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May 2010

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine SERVING THE INDUSTRY SINCE 1912

93rd ABMA Annual Convention Coverage ABMA Division Reports Industrial & Maintenance Paint Applicator Broom & Mop

ABMA Speaker Getting The Most Out Of Internet Search Engines

ABMA Suppliers Display Photo Gallery FIMM ITALIA S.p.A. Buys Handles USA


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

May 2010

Broom, Brush & Mop A RANKIN PUBLISHING PUBLICATION

May 2010

FEATURES

Volume 100, Number 5

CALENDAR

ABMA Convention Theme Succeeding In Difficult Times ____________________6

MAY 4 - 6, 2010

Division Meetings Open ABMA 93rd Annual Convention________________________11

MAY 22 - 25, 2010

ABMA Speaker Gives Internet Search Tips ________17 Import/Export Overview________________________19

National Hardware Show, Las Vegas, NV Information: 203-840-5622 National Restaurant Association Annual Show, Chicago, IL Information: 312-853-2525

NOVEMBER 9 - 12, 2010

January Imports & Exports _____________________20

ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Orlando, FL Information: 800-225-4772

Broom Corn Dealer Survey _____________________27

NOVEMBER 18 - 19, 2010

FIMM ITALIA S.p.A. Buys Handles USA____________28

National Broom & Mop Meeting, St. Louis, MO Information: 800-626-7282 or 800-637-7739

ABMA Photo Gallery __________________________29

MARCH 6 - 8, 2011

International Home & Housewares Show, Chicago, IL Information: 847-292-4200

STAFF CO-PUBLISHERS Don Rankin

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Rick Mullen

drankin@consolidated.net

rankinmag@consolidated.net

Linda Rankin

GRAPHIC/PRODUCTION Jennie Grace David Opdyke RECEPTION Sandy Pierce

lrankin@consolidated.net

EDITOR Harrell Kerkhoff rankinmag@consolidated.net

MARCH 23 - 26, 2011 ABMA Annual Convention, Austin, TX Information: 630-631-5217

MAY 9 - 11, 2012 InterBrush, Freiburg, Germany Information: www.inter-brush.com

Rankin Publishing, Inc.

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130 • Arcola, Illinois 61910-0130, USA Phone: (217) 268-4959 • Fax: (217) 268-4815 • Website: www.rankinpublishing.com

ABMA................................................................15 Caddy & Co., Inc., R.E. .....................................10 Carlson Tool ......................................................27 Crystal Lake .........................................................9 Jones Companies ................................Front Cover Line Manufacturing, Inc. ...................................28 Manufacturers Resource ......................................3 Monahan Co., The Thomas .................................5 Mount Joy Wire...................................Back Cover PelRay International.............................................2 Shanghai Aubi Metals Co. .................................35 St. Nick Brush Co. .............................................13

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP (ISSN 0890-2933) is published monthly at 204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130, Arcola, Illinois 61910. Telephone: (217) 268-4959. Subscriptions are $25 in the United States; $35 in Canada and Mexico; all others $110. The $110 foreign subscriptions include first class air mail postage. Arrangements can be made for first class postage for the United States, Canada and Mexico. Single copies of issues are $2 for subscribers; $5 for nonsubscribers, postage extra. The Suppliers Directory issue is $10 per copy. BROOM, BRUSH & MOP is a monthly trade magazine devoted to news of broom, brush and mop manufacturers and allied industries. It was established in 1912 as the Broom & Broom Corn News. It was entered as second class mail matter Feb. 27, 1912, at the U.S. Post Office in Arcola, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Arcola, IL, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: send address changes to P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910.

ASSOCIATIONS AMERICAN BRUSH MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 2111 W. Plum St., Aurora, IL 60506 • (630) 631-5217 AMERICAN HARDWARE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 801 North Plaza Drive, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4977 • (847) 605-1025 FEIBP EUROPEAN BRUSH FEDERATION P.O. Box 90154, 5000 LG Tilburg, The Netherlands • 00 31 13 5944 678 INTERNATIONAL SANITARY SUPPLY ASSOCIATION 7373 N. Lincoln Avenue, Lincolnwood, IL 60646-1799 • (847) 982-0800 INTERNATIONAL HOUSEWARES ASSOCIATION 6400 Shafer Court, Suite 650, Rosemont, IL 60018 • (847) 292-4200


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Arcola Broom Corn Festival Race 2009

JIM

PAT

TIM

We Go The EXTRA MILE! 202 N. Oak • Box 250 Arcola, IL 61910 217-268-4955 • Fax 268-3113 www.thomasmonahan.com


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

May 2010

By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

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ooking forward to a brighter future was a major topic of discussion during the 93rd American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) Annual Convention, which took place March 17-20 at the Omni Champions Gate Resort & Spa in Orlando, FL. With this year’s convention theme, “Succeeding In Difficult Times,” serving as a backdrop, ABMA President Mark Godfrey, of Felton Brush Inc., Londonderry, NH, asked attendees at the ABMA Opening Business Session/President’s Welcome on March 18 if everyone was glad 2009 was behind them. “It was certainly an historical year in terms of the economy and business, and I feel we can look forward to better times,” Godfrey said. “While talking to people (during the first night of the convention) it seems many feel business is starting to pick up. That is encouraging, as business is the engine that drives the economy. Many manufacturers believe that manufacturing drives the economy of any country. We need good and strong manufacturers.” Godfrey added that the events of 2009 helped put many things in proper perspective. This included not only making necessary changes financially for both companies and individuals, but also taking greater stock of what values are truly important in life. This included the act of showing greater compassion and giving more time and effort back to the world. “I think these changes are good and are what this country was founded on. It’s also good to instill (these values) upon our children and the next generation. (These changes) not only help us rebalance our portfolios, but our lives, helping us find where we want to go in the future,” he said. “Our convention theme, ‘Succeeding In Difficult Times,’ is all about succeeding, not just surviving.” Godfrey challenged ABMA convention attendees during the Opening Business Session to think about their real definition of success. Is it just financial, or something more? This year’s ABMA Annual Convention featured many networking and educational opportunities for the brush, mop, broom, roller, squeegee and related industry manufacturers and suppliers as they gathered for four days of meetings, seminars, receptions and recreational activities. Included in this year’s convention was the annual Suppliers Display on March 19. Suppliers from across North America and the world showcased various products while meeting both new and longtime ABMA active manufacturer members.

ABMA President Mark Godfrey, of Felton Brush, presided over the 93rd Annual Convention of ABMA in Orlando, FL, March 17-20.

The convention also featured an important scheduling change from past years. Three well received technical presentations were given during Division Meetings on March 17, the first day of the convention. In the past, these technical presentations were held during the Suppliers Display. This year’s presenters were Ralph Rosenbaum, of Stainless Steel Products, Deer Park, NY, who discussed “Fatigue Life Improvements Of Ground Surfaces By Wire Brushing,” during the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting; Tony Ring, of Fielco Adhesives, Huntingdon Valley, PA, who presented “All Epoxies Are Not The Same,” during the Paint Applicator’s Division meeting; and Jim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Company, Arcola, IL, who talked about “Specie/Material Characteristics Of Wood/Metal Handles” during the Broom & Mop Division meeting. “I would like to thank those who gave these presentations. I think they were great additions to our divisional meetings,” Godfrey said.


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Also during the Opening Business Session, Godfrey introduced Phil Coward, of Hill Brush Inc., of the United Kingdom. Coward spoke as a representative of the European Brushware Federation (FEIBP). “Companies on both sides of the Atlantic have been through difficult times over the past 13 months. And for many, the situation is still difficult,” Coward said. “In Europe, industrial brush manufacturers were the hardest hit last year (2009), with the retail side coming out fairly well. However, the situation seems to have reversed itself somewhat (thus far in 2010) with the industrial side picking up business and the retail side slowing. This is certainly true in the United Kingdom. “It’s uncertain what the economic situation will be like in the future. Many companies have used the recession as an opportunity to streamline their businesses through a reduction in inventory.” Coward also stated that the 52nd FEIBP Congress will take place in Hamburg, Germany, on Sept. 16-18, 2010. Discussed during the Opening Business Session as well was the next InterBrush in Freiburg, Germany, scheduled for May 9-11, 2012. InterBrush, which is held every four years, is an event directed toward those associated with the brush, broom and related industries. It provides access to various suppliers and machinery manufacturers located around the world. Godfrey said InterBrush application forms are expected to become available in October 2010. Several trade partners of ABMA were also recognized during the Opening Business Session. ABMA Welcomes New Members / First-Time Convention Attendees

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everal new ABMA-member companies were recognized during the Opening Business Session. These companies are: Freudenberg Household Products, Elmhurst, IL; New York City Industries for the Blind, Inc., Brooklyn, NY; Fili & Forme SRL, Milano, Italy; A. Richard g.p., Berthierville, Quebec; and Industrial Wood Products, Inc., Burlington, NJ. Several representatives of these companies presented brief descriptions of their individual businesses during the Opening Business Session. They included: ■ Christopher Deane, of Freudenberg Household Products, who explained that the company’s brands include O-Cedar® in the United States, and Vileda® in Mexico, Canada and Europe. The company sells a variety of household cleaning-related products, such as brooms, mops and scrubber sponges, to the retail sector, and has operations in 47 countries; ■ Francois Panfili, of A. Richard, who said the Canadian company will celebrate its 120th anniversary in 2010. “We are a third-generation family business that not only provides prep tools, but also roller covers, paintbrushes and accessories,” Panfili said. He added that A. Richard sells to 12 different countries; ■ Gian Pogliani, of Fili & Forme, who described the Italian company as a provider of synthetic filaments for the brush industry; and, ■ Fred Mirsky, of Industrial Wood Products, who stated the

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The Malish Corporation was named winner of the William A. Cordes Innovation Excellence Award during the ABMA Convention. Jeff Malish, right, accepts the award from Carlos Petzold, Borghi USA, Chair of the Public Relations Committee.

company has been a family owned business-to-business supplier of wood products and parts for 40 years. Others attending their first ABMA Annual Convention were announced. Those introduced: Bernd Stein, Zahoransky AG, Todtnau, Germany; Steve Fraser and Lance Hayward, Harper Brush Works, Fairfield, IA; Mariana Aguayo, PMM, Mexico City, Mexico; Florian Kisling, Hahl Inc., Lexington, SC; David Rodrigues, JAZ USA, Inc., Lincoln, RI; Steve Strongosky, The Sherwin Williams Company, Avon, OH; Bruce Ziegler, CWP Technologies, Cleveland, OH; Bill Fagert and Michael Zimmerman, The Wooster Brush Co., Wooster, OH; Marc Simonneau, Multi Brosses, St. Jules, QU; Joyce Huang, Yo Yuen Metal Wire Co., Lujhu, Taoyuan, Taiwan; and Jim Teeple, Weiler Corporation, Cresco, PA; Also recognized were five past ABMA presidents in attendance: John Lindstrom 1997-1999, Zephyr Mfg. Co., Sedalia, MO; John Cottam 2001-2003, Industrial Brush Corporation, Pomona, CA; Bruce Gale 2003-2005, Michigan Brush Mfg. Co., Inc., Detroit, MI; Kenneth Rakusin 2005-2007, Gordon Brush Mfg., Co., Inc., Commerce, CA; and Immediate Past ABMA President Barry Harper 2007-2009, Harper Brush Works, Fairfield, IA. Committee Reports Presented At Closing Business Session

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arious committee reports highlighted the Closing Business Session held on the final day (March 20) of the ABMA Annual Convention. ABMA Treasurer and Finance Committee Chair Jeff Malish, of The Malish Corporation, Willoughby, OH, reported ABMA remains financially a healthy organization and enjoys a two-year operating budget in reserve. Due to a reduction in membership fees and dues last year, the association did report a


