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May 2009

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine SERVING THE INDUSTRY SINCE 1912

92nd ABMA Annual Convention Coverage ABMA Division Reports Industrial & Maintenance Paint Applicator Broom & Mop Suppliers

ABMA Photo Gallery Imports/Exports Imports Show Mixed Signs To Start 2009


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YOUR SOURCE FOR COMPETITIVE FIBERS, YARN, HARDWARE AND HANDLES.

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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

May 2009

Broom, Brush & Mop A RANKIN PUBLISHING PUBLICATION

May 2009

FEATURES Mark Godfrey New ABMA President Attendance, Membership Strong As ABMA Holds 92nd Convention In Miami Beach, FL _________6 ABMA Divisions Elect New Officers, Report On Industry Events ______________________13 ABMA Speaker Gives Tips On Being Green ________17 ABMA Photo Gallery __________________________20

DEPARTMENTS Import/Export Overview ________________________28 January Imports & Exports _____________________30 Broom Corn Dealer Survey _____________________36

STAFF CO-PUBLISHERS Don Rankin Linda Rankin EDITOR Harrell Kerkhoff

RECEPTION Sandy Pierce

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Rick Mullen GRAPHIC/PRODUCTION Jennie Grace David Opdyke

Rankin Publishing, Inc. 204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130 • Arcola, Illinois 61910-0130, USA Phone: (217) 268-4959 • Fax: (217) 268-4815 • Website: www.rankinpublishing.com BROOM, BRUSH & MOP (ISSN 0890-2933) is published monthly at 204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130, Arcola, Illinois 61910. Telephone: (217) 268-4959. Subscriptions are $25 in the United States; $35 in Canada and Mexico; all others $110. The $110 foreign subscriptions include first class air mail postage. Arrangements can be made for first class postage for the United States, Canada and Mexico. Single copies of issues are $2 for subscribers; $5 for nonsubscribers, postage extra. The Suppliers Directory issue is $10 per copy. BROOM, BRUSH & MOP is a monthly trade magazine devoted to news of broom, brush and mop manufacturers and allied industries. It was established in 1912 as the Broom & Broom Corn News. It was entered as second class mail matter Feb. 27, 1912, at the U.S. Post Office in Arcola, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Arcola, IL, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: send address changes to P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910.

MOVING?

Volume 99, Number 5

CALENDAR MAY 5-7, 2009 National Hardware Show, Las Vegas, NV Information: 203-840-5622

JUNE 27-28, 2009

Canadian Brush Manufacturers Association Annual Conference Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario Information: 416-971-7800

OCTOBER 6-9, 2009

ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Chicago, IL Information: 800-225-4772

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National Broom & Mop Meeting, St. Louis, MO Information: 800-626-7282 or 800-637-7739

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International Home & Housewares Show, Chicago, IL Information: 847-292-4200

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ABMA Annual Convention, Orlando, FL Information: 630-631-5217

ASSOCIATIONS AMERICAN BRUSH MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 2111 W. Plum St., Aurora, IL 60506 • (630) 631-5217 AMERICAN HARDWARE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 801 North Plaza Drive, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4977 • (847) 605-1025 FEIBP EUROPEAN BRUSH FEDERATION P.O. Box 90154, 5000 LG Tilburg, The Netherlands • 00 31 13 5944 678 INTERNATIONAL SANITARY SUPPLY ASSOCIATION 7373 N. Lincoln Avenue, Lincolnwood, IL 60646-1799 • (847) 982-0800 INTERNATIONAL HOUSEWARES ASSOCIATION 6400 Shafer Court, Suite 650, Rosemont, IL 60018 • (847) 292-4200

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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

May 2009

By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

W

ith the theme “Going Green” serving as a backdrop, the 92nd Annual American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) Annual Convention took place March 25-28 at the Eden Roc Renaissance Resort & Spa in Miami Beach, FL. The event was full of networking and educational opportunities as brush, mop, broom, roller, squeegee and related industry manufacturers and suppliers gathered for four days of meetings, seminars, receptions and recreational activities. Included in this year’s convention was the annual Suppliers Display on March 27. Suppliers from across North America and the world displayed various products and had a chance to meet both new and existing ABMA active manufacturer members. During this display time two companies gave technical presentations. They were Monahan Filaments, of Middlebury, VT, which discussed the topic “Not All Nylons Are Created Equal”; and MYTec Soft, of Lexington, SC, which presented “Using ERP To Streamline And Enhance Your Organization.” The Suppliers Display was then followed by the Annual Finished Goods Display, where several manufacturers displayed their finished products. A highlight near the start of the Annual Convention was the Opening Business Session/President’s Welcome on March 26. Presiding over the event was ABMA President Barry Harper, of Harper Brush Works, Fairfield, IA. Harper expressed his appreciation to all those who attended this year’s convention, especially in the wake of hard economic conditions influencing many of today’s businesses. It was announced that 225 people attended this year’s Annual Convention, an increase over last year’s final number of 200 participants which was attributed, in part, to the 2008 show being close on the calendar to last year’s InterBrush. During its 2009 Annual Convention, ABMA welcomed 35 firsttime attendees, 8 new member companies and 4 prospective member companies. Harper also introduced several members from other trade associations at the Opening Business Session who made the trip to Miami Beach for the ABMA event. They were: Henk Slettenhaar of the European Brushware Federation (FEIBP), Tony

Outgoing ABMA President Barry Harper, left, was honored by New ABMA President Mark Godfrey at the ABMA Convention.

Ponikvar of the Canadian Brush Manufacturers Association (CBMA); and Gianantonio Pogliani of ASSOSPAZZOLE (The Italian Brush & Broom Manufacturers Association). Slettenhaar spoke of the importance of “going green” in today’s business world, which not only was the theme of this year’s ABMA Annual Convention, but also is very popular in his home country of The Netherlands. “There are more bicycles than cars in The Netherlands — 20 million bikes to 16 million people. Almost all of these people go to work on their bikes,” Slettenhaar said. He added that despite today’s economic recession in many parts of the world, it’s important for brush makers and other manufacturers/suppliers to remain optimistic. “It’s important to pull out all the stops to ride out this storm. A large number of European brush companies have existed for generations and have built financial reserves which have helped them


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May 2009

Machines Boucherie NV was the winner of the Innovation Excellence Award. Bart Boucherie, left, accepted the award from Carlos Petzold, chair of the Award Committee.

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Jim Furgale, left, and Fred Spach, retiring ABMA Board Members were honored by ABMA. Presenting their plaques is outgoing ABMA President Barry Harper.

through this crisis,” Slettenhaar said. Tony Ponikvar spoke of CBMA’s close relationship with the ABMA — both in the past, present and well into the future. “There is tremendous value coming to (ABMA) meetings, visiting with suppliers and networking with other brush makers,” Ponikvar said. Also introduced during the Opening Business Session was

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Retiring ABMA Officer, Board Member, and Committee Member Ken Rakusin, left, was also honored by ABMA and Harper.

Messe Freiburg Director Daniel Strowitzki, who discussed last year’s InterBrush. Messe Freiburg is Freiburg, Germany’s exhibition and conference center. InterBrush, which is held every four years, is an event for those associated with the brush, broom and related industries, allowing these people to visit with various machinery manufacturers from around the world and see the latest in equip-


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

May 2009

ment. Strowitzki reported an attendance increase for the April 2008 InterBrush event over 2004 figures. “In 2008, there were 185 exhibitors from 28 countries in attendance, compared to 148 exhibitors from 21 countries in 2004,” Strowitzki said. “From the visitors side, there were 6,000 visitors and 89 countries represented in 2008, while in 2004 we saw 5,500 visitors participate and 88 countries represented.” He added that a large attendance of exhibitors and visitors are expected again for the 2012 InterBrush event.

