Dio Wentzell, MSW ’85 Elaine Penn Werby, MSW ’66 Genevieve Madison West, MSW ’53 Gordon William Wetmore, Jr., MBA ’90 & Rosemarie Wetmore, MSW ’81 Christine M. Whalen, MSW ’84 Francesca V. Wier, BA ’78 & Peter A. Wier Jerome J. Wild, MSW ’62 Norline R. Wild, MSW ’03 & Jason H. Wild, BA ’00

Tracy Wilkes, MSW ’91 & Paul Wilkes Joan N. Willard, MSW ’00 Karen Willwerth, MSW ’98 Marianne Willett Wilson, MSW ’65 William R. Wilson, MSW ’58 & Patricia Fay Wilson, MSW ’58 Hans Woicke, MSW ’05 Jill M. Wussler, MSW ’93

Joanne D. Zannotti, MSW ’68 Katherine A. Zeisler, MSW ’83 Paul A. Zgurzynski, BS ’91 & Karen Slattery Zgurzynski, BS ’91 Ling Zhang, MSW ’92 Elisabeth Zweig, MSP ’77, MSW ’77, DHL ’02 Dun & Bradstreet Corporation Fidelity Investments

General Dynamics Network Systems General Electric Company HSBC Kennametal Foundation Northwestern Mutual Life Residential Funding Corp United Way of Rhode Island Wyeth

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS distinguished alumni awards 2008 Nominate an MSW or Ph.D. alumna/us of the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work for the 2008 Distinguished Social Work Alumni Awards. These awards recognize contributions to the practice of social work made by a BCGSSW alumna/us that include: • • • • • • •

enhancing the profession of social work in the larger community improving social work education enhancing an area of public service supporting practice issues within the profession (clinical and macro) changing or improving social policy helping BCGSSW students and alumni, and/or representing a lifetime of achievement in the profession of social work

The award must go to an alumna/us of the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work (MSW or Ph.D.). Current BCGSSW Alumni Association Board members are not eligible. Nominations can be made by alumni, faculty (past and present), administrators, and current students. Nominations must be completed and received by 5 p.m., February 3, 2008. To nominate, submit a resume of the nominee and include the following: 1. Your name, address, daytime phone, and email. 2. Candidate’s name, address, daytime phone, and email. Please describe the candidate’s outstanding achievements, and include the following information: area of contribution, area of practice, educational history, employment history, personal history, publications, other awards. Nominations can be submitted in three ways:

Email all of the nomination information to gsswalumni@bc.edu. Mail the information to: Boston College Graduate School of Social Work 140 Commonwealth Ave. Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 Attn: Alumni Award Nominations Fax this information to 617-552-2374 Attn: Alumni Award Nominations. You may also download a nomination form at: socialwork.bc.edu/alumni. Questions? Contact the GSSW Alumni Association at gsswalumni@bc.edu or 617-552-4020.

† = Deceased

boston college | graduate school of social work | 31


Non-Profit Org

BCGSSW | M A G A Z I N E | BOSTON COLLEGE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 140 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE MCGUINN HALL RM 118 CHESTNUT HILL, MA 02467

GSSW students explore Tanzania.

US Postage PAID Permit No. 191 Burlington, VT

GSSW Magazine  

Boston College Graduate School of Social Work Magazine 2007

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you