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recent loss. This was mainly from 2009 convention costs. Malish explained that ABMA officials felt it was necessary to give its membership a break with the cost of last year’s dues and fees, especially considering the hard economic times being experienced for many companies in 2009. “We want to work with a balance budget from here on out,” Malish added Also during the Closing Business Session, ABMA Vice President and Convention Committee Chair Ian Moss, of Static Faction, Inc., Salem, MA, thanked Kristin Draper, of Draper Knitting Company, Inc., Canton, MA; ABMA Executive Director David Parr and staff for their efforts regarding the annual ABMA Suppliers Reception, which took place on Friday, March 19. Moss also noted that the 2011 ABMA Annual Convention is scheduled for March 23-26 at the Hyatt Regency Lost Pines, inAustin, TX. Parr added during the Closing Ian Moss Business Session that the location for next year’s annual convention is approximately 25 miles south of Austin. He noted there are plenty of activities available at the resort, including a large aquatic center, golf course, rafting, horseback riding, skeet shooting and paintball. ABMA Membership Committee Chair Daniel Sinykin, of Monterey, Inc., Janesville, WI, reported during the Closing Business Session that ABMA continues a strong effort in seeking new members. “Although the number of members we have today is the same as during last year’s convention, it’s about 85 members short of what (ABMA) had 25 years ago,” Sinykin explained. “We know there have been consolidation and business closures over the years, but we also have an amazing data base of potential new members. There must be 150 to 200 companies in that data base.” He added the ABMA Membership Committee is currently working on reaching out to these companies in an effort to see if they would be interested in becoming part of the association. Daniel Sinykin Sinykin said that any ABMA member is welcome to contact David Parr about becoming part of the association’s Membership Committee. He explained that ABMA does have a contest in place regarding the recruitment of new members. “If you are responsible for a new member joining ABMA, there is a $100 reward given to your company,” Sinykin said. For this past year, Carlos Petzold, of Borghi USA / Bodam International Ltd., Aberdeen, MD, won a reward for bringing in the most new members. Also at the Closing Business Session, ABMA Safety & Standards Committee Co-Chair Gene Huegin, of Pferd Milwaukee Brush, Leominster, MA, spoke of the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) B165.1 standard. This

May 2010

standard establishes requirements for the design, care and use of power-driven brushing tools in order to prevent injuries to users. “Every five years we have to revisit the standard. Over the past months, (David Parr) sent out surveys to our members who, in return, sent back information on their thoughts. The consensus was that the standard should basically remain unchanged,” Huegin said. He also discussed the ABMA Safety Slip Program. These slips are used on products to warn consumers of potential hazards in the design, care and use of power brushes. The Gene Huegin slips are a copyrighted document that includes the ABMA logo, address and Web site. ABMA sells safety slips to various companies that make power brushes and that comply with proper standards. Companies that purchase safety slips through ABMA must also provide a manufacturer’s mark. Safety slip sales provide ABMA dollars that go toward maintaining the ANSI standard. “There has been one slight change (with the safety slips). We have shifted more of the burden toward the users of the products these slips are on. More than just read it, they must now have to comprehend and understand (verbiage of the slips),” Huegin said. Another report was presented by Jill Shinners ABMA Statistical Committee Chair Jill Shinners, of Pioneer Packaging, Inc., Chicopee, MA. The goal of this committee is to help determine what surveys, studies and other activities are helpful to ABMA members while conducting their businesses. The committee also works to encourage membership to participate in various activities in an attempt to add value. The Statistical Committee does not have access to any individual members’ content or figures regarding surveys. Three ABMA surveys are distributed and published on a rotating three-year cycle. They are the Data Collection Survey, the Business Ratio Survey and the Wage and Benefit Survey, the latter of which will be distributed in 2010. Shinners said some changes have been made to certain questions regarding the upcoming Wage and Benefit Survey. “I think they are good changes. It’s an easy survey to fill out and the Andrew Dailey information is beneficial,” she said. ABMA Suppliers Division Chair Andrew Dailey, of Jones Companies, Humboldt, TN, discussed the many benefits of joining and becoming active in ABMA. He also addressed the Suppliers Division’s commitment to


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work with the ABMA Industrial & Maintenance Division in an effort to possibly create a color-coded labeling system for the packaging of nylon filament products. ABMA Public Relations Committee Chair Carlos Petzold also spoke during the Closing Business Session. He said one of the best vehicles for ABMA’s public relation efforts is the association's Web site (www.abma.org). “If you haven’t visited the Web site and enter the members only section, you are missing out on a lot of great information,” Petzold said. Carlos Petzold He added that the main page of the Web site is also very informative and includes a “share” link where visitors can click and find various social networking links such as Facebook and Twitter. Other key features of the Web site include its classified section and the member-provided press release section, which highlights various company events and news. Petzold added that ABMA members also receive information via Brush Up Monthly emails. Another topic presented by Petzold was efforts being made by the ABMA 100th Anniversary Task Force. “In 2017, the association will be 100 years old. Therefore,

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May 2010

the task force has set a budget (objective) of $100,000. It’s a fund-raising budget that we would like to work outside of ABMA, so (the association) does not have to be saddled with this expense. There will be a voluntary fund-raising campaign,” Petzold said. “There are many long-term and generational company members of ABMA that I’m sure would want to contribute toward this fund-raising. It’s easier to defray these costs over a 6-year period, so we want to start the fundraising immediately.” He added that the objective of the 100th Anniversary Task Force is to create something useful for all ABMA members. “We are looking at putting something together showing the association’s entire 100 year history. The idea is to help (members’) businesses and products,” Petzold said. “It’s important to give a good feel of exactly where we have been (as an industry and association) during the past 100 years, and where we are heading in the future.” The Malish Corporation Wins 2010 Innovation Excellence Award

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oward the end of the Closing Business Session, it was announced by Carlos Petzold that ABMA had awarded its Fifth Annual William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award to The Malish Corporation, of Willoughby, OH, for the company’s Diamabrush™ diamond abrasive floor preparation system. Jeff Malish, president of The Malish Corporation, said it is a true honor for his company to be selected as this year’s recipient of the Innovation Excellence Award. “As every year, there are outstanding nominations in the industry. To be selected by your peers makes the award even more special,” Malish said. “The Diamabrush is unique and revolutionary in the way we approached its function, design and construction. From the time of its first introduction, it has been received very well and has performed wonderfully.” The Diamabrush is designed for concrete floor polishing, mastic removal and hardwood floor prep. It’s comprised of four different tools, each to be used on standard low pressure commercial cleanDiamabrush™ ing machines including single discs, walk-behind auto scrubbers and ride-on auto scrubbers. According to the company, Diamabrush™ is designed to rejuvenate concrete and hardwood floors. The William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award recognizes outstanding innovation of manufactured products, components or services in the broom, brush, mop and roller industries. The award is named after William Cordes, who served as the first ABMA president from 1917-1928. The award serves as a constant reminder that all new and exciting endeavors have beginnings that connect with real people. After the Closing Business Session, Stephen G. Salley, Esq., of GenSpring’s Family Enterprise Center, gave a presentation on “Transition and Wealth Strategies for Family Held Business.”


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By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

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issues related to the broom and mop industries. Technical Presentation By Jim Monahan

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trong attendance was reported during three divisional meetings held on March 17, the first day of the 93rd ABMA Annual Convention. Around 40 people attended each meeting to hear about various industry-related topics and technical presentations. The following are highlights from the meetings involving the Broom & Mop, Industrial & Maintenance, and Paint Applicator divisions. BROOM & MOP DIVISION

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art of this year’s Broom & Mop Division meeting centered around current ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standards in place for brooms and wet mops. These are voluntary packaging/marketing standards. Division Chair Jim Nairn, of Harper Brush Works, Fairfield, IA, reported that ABMA continues to support these standards that were written over a period of time. “We worked for a number of years to develop the testing methods that would be accepted by ASTM and by our group. It has (recently) been decided there remains a need by ABMA membership for continuance of these standards,” Nairn said. He also gave a report on the events that took place during the annual National Broom & Mop Meeting, held last November in St. Louis, MO. This group meets yearly to discuss specific

Jim Nairn, Harper Brush Works, is the Division Chair of the Broom & Mop Division.

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ne of the major changes to this year’s ABMA Annual Convention was the addition of technical presentations during three division meetings. In the past, these presentations were given during the ABMA Suppliers Display. Jim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Company, Arcola, IL, presented “Specie / Material Characteristics Of Wood / Metal Handles,” during the Broom & Mop Division meeting. He began by discussing the different types of wood handles. “Wood handles today come from all over the world. Originally, 30 to 40 years ago, they mostly came from the United States. With the decline of the wood industry in this country, however, other areas of the world began to export here for handle production,” he said. This includes Indonesia, which has been an importer of handles for 40 years. “Ramin was the original wood used for handles that came from Indonesia, but has since been outlawed due to environmental concerns and over-cutting. Indonesia, however, is still a supplier of other hardwoods for handles,” Monahan said. “Brazil has probably become our biggest source of wood handles. Tauari hardwood comes out of the vast forest regions of Brazil. From Honduras in Central America, meanwhile, we receive Honduran pine, which is a softer wood.” Monahan said 30 to 40 years ago, just about every handle for brooms, mops and brushes was made from wood. This changed, however, in the 1970s and 1980s as demand for metal handles increased. According to Monahan, it’s important to remember that today’s wood used for handles can come from a scrap recovery process. This wood is part of what is called a “first cut” of a log. The rest of the log is used to make furniture parts, moldings, 2 by 4s, 4 by 8s, etc., which sell for a higher price. In practical application, some of the raw material for handles comes from the entire log being cut into squares to make dowels, and some squares come from scrap. The saw mills try to average their higher costs of cutting the entire log into handles by also using lower cost scrap to make these handles. When demand for wood handles is good, there is often not enough scrap to make enough wood handles to supply the


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Jim Monahan, The Thomas Monahan Co., gave the Technical Presentation on wood and metal handles during the Broom & Mop Division Meeting.

market. Monahan explained that with the advent of metal handles, there are now fewer ups and downs of wood handle supply. He said wood handles are still popular within certain markets such as janitorial/sanitary (jan/san) and industrial brush. Meanwhile, angle brooms, mops and overall stick goods sold in big box stores are prime markets for metal handles. “As we continue the evolution of wood, Brazil now is the major source along with Honduras,” Monahan said. “In Brazil, the government has been trying to control supply by controlling the cutting of trees. There is a very elaborate permit system with two to three large saw mills producing most of the wood handles. These mills own tree rights and have plenty of wood to harvest.” When making a wood handle, Monahan said there is a detailed process that takes place. Wood is dried and then run through dowel machines to make the handle into its rounded form. It is then sanded and can be finished with paint, tapered or whatever else the customer wants. A lot of this latter work is done in the United States. “The situation in Honduras is very similar to Brazil where there are major suppliers in place. Honduran pine handles are mostly supplied to the paint sundry industry as well as industrial and jan/san markets. “Wood is readily available right now. The supply of wood all over the world depends upon the availability of trees, which is good. The wood handle business is a very mature industry,” Monahan explained. Monahan was asked if ramin grown in Southeast Asia will ever become available again for wood handle production. “Ramin will not come back. It’s been outlawed by the Indonesian government. It’s a swamp tree and was our prime wood used for years. It’s a very slow growing tree and has been placed on the endangered species list,” Monahan said. “It’s a beautiful wood, but it’s just not available. It can’t be imported into the United States.” Monahan was also asked about the availability of bamboo as

May 2010

it pertains to wood handles. He explained that bamboo handles were introduced a couple of years ago. Benefits included positive environmental and pricing features. “It’s a laminated handle, where they take the bamboo and strip it into four quarters which is then glued together,” Monahan said. “The problem is that of not having enough available product. It’s a very labor intense operation (to make the handles), which you typically see in China. Three or four years ago bamboo was readily available. Today, however, bamboo is also used in flooring and an explosion of other products. We are not seeing the same level of supply as before.” Although wood is the popular choice for many handles, metal continues to increase in popularity. These handles, Monahan added, are made in high-speed mills that produce approximately 60 to 80 pieces per minute in 4-foot lengths. Raw material used is called slit steel, typically at .014” thickness and rolled into a 400 to 500 pound coil. “Back in the 1980s and 1990s, demand for 48-inch handles became big. These handles remain very available today. There is good capacity in the United States and Italy,” Monahan said. “Historically (metal handles) have been a little cheaper than wood handles.” He added that the cost of metal handles is very dependent on the cost of steel, and that the No. 1 user of steel in the United States is the automotive industry. The steel industry has gone through extensive consolidation over the years. Today, there remains just 3 to 4 major steel making companies compared to 10 to 15 in past years. “The blast furnaces that make steel are huge monsters. They are loaded with iron ore and other by-products including scrap steel. These furnaces can produce approximately 2,000 tons of steel an hour,” Monahan said. “Once a furnace is fired up, it has to keep going. It’s a 24 hour, 7 days a week process.” He added that steel is the No. 1 recycled product in the world. Old cars, appliances and other items containing steel are often recycled for new steel production. “Typical steel mills use 10 percent scrap. They can still do that and meet the technical specifications of their customers such as the auto industry. There are mini-mills that use 100 percent scrap, but they can’t meet some of the specifications found within the auto industry,” Monahan said. “The problem we face in the metal handle industry is that a very fine gauge of steel is used.” He added it costs a mill extra to roll steel at such a fine gauge. Therefore, mills charge a premium for this type of steel used in metal handle production. Another key buyer of fine gauge steel is the canning industry. In summary, Monahan said one big advantage to using metal handles is that they can be made very quickly and meet various specifications. This includes handles that come with a powder or plastic coated finish as well as various end-fitments. “Metal handles comprise approximately 80 percent of the overall handle market in the United States compared to 20 years ago when it was around 20 percent. Wood and metal handles have done a flip flop in this regard,” Monahan said.


