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spring 2015

W I N S T O N U P D ATE T he Winston Center for L eadership and Et hics

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FORMER PRIME MINISTER OF GREECE, G E O R G E PA PA N D R E O U , S P E A K S AT WINSTON CENTER EVENT By Andrew Skaras, The Heights Staff

IN THIS ISSUE

1 Clough Colloquium: Former Prime Minister of Greece, George Papandreou, Speaks About Leading Greece Through the Financial Crisis

Photo by John Gillooly

2 Chamber Lecture Series: Former President of ESPN George Bodenheimer Talks About the Keys to ESPN's Success

Papandreou addresses crowd in Robsham Theater.

Whether it is containing the spread of Ebola or combating economic crises, international organizations could play a critical role in solving society’s greatest difficulties. But instead, they often force countries to face them alone, said George Papandreou, former prime minister of Greece, at the Clough Colloquium on Wednesday, October 8. The son and grandson of two prime ministers, Papandreou drew on his experience of leading Greece through “the center of the financial and economic storm” between

3 Forum on Business Ethics: Former U.S. Congressman Bob Inglis Brings Awareness to Climate Change 3 Lunch with a Leader: State Senator Linda Dorcena Forry 4 Lunch with a Leader: Veteran Investor Bob Davis

2009 and 2011 to provide perspective on global gover­nance, collective responsibility in the face of crisis, and the role of institutions in creating necessary change in a society. “When I took office, I was stunned and angry to discover that we were already sinking. For Greece, it was a moment of truth. For me, it was a critical test of my leader­ship. My option was full transparency—to come clean about the Greek situation. Honesty, no matter how pain­ful, was the only way to show all that we were ready to change.” With financial markets in turmoil, other leaders approached the Greek situation not (Continued on page 5)

4 Lunch with a Leader: State Street CEO Jay Hooley 5 Monetta Edwards joins the Winston Center 5 Winston Center Research Activities 6 Spring Events 6 Jenks Leadership Program Update


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FORMER PRESIDENT OF ESPN GEORGE BODENHEIMER D I S C U S S E S C O R P O R AT E VA L U E S AT C H A M B E R S L E C T U R E S E R I E S

Photo by John Gillooly

By Archer Parquette, The Heights Staff

George Bodenheimer with Bob and Judy Winston.

At the Chambers Lecture on Tuesday, October 28, former president and executive chairman of ESPN George Bodenheimer told audience members that mission, brand, and culture were the keys to ESPN’s success. He opened the dialogue on his approach to business by speaking about the origins of ESPN and highlighting the company’s growth, from broadcasting University of Connecticut games to a small audi­ence in 1979 to the 24-hour sports network it has become today. Bodenheimer pointed to the company’s mission—“To Serve Sports Fans”—as a key part of its growth. “Whether you’re running a company, or whether you’re running this college or any other organization, define your mission and drive it home.” The other facet of the company’s success, he said, was effective brand­ing. “A brand is what comes to mind when you mention a product, a company, or even a person.” To illustrate the importance of building and nurturing a company’s perception through branding, he cited ESPN’s popular “This is Sports Center” ad campaign to project the network as a sports authority with

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personality. “It taught us to have fun and to laugh at ourselves,” he said. “It taught us to take our sports seriously, but not to take ourselves too seriously.” Bodenheimer said the third component of ESPN’s success was company culture, stating that culture is arguably the most important of the three keys. “There’s a lot of things in business that you cannot control, but one that you can control is your culture.” Bodenheimer also expanded on the blue-collar work ethic that he believes makes ESPN such a success—cit­ing the story of “The Little Engine That Could,” he said that an underdog mentality generally makes people work harder and fight for what they have. “In my job as president, I thought of myself as a servant-leader,” Bodenheimer said. Referencing a Vince Lombar­di quote—“Develop a culture that breeds and feeds on success”—he discussed how running a company requires a combined effort, and that it can’t be done without the employees.