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“We have not finalized the exact dates of when (InterBrush) will be held in 2012. We are still hoping to move the show dates back a little bit toward the end of April or beginning of May. This would allow more time to take place between the ABMA and InterBrush conventions during that year,” Strowitzki said. “We are very proud to have this show in Freiburg and to also work with the ABMA. It’s a lot of fun and I think we will have a very good show again in 2012.” Harper also discussed the importance of InterBrush. “As many here know, (InterBrush) is a great show. One of the benefits is that ABMA is now a partner (of the event),” Harper said. He added that part of the $55,000-plus received from InterBrush in 2008 allowed ABMA officials to reduce fees that ABMA members pay in order to attend the Annual Convention. Harper continued that a very good alliance remains in place between ABMA and InterBrush. Several trade partners of ABMA were also recognized during the Opening Business Session. This included Jack Chambers, president of freight vendor Transportation Programs for Assoc iations (TPA), of West Orange, NJ. TPA has been partnering with ABMA for nine years to provide transportation programs at negotiated rates. A goal of the company is to deliver cost efficient shipping, wareProducts: house and distribution solutions to ABMA • Tempered High Fatigue Brush members. • Tempered Regular Brush “I want to lead off with two very positive • Tempered Scratch Brush things,” Chambers told those in attendance • Tempered Flat Brush at the Opening Business Session. “Both the • Hard Drawn Brush price of diesel and fuel surcharges are • Stainless Steel Brush • Tin Plated Brush down. • Galvanized Stem Wire “Also, we have (recently) found in rene• Specials gotiating people’s freight programs, that even though their volume of business has Packages: fallen, it’s possible right now to get better • Straight in Coil or Spool transportation rates with less volume due • Crimped in Coil or Spool to the excess capacity available among • Straight in Hanks truckers in the marketplace. We are finding • Crimped in Hanks that costs are actually falling in transporta• Straight Multi-Stranded tion.” • Crimped Multi-Stranded Harper added that one of the benefits of • Reels or Stems membership in ABMA is the availability of such third party partners as TPA. ABMA Welcomes New Members / First-Time Convention Attendees

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ine new ABMA-member companies were recognized during the Opening Business Session. These companies are: Haviland Corporation, of


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Henk Slettenhaar of FEIBP/European Brushware Federation

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Tony Ponikvar of CBMA

Linn, MO; Crystal Lake Mfg., Inc., of Autaugaville, AL; Redtree Industries, LLC, of Commerce, CA; K D Manufacturing, of Suwanee, GA; Smith Equipment & Supply Company, of Lakeland, FL; Corona Brushes, of Tampa, FL; Unimac s.r.l., of Zola Predosa, Italy; Brush One, of Millersburg, PA; and Atlas Graham Industries Co. LT., of Winnipeg, Canada. Several representatives of these companies presented brief descriptions of their individual businesses during the Opening Business Session. They include: n Jan Haviland, of the Haviland Corporation, who explained that her 63-year-old company is a U.S. manufacturer that specializes in providing a large selection of squeegee and other related products; n Edward Pearson, of Crystal Lake, who said his company, which dates back to 1935, manufactures such cleaning products as corn brooms, plastic brooms, wet mops and dust mops in Alabama. The company not only is strong in OEM manufacturing, but it also sells through distributors who are located in many regions; n John Leone, of Redtree Industries, LLC, who, along with Bill Loitz and Ken Rakusin, have recently acquired the 32-yearold company, said Redtree’s operations have been moved from New Jersey to the Los Angeles, CA, area. The business manufactures and distributes a full line of paint applicator products; n Tom Klatt, of K D Manufacturing, who said his company manufactures strip brushes and strip brush products. It specializes in supplying brushes to fit special needs markets and short runs; and, n Vanes Villani, of Unimac s.r.l., who explained that the Italian company produces equipment for the manufacture of such products as broom handles and brushes. He said the company’s customer base is mostly located in Europe and has recently expanded into the United States. Others attending their first ABMA Annual Convention were also announced. They were: Caleb Gonzalez, Alamo Broom Company, San Antonio, TX; Albert Waksman, Corona Brushes, Tampa, FL; Patrick Debideen, Felton Brushes Limited, Hamilton, ON; Joyce Dudenhoeffer, Haviland

May 2009

Daniel Strowitzki of Messe Freiburg

Corporation, Linn, MO; Charles Coward and Phillip Coward, Hill Brush, Wiltshire, United Kingdom; Mark Saji, Linzer Products Corp., Wyandanch, NY; Andrew Marsden and Dennis De Renzo, Paint Sundry Brands LLC, Portland, OR; Robert McMahon, Precision Brush Co., Solon, OH; Sandy Arnold, S.M. Arnold, St. Louis, MO; Doug Mattice, Sealeze, Richmond, VA; Cathy Sutton, Shur-Line, Huntersville, NC; Karey Smith, Smith Equipment & Supply Co., Lakeland, FL; David Malizia and Ryan Cortner, United Rotary Brush Corp., Lenexa, KS; R.J. Lindstrom, Zephyr Manufacturing Co., Sedalia, MO; Glauco Generali, Borghi s.p.a., Castelfranco, Italy; Mark Hartig, Hahl Inc., Lexington, SC; Bob Dill, Monahan Filaments, Middlebury, VT; Christopher Marshall, Osborn International, Cleveland, OH; Raul Molina, Paul Marsh LLC., New York, NY; Robert Dous, Zahoransky AG, Todtnau, Germany; Henk Slettenhaar and Eveline Lourens, FEIBP, Tilburg, The Netherlands; Bryan Peters, MB Companies, Inc., New Holstein, WI; Barry Berhoff, Shurhold Industries, Inc., Palm City, FL; Mike Ho and Stephen Tzeng, Union BrushEang Lian Corp., Chia Ting, Taiwan; and Steve Pandolfo, Sunset Transportation, Livingston, NJ. Also recognized were four past ABMA presidents in attendance. They were: John Lindstrom 1997-1999, Zephyr Mfg. Co., Sedalia, MO; John Cottam 2001-2003, Industrial Brush Corporation, Pomona, CA; Bruce Gale 2003-2005, Michigan Brush Mfg. Co., Inc., Detroit, MI; and Immediate Past ABMA President Kenneth Rakusin 2005-2007, Gordon Brush Mfg., Co., Inc., Commerce, CA. New ABMA Officers Elected

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ew ABMA officers were elected and announced during the Closing Business Session held on the final day (March 28) of the ABMA Annual Convention. They are: President — Mark Godfrey, of Felton Brush Inc., Londonderry, NH; Vice President — Ian Moss, Static Faction, Salem, MA; Treasurer — Jeff Malish, The Malish Corporation, Willoughby, OH.; and Past President — Barry Harper. Terms for these posts run three years (2009-2011).


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Also recognized during the Closing Business Session were retiring directors James Furgale, of Furgale Industries, Winnipeg, Canada; Frederick Spach Jr., of Carolina Brush Mfg., Co., Inc., Gastonia, NC; and Past President Kenneth Rakusin. These men were thanked for their lengthy service to the industry and ABMA. Incoming ABMA President Mark Godfrey presented outgoing President Barry Harper with a salute and gifts, including a new racing bicycle due to Harper’s desire to participate in future triathlons. According to Harper, it’s been his honor to serve in various leadership roles for ABMA throughout the years. “I would like to thank the (ABMA) Board and members for all of their support that they have given me. It’s a great organization,” Harper said. “I also urge everyone to consider being active in any ABMA committee or the board. The association is only as good as its membership and support.” Various committee reports also highlighted the Closing Business Session. ABMA Treasurer Ian Moss reported that the association remains in good financial condition. He added it was good to see 225 people attend this year’s Annual Convention in the wake of today’s economic recession. Moss was also the chair of the ABMA Membership Committee and reported on recent growth figures of the association, which included nine new member companies and four

Carlson

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prospective member companies. He reported that ABMA members Mark Fultz, of Abtex Corporation, Dresden, NY; Daniel Sinykin, of Monterey Inc./Roller Fabrics, Janesville, WI; and Carlos Petzold, of Borghi USA, Aberdeen, MD, were awarded the prize for bringing in the most new ABMA members during the past year. “We (at ABMA) try to attract 8 to 10 new members a year to stay where we are due to normal attrition that takes place among existing members,” Moss said. “I encourage everybody who feels they know someone who might want to become a member to make that phone call and see if they can a least get them to express an interest. (ABMA Executive Director David Parr) will then send them a package that details all of the benefits of membership. Our benefits are also displayed on the Web site (www.abma.org).” Harper added that it helps when ABMA-member manufacturers encourage their different suppliers to look into ABMA membership, and that suppliers who are currently members can also help by asking their manufacturer customers to join as well. ABMA Convention Committee Chair Mark Godfrey spoke of a main format change to this year’s convention schedule, as ABMA’s different division meetings were held on Wednesday as opposed to Saturday. Godfrey said he felt this format change had been successful and that the ABMA