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INDUSTRIAL & MAINTENANCE DIVISION

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articipation in ABMA’s upcoming Wage and Benefit Survey was among topics discussed during the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting. Division Chair Mark Fultz, of Abtex Corporation, Dresden, NY, said this survey and other statistical information supplied by the ABMA provide important benchmarking opportunities for member companies. “A lot of us who own small businesses can operate in a bit of a vacuum. The opportunity to benchmark yourself or evaluate some of the performances of your company against other mem-

Officers of the Industrial & Maintenance Division are pictured during the Division meeting. The officers are, from left, Mark Fultz, Abtex Corp., Chair, and Gene Huegin, Pferd Milwaukee Brush, Vice Chair.

bership companies is extremely valuable,” Fultz said. “I encourage those who have the opportunity to participate to do so. I think the information that is provided is valuable.” Three ABMA surveys are distributed and published on a rotating three-year cycle. They are the Wage and Benefit Survey, the Data Collection Survey, and the Business Ratio Survey. A report on safety slips was also presented during the meeting. Division Vice Chair Gene Huegin, of Pferd Milwaukee Brush, Leominster, MA, reported on a small change regarding the wordage of these slips. “The change is somewhat more forceful. Instead of simply saying ‘read,’we now indicate to the recipient of those safety slips that they must read and understand,” Huegin said. “This puts more of the burden on the user to be responsible and adhere to the standards.” The safety slips are used on products to warn consumers of potential hazards in the design, care and use of power brushes. The slips are a copyrighted document that include the ABMA logo, address and Web site. ABMA sells safety slips to various companies that make power brushes and that comply with proper standards. Companies that purchase safety slips through ABMA must also provide a manufacturer’s mark. Safety slip sales provide ABMA dollars that go toward maintaining the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) B165.1 standard that controls power brushes. This standard establishes requirements for power-driven brushing tools in

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order to prevent injuries to users. During the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting, Huegin also reported that a recent review of the ANSI standard made by the ABMA Safety & Standards Committee showed that relatively no changes would be requested regarding this standard. A review must take place every five years. ABMA Executive Director David Parr also spoke during the divisional meeting on this matter. “The standard’s accreditation process is a process of design consensus. The first consensus body to review the standard is the users of the standard, and we (ABMA) have come to an agreement,” Parr said. He added that the next step is a review among other interested parties, such as the United Auto Workers and the Power Tool Institute. “Over the next number of months, (the review process) will circle around a few times until enough consensus is built where everybody says, ‘We like this standard. Let’s go again for the next five years,’” Parr said. He added that the ABMA Safety & Standards Committee serves as a conduit between the consumer/end-user and the ABMA. Parr also discussed ABMA’s expert witness program currently in place where member companies can draw upon a pool of expert witnesses in the instance of product liability issues. “Finding an expert witness can be tough in this industry. This is where ABMA provides membership value that our members may not be able to attain on their own,” Parr said. Another matter discussed during the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting concerned the creation of a color-coded labeling system for the packaging of nylon filament products. This matter was also brought up during the ABMA Suppliers Division meeting. The idea is to provide warehouse and production floor employees within the industry a good way to properly identify particular types of nylon. Three attendees of the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting volunteered to be part of a task force on this matter. They are: Jim Benjamin, of Precision Brush Company, Solon, OH; Paul Miller, of The Mill-Rose Company, Mentor, OH; and Jeff Malish, of The Malish Corporation, Willoughby, OH.


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Technical Presentation By Ralph Rosenbaum

May 2010

and propagation. And lastly, they were able to establish the role of work hardening and residual stress on fatigue crack alph Rosenbaum, of Stainless Steel Products, Deer growth.” He added that an important experiment used by the paper’s Park, NY, presented “Fatigue Life Improvements Of Ground Surfaces By Wire Brushing” during this year’s authors involved 304 stainless steel as a basis for analysis. “They notched a ‘V’ shaped groove into a metal specimen. Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting. This presentation advocated the use of wire brushes for helping to harden pieces of The reason why this method was chosen is because localized metal; and to think outside the box as it relates to new ways cracking issues start at the notched root. Only the notch was products, such as wire brushes, can be used in the marketplace. grounded or brushed and then comparisons were made,” Rosenbaum said his presentation was inspired by a study pub- Rosenbaum said. “The test surfaces were characterized by lished on Dec. 21, 2003, in the Journal of Materials Engineering measuring roughness. Hardening was characterized by microhardness measurements. Residual stresses were evaluated and Performance, through ASM International. “There is no doubt in my mind that if a sales person can under- using X-ray methods. High cycle fatigue tests were carried out using 3-point bend geometry. stand the concepts of this And other effects were measpaper, (he/she) can improve ured including surface finish the sale of wire brushes,” and surface temperature.” Rosenbaum said. “Grinding He said the next part of this of metal surfaces is very comexperiment was to optimize mon in order to achieve brushing conditions. desired geometry. Typical by“They used a few variables products of grinding include to determine which brushing surface burning, material redecondition was optimal. These position, surface and subsurvariables included brush face cracking, mechanical and speed, work speed and the metallurgical transformation, number of passes used. The and surface tensile residual option that was most producstresses.” tive took 12 seconds comRosenbaum noted that typipared to the next best alternacal remedies to minimize the tive which took 14 seconds,” effects of grinding and Ralph Rosenbaum, Stainless Steel Products, made a Technical Presentation on "Improving Fatigue Life of Ground Surfaces by Wire Rosenbaum said. improve compressive residual Brushing" during the Industrial & Maintenance Division Meeting. He then showed a slide that stresses include using finer indicated that surface quality grits, slowing down brush work speeds, using smaller cut depths while grinding, using changes are dramatic when a piece is brushed after the grinding CBN or diamond grits, polishing, shot peening, ball burnishing, process versus grinding without brushing. Surface roughness surface coating and surface nitriding. These remedies, however, declines and results in a 26 percent increase in fatigue life of a product. can be expensive and can reduce productivity. “Basically, wire brushing is relatively inexpensive, is a simple “An alternative is wire brushing. The main benefits are that it’s fast and easy, it’s a low-cost alternative, its very common for process and provides fatigue life improvements on ground suron-line polishing and deburring, it’s good for complex geome- faces. This, in turn, results in fewer potential sites for fatigue tries, and, the focus of this paper, it induces hardening and com- crack initiation,” Rosenbaum said. pressive residual stresses,” Rosenbaum said. PAINT APPLICATOR DIVISION During his technical presentation, Rosenbaum was asked to explain “compressive residual stresses.” n update on the ongoing anti-dumping issue regarding “After grinding a work piece, typically that metal piece may natural bristle paintbrushes from China was discussed get brittle because the molecules have changed due to the during the start of this year’s Paint Applicator Division grinding action,” he said. “Basically, compressive residual stress is a hardening of that work piece. We are changing the meeting. Division Chair Bill Pavilonis, of Paint Sundry Brands, piece from being brittle, relatively speaking, to being hardLLC, Portland, OR, said the next administrative Sunset ened. “In this study, the purpose of the experiments was to Review on this matter will not be funded through the ABMA this measure the fatigue life enhancements on stainless steel year, but is scheduled to take place outside the organization. “Distribution of funds gathered from the Byrd Amendment for ground surfaces using wire brushing. In other words, how much does wire brushing improve the hardening and fatigue 2009 have been dispersed and it appears there will be another life of ground surfaces? The experiments also allowed the distribution from that continuation into this year (2010),” authors to investigate mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation Pavilonis said.

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Pictured during the Paint Applicator Division Meeting are, from left, Chris Tesmer, Shur-Line, Vice Chair; and Bill Pavilonis, Paint Sundry Brands, Sherwin-Williams, Chair.

The Byrd Amendment, otherwise known as the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act (CDSOA), was a law enacted by Congress in 2000 at the request of Sen. Robert Byrd (DWV). The law provided that collected anti-dumping duties be

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distributed to domestic producers, such as specific paintbrush manufacturers, that petitioned the government as long as these producers were still in operation and producing specified products. The Byrd Amendment was challenged over the years by the World Trade Organization (WTO), and there was an increasing amount of political and diplomatic pressure to repeal the amendment, which finally occurred in 2006 with respect to imports on or after Oct. 1, 2007. However, payment of collected anti-dumping duties to affected domestic producers continues. A motion was passed during the division meeting to approve $12,000 to be used to cover 2010 retaining costs for King & Spalding LLP, Washington, D.C., which is ABMA’s legal counsel. King & Spalding monitors activities associated with the Sunset Review and has been working with the Paint Applicator Division on the subject for several years. In another matter, is was announced Michael Zimmerman, of The Wooster Brush Company, Wooster, OH; and Andrew Marsden, of The Sherwin Williams Company, Avon, OH, will serve on an ASTM subcommittee for the Paint Applicator Division. Also during the meeting, Pavilonis recognized and thanked Dennis Humphrey, who has retired from The Wooster Brush Co., for all his years of service in working with ABMA, and specifically for his work with the ASTM subcommittee.


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Technical Presentation By Tony Ring

P

roviding a technical presentation titled “All Epoxies Are Not The Same” during the Paint Applicator Division meeting was Tony Ring, of Fielco Adhesives, Huntingdon Valley, PA. Ring said most people involved with the brush and roller industries are familiar with epoxies since they have been used for years in this field. He added the goal of his presentation was to increase an understanding of epoxies and point more people toward greater process improvements in manufacturing. He explained that the epoxide group, also termed as the oxirane or ethoxyline group, is a three-member ring containing two carbons and one oxygen. Epoxy resin is defined as a molecule containing more than one epoxide group. The most common epoxy resins are diglycidyl ethers produced from a reaction between epichlorohydrin with bisphenol A.

Tony Ring, Fielco Adhesives, made a Technical Presentation on epoxies at the Paint Applicator’s Division Meeting.