“A brand is what comes to mind when you mention a product, a company, or even a person.” – George Bodenheimer


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FORMER U.S. CONGRESSMAN BOB INGLIS D I S C U S S E S C L I M AT E C H A N G E S O L U T I O N S By Laura McLaughlin, The Heights Staff

Photo by John Gillooly

not take seriously because of his political affiliation. When his son urged him to look into the issue, Inglis joined the science committee and went to Ant­arctica where he became convinced of the existence of climate change. He explained the science of his conversion—the proof he saw from the scientists’ samples of ice dating back thou­ sands of years and measurements of the Earth’s CO2 levels that coincide with the Industrial Revolu­tion.

Bob Inglis speaks at the Winston Forum on Business Ethics.

On Tuesday, October 21, the Winston Center’s Forum on Business Ethics, together with the Environmental Studies Program and the College Republicans, invited former Congressman Bob Inglis of South Carolina and founder of the Energy and Enterprise Initiative (E&EI), a public engagement campaign, to speak about

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an economically conservative solution to climate change. He began by speaking about his conversion to believing in climate change and the need to address it. Inglis ad­mitted that he was ignorant about climate change earlier in his career, believing it to be an exaggerated issue that he, as a conservative, should

Following a lost bid for re-election, Inglis launched the E&EI in order to raise awareness about climate change issues and solutions to them. E&EI advocates for a border-adjustable carbon tax and legislation that eliminates fuel subsidies and lowers income taxes. Implementation, he said, would create a 100 percent returnable emissions tax, mean­ing that a new carbon tax would be balanced out by a reduced income tax. This would replace legislation that makes technology that harnesses energy from renewable resources impossible to profit from because of the artificially low cost of fossil fuels.

LUNCH WITH A LEADER: FROM DORCHESTER TO BEACON HILL – LINDA DORCENA FORRY CHRONICLES HER JOURNEY FROM C O M M U N I T Y L E A D E R T O S TAT E S E N AT O R By Nathan McGuire, The Heights Staff

September 16, 2014 – Linda Dorcena Forry ’96, discussed her journey from her parents’ Dorchester home to representing Linda Dorcena Forry more than 160,000 constituents as a state senator. Forry credits her parents, immigrants from Haiti, with instilling in her a desire to help others. She brought her communitycentered values with her to Boston College.

“Even though I was here living on an awesome campus, I was always going back to my community,” Forry said. “The Boys & Girls Club would have a college fair, so we would go down to it. We would bring high school students up here so they could get a feel of what it is like to go on to college and to live on campus.” Forry got her start in politics in 1996 as a legislative aide to former state representative Charlotte Golar Richie. Then in 2005, Forry was sworn in as the Commonwealth’s 12th Suffolk District’s first representative of color, where she served for

eight years before being elected as the state senator for the 1st Suffolk District in a 2013 special election. Forry stressed that good leaders listen to others, find common ground, and compromise on the ideas or policies where they differ. Being immersed in her community throughout her life helped Forry to shape her successful political career. “As you leave BC, please remember that you live in communities with neighbors on the left and right of you, and it’s important to get to know what’s going on along your street and in your neighborhood.”

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LUNCH WITH A LEADER: VETERAN INVESTOR B O B D AV I S TA L K S V E N T U R E C A P I TA L By Mujtaba Syed, The Heights Staff

September 24, 2014 – Bob Davis of Highland Capital Partners recalled the steps that led to his first entrepreneurial venture Bob Davis in 1994, the purchase of the technology called Lycos. Using venture capital funding to purchase the technology, Davis co-founded Lycos, Inc., and worked to build the business into one of the pioneering websites that helped early Internet users search the web. “It was Google before Google existed,” he said. Davis led Lycos to the fastest initial public offering in Nasdaq history, becoming a global media entity before being sold to Spanish telecom giant Telefónica in late 2000, shortly before the Internet bubble burst and market values crashed. Davis stayed on as the CEO of the newly formed

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Terra Lycos post-sale, but left after six months to pursue a career in venture capital at Highland. As an investor, Davis looks for entrepreneurial ventures that have the potential to become big play­ers in multibillion-dollar industries. Market analysis is not his top factor in analyzing an entrepreneur’s pitch, however. “Chemistry is what this is all about,” he said, indicating that a sincere relationship between the entrepreneur and the investor must be at the heart of a solid venture capital investment. Davis closed his talk by emphasizing the abundant opportunities for students and young professionals to differ­entiate themselves and pursue their interests. Offering advice to aspiring entrepreneurs, he noted that while he hardly holds any regrets, one is that he waited a number of years before becoming an entre­preneur. “The time to start a business is when you wake up in the morning and have that passion.”