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Convention Committee always welcomes feedback from memAnother report was presented by ABMA Statistical Committee bers. Chair Jill Shinners, of Pioneer Packaging, Inc., Chicopee, MA. “The Convention Committee really does look at (survey forms) She explained that the goal of this committee “is to help determine from attendees. We take the information very seriously on how we what surveys, studies and other activities are helpful to ABMA are doing and seek feedback in order to improve the convention,” members while conducting their businesses. The committee also Godfrey said. works to encourage membership to participate in various activities He noted that future ABMA Annual Convention dates and loca- in an attempt to add value. The Statistical Committee does not tions are as follows: March 17-20, 2010, at Champions Gate have access to any individual members’ content or figures regardOmni Resort, Orlando, FL; March 23-26, 2011, at Hyatt Regency ing surveys.” Lost Pines, Austin, TX; and March 7-10, 2012, at PGA National Three ABMA surveys are distributed and published on a rotatResort and Spa, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. ing three-year cycle. They are the Data Collection Survey, the Godfrey noted that the ABMA Convention Committee is also Business Ratio Survey and the Wage and Benefit Survey. Shinners starting to make plans for the 2013 and said that in 2008, 18 member companies 2014 conventions. responded to the Business Ratio Survey ABMA Public Relations Committee and in 2009, the Data Collection Survey Chair Carlos Petzold discussed changes will be distributed. She urged strong parmade last year to www.abma.org. He also ticipation for this and all ABMA surnoted that the ABMA staff now internalveys. ly maintains this site, saving the associaGB Boucherie NV Wins The 2009 tion approximately $6,000 per year. ABMA Innovation Excellence Award It was also noted by Petzold that ABMAs 100th anniversary of 2017 is oward the end of the Closing fast approaching. A working committee Business Session, it was anhas been formed to plan for this milenounced that ABMA had awardstone. ed its Fourth Annual William Cordes “There is a task force that is trying to Innovation Excellence Award to put together ideas of what we (as an Machines Boucherie NV, of Izegem, association) want to do for the 100th Belgium, for the company’s AFT-HH anniversary; how we can look back on brush making machine. There were the history of ABMA as well as look eight products nominated for this year’s toward the future,” Petzold said. “We award. will be sending out some information Machines Boucherie President Bart requesting historical documents, etc., to Boucherie thanked the ABMA for the help in this celebration. We want to hold award, adding, “The award helps proon to our history as we work toward the vide the stimulus to continue to develop next 100 years.” this technology.” Presenting an ABMA Safety & Standards report was Committee CoThe Boucherie AFT-HH brush makBarry Harper served as ABMA President Chair Fred Spach Jr. He reported that ing machine features a reduction in for the 2007-2009 term. material costs while also maintaining ABMA is 100 percent compliant with its Safety Slip Program. These slips are used on products to warn high output of up to 1,500 picks per minute with zero index consumers of potential hazards in the design, care and use of time. Its design allows for dissimilar component technology power brushes. The slips are a copyrighted document that and a fully recyclable product. The AFT-HH utilizes includes the ABMA logo, address and Web site. ABMA sells Boucherie’s patented anchorless technology. The William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award recogsafety slips to various companies that make power brushes and that comply with proper standards. Companies that purchase nizes outstanding innovation of manufactured products, safety slips through ABMA must also provide a manufacturer’s components or services in the brush, broom, mop and roller industries. The award is named after William Cordes, who mark. Safety slip sales provide ABMA dollars that go toward main- served as the association’s first president from 1917 to taining the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) B165.1 1928. The award serves as a reminder that all new and exciting standard. This standard establishes requirements for the design, care and use of power-driven brushing tools in order to prevent endeavors have beginnings that connect with real people. Interested parties are encouraged to submit nominations to ABMA injuries to users. Spach also stated that the current American Society for Testing during any calendar year for consideration. All nominations must and Materials (ASTM) standard for brooms and mops remains in be readily available in the marketplace during the year in which they are to be considered. effect.

T


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May 2009

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By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

D

ivisional meetings that traditionally were held on the Saturday morning of the ABMA Annual Convention were moved this year to a new Wednesday afternoon format (March 25). This was done, in part, so that the results of these meetings could be reported during Saturday’s Closing Business Session. The following are highlights from the meetings involving the Paint Applicator, Broom & Mop, Industrial & Maintenance and Suppliers divisions. PAINT APPLICATOR DIVISION

T

he majority of the 2009 ABMA Paint Applicator Division meeting was spent discussing possible defense of an anti-dumping order on natural bristle paintbrushes from China. A “Sunset Review” on the matter is slated for later this year (2009). All anti-dumping orders must be reviewed once every five years. The last action on the Sunset Review was a positive one for the brush industry. The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) voted in 2004 to continue the anti-dumping order on natural bristle paintbrushes from China. The ITC determined that continuation of this order was necessary to prevent material injury to U.S. producers. Continuation of the order is expected to maintain the current level of protection against dumped imports from China. “We have to make a decision in the upcoming months on whether we want to have the anti-dumping issue extended. It’s going to be put to a vote (by the ITC) later this year (2009),” said Paint Applicator Division Vice Chair Bill Pavilonis, of Paint Sundry Brands, LLC, Portland, OR. ABMA’s legal counsel Steve Jones, of King & Spalding LLP, Washington, D.C., monitors all activities associated with the Sunset Review and has been working with the ABMA Paint Applicator Division on the subject for several years. Jones gave an update during this year’s division meeting on what needs to take place to help extend the anti-dumping order on natural bristle paintbrushes from China for another five years. At the start of his discussion, Jones said King & Spalding specializes in representing U.S. industries to make sure international trade laws are being enforced in an effort to protect domestic man-

Pictured during the Paint Applicator Division Meeting are, from left, Chris Tesmer, Shur-Line, new Vice Chair; and Bill Pavilonis, Paint Sundry Brands, Sherwin-Williams, Chair, for 2009-2011.

ufacturing and employment. According to Jones, King & Spalding has been working with the ABMA Paint Applicator Division since 1996 and has represented the industry in two prior Sunset Reviews. He explained for those at the Paint Applicator Division meeting who were not familiar with the events leading up to these reviews, an antidumping order on natural bristle paintbrushes was imposed in 1985. Due to a change in the law, the order came up for a Sunset Review in 1999 to determine on whether the anti-dumping measure should be continued or revoked. King & Spalding was successful in helping to get the order continued, both in 1999 and again in 2004. King & Spalding has also assisted in helping the paintbrush industry regarding the Byrd Amendment, otherwise known as the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act (CDSOA). The Byrd Amendment was a law enacted by Congress in 2000 at the request of Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV). The law provided that collected anti-dumping duties be distributed to domestic producers, such as specific paintbrush manufacturers, that petitioned the government or otherwise supported the petition, as long as these producers were still in operation and producing specified products. The Byrd Amendment was challenged over the years by the World Trade Organization (WTO), and there was an increasing amount of political and diplomatic pressure to repeal the amend-


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Stephen A. Jones, King & Spalding, makes a presentation regarding an Administrative Review of the Anti-Dumping duty levied against China at the Paint Applicator Division Meeting.

ment, which finally occurred in 2006 with respect to imports on or after Oct. 1, 2007. However, Jones said there may be legislation brewing to either reinstate the Byrd Amendment or create an alternative to this amendment in the future. “However, the Byrd Amendment is a statute that (is currently) repealed, but it did provide for payment of collected anti-dumping duties to affected domestic producers,” Jones said. “Meanwhile, we (King & Spalding) have represented U.S. manufacturers in a lot of Sunset Reviews. I have counted 32 over the years, including a lot of reviews involving imports from China. “In a Sunset Review, the government determines whether an order should be continued or revoked. The (domestic) industry (in question) must participate for the order to continue. If the industry steps forward and says, ‘Yes, we want this order to continue,’ then a review is conducted,” Jones explained. He added that initiation of the third Sunset Review is scheduled to take place in November 2009 regarding the anti-dumping order on natural bristle paintbrushes from China. The domestic paintbrush industry is required to submit information showing that if the order were to be revoked, dumping of natural bristle paintbrushes from China would take place in the United States, and that the domestic paintbrush industry would be injured from this dumping. “We have to submit information showing these two things would take place and argue that the order should be continued,” Jones said. He added that information for this needs to be collected and prepared by late fall of this year. “If the domestic industry’s response is adequate, and no one from the Chinese industry or from effected importers submit a response, then the ITC will conduct what is called an ‘Expedited Review,’” Jones said. “This is what has happened twice before, in 1999 and 2004. The domestic industry submitted an adequate response to the Notice of Initiation. There was no response from the Chinese industry or from U.S. importers of paintbrushes, and so the ITC determined that it should conduct an Expedited Review.