According to Ring, the first commercial attempts to prepare resins from epichlorohydrin occurred in 1927 in the United States. Credit for the first synthesis of bisphenol A-based epoxy resins were shared by Dr. Pierre Castan of Switzerland and Dr. S.O. Greenlee of the United States in 1936. Hexion, Dow and Huntsman are now the largest producers of epoxy resins in the United States with many foreign suppliers as well. There are other types of epoxy resins that are based on various alcohol containing compounds which are important to epoxy formulators, Ring said. Epichlorohydrin can react with phenolic-bearing material to create mono-functional diluents, bisphenol-F and novalac resins. These are highly crosslinked systems that are used when high levels of chemical resistance, thermal resistance or strength are needed. However, this is a smaller segment of the market. He added that glycols and alcohols are reacted with epichlorohydrin to create poly-functional and mono-functional diluents and flexibilizers. Another class of epoxies are cycloaliphatic and aliphatic resins. These are non-glycidyl epoxies that are formed by peroxidation of olefinic double bonds. They are used primarily in

May 2010

UV-cured formulations and outdoor applications where sunlight can cause yellowing. These epoxies don’t yellow over time. Ring also discussed curing agents. “Epoxy is a very reactive material. Whenever you have a threemember epoxy ring, it’s very susceptible to various reactions.” In the curing process, the epoxy group reacts with various molecules commonly known as curing agents to form highly cross-linked thermoset polymers. Common curing agents are amines, polyamides, amidoamines, anhydrides, Lewis acids, organic acids, phenols and thiols. “Each of these materials give different properties and different characteristics,” Ring said. Properties of optimally formulated cured epoxy systems are: low shrinkage; high shear and tensile strength; the ability to bond to a large variety of substrates; low level of creep under a sustained load; good thermal resistance; good electrical insulator characteristics; chemical and solvent resistance; stiffness; good gap filling properties; low or no VOCs; wide formulation latitude possible in terms of chemical properties, viscosities and curing rates; and a low cost-to-performance ratio. Ring added there are countless ways epoxy compound properties can be modified by adding various materials, such as: mineral fillers (talc, silica, alumina, etc.); flexibilizers; diluents (functional and external); pigments; thickeners; accelerators; adhesion promoters; impact modifiers; and tougheners. Property modifications can be made to improve performance. Advantages include that of being less rigid and brittle, decreasing cure times and increasing peel strength; improving processing convenience; reducing health hazards; adjusting mix ratios; reducing cure times and temperature for one part systems; and reducing costs. “Epoxy applications are very widespread. There are numerous industrial applications found not only for paint applicators, but also for aerospace, transportation, flooring, countertop production, electronics, and industrial assembly — just to name a few,” Ring said. He added that there are FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved epoxies and curing agents available in the marketplace as well. For example, epoxy adhesives can be formulated for indirect food contact applications such as the assembly of pastry brushes. Ring also emphasized that epoxy adhesives can be formulated to meet the performance requirements of almost any application. The key factor is to have the right epoxy for the application at hand. The formulator must understand the end-use, application methods and performance requirements. With this knowledge, epoxies can be very rigid or flexible; hard or soft; thick or thin; serve as an electrical insulator or conductor; can be cured at room temperature, elevated temperature or with UV light; have fast or slow cure times; become opaque or clear; can be permanent or temporary; and can come in one or two parts. “The list goes on. All epoxies are not the same,” Ring said.


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By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

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t’s no secret that today’s Internet can provide a wealth of information and be beneficial for both individuals and companies alike. Getting the most out of the Internet, however, does provide some challenges. How to successfully navigate through so much information and find important resources from today’s key search engines, such as Google, were answered during the ABMA Educational Institute as part of the 2010 ABMA Annual Convention in Orlando, FL. The event’s speaker, Sam Richter, is author of Take The Cold Out Of Cold Calling and an expert on such topics as online information technologies, personal reputation management, and marketing and leadership development. In front of a large gathering of ABMA members, Richter discussed various ways to use the Internet to find valuable information that will allow business professionals to ultimately find new customers and increase sales. “Within your industry there has been an incredible amount of consolidation take place over the past few years with mergers and acquisitions,” Richter said. “What I want to show is how to better find new prospects and then be able to relate to them. Maybe you have never done business within a particular prospect’s industry before, but there are ways to find out what is important to them in their world, and what is relevant in their lives. Being able to do this will allow you to help solve problems better and faster.” He added that there are standard ways to find out basic information over the Internet about a person or client. Visiting a company Web site is usually a start, but this may not provide the full story. “How do you really understand what the other person’s business issues are? What are the things they care about? What is going on in their industry? Who are their competitors?” Richter asked. “If you don’t know the answers to these questions, then you are ‘winging’ it. The questions we want to answer today are: Can your business be better if you have access to better information? How can you get access to this information in an ethical

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manner? And how can you ethically use that information to your advantage, and more importantly, to the advantage of your prospects and clients? “Sales are all about relationships, and selling is changing when it comes to the Internet. From a consumer prospective, you can buy anything on the Internet. From a business prospective, you can sell any product or service online these days. What has really changed with the Internet, in my opinion, is the Sam Richter traditional role of the sales person and the ability to build one-on-one relationships.” According to Richter, there are many sales training courses that talk about the ability to ask great questions and build relationships. In other words, how to figure out what’s going on in the other person’s world. “The beautiful thing today is the Internet will allow you to answer many of those questions before you even walk through the door. That is how the Internet has rapidly changed the way people can sell,” Richter said. The problem is, he added, more than 90 percent of business information that is free and fully accessible is not easily found through search engines. There are ways, however, to unlock this information by knowing how to properly work search engines such as Google. Unlocking The Mysteries Of Search Engines any of the Internet search engines, such as Google.com, are very well known to today’s Web surfing public. During his presentation, however, Richter showed that there is much more than meets the eye when it comes to successfully navigating a search engine. Richter explained that although he likes to focus on Google, his tips can also work with other search engines as well. “We all realize that when you go to Google and type in some-

M


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thing, you usually find some type of response. However, there are times you can’t find exactly what you want. Or you think you have found exactly what you want, and you click on the link and it says, ‘Page no longer appears.’ This is when you want to kick your notebook across the room,” Richter said. “There is a lot of confusion out there, and thousands of business people have had these same experiences.” He explained that it’s important to understand how search engines really work in order to successfully mine them for important information. “Google, for example, is really nothing more than a big vacuum cleaner. Imagine a big vacuum cleaner going all over the Internet looking for Web pages. When it finds a Web page with words in it, it sucks up those words, goes back to Google headquarters, and throws those words into a big database,” Richter said. “Then, when somebody goes to Google and types in one or more of those words, all Google is doing is listing the Web sites that have those words in them.” The problem is, if a person types in a common word, such as “brush,” the user can be overwhelmed by the number ofWeb site offerings which appear. Richter said it’s essential to provide good information to a search engine in order to receive good information in return. Some “tips of the trade” that Richter provided to get the most out of a search engine, such as Google, are as follows:

■ THE USE OF THE MINUS SIGN (-) OR (NOT) — “Using the minus sign (or not) actually allows a person to remove search results that are not wanted,” Richter said. For example, if a school girl is assigned to write a report on the Vikings who lived in Norway 500 years ago, and types in the word “Vikings” on a search engine, that child will receive hundreds of sites about the Minnesota Vikings of the NFL. “This child doesn’t want to know about football, so she could type in lots of words such as ‘Vikings from Norway with swords,’” Richter said. “But if she simply types in ‘Vikings football’ she can greatly remove many sites that reference the football team. This is a tip a lot of people don’t use.”

■ USING “QUOTATION MARKS” — Richter said when searching for a phrase, use quote marks to treat the phrase as a single entity. Always use proper nouns. “Quotation marks are important when doing business searching. They actually tell the search engine that the words within the quotation marks must be in that exact order every single time,” he said. “Any time you are searching for a proper noun such as the name of a company, name of a person or even a phrase, this can greatly cut down on the number of results that are not wanted.”

■ THE USE OF A SEARCH ENGINE’S “ADVANCED” LINK/BUTTON — “Most of us look at a search engine’s ‘Advanced’ link and we think, ‘Oh, that can’t possibly be for me. That must be for a librarian or scientist,’” Richter said. “When Google built its search engine, it didn’t think like the rest of us. If we were building Google, we would call the ‘Advance’ link something like ‘Easy Search’ or ‘Simple Search’ or ‘Searching for Business Executives.’”

May 2010

He noted that using an advance search allows the person to greatly limit the Web pages that come up. It helps provide a more focused and limited search on specific topics.

■ USING GOOGLE’S “CACHED LINK” TO FIND WHAT A WEB PAGE USED TO LOOK LIKE — One problem people have when using a search engine is that sometimes pages can no longer be found. There are ways, however, to “find” that page after all. “Any time you get ‘Page Can No Longer Be Found’ what you need to look for is a little link called ‘cached.’ Again, if we were putting together a search engine, we would not call this ‘cached,’ we would call it ‘Polaroid Picture,’” Richter said. “Think of it this way, on top of the Google vacuum cleaner going all over the Internet is a Polaroid camera. Anytime it finds a Web site, it not only sucks up those words, it also takes a picture of that Web site and stores the picture back at Google headquarters. “If you do the right search in Google, information you are looking for will still appear even though the Web page is no longer there. The good news is, Google took a picture of what that Web site used to look like.” He added the “cached” link will highlight the words the user wanted to look up. Therefore, the person does not have to read a bunch of copy he/she is not interested in.

■ USING AN ASTERISK WHEN YOU CAN’T REMEMBER (FOR EXAMPLE: “VICE PRESIDENT OF *”) — “This helps when you can’t remember a person’s name, job title, etc.,” Richter said. “Knowing how to do this kind of search can be a huge time saver when looking for information that is missing. “If something you are looking for has not shown up in the first 10 listings you see on a page, then put in different words. I very rarely go to the second page of a Google listing.”

■ FINDING AN E-MAIL ADDRESS USING “*@XXX.COM” — Richter said when searching for an e-mail address, replace “xxx” with the Web site address of a specific company and surround the query with quotation marks. “Once you know what a company’s Web site address is, you can usually find the e-mail address you are looking for,” according to Richter.

■ CLICK “SHOW OPTIONS” ON THE GOOGLE RESULTS PAGE TO SORT RESULTS — By doing this, the user can find the latest in up-to-date news and visit the timeline feature for historical information on a company. Richter said by using the “Show Options” feature, a person can better relate to a client’s business in a positive sense. “The Internet has completely changed the way the traditional sales person does his/her job. In the old days, you had Continued On Page 25


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January Import/Export Figures Show Some Increases By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor Trade data released by the U.S. government indicated that in January 2010 raw material imports were up in one of the two categories outlined in this issue of Broom, Brush & Mop compared to January 2009, other than metal handles. Figures for metal handles prior to March 2009 are not available for comparison. Import totals for January 2010 were up in two of the three finished goods categories outlined from January 2009. RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS Broom And Mop Handles The import total of broom and mop handles during January 2010 was 1.3 million, down about 50 percent from 2.6 million broom and mop handles imported in January 2009. Brazil exported 518,395 broom and mop handles to the United States in January 2010, while Honduras sent 410,908. The average price per handle for January 2010 was 72 cents, down about 5 percent from 76 cents for January 2009. The average price per handle for December 2009 was 58 cents, and 68 cents for all of 2009. Brush Backs January 2010 imports of brush backs totaled 572,620, up about 466 percent from the January 2009 total of 101,236 brush backs. The Unites States imported 229,290 brush backs from China, and 174,655 from Canada during January 2010. The average price per brush back was 52 cents during January 2010, down about 19 percent from the average price for January 2009 of 64 cents. The average price per brush back in December 2009 was 51 cents. The average for all of 2009 was 44 cents. Metal Handles The import total of metal handles during January 2010 was 3 million, up from the December 2009 total of 1.5 million. The United States imported 1.7 million metal handles from Italy and 758,006 million from China during January 2010. The average price per handle for January 2010 was 50 cents, down from the previous month’s average price of 54 cents. The average price from March 2009 to the end of the year was 62 cents. FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At More Than 96 Cents The United States imported 651,439 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during January 2010, compared to 605,909 in January 2009, an increase of about 8 percent. Mexico shipped 637,711 brooms to the United States in January 2010. The average price per broom for January 2010 was $2.53, up about 12 percent from $2.25 for January 2009. The average price for December 2009 was $2.37. The average price for 2009 was $2.44. Toothbrushes The United States imported 67.4 million toothbrushes in January 2010, up slightly from 67.1 million imported in January 2009.