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W I N S T O N U P D AT E

Editor Richard Keeley Chief Writer Monetta Edwards Contributors Mary Ann Glynn Nathan McGuire Laura McLaughlin Katie O’Connor Archer Parquette Andrew Skaras Mujtaba Syed Photography John Gillooly Christopher Soldt Design Progressive Print Solutions Copy Editing Linda Walsh Please send editorial correspondence to

L U N C H W I T H A L E A D E R : S TAT E S T R E E T C E O TA L K S A B O U T P E R S O N A L G R OW T H AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

winston.center@bc.edu.

By Katie O’Connor, Winston Ambassador

Printed in the U.S.A.

Copyright ©2015 Winston Center for Leadership and Ethics All rights reserved.

October 16, 2014 – Chairman, president, and chief executive officer of State Street Corporation and BC alumnus, Joseph L. “Jay” Joseph L. Hooley Hooley ’79, spoke about the importance of challenging oneself for the pursuit of personal growth. Hooley described the diverse positions he has held within State Street and argued that, as a result of these different roles, he has become a better leader. By pushing him outside his comfort zone, they made him a dynamic and contributing member of the financial services industry. He challenged the students to seek experiences at Boston College that promise personal growth and discovery.

Hooley also expounded on his personal and social responsibilities as an influential corporate leader. He spoke about the need to balance his career with family and to maintain a broad awareness of the needs of the community. More specifically, he recognized the importance of getting involved in the community. His influence in organizations like the Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston and Massachusetts General Hospital speaks to this awareness. Hooley left students with an understanding of his roles and responsibilities at State Street and to the broader community of Boston. His “challenge” for students to become more introspective— and more comfortable with sometimes being uncomfortable outside their safety zone—made a resounding impact on the audience.

Email: winston.center@bc.edu Phone: 617-552-9296

•••••••••••••••• www.bc.edu/leadership

•••••••••••••••• If you would like to make a contribution to help support the Winston Center, please contact Renee LeBlanc DeCesare at 617-552-4400. Website: www.bc.edu/leadership

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G E O R G E PA PA N D R E O U S P E A K S AT W I N S T O N C E N T E R E V E N T … (Continued from page 1)

with support, but with trepidation, afraid of what it might mean for their own countries. Looking for assistance in righting the country’s ship of state, he was told that it was Greece’s respon­sibility to solve its own problems. “The crisis not only revealed the interdependence and flaws of the Eurozone governance structures, but also the close interrelationship of the global economy.”

Working to solve the revenue side of the government’s problem, he cited the “imaginative methods” that his govern­ment employed to collect taxes, like instituting a luxury tax on swimming pools. He also highlighted industries in which Greece was positioned to grow economi­cally, such as tourism, agriculture, wellness services, and renewable energy.

Without European assistance, Papandreou described the country as isolated and facing an unraveling. In trying to resolve the crisis, he found underlying structural issues that inhibited the proper functioning of the institu­tions of governance. The main focus of the troika—the European Union, the International Monetary Fund, and the European Central Bank, was primarily budget cuts and not the necessary changes. To Papandreou, the most difficult and most necessary change was the mindset of Greeks across the nation.

Papandreou’s closing point was that instead of seeking isolation by running away from the problems of the world, countries must face them collectively. In the long run, the goal is to “integrate societies into global communities.”

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WINSTON CENTER RESEARCH ACTIVITIES By Mary Ann Glynn

•••••••••••••••••• PUBLICATIONS Assistant Professor of Management and Organization, Sean Martin published two co-authored papers: “Situational Moral Disengagement: Can the Effects of Self-Interest be Mitigated?” (Journal of Business Ethics, December 2014) and “Blind forces: Ethical infrastructures and moral disengagement in organizations” (Organizational Psychology Review, November 2014). CONFERENCES

“No one is an island,” he said. “We are all in this together. More and more, your problem is mine, and my problem is yours.”