May 2009

“However, if there are adequate responses from both sides, then there will be a ‘Full Review.’ We haven’t had a Full Review of this order to date. It’s a longer and more involved process than an Expedited Review.” Jones said the domestic industry almost always wins an Expedited Review. This is because the only information in front of the ITC is what the domestic industry submits — and this usually supports continuation of the order. However, it’s not always the case that the domestic industry wins, therefore the industry must provide good information. “You have to show that imports (of natural bristle paintbrushes) will increase if the order is revoked, that the price of these imports is going to be lower than the price of domestically-produced merchandise and that this impact is going to (harm) sales, production, employment and performance of the domestic industry,” Jones said. “It’s important to provide good information on which the ITC can base an affirmative determination to continue the order.” According to Jones, imports of natural bristle paintbrushes from China have declined since 2004. Indonesia is now the predominate foreign supplier. Average unit prices for imports from China are higher than from Indonesia. These facts, therefore, generally support continuation of the order because they tend to raise the inference that imports from China would increase if the order were revoked. “This all shows that the order has been effective in doing what it is intended to do, which is to reduce the volume of imports (from China) and increase their price. This is why anti-dumping orders are imposed and usually provide relief to the domestic industry,” Jones said. “For the companies that produce natural bristle paintbrushes, the order has had commercial benefits. “Questions that now must be asked are: Does the order continue to have commercial benefits? If so, are these benefits greater than the cost of continuing the order? What would happen if the order is revoked?” Jones stated that the cost to represent the paintbrush industry in an Expedited Review would be lower than if a Full Review was required. “It’s a much longer and involved process (for a Full Review). It’s really considered litigation at that point as there is a party wanting the order to continue and another party wanting it revoked,” Jones said. After Jones’ presentation, he recommended that members of the ABMA Paint Applicator Division begin thinking about the course of action they want to take regarding the upcoming Sunset Review. “This is not something I would suggest you vote on today (at that ABMA division meeting). It’s something (domestic ) companies that produce natural bristle paintbrushes need to think about,” Jones said. After Jones’ presentation, Division Vice Chair Pavilonis agreed that the industry needs to make a decision as an organization in the coming months concerning this issue. Also at the division meeting, a motion was passed to approve $12,000 to be used to cover 2009 retaining costs for King & Spalding. Toward the end of meeting, The Paint Applicator Division elected the following new officers to serve 2009-2011 terms: William


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Pavilonis, Paint Sundry Brands, Chair; Chris Tesmer, ShurLine, Vice Chair; and Steve Workman, The Wooster Brush Co, Secretary. BROOM & MOP DIVISION

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STM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standards were part of the discussion that took place at this year’s Broom & Mop Division meeting. ABMA Broom & Mop Division Chair Jim Furgale, of Furgale Industries, Winnipeg, MB, reminded those at the meeting that current ASTM standards are in place for brooms and wet mops, and that more information on these standards can be found by visiting www.astm.org. These are voluntary packaging/marketing standards. Furgale added that discussions during past division meetings have taken place on the possibility of forming future ASTM standards for microfiber. There have been problems in the past, howev-

James B. Furgale, left, Furgale Industries, is the outgoing Chair and Jim Nairn, Harper Brush Works, is the new Division Chair of the Broom & Mop Division.

er, on how best to go about setting such standards for this material. It was noted at this year’s meeting that there is not an easy test to perform in order to judge how much microfiber is actually in a particular piece of fabric or type of product. However, similar problems have also arisen with mops and brooms, but definitions were still developed by the industry and certified by ASTM. Unfortunately, the industry is experiencing degradation in microfiber quality as some low cost producers are diluting the level of actual microfiber in finished products and generally mislabeling such products to the end-user. The general consensus at the division meeting was to let this issue go for now regarding possible microfiber standards, but to monitor the situation for possible action in the future. Another topic that was brought up during the Broom & Mop Division meeting concerned a report on the 2008 National Broom & Mop Meeting that took place in St. Louis last November. It was noted by Broom & Mop Division Vice Chair Jim Nairn, of Harper Brush Works, Fairfield, IA, that there was a lot of educational information shared at this meeting on such

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industry topics as handles, wire, fiber and broom corn. An exchange rate presentation was also given in St. Louis by Bart Pelton, of PelRay International, San Antonio, TX. The recent issue with broom corn fumigation at the U.S.-Mexican boarder was also discussed at the St. Louis meeting and talked about again during the ABMA Boom & Mop Division meeting. The fumigation issue began in October 2008 when the United States Department of Agriculture required that all incoming broom corn from Mexico be fumigated at the border in an effort to protect against corn bores, although corn bores have been in the United States for decades. The fumigation requirement caused concerns from U.S. broom corn dealers and users over what influence the requirement would have on supply and costs. It was noted at the Boom & Mop Division meeting that those who attended the St. Louis meeting were successful in a letter writing campaign to help reverse the fumigation issue. “We were able to get our broom corn import permit amended so that fumigation is no longer required on Mexican broom corn,” Pelton said. “I talked to at least one other importer who also had an import permit changed, so this situation was largely resolved successfully at a very minimal cost.” Pelton also discussed during the Broom & Mop Division meeting his concerns regarding amendments to The Lacey Act. This act is primarily designed to regulate the importation of non-native animal and plant species. According to Pelton, these amendments could negatively influence future importation of wooden handles brought into the United States. “(Wood) species have to be properly identified, and there is a lot a paperwork involved, along with significant penalties if you bring in wooden handles that are not properly identified,” Pelton said. “The problem is, when wood is imported, sometimes it’s hard to know what you are really getting. This includes wooden handles on corn brooms imported from Mexico; as well as wooden brush blocks and other products that impact our industry.” Also during the Broom & Mop Division meeting, Nairn reported that those non-ABMA members who attended the St. Louis meeting were urged to consider membership in the association. Likewise, those who attended this year’s ABMA Broom & Mop Division meeting were advised to look into attending the St. Louis


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meeting. This year’s ABMA Broom & Mop Division meeting came to a conclusion shortly after electing officers for the term running from 2009 to 2011. New officers are Jim Nairn, Chair; and Edward Pearson, Crystal Lake Manufacturing, Vice Chair. INDUSTRIAL & MAINTENANCE DIVISION

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articipation in ABMA’s upcoming Data Collection Survey was among the various topics discussed during the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting. Division Chair Fred Spach Jr., of Carolina Brush Mfg. Co., Inc., Gastonia, NC, said this year’s ABMA survey seeks data from par-

The officers of the Industrial & Maintenance Division are pictured during the Division meeting. The officers are, from left, Fred Spach, Jr, Chair; and Mark Fultz, Vice Chair. Fultz is the new Division Chair for 2009-2011.

May 2009

Parr said that once every five years the standard goes under review, and that this review process will begin again toward the end of 2009. A report on safety slips was also given by Parr. He noted that two European companies are now licensing ABMA safety slips for use on products that are shipped into the United States. Both of these companies are currently ABMA members. “In lieu of buying these slips in the United States and then shipping them to an offshore manufacturing site, (the two companies) are using a licensing agreement now in place,” Parr said. Safety slips are used on products to warn consumers of potential hazards in the design, care and use of power brushes. Companies that purchase these slips through ABMA must provide a manufacturer’s mark. “The safety slip process also involves a shared product liability expert witness agreement. An ABMA-member company that participates in the safety slip program can hire an expert witness from another ABMA company to represent them regarding a possible litigation trial,” Parr said. “There have been some great additions to our safety slip program.” Another matter discussed during the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting was the idea of creating a color-coded label system for the packaging of nylon filament products. This matter was also brought up during the ABMA Suppliers Division meeting. The following people were elected to 2009-2011 terms regarding the Industrial & Maintenance Division. They are: D. Mark Fultz, Abtex Corporation, Chair; Eugene Huegin, Pferd Milwaukee, Vice Chair; and D. Scott Enchelmaier, The Industrial Brush Co, Secretary. SUPPLIERS DIVISION

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embers of the ABMA Suppliers Division agreed durticipants on such topics as health insurance, safety and human ing their meeting to work with David Parr and those resources, freight, orders, computer integration, quality assurance, companies involved with the Industrial & Maintenance financial and sales production. Division concerning a color-coded labeling project for nylon prod“The survey provides a good opportunity to benchmark yourself ucts. It was noted that color-coding could possibly help employees against your peers. I would highly encourage everyone to partici- better differentiate between various nylon items. pate. I think you will find it very worthwhile. This information Continued On Page 38 you provide is also completely confidential,” Spach said. He added that ABMA received just 18 responses from member companies regarding the 2008 Business Ratio Survey. “This particular survey can be very useful. Unfortunately, with the low level of participation, it wasn’t as useful as it could have been if more companies had participated,” Spach said. Also during the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting, ABMA Executive Director Dave Parr presented a Safety & Standards Report. He spoke about the current ANSI (American National Standards Institute) B165.1 stanThe officers of the Suppliers Division are, from left, Jill Shinners, Pioneer dard that controls power brushes. The goal of this standard Packaging, At Large; Andrew Dailey, Jones Companies, Vice Chair; Ian Moss, is to establish requirements for the design, care and use of Static Faction, Chair; Carlos Petzold, Borghi USA, 3rd Vice Chair-Exhibit power-driven brushing tools in order to prevent injuries to Chair; and Dan Sinykin, Roller Fabrics, 2nd Vice Chair-Secretary/Treasurer. users. Andrew Dailey is the new Chair of the Suppliers Division for 2009-2011.