In January 2010, China shipped 41.7 million toothbrushes to the United States, while Switzerland sent 12.3 million. The average price per toothbrush for January 2010 was 17 cents, down about 23 percent from the average price for January 2009 of 22 cents. The December 2009 average price per toothbrush was 24 cents. The average price for all of 2009 was 22 cents. Paintbrushes U.S. companies imported 16.5 million paintbrushes during January 2010, down about 6 percent from 17.5 million brushes imported during January 2009. In January 2010, China shipped 14.1 million paintbrushes to the United States, while Indonesia shipped 2.2 million. The average price per paintbrush for January 2010 was 28 cents, down about 26 percent from the January 2009 average price of 38 cents. The average price for December 2009 was 25 cents. The average price for all of 2009 was 30 cents. EXPORTS U.S. export totals for January 2010 were up in two of the three categories outlined, compared to January 2009, according to government trade data. Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials The United States exported 9,211 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during January 2010, up about 149 percent from the January 2009 total of 3,706 dozen. Canada imported 1,408 dozen brooms and brushes from the United States in January 2010, while Mexico imported 1,172 dozen. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $45.10 in January 2010, compared to $40.27 for January 2009, an increase of about 12 percent. The average price for December 2009 was $31 per dozen. The average price per dozen for all of 2009 was $30.06. Toothbrushes During January 2010, the United States exported 7.4 million toothbrushes, down about 32 percent from the total recorded in January 2009 of 10.9 million. In January 2010, Canada imported 2.9 million toothbrushes from the United States, while Mexico imported 2.1 million and Argentina received 535,284. The average price per toothbrush for January 2010 was 70 cents, up about 27 percent from the January 2009 average price of 55 cents. The average price for December 2009 was 88 cents, and the average price for all of 2009 was 77 cents. Paintbrushes The export total of paintbrushes during January 2010 was 91,365, up about 73 percent from 52,956 paintbrush exports recorded for January 2009. During January 2010, Canada imported 27,649 paintbrushes from the United States, while The Netherlands received 20,576. The average price per paintbrush for January 2010 was $17.75, up about 11 percent from $16.03 for January 2009. The average price for December 2009 was $15.38. The average price for all of 2009 was $15.66.


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EXPORTS January Exports By Country

Foreign Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles Year To Date January Country Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Canada 2 3,861 2 3,861 Hondura 4 15,092 4 15,092 Austral 4 19,167 4 19,167 TOTAL 10 38,120 10 38,120 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles January Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 87 6,604 87 6,604 TOTAL 87 6,604 87 6,604 9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,240,457 788,894 1,240,457 788,894 Mexico 35,461 59,402 35,461 59,402 C Rica 5,184 4,267 5,184 4,267 U King 497 5,089 497 5,089 Fr Germ 1,000 4,019 1,000 4,019 Singapr 9,565 14,105 9,565 14,105 Hg Kong 6,336 3,546 6,336 3,546 Taiwan 16,200 8,410 16,200 8,410 Austral 19,296 9,377 19,296 9,377 TOTAL 1,333,996 897,109 1,333,996 897,109 9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Value Net Q/No. Country 80,256 99,851 80,256 99,851 Canada Mexico 33,790 55,791 33,790 55,791 Ecuador 6,480 9,541 6,480 9,541 U King 860 7,867 860 7,867 Fr Germ 1,569 26,455 1,569 26,455 17,261 17,261 1,888 1,888 Italy Phil R 4,752 10,246 4,752 10,246 TOTAL 129,595 227,012 129,595 227,012 9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar Brushes for the Application of Cosmetics January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 343,560 1,224,735 343,560 1,224,735 101,730 36,272 101,730 36,272 Mexico Trinid 3,185 11,751 3,185 11,751 Brazil 56,829 84,295 56,829 84,295 U King 25,036 92,373 25,036 92,373 Belgium 16,408 60,541 16,408 60,541 30,238 8,195 30,238 8,195 France Fr Germ 15,606 30,796 15,606 30,796 2,907 1,846 2,907 1,846 Czech 9,612 35,462 9,612 35,462 Switzld Poland 1,872 11,189 1,872 11,189 111,905 37,072 111,905 37,072 Russia Ukraine 9,360 30,135 9,360 30,135 Kazakhs 4,740 10,572 4,740 10,572 1,440 6,211 6,211 1,440 Spain 44,776 12,135 44,776 12,135 Italy

Greece Arab Em Singapr China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral Rep Saf TOTAL

May 2010 2,220 1,904 925 4,089 8,317 3,277 845 8,411 15,093 1,998 630,247

4,797 7,408 3,413 15,090 28,174 12,094 3,118 43,922 57,297 7,373 2,072,302

2,220 1,904 925 4,089 8,317 3,277 845 8,411 15,093 1,998 630,247

4,797 7,408 3,413 15,090 28,174 12,094 3,118 43,922 57,297 7,373 2,072,302

Country Canada Mexico Hg Kong TOTAL

9603402000 Paint Rollers January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 30,207 45,184 30,207 33,777 43,160 33,777 157 2,764 157 64,141 91,108 64,141

Value 45,184 43,160 2,764 91,108

Country Mexico TOTAL

9603404020 Paint Pads January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 9,469 67,215 9,469 9,469 67,215 9,469

Value 67,215 67,215

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 3,403 28,036 3,403 28,036 Mexico 295 10,448 295 10,448 TOTAL 3,698 38,484 3,698 38,484 9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts For Broom or Brush Making, NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 51,868 509,699 51,868 509,699 Mexico 5,427 88,006 5,427 88,006 C Rica 826 13,392 826 13,392 Panama 261 4,240 261 4,240 6,742 966 6,742 966 Chile Finland 542 8,791 542 8,791 Denmark 305 4,944 305 4,944 3,032 129 3,032 129 U King Ireland 387 6,282 387 6,282 France 1,048 17,000 1,048 17,000 5,161 318 5,161 Fr Germ 318 Russia 82 8,844 82 8,844 Spain 482 7,815 482 7,815 Austral 600 8,115 600 8,115 6,047 107 6,047 107 Rep Saf TOTAL 63,348 698,110 63,348 698,110

Domestic Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles January Year To Date Value Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Country Mexico 1 4,380 1 4,380 TOTAL 1 4,380 1 4,380 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles January Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/Dozen Value Canada 1,408 89,959 1,408 89,959 1,172 44,553 44,553 1,172 Mexico Belize 66 5,056 66 5,056


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May 2010 C Rica Bahamas Brazil U King France Portugl S Arab Singapr Kor Rep Japan TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Salvadr Hondura C Rica Panama Bermuda Jamaica Dom Rep N Antil Venez Chile Brazil Paragua Argent U King Nethlds France Fr Germ Russia Italy S Arab India Thailnd Vietnam Singapr China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 179 724 547 1,116 1,738 14 1,652 422 83 90 9,211

3,275 29,418 19,506 61,060 71,280 7,108 62,169 13,906 4,770 3,330 415,390

179 724 547 1,116 1,738 14 1,652 422 83 90 9,211

3,275 29,418 19,506 61,060 71,280 7,108 62,169 13,906 4,770 3,330 415,390

9603210000 Toothbrushes January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 2,916,277 1,681,109 2,916,277 2,092,052 735,763 2,092,052 3,456 2,845 3,456 14,140 28,425 14,140 11,232 10,146 11,232 6,912 5,690 6,912 3,456 2,845 3,456 270 3,507 270 8,880 2,620 8,880 36,288 8,770 36,288 620 5,528 620 186,588 86,378 186,588 45,144 18,242 45,144 17,820 9,266 17,820 693 3,618 693 535,284 89,856 535,284 27,294 184,100 27,294 31,939 305,776 31,939 7,500 4,650 7,500 271,412 783,660 271,412 1,344 9,295 1,344 1,470 8,467 1,470 7,412 14,155 7,412 31,680 60,095 31,680 81,192 11,013 81,192 250,000 37,500 250,000 32,424 22,830 32,424 123,199 221,259 123,199 212,384 119,425 212,384 256,996 124,138 256,996 29,424 18,508 29,424 381,659 80,897 80,897 56,571 147,841 56,571 7,382,250 5,148,979 7,382,250

Value 1,681,109 735,763 2,845 28,425 10,146 5,690 2,845 3,507 2,620 8,770 5,528 86,378 18,242 9,266 3,618 89,856 184,100 305,776 4,650 783,660 9,295 8,467 14,155 60,095 11,013 37,500 22,830 221,259 119,425 124,138 18,508 381,659 147,841 5,148,979

9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use on the Person January Year To Date Value Net Q./No. Value Net Q/No. Country Canada 292,836 239,696 292,836 239,696 Mexico 506,167 224,000 506,167 224,000 5,812 36 5,812 36 Peru Chile 2,508 12,790 2,508 12,790 Argent 1,819 16,633 1,819 16,633 100 3,200 100 3,200 Sweden Norway 24 3,702 24 3,702 U King 19,411 103,532 19,411 103,532 Nethlds 1,990 4,268 1,990 4,268 France 2,599 11,171 2,599 11,171 Fr Germ 12,760 32,635 12,760 32,635 3,085 15 3,085 15 Czech Poland 1,875 17,150 1,875 17,150 Italy 4,285 43,538 4,285 43,538 9,900 1,083 9,900 1,083 Arab Em Thailnd 2,544 23,269 2,544 23,269 2,790 305 2,790 305 Singapr China 830 7,590 830 7,590 575 5,254 575 5,254 Kor Rep

Hg Kong Japan Gabon Rep Saf TOTAL

PAGE 21 9,230 3,345 551 547 865,435

84,413 46,509 5,040 5,000 910,977

9,230 3,345 551 547 865,435

84,413 46,509 5,040 5,000 910,977

9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar Brushes for the Application of Cosmetics January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 392,415 914,764 392,415 914,764 Mexico 30,267 100,499 30,267 100,499 Jamaica 1,266 4,672 1,266 4,672 Trinid 106 4,058 106 4,058 Colomb 2,458 9,068 2,458 9,068 Chile 960 5,400 960 5,400 Sweden 5,371 19,817 5,371 19,817 Norway 15,040 81,891 15,040 81,891 Finland 729 2,690 729 2,690 41,958 180,792 41,958 180,792 U King 2,943 10,859 2,943 10,859 Nethlds Belgium 8,148 30,061 8,148 30,061 8,697 37,188 8,697 37,188 France Fr Germ 5,543 20,453 5,543 20,453 Estonia 633 9,600 633 9,600 Poland 6,498 23,977 6,498 23,977 Italy 5,484 22,901 5,484 22,901 Turkey 692 2,552 692 2,552 Singapr 3,510 12,952 3,510 12,952 China 1,331 4,912 1,331 4,912 Hg Kong 135,075 261,471 135,075 261,471 Japan 695 2,566 695 2,566 Austral 5,394 19,901 5,394 19,901 Tnzania 4,605 46,000 4,605 46,000 Rep Saf 1,502 5,542 1,502 5,542 TOTAL 681,320 1,834,586 681,320 1,834,586

Country Canada Mexico C Rica Bermuda Jamaica Dom Rep Aruba Colomb Chile Argent U King Nethlds France Switzld S Arab Singapr China Hg Kong Austral TOTAL

9603402000 Paint Rollers January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 234,240 707,435 234,240 39,215 81,302 39,215 759 17,776 759 1,364 23,940 1,364 800 6,200 800 1,866 18,000 1,866 38,279 2,181 2,181 183 3,209 183 8,250 8,745 8,250 40 2,830 40 1,000 8,300 1,000 151 2,650 151 220 3,861 220 1,600 7,040 1,600 21,058 25,645 21,058 242 4,250 242 670 6,419 670 49,389 34,222 49,389 585 10,269 585 363,813 1,010,372 363,813

Value 707,435 81,302 17,776 23,940 6,200 18,000 38,279 3,209 8,745 2,830 8,300 2,650 3,861 7,040 25,645 4,250 6,419 34,222 10,269 1,010,372

Country Mexico Peru Kor Rep Austral TOTAL

9603404020 Paint Pads January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 18,168 48,010 18,168 2,898 26,850 2,898 644 4,569 644 1,253 8,896 1,253 22,963 88,325 22,963

