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World War II Aggression In Europe And Asia


Aggression In Europe In The 1930s Gains Of Italy: Invasion of Ethiopia and Africa Weakening of the League Of Nations due to lack of response

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Gains Of Germany: Hitler begins to violate Treaty of Versailles  

Build-up of military (1935) Invasion of Rhineland (1936)

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Germany expands into Europe  

Peacefully takes Austria (March 1938) Hitler demands control of the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia


Hitler’s Aggression In Europe: 1933 - 1939

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Responses To German Aggression: Britain and France allow Germany to violate the Treaty Appeasement - act of compromising to maintain the peace Nations give in to Hitler in hopes of limiting his expansion Munich Conference (Sept. 1938) – Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s “peace in our time”

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Hitler seizes rest of Czech. (March 1939) – appeasement fails


Reasons For British & French Inaction: 

Why would European nations choose to appease Hitler instead of resisting his expansion? QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

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The memory of World War I Unease with the Versailles Treaty Hope for compromise with Germany Fear of Soviet communism

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Appeasement By European Leaders:


Final Steps To War:

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Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact (August 1939) Germany invades Poland (Sept 1, 1939) Britain and France declare war (Sept. 3, 1939) World War II begins

Soviet Foreign Commissor, Vyacheslav Molotov, signs the German-Soviet nonaggression pact. Joachim von Ribbentrop and Josef Stalin stand behind him. Moscow, August 23, 1939. Photo credit: The National Archives and Records Administration

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Major Conflicts In Europe


Reasons For U.S. Inaction: ďƒ˜

Why would the U.S. government not take action against Italian and German aggression? Isolationist attitude Unwillingness to enter another global war Did not believe it affected the U.S. But gradual preparation for war by Roosevelt after elected to third term Peacetime selective service, sale of supplies to Britain, naval support


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Japanese Aggression In The Pacific


U.S. Relations With Japan: Japan controlled Manchuria Attacked China (1937) and invaded Indochina (1941) Roosevelt’s responses: Embargo of iron, steel, and oil to Japan Seized Japanese property Japan saw war with U.S. as inevitable Attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 “a date which will live in infamy” Three days later, Japan’s allies (Germany and Italy) declared war on U.S.

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TIFF (Unc are nee


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Major Conflicts In Asia


Aggression In Europe & Asia