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May 2009

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By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

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duction and how this has had a profound influence on today’s world population, as evident by last summer’s high fuel prices. “What we saw in 2008 was the first signals of a worldwide he threat of negative climate change has helped lead many people and companies throughout the world to become decline in oil production. I think this is very dramatically going to “greener” as they strive to use less and conserve more in affect manufacturing businesses in the years to come. We are day-to-day activities. How to do this while also remaining pro- going to see some small peaks and valleys in the price in oil, but ductive and profitable was the central message of Alison overall, we are going to see a worldwide decline (in oil producGannett, who works with individuals, businesses and govern- tion),” Gannett said. She added that it’s important to find out how future events will ments while training them on her four-step solution framework influence each business and for global warming called how to take advantage of these CROP™. changes in order to become Gannett was the featured more efficient. Gannett exspeaker during the ABMA Allplained that the common term Attendee Educational Session “global warming” is misleadduring the 2009 ABMA Aning. What is actually taking nual Convention in Miami place is a greater abundance of Beach, FL. She opened her first “extreme weather.” This inbusiness dedicated to climate cludes more flooding and change in 1991, and has since drought conditions. founded and operates four non“We are experiencing greater profit organizations dedicated storms — more water where to solutions for global warmwe don’t need it and less water ing. where we do,” Gannett said. According to Gannett, the How climate change influissue of climate change is very ences eco-systems is also very real. Although it’s true that important to the entire plant. temperatures on Earth naturally “It has huge implications rise and fall as carbon dioxide on our eco-systems around (CO2) levels rise and fall, the world including places recent changes in the climate like Europe, Africa and have caused wide-spread North America. There are alarm. Alison Gannett trees and plants dying due to “About every 150,000 years there is a warming spell and then an ice age. This is because the increases in temperature. What is being exacerbated by these Earth and the sun become closer together and then farther apart. trees dying is wildfires, which has a big effect on the ranchHowever, what is happening now (with global warming) is some- ing industry and agriculture,” she said. Not everything is doom and gloom, however. According to thing different,” Gannett said. Regarding today’s CO2 concentration and where it’s headed in Gannett, the purpose of her presentation at the ABMA Annual the near future, she said: “We are entering into uncharted territo- Convention centers around solutions to climate change and how businesses can take advantage of these solutions to become more ry.” Gannett also spoke about the Kyoto Protocol, an interna- competitive. “In today’s economic environment, your business must make a tional environmental treaty intended to achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. She difference, improve its bottom line and become more sustainable added another issue that is influencing the world is oil pro- as a company,” she said.

T


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Four Steps To Fight Climate Change

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or the past 20-plus years working on climate change, Gannett said she has noticed that many people have become frustrated when trying to help solve this issue. Whether it is a home, business, school or government, people in general tell her that they are overwhelmed and don’t know where to start. “What I realized was that people had to have an easy thing to remember when it came to finding solutions to climate change,” Gannett said. In response to this need, Gannett devised the acronym CROP™, a program which helps people to Calculate their carbon footprints; place strategies for Reducing carbon footprints in buildings, transportation, consumption and policy; educating the proper way to purchase carbon Offsets; and showing how to Produce a person’s or company’s own power, through such sources as wind, solar, geothermal and mini-hydro. When it comes to calculating energy use, otherwise known as “a carbon footprint,” Gannett said, “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it. “It’s important to get away from the idea that being green is a ‘hippie’ kind of thing to do. Instead, we are talking about a business plan for being green and how to become more sustainable. But more importantly, we are going to talk about how (a business) can be more profitable and make a difference,” Gannett said. When calculating a company’s carbon footprint, Gannett recommends visiting www.carbonfootprint.com and looking for the business calculator on the site. It’s possible for a company to breakdown its carbon footprint by individual sections, such as a particular retail store, manufacturing plant, entire business, etc. According to Gannett, the average U.S. citizen uses 20 tons of carbon a year, while the average European citizen uses 10 tons of carbon a year and the average world citizen uses 3 tons of carbon a year. The goal, she said, is to get down to 2 tons of carbon per person per year to effectively help the planet. Regarding individual businesses, Gannett said mandates will become the norm in the future, forcing companies in the United States to meet certain carbon levels. When calculating a company’s carbon footprint, she recommends a business receive the proper understanding of how it’s impacting the planet. This will help each company receive a baseline for future production targets. Gannett also discussed emission targets that are coming up in various parts of the world. For instance, in the United States, there is a pledge to have a 7 percent reduction in emissions by 2012. “This is mandated right now in all of the industrialized nations in the world except the United States. All European countries are already in the process of meeting the 2012 target. They have an intense competitive advantage against (companies) in the United States that are not already moving toward this (target),” Gannett said. “Most companies (in the United States) don’t know what their carbon footprint is; and more importantly, most companies don’t know how to reduce their carbon footprint. “Some state mandates have already begun, however, such as in California, while 17 other states are looking at state mandates that will go into effect within the next few years.” She added that a new Kyoto Agreement will go into effect in

May 2009

2012 and includes the United States as the Bush Administration decided to join this effort. It is expected that the Obama Administration will also honor the agreement. “We don’t know exactly what the (target) numbers are going to be, but we will probably know by the end of this year. Most likely, for your company, there will be international targets that you are going to have to meet by 2012. This is very important,” Gannett said. How To Reduce Carbon Footprints

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lthough knowing what each company’s carbon footprint is remains very important in today’s business world, it’s even more important to understand how to properly reduce this footprint in buildings, transportation, consumption and policy, according to Gannett. “I’ve been asked how this all can influence businesses worldwide? If there is a carbon tax in the future, it’s possible that a (product) from the United States will be less expensive than (the same product) from China due to a carbon tax. This may have profound effects on manufacturing in the future, depending on how much your business depends on transportation,” Gannett said. She added that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently announced that it is looking into the possibility of ruling carbon a pollutant. “If this happens, (a business is) going to have to meet pollution mandates on carbon. One way or another, this is going to effect you,” Gannett said. “However, to put this in a positive spin. Instead of thinking about mandates, I believe this is going to give companies a marketing advantage and a return on their investments for meeting carbon (goals).” She said there are major companies today that are very committed to power reduction when it comes to reducing their carbon footprint. Part of this objective provides for great marketing, while it also can save these companies lot of money by reducing their energy costs. “When you calculate your carbon footprint, each company is going to look different. Every business is different. That is why it’s so important to go to www.carbonfootprint.com and calculate what your footprint is for your business. There is no blanket solution for every business. You have to calculate your carbon footprint, whether it’s for your home, your business, or government — and then you have to systematically reduce it, depending on which area is the highest,” Gannett said. For many companies, transportation provides a very high area of carbon output. Gannett explained, however, that there are great examples of companies saving money by replacing their fleet of vehicles. She recommended that each company visit www.fueleconomy.gov to find out more. “It’s not always cost effective or environmentally effective to replace vehicles. Therefore, it’s important to calculate this first,” Gannett said. She added that many companies are taking advantage of using vehicles that operate on clean diesel engines. “These engines are coming to the United States and they provide a huge impact for the transportation sector,” Gannett said. “It’s also very important that if you are going to use hybrid


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engines that operate on electricity, to know where that electricity is coming from. Is it coming from coal or is it coming from clean sources of energy? It is not a good solution to plug into dirty power.” She added that technology is improving every day when it comes to electric vehicles and that the cost of these vehicles continues to come down. She also said that people who drive older vehicles could use homemade bio-diesel, such as from used cooking oil. “Look at what you have locally for a fuel source. Every location is going to be different. It’s not going to make sense to use corn-based ethanol if you live in the Caribbean. However, (companies in the Caribbean) are looking at using coconutbased fuel sources. Look around and see what is available,” Gannett said. Another point that Gannett made when it comes to reducing a company’s carbon footprint is to think smart. “In other words, you don’t want to replace your whole vehicle fleet at a cost of $2 million; this is not going to bring a very good return on your investment unless you drive all of the time,” she said. “Therefore, look at costs that are going to save your company money immediately. This includes placing incentives to drive less as a main priority.” She also spoke of software systems in place that can help companies reroute their shipping runs in an effort to reduce fuel costs and a company's carbon footprint. “These are all little solutions that add up to making huge differences,” Gannett said. “This includes making sure tires on properly inflated. If everyone properly inflated their tires every time they filled up with gas, we would save 800,000 barrels a oil a day.” Other ways to save fuel and money for a company include having employees car pool or starting a program where people can ride a bicycle to and from work every day. Gannett also spoke of the next highest carbon footprint area for many businesses, which is buildings. “Buildings actually provide the highest carbon footprint worldwide if you factor in everything in the manufacturing process,” she said. “Being more efficient with your buildings translates into a lot of money savings.” Again, it’s often the small things that can add up to saving money and the environment, she said. This includes making sure computers are shut off at night when not in use, using a combination of sky lights and high-efficient lighting in such areas as warehouses, using motion sensors in buildings for lights, turning back thermostats and installing energy saving smart strips for computers. “By going to www.energystar.gov, you can determine how best to save money at your office. If you want to find the most efficient printer, etc., everything is listed on this Web site,” she said. “Grants are also available from local states. This is part of the Obama stimulus package. There is a lump sum of money going to various states to help businesses become more efficient.” Gannett also spoke about conducting thermographic scans of houses and businesses to see where heat losses occur and where to add insolation, improve windows, etc. “You can have entire scans done (from the air) of your business or manufacturing plant to see which areas are doing well regarding energy efficiency and which areas are doing poorly,” she said.