Value 48,010 26,850 4,569 8,896 88,325

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) Year To Date January


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PAGE 22 Country Canada Salvadr Hondura C Rica Panama Bermuda Bahamas Cayman Antigua S Lucia Trinid N Antil Aruba Colomb Brazil Argent Sweden Denmark U King Nethlds France Fr Germ Poland Israel Arab Em Vietnam Malaysa Singapr China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral Moroc TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP Net Q/No. 27,649 822 1,183 1,721 3,541 2,065 985 614 382 235 993 124 469 920 3,847 1,108 1,040 3,227 8,970 20,576 947 1,350 40 167 1,000 1,326 1,377 595 500 445 1,435 1,100 429 213 91,395

Value 395,543 17,056 23,353 53,111 77,508 20,879 23,522 12,737 11,996 6,522 8,715 9,082 9,733 13,125 78,101 9,420 15,600 17,989 213,244 426,790 23,982 23,814 5,770 3,462 9,500 27,512 9,100 12,340 7,500 9,232 16,502 9,676 15,402 4,415 1,622,233

Net Q/No. 27,649 822 1,183 1,721 3,541 2,065 985 614 382 235 993 124 469 920 3,847 1,108 1,040 3,227 8,970 20,576 947 1,350 40 167 1,000 1,326 1,377 595 500 445 1,435 1,100 429 213 91,395

Value 395,543 17,056 23,353 53,111 77,508 20,879 23,522 12,737 11,996 6,522 8,715 9,082 9,733 13,125 78,101 9,420 15,600 17,989 213,244 426,790 23,982 23,814 5,770 3,462 9,500 27,512 9,100 12,340 7,500 9,232 16,502 9,676 15,402 4,415 1,622,233

9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts for Broom or Brush Making, NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 230,589 2,224,818 230,589 2,224,818 Mexico 66,656 943,740 66,656 943,740 Panama 3,594 56,034 3,594 56,034 60 4,093 4,093 60 Bermuda Trinid 1,748 17,296 1,748 17,296 Colomb 222 3,600 222 3,600 863 14,000 863 14,000 Venez Ecuador 100 2,905 100 2,905 Peru 453 7,353 453 7,353 Chile 8,321 39,541 8,321 39,541 Brazil 1,395 22,630 1,395 22,630 18,717 1,154 18,717 1,154 Norway Denmark 195 11,261 195 11,261 U King 7,726 76,040 7,726 76,040 Ireland 1,109 17,994 1,109 17,994 1,287 30,259 30,259 1,287 Nethlds Belgium 1,104 11,823 1,104 11,823 Luxmbrg 215 3,495 215 3,495 France 673 10,911 673 10,911 Fr Germ 204 3,307 204 3,307 9,930 845 9,930 845 Switzld Russia 202 3,271 202 3,271 4,456 625 4,456 625 Spain Italy 720 11,676 720 11,676 Cyprus 1,932 11,183 1,932 11,183 3,928 30 3,928 30 Israel S Arab 3,301 19,281 3,301 19,281 Qatar 5,602 90,869 5,602 90,869 11,110 788 11,110 788 Arab Em 7,500 462 7,500 462 Afghan India 50 3,859 50 3,859 Thailnd 175 9,654 175 9,654 Singapr 311 6,955 311 6,955

Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Reunion Rep Saf TOTAL

May 2010 100 3,747 1,924 1,534 2,473 3,848 3,731 3,429 194 196 363,887

4,480 63,369 17,578 24,886 48,594 34,288 60,529 13,581 3,150 3,176 3,987,120

100 3,747 1,924 1,534 2,473 3,848 3,731 3,429 194 196 363,887

4,480 63,369 17,578 24,886 48,594 34,288 60,529 13,581 3,150 3,176 3,987,120

Broom and Brush

IMPORTS January Imports By Country

Country China TOTAL

0502100000 Pigs’, Hogs’ or Boars’ Bristles and Hair and Waste Thereof January Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 4,427 125,015 4,427 4,427 125,015 4,427

Value 125,015 125,015

Country China TOTAL

0502900000 Badger Hair and Other Brushmaking Hair and Waste Thereof January Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 8,411 123,532 8,411 8,411 123,532 8,411

Value 123,532 123,532

0511993300 Horsehair and Horsehair Waste, Whether or Not Put Up As A Layer With or Without Supporting Material January Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value China 18,253 150,596 18,253 150,596 TOTAL 18,253 150,596 18,253 150,596 1404903000 Istle Used Primarily In Brooms or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles January Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Mexico 25,395 127,033 25,395 127,033 TOTAL 25,395 127,033 25,395 127,033 4417002000 Broom and Mop Handles, 1.9 CM or More Diameter and 97 CM or More In Length, Of Wood January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 2,500 2,550 2,500 Mexico Hondura 410,908 182,737 410,908 518,395 488,645 518,395 Brazil Indnsia 204,086 139,639 204,086 China 117,000 82,527 117,000 896,098 1,252,889 1,252,889 TOTAL

In

Value 2,550 182,737 488,645 139,639 82,527 896,098

4417004000 Paint Brush and Paint Roller Handles, Of Wood Year To Date January Value Net Q/Variable Value Country Net Q/Variable Poland 4,729 4,729 Italy 954,521 954,521 Thailnd 22,745 22,745 45,319 45,319 Indnsia 167,249 167,249 China Taiwan 2,103 2,103 TOTAL 1,196,666 1,196,666

Country Canada

4417006000 Brush Backs, Of Wood Year To Date January Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 174,655 62,253 174,655

Value 62,253


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May 2010 Brazil Sri Lka China TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Brazil China Taiwan TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 77,025 91,650 229,290 572,620

86,162 90,245 59,051 297,711

77,025 91,650 229,290 572,620

86,162 90,245 59,051 297,711

4417008010 Tool Handles of Wood January Year To Date Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable 5,700 46,474 303,372 4,620 10,920 371,086

Value 5,700 46,474 303,372 4,620 10,920 371,086

4417008090 Tools, Tool Bodies, Broom or Brush Bodies, Shoe Lasts and Trees, of Wood January Year To Date Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Value Canada 79,340 79,340 Chile 807,504 807,504 France 2,928 2,928 Russia 3,201 3,201 India 83,275 83,275 Sri Lka 123,061 123,061 Vietnam 23,731 23,731 127,849 127,849 China Taiwan 11,122 11,122 Japan 369,966 369,966 TOTAL 1,631,977 1,631,977 7326908576 Metal Handles For Brooms, Mops, Paint Applicators January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,500 2,209 1,500 2,209 Mexico 23,828 8,821 23,828 8,821 Brazil 1,860 10,030 1,860 10,030 Denmark 230 2,296 230 2,296 Spain 440,448 251,914 440,448 251,914 Italy 1,770,071 718,499 1,770,071 718,499 China 758,006 518,287 758,006 518,287 TOTAL 2,995,943 1,512,056 2,995,943 1,512,056 9603100500 Wiskbrooms, of Broom Corn, LT=.96 EA. Prior to Entry or Withdrawal for Consumption of 61,655 Dozen In Calendar Year January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 2,400 2,165 2,400 2,165 2,400 2,165 2,165 2,400 TOTAL 9603104000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, Prior to Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year January Year To Date Mexico 2,400 2,114 2,400 2,114 TOTAL 2,400 2,114 2,400 2,114 9603106000 Other Brooms, Of Broomcorn, Valued Over .96 Each January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 637,711 1,620,830 637,711 1,620,830 26,221 13,728 26,221 13,728 Hondura TOTAL 651,439 1,647,051 651,439 1,647,051 9603109000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles, NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 6,516 8,256 6,516 8,256 4,404 2,000 4,404 2,000 Italy 151,718 211,608 211,608 151,718 Sri Lka Vietnam 70,940 53,554 70,940 53,554 China 22,156 59,663 22,156 59,663

TOTAL

PAGE 23 253,330

337,485

253,330

337,485

9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 11,577 6,443 11,577 6,443 Mexico 875,232 97,703 875,232 97,703 Guatmal 76,800 12,762 76,800 12,762 Brazil 540,216 140,648 540,216 140,648 Ireland 1,001,352 187,601 1,001,352 187,601 Nethlds 98,545 22,628 98,545 22,628 France 900 9,531 900 9,531 Fr Germ 1,644,871 1,331,700 1,644,871 1,331,700 Switzld 12,238,470 2,186,370 12,238,470 2,186,370 Italy 281,400 104,721 281,400 104,721 India 1,918,248 416,964 1,918,248 416,964 Bngldsh 95,040 7,428 95,040 7,428 Thailnd 1,370,380 169,019 1,370,380 169,019 Vietnam 1,437,572 196,512 1,437,572 196,512 Malaysa 3,611,000 87,803 3,611,000 87,803 Indnsia 196,000 10,108 196,000 10,108 China 41,653,186 6,527,412 41,653,186 6,527,412 Hg Kong 181,000 10,595 181,000 10,595 Taiwan 165,872 59,775 165,872 59,775 Japan 3,600 2,728 3,600 2,728 TOTAL 67,401,261 11,588,451 67,401,261 11,588,451 9603294010 Hairbrushes, Valued Not Over .40 Each January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value China 3,439,255 857,866 3,439,255 857,866 Hg Kong 75,300 11,325 75,300 11,325 TOTAL 3,514,555 869,191 3,514,555 869,191 9603294090 Shaving Brushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person, Valued Not Over .40 Each January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 2,286,900 152,074 2,286,900 152,074 Fr Germ 2,082,520 441,631 2,082,520 441,631 Italy 12,876 3,572 12,876 3,572 China 2,371,696 417,256 2,371,696 417,256 Kor Rep 24,000 7,850 24,000 7,850 Taiwan 21,600 4,104 21,600 4,104 TOTAL 6,799,592 1,026,487 6,799,592 1,026,487 9603302000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Not Over .05 Each January Year To Date Value Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Country Canada 150,500 6,578 150,500 6,578 Mexico 668,400 17,238 668,400 17,238 Fr Germ 1,951,500 49,151 1,951,500 49,151 2,022,800 29,213 2,022,800 29,213 Italy India 300,000 9,546 300,000 9,546 288,846 13,059,412 288,846 13,059,412 China Kor Rep 2,120,000 89,362 2,120,000 89,362 TOTAL 20,272,612 489,934 20,272,612 489,934 9603304000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application of Cosmetics, Valued Over .05 But not Over .10 Each January Year To Date Value Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Country 361,138 4,509,279 361,138 4,509,279 Mexico Fr Germ 403,633 34,014 403,633 34,014 China 16,301,773 1,261,707 16,301,773 1,261,707 Kor Rep 100,000 7,831 100,000 7,831 21,314,685 1,664,690 21,314,685 1,664,690 TOTAL 9603306000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Over .10 Each January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Value Net Q/No. Country


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PAGE 24 Canada Mexico Dom Rep U King Belgium France Fr Germ Switzld Spain Italy India Sri Lka Thailnd China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Mauritn TOTAL

Country Mexico Sweden Fr Germ China TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 192 13,823,945 17,092 84,692 130 62,034 1,312,964 203 10,888 62,054 899,016 140,376 124,613 14,896,664 422,210 395,096 68,068 255,630 2,510 32,578,377

8,633 2,359,529 17,310 107,799 9,494 236,905 482,443 5,474 48,590 41,231 381,501 84,262 50,907 8,215,205 314,427 169,930 54,705 881,732 13,838 13,483,915

192 13,823,945 17,092 84,692 130 62,034 1,312,964 203 10,888 62,054 899,016 140,376 124,613 14,896,664 422,210 395,096 68,068 255,630 2,510 32,578,377

8,633 2,359,529 17,310 107,799 9,494 236,905 482,443 5,474 48,590 41,231 381,501 84,262 50,907 8,215,205 314,427 169,930 54,705 881,732 13,838 13,483,915

9603402000 Paint Rollers Year To Date January Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 1,100,431 456,252 1,100,431 400 3,006 400 272,552 53,878 272,552 4,045,164 1,723,225 4,045,164 5,418,547 2,236,361 5,418,547