Mary Ann Glynn gave a talk on “Institutions and Individuals: Thoughts on the Relational and Interactional Nature of Institutions” at the September 2014 SCANCOR conference honoring the work of John Meyer of Stanford University. She was also appointed as an Inaugural Affiliated Faculty (Boston) for Stanford University’s SCANCOR.

M O N E T TA E D W A R D S J O I N S T H E W I N S T O N C E N T E R

Mary Ann Glynn delivered the keynote address at the October 2014 Field Configuring Events workshop in Bremen, Germany, and gave a talk at Jacobs University on “The Burden of Leadership: Identity, Institutional Work, and Organizational Integrity.”

Monetta Edwards joined the Winston Center in October as the Assistant Director. In this role, she will be responsible for the Center’s strategic initiatives, including the programmatic schedule, communications, and public relations, and for broadening the Center’s reach across the Boston College campus. She will also serve as the staff advisor for the Jenks Leadership Program.

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Photo by Chris Soldt

Prior to the Winston Center, Edwards was at the university’s Center for Centers where she provided event-planning expertise and support through her role as Manager of Programs & Events to the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, the Institute for Liberal Arts, the Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy, and other designated centers and institutes. She currently serves on the Steering Committee of the Boston College Women’s Collaborative.

AWARDS

Monetta Edwards

Sean Martin and Mike Pratt were awarded a $14,000 Carroll School of Management Catalyst grant to conduct research on leadership development in the top two tiers of leadership in a 40,000-person company. OTHER ACTIVITIES Mary Tripsas, an Organization Science Senior Editor, served as a judge for the finals of the Informs/Organization Science Dissertation Proposal Competition at the annual conference in San Francisco in November 2014.


FIRST CLASS PRESORT U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

BOSTON, MA PERMIT NO. 54465

Fulton Hall 255 140 Commonwealth Avenue Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3808

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SPRING EVENTS

February 25: Clough Colloquium

March 17: Lunch with a Leader

Speaker: Karen Hughes, Former Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, and Counselor to President George W. Bush Location: Gasson Hall Time: 4:00 p.m.

Speaker: John Fish, Suffolk Construction Location: Fulton Honors Library Time: 12:00 p.m. By Invitation Only

Conference: Legally Blind: Law, Ethics, and the Third Reich Location: Heights Room, Corcoran Commons Time: 9:30 a.m.

Speaker: Tina Rosenberg, Pulitzer Prize winning author and New York Times contributor Location: Gasson Hall Time: 7:30 p.m.

April 7: Chambers Lecture Series Speaker: Lara Logan, CBS Location: Heights Room, Corcoran Commons Time: 7:00 p.m.

www.facebook.com/BCWinstonCenter

W E B F E AT U R E S The Winston Center has video available of many past keynote lectures, including speakers from the Clough Colloquium, Chambers Lecture Series, and Winston Forum on Business Ethics. You can find these videos by visiting www.bc.edu/leadership.

J E N K S L E A D E R S H I P P R O G R A M U P D AT E

In September, the students of the Jenks Class of 2015 were the guests of Bob and Judy Winston at their Cape Cod house. During the daylong retreat, Winston talked about servant leadership and the impact of doing something totally unselfish in one’s life. The students also heard from Rev. Leo Shea MM ’60, former Vicar General of the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, who gave a narrative about his life as a missionary dedicated to working in very poor communities around the world. Father Leo imparted a lasting message with students that stressed the importance of being aware and respectful of the culture of the people

Photo by John Gillooly

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@bcwinstoncenter

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK March 31: Brennan Symposium

March 10 & 11: Winston Center Collaboration

THE WINSTON CENTER IS ON TWITTER

Jenks students with Bob Winston at retreat.

they are serving, and how to work within the confines of that culture. Co-directors of the incoming Class of 2016, Siobhan Burke, Catherine Kernan, and Thomas Yorke, led the recruitment and selection of the new class. From a

pool of almost 60 applicants, 24 students representing each of the four schools were selected. The students are poised and ready to embark on this journey, and look forward to developing their leadership skills and working on service projects that will be meaningful and enduring.

Winston Update: Spring 2015  

The Winston Center for Leadership and Ethics, founded in the spring of 2006, was made possible by the generosity of Bob ’60 and Judy Winston...