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“Plus, there are many other simple things, such as changing the color of the roof to reduce utility usage.” Another important area for companies to look into is LEED certification — a recognition that a construction project or building can attain by utilizing environmentally friendly building practices during construction or remodeling. LEED is the acronym for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and is the Green Building Rating System developed by the U.S. Green Building Council. The model was developed in 1998 to encourage environmental awareness among government agencies, architects, engineers, developers, and builders. “What is great about achieving LEED certification for your building is that it can lead to marketing advantages as well as providing huge energy savings. There are those who say LEED buildings are more expensive, but generally, LEED buildings pay for themselves in the first year when it comes to energy savings,” Gannett said. She added that many types of businesses are heading toward LEED certification including restaurants and manufacturing plants. There are also ways to become green while making business trips, according to Gannett, thus further reducing a person’s or company's carbon footprint. This includes lumping business trips and vacations together and using electronic ticketing to save paper. “Check your carbon footprint to see whether you should fly or drive. A lot of people think that flying always uses more energy. It’s actually often more carbon effective to fly rather than to drive because more people are in a single airplane than in a single car,” she said. Another area to keep in mind when it comes to reducing a carbon footprint is with foods that a person consumes. According to Gannett, pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers used in food production can lead to a large carbon footprint. It’s better to eat organic and locally grown foods when possible. When it comes to the manufacturing process, companies can either reduce or increase their carbon footprints in many ways. “The interesting thing about carbon footprinting each type of product is how much of that product comes from raw materials. It’s possible to actually break down the carbon footprint of a brush being made, for example, and then look at why that particular brush is higher or lower in carbon as it relates to certain areas (of the product),” Gannett said. “Are there specific materials in a particular brush that make a difference? Is it the actual manufacturing process? How about packaging and distribution? Every single type of brush you make is going to be different.” As mentioned, part of the carbon footprint of a product is related to how much or little packaging is used. Gannett mentioned Pioneer Packaging’s Eco Friendly product that was one of the candidates for the ABMA William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award. This packaging serves as a reusable paintbrush keeper made from 100 percent post-consumer waste material, making it fully compostable. Additionally, it utilizes soy-based inks and special water-based coatings to protect and extend the life of the keeper. Continued On Page 35


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May 2009

Jones Companies

Jones Companies, Ltd. of Humboldt, TN, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are Andrew Dailey, left, and Ralph Jones.

Monahan Filaments

Monahan Filaments of Middlebury, VT, was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Jon Monahan, Brian Crawford and Pat Monahan.

Boucherie USA/Machines Boucherie

Machines Boucherie and Boucherie USA of Izegem, Belgium and Knoxville, TN, were exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are from left, Ray Wilson, Boucherie USA.; Bart Boucherie Jr., Machines Boucherie NV; and John Williams, Boucherie USA.


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PelRay International

PelRay International of San Antonio, TX, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Ray LeBlanc and Bart Pelton.

Proveedora Mexicana De Monofilamentos

Proveedora Mexicana De Monofilamentos of Mexico City, Mexico, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Enrique Mejia, Dennise Silva and Cynthia Sauza.

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Zahoransky USA/Zahoransky AG

Zahoransky USA of Sugar Grove, IL, which represents Zahoransky in the United States, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Frank Kigyos, Zahoransky USA; Robert Dous, Zahoransky AG; Ulrich Zahoransky, Zahoransky AG; and Artur Seger of Zahoransky USA.

Carlson Tool & Machine Co.

Carlson Tool & Machine Co. was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are John Carlson, Carlson Tool; Mark Fultz, Abtex Corporation; and Chuck Tanis.


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Borghi USA & Borghi S.P.A.

Borghi USA of Aberdeen, MD, and Borghi S.P.A., of Italy, were among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left, are Matt Tompkins, Borghi USA; Tony Ponikvar, CBMA president; Carlos Petzold, Borghi USA; Jim Furgale, Furgale Industries; Vanes Villani, Unimac; Enzo Ferrari, Borghi S.P.A.; and Glauco Generali, Boghi S.P.A.

Keystone Plastics, Inc.

Keystone Plastics, Inc. of South Plainfield, NJ, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Marvin Naftal and Michael Naftal of Keystone Plastics.

May 2009

Lanoco Specialty Wire Products, Inc.

Lanoco Specialty Wire Products, Inc. of Sutton, MA, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are John Lannon and Kevin Lannon.

Brush Fibers

Brush Fibers, Inc. of Arcola, IL, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are Chris Monahan, Brush Fibers; and Joyce Harper, Harper Brush.


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Jewel Wire Co.

Jewel Wire Co. of Pomfret, CT, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is Sam Dixon.

Mount Joy Wire

Mount Joy Wire of Mount Joy, PA, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is George Belforti, Mount Joy Wire.

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Distribuidora Perfect

Distribuidora Perfect, S.A. de C.V. of Naucalpan, Edo. de Mexico, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured are Eduardo Bertello and Rodrigo Ripstein.

Stainless Steel Products

Stainless Steel Products of Plainview, NY, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Bryan Peters of M-B Companies and Ralph Rosenbaum of Stainless Steel Products.


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Plasticfibre S.P.A.

Plasticfibre S.P.A. of Italy, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Glenn Guyette and Cristiana Cerati.

Connors & Co. Inc.

May 2009

Paul Marsh LLC

Paul Marsh, LLC of New York, NY, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Raul Molina and Paul Marsh.

Hahl, Inc.

Connors & Co., Inc. of Ramsey, NJ, which represents Wohler Brush Tech in the United States, was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are Matthias Peveling, Claudia Peveling, Wendy Connors and Brian Connors. Hahl, Inc. of Lexington, SC, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Terry Hogan, Guenter Muckenfuss and Mark Hartig.


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MYTec Soft

MYTec Soft of Lexington, SC, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured, from left, are Pat Layden and Tim Hill.

DuPont Filaments

DuPont Filaments of Newark, DE, was among the exhibitors at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured from left are John Hackney, DuPont; Tom Vichich, DuPont; and Bill Shaul, Draper Knitting Co.

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Fiberglass Innovations

Fiberglass Innovations of Rockford, IL, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is Jeff Jones.

Static Faction, Inc.

Static Faction, Inc., Salem, MA, was an exhibitor at the ABMA Suppliers Display Program. Pictured is Ian Moss.


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B

orghi s.p.a., located in Castelfranco Emilia (Modena) Italy, a world leading manufacturer of machinery and technology for the brush industry, has announced a new business partnership with Unimac s.r.l., located in Zola Predosa (Bologna) Italy. Unimac is a producer of machinery for the production of power brushes as well as equipment for the production of metal handles, both fixed and telescopic. It was announced that the goal of this partnership is to deliver out-of-the-box solutions in every branch of the brush industry. Borghi s.p.a. is not new to this kind of strategic alliance, already having experienced successful partnerships with Mass–Osmas and Technoplastic. Borghi s.p.a.’s Export Manager Paolo Roversi had the following answers to questions regarding this announcement: Why did Borghi and Unimac decide to work together? “First of all, on a general basis, I think that strategic alliances are the best way for a company to compete and succeed in today’s networked economy. Borghi s.p.a. has gained valuable experience over the years working together with companies like Mass–Osmas and recently Technoplastic. “These synergies have stimulated new ideas and projects that put Borghi s.p.a. in the position to offer wider and better solutions for every kind of request coming from the brush industry. Although, I have to admit that building a strategic alliance and making it work are not always easy, Borghi s.p.a. has the capability that I would call ‘leadership’ to convey the best skills of such companies into a huge range of opportunities for our customers.” Can you summarize what is Unimac’s core business and how it relates with Borghi? “Unimac has been in the business for 20 years as a manufacturer of complete lines of machinery for the highly automated production of a full range of metal broom handles and metal power brushes. This can be considered a niche market, but to obtain high quality final products it is necessary to have a very particular competence

Borghi s.p.a. President Enzo Ferrari (right) and Unimac President Vanes Villani shake hands at the ABMA Annual Convention during the partnership announcement.