Value 456,252 3,006 53,878 1,723,225 2,236,361

9603404020 Paint Pads (Other Than Of Subheading 9603.30) January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value China 802,630 599,396 802,630 599,396 TOTAL 802,630 599,396 802,630 599,396 9603404040 Natural Bristle Brushes, Other Than Brushes Of Subheading 9603.30 January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 8,080 12,911 8,080 12,911 Italy 26,200 138,328 26,200 138,328 Israel 1,719 5,415 1,719 5,415 Vietnam 374,250 36,756 374,250 36,756 Indnsia 4,096,025 645,125 4,096,025 645,125 China 31,652 7,637 31,652 7,637 1,100 5,836 1,100 5,836 Taiwan Austral 984 2,851 984 2,851 TOTAL 4,540,010 854,859 4,540,010 854,859 9603404060 Paint, Distemper, Varnish/Similr Brushes Exc Brushes of Subheading 9603.30 NESOI January Year To Date Value Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Country Canada 37 3,281 37 3,281 Sweden 25,250 17,397 25,250 17,397 24,119 7,345 24,119 7,345 Fr Germ Spain 264 4,117 264 4,117 Italy 6,156 10,641 6,156 10,641 27,861 28,539 27,861 28,539 Thailnd Indnsia 2,235,624 409,141 2,235,624 409,141 China 14,065,904 4,008,950 14,065,904 4,008,950 Kor Rep 3,060 2,755 3,060 2,755 Taiwan 83,320 79,355 83,320 79,355 Japan 2,000 11,740 2,000 11,740 16,456,821 4,600,035 4,600,035 16,456,821 TOTAL

Country Belgium China TOTAL

9603908010 Wiskbrooms Year To Date January Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 240 8,495 240 24,864 51,731 24,864 25,104 60,226 25,104

Value 8,495 51,731 60,226

Country Mexico Italy Vietnam China Taiwan TOTAL

May 2010 9603908020 Upright Brooms January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 39,998 37,290 39,998 65,724 90,973 65,724 2,400 3,056 2,400 817,128 977,879 817,128 2,004 14,052 2,004 927,254 1,123,250 927,254

Value 37,290 90,973 3,056 977,879 14,052 1,123,250

9603908030 Push Brooms, 41 CM or Less in Width January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. China 1,800 2,844 1,800 Taiwan 300 2,371 300 TOTAL 2,100 5,215 2,100

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr Colomb Brazil Czech Russia Spain Italy India Sri Lka Thailnd China TOTAL

9603908040 Other Brooms, NESOI January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 126,272 215,931 126,272 560,301 701,843 560,301 31,320 31,739 31,320 3,540 24,964 3,540 16,134 76,726 16,134 48,312 38,020 48,312 4,000 2,553 4,000 2,376 7,015 2,376 153,042 137,047 153,042 2,500 2,495 2,500 66,407 159,808 66,407 7,000 12,128 7,000 528,696 553,412 528,696 1,549,900 1,963,681 1,549,900

Value 2,844 2,371 5,215

Value 215,931 701,843 31,739 24,964 76,726 38,020 2,553 7,015 137,047 2,495 159,808 12,128 553,412 1,963,681

9603908050 Brooms, Brushes, Sqeegees, Etc., NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,672,403 1,672,403 Mexico 2,439,488 2,439,488 Hondura 1,088,847 1,088,847 Dom Rep 29,624 29,624 Colomb 95,264 95,264 Brazil 18,555 18,555 Sweden 2,823 2,823 Denmark 117,715 117,715 10,389 10,389 U King Nethlds 156,795 156,795 Belgium 99,288 99,288 France 2,368 2,368 Fr Germ 132,238 132,238 29,176 29,176 Czech Switzld 4,624 4,624 2,526 2,526 Poland Spain 122,594 122,594 Italy 322,325 322,325 11,373 11,373 Turkey Israel 2,645 2,645 India 151,998 151,998 319,184 319,184 Pakistn Sri Lka 215,223 215,223 Thailnd 663,614 663,614 Vietnam 127,573 127,573 Indnsia 24,694 24,694 Macao 3,602 3,602 29,290,146 29,290,146 China Kor Rep 189,029 189,029 Hg Kong 510,537 510,537 1,017,319 1,017,319 Taiwan Japan 31,694 31,694 2,558 2,558 Austral Egypt 12,864 12,864 38,921,095 38,921,095 TOTAL


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Sam Richter Continued From Page 18 to ask, ‘Tell me a little bit about your company?’ Now you can find answers to these types of questions before you walk through the door,” Richter explained. “You can click on the timeline link (under Show Options) and it will provide a timeline of all the news Google has ever found about a particular organization over the years. “One of the neat things about the timeline is that the more colorful the graph, the more information Google has found about the company.”

■ GOOGLE FILE TYPE SEARCH — Doing a search on a company can be more rewarding by typing in the company name and then the file type extension. File type extensions are xls or xlsx for Microsoft Excel; ppt or pptx for Microsoft PowerPoint; doc or docx for Microsoft Word; and pdf for Abode PDF format. Richter said there are millions of files “floating” around the Internet. They can be found using this method. “Let’s say you created a big PowerPoint presentation and you want to e-mail it to somebody, but their e-mail doesn’t accept large attachments. Therefore, you post that attachment online and then e-mail that person a link where he/she can download the presentation. You may think that the only person in the world who knows where that document is, remains the person it’s intended for,” Richter said. “What you don’t know is, once a file gets posted online, Google is going to find it, and Google is not only going to vacuum up the name of the file, it will actually vacuum up every single word within that file. For example, it will open up an Excel spread sheet and vacuum up every word on that spread sheet. “Every budget and sales proposal a company has submitted to the government can probably be found online. This includes spread sheets, PowerPoint presentations, word documents, presentations at conferences, etc.” Richter added that one of the things he likes to find out regarding a company before an initial meeting is that company’s core values. The same is true before meeting with an individual for the first time. “Oftentimes, somebody is not going to post his/her core values online, but you can usually tell what is important to somebody based on where he/she has volunteered, etc.,” Richter said. “The good news is, most non-profit organizations will post their annual reports online. And remember, Google will open up that annual report and pick up every single word within that report.” When conducing online searches, Richter explained that it’s good to be a critical thinker. This is an important trait that is often lost with today’s younger generation. “A lot of kids today are taught that if they type in a question on Google and an answer doesn’t appear, then it doesn't exist,” he said. “I encourage people to work with the younger generation in a company to help them develop critical thinking skills.” Richter also stressed the need for individuals and companies to protect against identity theft. He said it’s very easy today to get somebody’s Social Security number or other sensitive mate-

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rial via the Internet. It’s also easy to find protection. “I recommend everyone to talk with his/her insurance companies, bankers, investment advisers, and lawyer — somebody out there will offer protection for you,” Richter said. “If they don’t, there are (various companies) to get this done. I protect my entire family for $250 a year. It’s not fool proof and perfect, but the analogy that I use is, ‘If a bad guy is driving through my neighborhood, and my garage door is open and my neighbor’s garage door is closed, whose bicycle is going to get stolen?’”

■ GOOGLE E-MAIL RESULTS THROUGH www.google.com/alerts — Google Alerts are e-mail updates of the latest relevant Google results (web, news, etc.) based on a person’s choice of query or topic. Some handy uses of Google Alerts include monitoring a developing news story; keeping current on a competitor or industry; getting the latest on a celebrity or event; and keeping tabs on a favorite sports teams. To use Google Alerts, a person fills out a form. The service is free. “What I recommend is to type in the name of every one of your prospects and competitors. Any time Google finds new information on a subject, it’s going to send you an e-mail. It doesn't send, for example, 50 e-mails one at a time, but it finds 50 new bits of information and then sends one e-mail,” Richter said.

W

Using The ‘Invisible’ Web eb pages not found through the index search engines represents 80 percent of the Internet, according to Richter, 95 percent of which is acces-

sible. “We are all used to going into Google and getting thousands of search results, but this represents only about 20 percent of the free and publicly accessible information,” he explained. Richter added that there are Web sites that, for technical reasons, Google can’t get into. “How many of you have gone to a Web site where you had to register to access information? Registration is free, and once you register you could enter that site. Well, Google can’t register. It can’t get in these sites beyond the registration page. So in the sense, this is the ‘Invisible’ Web,” Richter said. “These are invisible to Google, while still being free and publicly accessible Web sites. Sometimes Google will get a portion of the information from these sites, but if you really want to get the entire information, you have to register.” Richter gave some examples of invisible Web sites:

■ COMPANY INFO (www.manta.com) — Once registered, this site provides basic information about the company that may be helpful in a search.

■ MANUFACTURERS AND PRODUCTS (www.thomasnet.com) — “Thomas Register is like the White Pages of manufacturers. A person can type in the name of a company and learn basic information,” Richter said. “You can also type in basic words


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such as ‘brushes’ and find companies (in the United States and Canada) that are producing brushes.”

■ BUSINESS NEWS (www.bizjournals.com/search) and (www.mool.com/media) — According to Richter, these sites are good for seeking company news. “If a company makes the news in its local community newspaper how do you find that information? There are a couple of sites. I use www.bizjournals.com/search, which is in about 50 markets in the United States,” he said. “You can type in the name of the company and pull up some good information about an organization before meeting with its representatives. Another source is www.mool.com/media.”

■ PATENTS / PATENT APPLICATIONS (www.google.com/advanced_patent_search) — “Most people don’t know they can actually find patents online, but more importantly, they can find patent applications online. These are products that might not have been introduced to the marketplace yet,” Richter said. He added that when conducting these searches, it’s good to classify a specific time period.

■ INSTANT INFORMATION / TWITTER SEARCH (www.topsy.com) — “Having a Twitter account and knowing how to use Twitter is an incredible tool for sales as people are out there typing what is going on ‘at that very moment,’” Richter said. He added www.topsy.com is a Twitter search engine. “You can find out what people are saying about a company,” Richter said. “I would encourage everyone whose products are used by consumers to go to this Web site and type in the name of your products. I will guarantee you, if your products are not performing correctly, or are performing exceptionally well, somebody will be tweeting about it. “This is a great way to head off problems before the problems get bigger.”

■ INDUSTRY INFORMATION / ASSOCIATION OF ASSOCIATIONS SEARCH (www.asaecenter.org/directories/associationSearch.cfm) — “Let’s say you want to sell brushes to the car washing industry. You can visit the car wash association and find out what’s going on in their world,” Richter said. “By the way, a lot of these associations feature their member directories online, which is synonymous with sales leads.” Other Web sites Richter recommended include: www.alacrawiki.com/index.php?title=Alacra_Industry_Spotli ghts, which focuses on industry Web sites; www.samrichter.com/pubs for information on free trade publications, research reports, white papers, and more; www.zoominfo.com, which provides an information database about people;

May 2010

www.linkedin.com, which helps build personal networks; www.opensecrets.org, a site detailing political contributions; www.ghin.com, a USGA golf handicap and information network; www.criminalsearches.com, which can be used for criminal searches; www.spokeo.com and www.pipl.com, for personal information and people searching; and, www.zillow.com, used to find property records. Richter added that the nation’s library system also provides a wealth of information and data, a lot of it usually only accessible to large Fortune 500 companies. “If I ran America’s library system, I would put a big dome on top of every library that said, ‘The No. 1 resource for business in the United States,’” he said. He added that by logging into a library’s Web site and using a library card ID number, a person can access premium content via various databases. “These databases can be accessed for free 24/7 from your own home or work computer as long as you have a library card,” he said. Learning The Platinum Rule ost school children learn at an early age the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” There is, however, a different rule to go by for those who want to better succeed in business, according to Richter. “Everything I talk about is based on a real simple rule that I call The Platinum Rule. This is ‘Do unto others as they would have it done upon themselves’ or ‘Treat others as they want to be treated,’” Richter said. He added that, in the business prospective, the Golden Rule can be viewed as being exceptionally arrogant. “Think about it. If you go to a prospect or existing client and say, ‘Hi, I have this catalog with great brushes. I have no clue if any of them are part of anything you care about, but we are going to go through all of them. And when we are done we will have about 15 minutes left where you can ask questions,’” he said. “This is the type of presentation your prospects and clients hear if you go in with the same catalog and the same presentation and same sales pitch all of the time.” Living by the Platinum Rule, however, shows the seller is more concerned about satisfying the needs of prospects and clients. Richter also discussed the benefits of living by the Double Platinum Rule, which states: “Do unto others before they even know what is ahead of them.” The idea behind this rule is to help solve people’s problems before they even know what those problems are, and to help them find solutions. “That is when you start to become a true business partner. It’s all based on asking really good questions,” Richter said. The more information a sales person has, even if that person chooses not to use it, allows him/her to feel more confident and can provide a much better sales presentation, Richter added. “When you are more confident and feel powerful during a meeting, the (prospect or client) is able to pick up on that positive energy,” he said. Visit www.takethecold.com for more information.