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that Unimac achieved with many years of experience in automation. “In a market where ‘complexity’ is increasing, it is illogical to think that ONE company has the required TOTAL expertise to best serve the customers at 360-degrees. This is why the partnership with Unimac is important in Borghi’s continual growth. I believe Unimac has the technical know-how for those specific fields, while Borghi has the resources and sales network to bring this know-how to a global market.” What are the main advantages that this partnership will bring about? “Actually there are many advantages, such as: n Expanding the range of products and solutions we can offer; n Developing new applications to benefit customers; n Increasing our sales penetration capacity; n Developing new distribution channels; n Cross-promoting our businesses to offer combined solutions; n Engineering new ideas from our combined expertise.” Is there anything else that you would like to say regarding this partnership? “Yes. ‘Evolution is the Solution’ is more than a catchy slogan. If a company stands still, it is lost. A famous Italian, Leonardo da Vinci, is known to have said, ‘Iron rusts from disuse. Water loses its purity from stagnation. Even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.’ To succeed in business, we have to continually evolve to improve upon what we do to help our customers so that they can do the same and be successful. This is why we also say: ‘Borghi...Solutions for the Brush Industry.’ We are ready to prove how we can live up to what we say.” The Borghi-Unimac alliance was first announced at the March 2009 American Brush Manufacturers Association (ABMA) Annual Convention, held in Miami Beach, FL. The announcement came during the “Suppliers Display” where Borghi s.p.a. and Unimac s.r.l. had a combined booth, displaying their product offerings.

The Borghi s.p.a., Borghi USA and Unimac team started working together at the ABMA Annual Convention.


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May 2009

Finished Goods Imports Show Signs Of Life At Beginning Of 2009 By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor Trade data released by the U.S. government indicated that in January 2009 raw material imports were down in two of the three categories outlined in this issue of Broom, Brush & Mop compared to January 2008. Import totals for January 2009 were up in 4 of the 8 finished goods categories outlined from January 2008. RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS Hog Bristle The United States imported 42,662 kilograms of hog bristle in January 2009, down about 29 percent from the total of 60,219 kilograms imported in January 2008. The decline of hog bristle imports this past January over January 2008 was in keeping with the overall downturn of hog bristle imports recorded in all of 2008, which recorded a decrease of about 22 percent from 2007 totals. In January of 2009, the United States imported 40,450 kilograms of hog bristle from China. The average price per kilogram for January 2009 was $15.98, up about 8 percent from the average price per kilogram for January 2008 of $14.82. The January 2009 average price was significantly less than the previous month’s (December 2008) average price of $31.55 per kilogram. The average price for all of 2008 was $15.37. Broom And Mop Handles The import total of broom and mop handles during January 2009 was 2.6 million, up slightly from 2.59 million broom and mop handles imported in January 2008. Import totals for all of 2008 were up about 10 percent over all of 2007. Brazil exported the most broom and mop handles to the United States in both January 2009 (1.6 million) and January 2008 (1.5 million). Also in January 2009, China shipped 254,825 handles and Indonesia shipped 225,916. The average price per handle for January 2009 was 76 cents, up about 15 percent from 66 cents for January 2008. The average price per handle for December 2008 was 63 cents, and 69 cents for all of 2008. Brush Backs January 2009 imports of brush backs totaled 101,236, down about 50 percent from the January 2008 total of 203,902 brush backs. Overall in 2008, brush back imports were down about 62 percent over the previous year’s total. Much of the difference between the January 2009 and January 2008 import totals was due to Brazil shipping no brush backs to the United States in January of this year, compared to 117,600 in January 2008. The average price per brush back was 64 cents during January 2009, down about 20 percent from the average price for January 2008 of 80 cents. The average price per brush back in December

2008 was 29 cents. The average for all of 2008 was 63 cents. FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At More Than 96 Cents The United States imported 605,909 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during January 2009, compared to 744,014 in January 2008, a decrease of about 19 percent. Import totals for all of 2008 were down about 11 percent from all of 2007. Mexico shipped 552,005 brooms to the United States in January 2009, compared to 659,846 in January 2008. The average price per broom for January 2009 was $2.25, down slightly from $2.29 for January 2008. The average price for December 2008 was $2.26. The average price for all of 2008 was $2.28. Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Material The import total of brooms and brushes of vegetable material during January 2009 was 103,852, down about 45 percent from 187,446 brooms and brushes imported during January 2008. Imports of brooms and brushes of vegetable material for all of 2008 were up about 3 percent from all of 2007. During January 2009, Sri Lanka sent 57,764 brooms and brushes to the United States compared to 115,940 during January 2008. The average price per unit for January 2009 was $1.49, down about 3 percent from $1.54 for January 2008. The December 2008 average price was $1.78, and the average price for all of 2008 was $1.54. Toothbrushes The United States imported 67.1 million toothbrushes in January 2009, up slightly from 66.3 million imported in January 2008. In all of 2008, the United States imported about 4 percent fewer toothbrushes than in all of 2007. In January 2009, China shipped 47.6 million toothbrushes to the United States. Other countries shipping more than 1 million included Switzerland (6 million), India (4.2 million), Germany (3.5 million), Taiwan (1.5 million) and Thailand (1.1 million). The average price per toothbrush for January 2009 was 22 cents, down 1 cent from the average price for January 2008. The December 2008 average price per toothbrush was 22 cents. The average price for all of 2008 was 24 cents. Hairbrushes U.S. companies imported 6.3 million hairbrushes during January 2009, up about 19 percent from 5.3 million imported during January 2008. Imports recorded for all of 2008 were down about 12 percent from all of 2007. China shipped 6.1 million hairbrushes to the United States in January 2009. The average price per brush for January 2009 was 19 cents, down about 21 percent from the January 2008 average price of 24 cents. The average price for December 2008 was 25 cents, and the average price for all of 2008 was 26 cents.


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Shaving Brushes January 2009 imports of shaving brushes totaled 13.3 million, up about 18 percent from 11.3 million imported during January 2008. Shaving brush imports for all of 2008 were up slightly from the previous year. Mexico shipped 4.3 million brushes to the United States during January 2009. Meanwhile, China sent 3.8 million; Germany, 2.5 million; and South Korea, 1.5 million. The average price per brush was 15 cents during January 2009, up about 15 percent from the average price of 13 cents for January 2008. The average price for December 2008 was 14 cents. The average price for all of 2008 was 13 cents per brush. Paint Rollers The import total of paint rollers during January 2009 was 3.4 million, down about 36 percent from 5.3 million paint rollers imported during January 2008. Import totals for all of 2008 were down about 12 percent from totals recorded for all of 2007. China shipped 2.4 million paint rollers during January 2009, compared to 4.4 million in January 2008. The average price per paint roller for January 2009 was 65 cents, up about 103 percent from 32 cents for January 2008. The average price for December 2008 was 46 cents. For all of 2008, the average price was 41 cents. Paint Pads The United States imported 805,002 paint pads in January 2009, a significant increase from 136,264 imported in January 2008. Paint pad imports for all of 2008 were down about 13 percent from all of 2007. China shipped a majority of the paint pads received by U.S. companies during January 2009 at 787,182, compared to 131,427 in January 2008. The average price per paint pad for January 2009 was 77 cents, down about 40 percent from the average price for January 2008 of $1.28. The average price for December 2008 was 65 cents. The average price for all of 2008 was 50 cents. Paintbrushes U.S. companies imported 17.5 million paintbrushes during January 2009, down about 5 percent from 18.5 million brushes imported during January 2008. Overall, imports of paintbrushes during 2008 were down about 20 percent from the previous year’s total. In January 2009, China shipped 13.8 million paintbrushes to the United States, compared to 13.9 million in January 2008. The average price per paintbrush for January 2009 was 38 cents, up about 36 percent from the January 2008 average price of 28 cents. The average price for December 2008 was 31 cents. The average price for all of 2008 was also 31 cents. EXPORTS U.S. export totals for January 2009 were down in four of the five categories outlined, compared to January 2008, according to government trade data. Brooms & Brushes Of Vegetable Materials The United States exported 3,706 dozen brooms and brushes of vegetable materials during January 2009, down about 61 percent