M


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Hail Damage Reported In Torreon Region News was received on April 22 from Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, that a hail storm in mid-April may have destroyed an estimated 10 to 20 percent of the first broom corn crop for 2010 in the Torreon region of Mexico. “It sounds like there’s significant damage. In many cases, the farmers are planning to plow the damaged crop under and replant,” Pelton said. “The trouble is, if they replant in May, the quality of the replanted broom corn could suffer. And, of course, that portion of the crop will be late in harvesting.” Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Commerce has reported that 84 short tons of broom corn were imported into the United States during February 2010. This import was valued at $202,685, with a cost per ton of $2,413 ($1.21 per pound). All of the month’s broom corn arrived from Mexico. These figures include what the government now classifies as “broom straw.” Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine has been working with officials from the U.S. Department of Commerce after concerns originated that not all imported broom corn entering the United States was being correctly classified and/or counted. It has been discovered that some broom corn imports are now classified as broom straw. Broom corn import figures for January 2010 have been revised to also include the broom straw entry. According to the government, 48 short tons were imported into the United States from Mexico during the first month of the year. Total value of this import was $165,991, with a cost per ton of $3,458 ($1.73 per pound). Pelton said revised broom corn import figures for January and February look to be more accurate. He did note, however, that February’s total value figure appears too low. “I know we (as an industry) are not bringing in a lot of broom corn these days, but it’s more than what has been indicated over the past year,” Pelton said. Along with the hail storm in the Torreon region, Pelton also reported that the threat of violence in northern Mexico has increased. “(Broom corn) processors have told us there is an increase in military and (drug) cartel activities in the Cadereyta area (of Mexico). They added that now is not a good time to visit,” Pelton said. “These are people (the processors) who want to sell to us and like for us to meet with them, yet they are still telling us, ‘Don’t come right now.’ “This is not the first time we have been told it’s not safe to travel (in northern Mexico), and are hoping it’s a temporary situation.” Tim Monahan, of The Thomas Monahan Co., inArcola, IL, also agreed that broom corn import figures for the first two months of 2010 appear more accurate once the broom straw entries are included. He also stated that due to continued violence in northern Mexico, it’s very hard to know just how much broom corn to expect this summer from Torreon. As far as yucca fiber is concerned, Monahan reported that fiber sources have been slow, causing several processing plants to close. “We are still getting (yucca fiber), but there are delays. Prices are up due to the shut down of these processors,” he said. Regarding overall business, Monahan added that he has seen

some slow improvements. “It’s getting better and on the right track,” he said, stating that on the national scale, the stock market seems to now be better able to absorb bad news and then rebound. Richard Caddy, of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, said the revised import figures for the first two months of 2010 are more believable, except for February’s total value price. “I don’t know of anything broom corn related that is available for purchase in Mexico at $1.21 per pound — possibly raw broom corn,” Caddy said. “I can believe, however, the $1.73 per pound (figure) for January.” When interviewed on April 21, he added that there remains an adequate supply of Mexican broom corn for purchase. “The processors (in Mexico) who I work with have benefited from receiving some of the Apatzingan crop that is suitable for export to the United States,” Caddy said. “They also received more broom corn than originally expected from the second Torreon cutting of last year.” Caddy also reported in mid-April on the state of overall business. “I would give it a C+ or B, but we are not close to breaking any records,” Caddy explained.

Carlson

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May 2010

FIMM ITALIA S.p.A. Purchases Handles USA By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

A

business relationship that began in the early 1980s between metal handle producers FIMM ITALIA S.p.A., and The Thomas Monahan Company, of Arcola, IL, has taken a big step with the recent purchase of Handles USA. With the transaction becoming official on April 19, 2010, Handles USA, a former division of The Thomas Monahan Company, will now be owned by FIMM ITALIA S.p.A., and known as FIMM USA. The new division will be housed in the same Arcola facility that was the home of Handles USA. Officials for The Thomas Monahan Company emphasized that the Arcola-based manufacturer and supplier of component parts for the production of brooms and mops is selling only its Handles USA division. Other divisions remain under the ownership of The Thomas Monahan Company. The divisions are Brush Fibers, Inc., Monahan Filaments and Whitley Monahan Handles FIMM USA President Enrico Company. Spinelli, left, and Executive The Thomas Monahan Manager Fabio Meli Company has been a family business since 1922, now managed by the fourth generation of Monahans. The history of FIMM ITALIA S.p.A. dates back to the 1890s. FIMM USA is leasing the current Arcola facility formerly used by Handles USA and will keep most staff including customer service representatives. Jim Monahan, former president of Handles USA, will now serve as sales manager for FIMM USA. Other company officials include FIMM USA President Enrico Spinelli and Executive Manager Fabio Meli, who will relocate full-time to the Arcola office. Jim Monahan explained that the relationship between The Thomas Monahan Company and FIMM ITALIA started in the early 1980s when the Arcola business purchased equipment from the Italian company. FIMM ITALIA is part of the Spinelli Group, a machinery manufacturer.

BROOM CAPS

“We have known Enrico Spinelli since that period of time. Several years ago, we (Handles USA) started talking with (Spinelli) about making improvements to our machinery. One thing led to another, and he became interested in expanding FIMM ITALIA to the North American market. This eventually led to the purchase of Handles USA,” Jim Monahan said. Meli added that FIMM ITALIA has also expanded metal handle production into Mexico with the formation of FIMM MEXICO, and China, which is known as FIMM CHINA. “This is all a result of our international strategy to compete, both domestically in the United States, and globally,” Meli said. “Handles USA has always been willing to meet the needs of its customers. We are going to continue to do this, while striving to maintain 100 percent share (of Handles USA’s) domestic market and decrease importation.” Enrico Spinelli added: “Our goal is to expand the business, bring new technologies from Italy and build a strong company in an effort to better supply international customers.” Currently, FIMM USA features metal handles that come in two standard finishes: plastic coating and powder coating. An additional finish is also planned for the future, called “glue plastic coating.” “This feature will come with the advancement in technology. Glue plastic coating gives the appearance that the handle has been painted,” Meli said. He added that this type of handle will be offered at a lower price point than the higher-end powder coated handle. Meli said demand continues to be strong in the United States for metal handles, although this demand is more seasonal in nature compared to European markets. Jim Monahan is optimistic about the future of FIMM USA, which is a new name backed by years of experience from both sides of the Atlantic. “We will continue to service the accounts we presently have in the United States and hopefully grow the business, providing our customers with more products and faster service,” Jim Monahan said. “We want to continue the reputation that Handles USA enjoyed in the past when it comes to service and quality. Enrico Spinelli and his company will certainly emphasize these two aspects. “We are all excited about adding more modern equipment and increasing our capacity to better service the U.S. market.”

BRUSH and HANDLE FERRULES

MANUFACTURING INCORPORATED P.O. Box 6505

Wolcott, CT 06716

Phone 203-879-1481


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Brush Fibers

Brush Fibers, Inc. of Arcola, IL, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Chris Monahan, Brush Fibers; and Jeff Schaefer, Schaefer Brush Mfg. Co.

Jones Companies

Jones Companies, Ltd. of Humboldt, TN, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are, Andrew Dailey, left, and Ralph Jones.

PAGE 29

Boucherie USA/Machines Boucherie

Machines Boucherie and Boucherie USA of Izegem, Belgium and Knoxville, TN, were exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are from left, Bart Boucherie Jr., Machines Boucherie NV; and John Williams, Boucherie USA.

Jewel Wire Co.

Jewel Wire Co. of Pomfret, CT, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are Sam Dixon and Donna Dixon.


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PelRay International

PelRay International of San Antonio, TX, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Shirley Arnold, Tracy Arnold and Joe Arnold, all of S.M. Arnold, Inc.; Bart Pelton, Katie Pelton, Ray LeBlanc of PelRay and R.J. Lindstrom, Zephyr Mfg. Co.

Monahan Filaments

Monahan Filaments of Arcola, IL, was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Brian Crawford, Monahan Filaments; Jim Benjamin, Precision Brush Co.; and Chuck Copp, Monahan Filaments.

May 2010

Zahoransky USA

Zahoransky USA of Sugar Grove, IL, and Zahoransky AG of Germany, were exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Robert Dous, Zahoransky AG; Artur Seger of Zahoransky USA; Bernd Stein of Zahoransky AG and Frank Kigyos, Zahoransky USA.

Keystone Plastics, Inc.

Keystone Plastics, Inc. of South Plainfield, NJ, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Michael Naftal and Jack Moran of Keystone Plastics.


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Borghi USA & Borghi S.P.A.

Borghi USA of Aberdeen, MD, and Borghi S.P.A., of Italy, were among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Joern Bielenberg, Pferd Milwaukee; Enzo Ferrari, Borghi S.P.A.; Carlos Petzold, Borghi USA; and Matt Tompkins, Borghi USA.

Proveedora Mexicana De Monofilamentos

Proveedora Mexicana De Monofilamentos of Mexico City, Mexico, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left, are Mariana Aguayo, Cynthia Sauza and Dennise Silva.

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DuPont Filaments

DuPont Filaments of Wilmington, DE, was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Tom Vichich and John Hackney.

Lanoco Specialty Wire Products, Inc.

Lanoco Specialty Wire Products, Inc. of Sutton, MA, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Kevin Lannon and John Lannon.


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Stainless Steel Products

Stainless Steel Products of Deer Park, NY, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Jim Hauck of Brushes Corp. and Ralph Rosenbaum of Stainless Steel Products.

Carlson Tool & Machine Co.

Carlson Tool & Machine Co. was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is John Carlson, Carlson Tool.

May 2010

Hahl, Inc.

Hahl, Inc. of Lexington, SC, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Gunter Muckenfuss, Florian Kisling, and Terry Hogan.

Connors & Co. Inc.

Connors & Co., Inc. of Ramsey, NJ, which represents Wohler Brush Tech in the United States, was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Brian Connors, Wendy Connors and Matthias Peveling.


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Distribuidora Perfect

Distribuidora Perfect, S.A. de C.V. of Naucalpan, Edo. de Mexico, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Rodrigo Ripstein of Distribuidora Perfect; and Raul Molina, Paul Marsh, LLC.

Industrial Wood Products

Industrial Wood Products, Inc. of Burlington, NJ, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Fred Mirsky, Industrial Wood Products, and Gus Treslo, E. Gornell & Sons, Inc.

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Northeast LTDA

Northeast LTDA of Sao Paulo, Brazil was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is Michael Grossmann.

Yo Yuen Metal Wire Co.

Yo Yuen Metal Wire Co. of TaoYuan, Taiwan, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is Joyce Huang.


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Fiberglass Innovations

Fiberglass Innovations of Rockford, IL, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is Jeff Jones.

Multi Brosses

Multi Brosses of St. Jules, Quebec, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Marcel Pare, Dominic Pare, and Yves Germain.

May 2010

Plasticfibre S.P.A

Plasticfibre S.P.A. of Italy, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Sergio Fiori and Glenn Guyette.

Fili & Forme SRL

Fili & Forme SRL, Milano, Italy, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are Gian Pogliani of Fili & Forme, left, and Philip Coward, Hill Brush, Inc. Both Hill Brush, Inc. and Fili & Forme are new members of ABMA.


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Broom, Brush & Mop May 2010  

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine's May 2010 issue. The trade magazine for the broom, brush and mop industry.

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