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from the January 2008 total of 9,410 dozen. Export totals for all of 2008 of brooms and brushes of vegetable materials were down about 10 percent from all of 2007. Canada imported 1,575 dozen brooms and brushes from the United States in January 2009, while Mexico imported 1,150 dozen. The average price per dozen brooms and brushes was $40.27 in January 2009, compared to $38.86 for January 2008, an increase of about 4 percent. The average price for December 2008 was $35.09 per dozen. The average price per dozen for all of 2008 was $42.96. Toothbrushes During January 2009, the United States exported 10.9 million toothbrushes, down about 37 percent from the total recorded in January 2008 of 17.3 million. Toothbrush exports from the United States for all of 2008 were down less than 1 percent from all of 2007. In January 2009, Mexico imported 4 million toothbrushes from the United States; Canada, 3 million and South Korea, 1.7 million. The average price per toothbrush for January 2009 was 55 cents, up about 96 percent from the January 2008 average price of 28 cents. The average price for December 2008 was also 55 cents, and the average price for all of 2008 was 37 cents. Shaving Brushes The export total of shaving brushes during January 2009 was 492,452, up about 24 percent from 397,447 recorded for January 2008. In all of 2008, the United States shipped 11 percent fewer shaving brushes than all of 2007. During January 2009, Mexico imported 260,951 shaving brushes from the United States, while Canada received 92,076 and Japan imported 87,103. The average price per shaving brush for January 2009 was $2.17, down about 21 percent from $2.73 for January 2008. In December 2008, the average price was $1.82. For all of 2008, the average price was $2.16. Artist Brushes The United States exported 601,443 artist brushes in January 2009, down about 11 percent from the total of 676,286 exported in January 2008. Exports of artist brushes were also down during all of 2008 by about 29 percent from 2007. Canada imported 329,650 artist brushes from the United States in January 2009. The average price per artist brush for January 2009 was $3.35, down slightly from the average price for January 2008 of $3.38. The average price for December 2008 was $3.26. The average price for all of 2008 was $3.42. Paintbrushes The export total of paintbrushes during January 2009 was 52,956, down about 69 percent from 170,545 paintbrush exports recorded for January 2008. U.S. paintbrush exports for all of 2008 were up about 6 percent from all of 2007. During January 2009, Canada imported 23,826 paintbrushes from the United States, compared to 64,734 during January 2008. The United Kingdom also imported significantly fewer paintbrushes during January 2009 at 578, compared to 59,190 during January 2008.


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EXPORTS January Exports By Country

Country Canada Mexico TOTAL

9603402000 Paint Rollers January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 153 2,686 153 53,359 75,112 53,359 53,512 77,798 53,512

Value 2,686 75,112 77,798

Country Mexico TOTAL

9603404020 Paint Pads January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 65,184 114,972 65,184 65,184 114,972 65,184

Value 114,972 114,972

Foreign Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles January Year To Date Country Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Canada 6 12,752 6 12,752 TOTAL 6 12,752 6 12,752 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles Year To Date January Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Country Canada 1,927 68,233 1,927 68,233 TOTAL 1,927 68,233 1,927 68,233 9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 904,414 770,232 904,414 770,232 Mexico 22,464 8,162 22,464 8,162 Jamaica 312 3,726 312 3,726 Singapr 13,752 9,702 13,752 9,702 Taiwan 36,456 14,559 36,456 14,559 TOTAL 977,398 806,381 977,398 806,381 9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 84,924 107,386 84,924 107,386 Mexico 112,537 57,454 112,537 57,454 11,758 1,286 11,758 U King 1,286 France 14,655 173,555 14,655 173,555 Fr Germ 3,501 48,065 3,501 48,065 Switzld 1,580 3,073 1,580 3,073 Italy 1,421 12,995 1,421 12,995 Croatia 3,682 3,070 3,682 3,070 8,346 7,728 8,346 7,728 Arab Em Phil R 985 9,011 985 9,011 Taiwan 720 26,145 720 26,145 TOTAL 233,019 460,858 233,019 460,858 9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar Brushes for the Application of Cosmetics January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Country 466,402 140,328 466,402 140,328 Canada Mexico 19,170 35,710 19,170 35,710 Argent 10,040 32,655 10,040 32,655 Sweden 23,509 39,333 23,509 39,333 Norway 1,150 9,552 1,150 9,552 76,348 25,721 76,348 25,721 U King Nethlds 324 4,030 324 4,030 Belgium 13,722 50,629 13,722 50,629 11,301 2,328 11,301 2,328 France Russia 4,657 25,662 4,657 25,662 24,199 5,053 24,199 5,053 Ukraine Italy 8,245 25,728 8,245 25,728 China 44,734 52,475 44,734 52,475 7,997 25,897 25,897 7,997 Kor Rep 3,066 831 3,066 831 Hg Kong Japan 2,916 14,766 2,916 14,766 Austral 4,979 18,373 4,979 18,373 TOTAL 315,704 916,126 315,704 916,126

May 2009

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,357 28,117 1,357 28,117 Mexico 983 20,388 983 20,388 Nethlds 256 5,301 256 5,301 Fr Germ 152 3,150 152 3,150 TOTAL 2,748 56,956 2,748 56,956 9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts For Broom or Brush Making, NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 25,098 253,980 25,098 253,980 Mexico 15,210 212,634 15,210 212,634 C Rica 812 13,176 812 13,176 Panama 801 12,993 801 12,993 Chile 620 10,042 620 10,042 Denmark 1,448 60,835 1,448 60,835 U King 2,233 54,754 2,233 54,754 Nethlds 558 13,733 558 13,733 Belgium 150 8,757 150 8,757 France 589 31,971 589 31,971 Fr Germ 572 29,577 572 29,577 3,300 374 3,300 374 Estonia Poland 166 2,687 166 2,687 Italy 41 2,506 41 2,506 986 2,539 2,539 986 Austral 713,484 49,658 713,484 49,658 TOTAL

Domestic Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles Year To Date January Country Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Mexico 2 5,705 2 5,705 2 5,705 2 5,705 TOTAL 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles January Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/Dozen Value 1,575 48,876 48,876 1,575 Canada 1,150 40,563 40,563 1,150 Mexico 5,579 169 5,579 169 Bahamas N Antil 12 3,550 12 3,550 U King 10 2,550 10 2,550 Ireland 8 7,200 8 7,200 Fr Germ 127 3,820 127 3,820 13,840 335 13,840 335 Poland 4,130 57 4,130 57 Turkey 41 3,840 3,840 41 Israel 4,920 83 4,920 83 Kor Rep 2,750 130 2,750 130 Hg Kong


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May 2009 Japan TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr Hondura C Rica Jamaica Dom Rep Antigua Barbado Trinid N Antil Colomb Venez Guyana Brazil Argent U King Ireland Nethlds France Fr Germ Switzld Italy Bulgar Israel S Arab Thailnd Vietnam Singapr China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 9 3,706

7,636 149,254

9 3,706

7,636 149,254

9603210000 Toothbrushes January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 3,001,715 2,659,104 3,001,715 3,983,800 1,508,686 3,983,800 15,000 9,825 15,000 3,456 2,848 3,456 19,896 11,629 19,896 6,912 5,695 6,912 21,168 10,726 21,168 13,824 14,378 13,824 3,456 2,848 3,456 3,456 2,847 3,456 480 3,590 480 696 3,412 696 20,880 8,261 20,880 10,440 9,180 10,440 83,520 28,048 83,520 262,848 121,289 262,848 15,552 7,457 15,552 182,208 293,195 182,208 151,200 52,722 151,200 499,587 94,992 499,587 42,207 37,928 42,207 1,058 5,184 1,058 19,800 14,966 19,800 908 4,449 908 1,174 5,753 1,174 12,600 9,817 12,600 7,608 3,161 7,608 200,000 31,200 200,000 170,608 62,663 170,608 23,568 11,158 23,568 1,746,226 653,350 1,746,226 44,352 12,906 44,352 26,140 15,728 26,140 66,882 117,174 66,882 225,210 120,194 225,210 10,888,435 5,956,363 10,888,435

Value 2,659,104 1,508,686 9,825 2,848 11,629 5,695 10,726 14,378 2,848 2,847 3,590 3,412 8,261 9,180 28,048 121,289 7,457 293,195 52,722 94,992 37,928 5,184 14,966 4,449 5,753 9,817 3,161 31,200 62,663 11,158 653,350 12,906 15,728 117,174 120,194 5,956,363

9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use on the Person January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q./No. Value Canada 92,076 216,607 92,076 216,607 276,837 260,951 276,837 260,951 Mexico Colomb 5,250 160,464 5,250 160,464 90 3,830 90 3,830 Venez Chile 2,016 13,888 2,016 13,888 39,142 4,280 39,142 4,280 Brazil U King 12,292 50,812 12,292 50,812 Ireland 357 3,262 357 3,262 Nethlds 1,256 10,940 1,256 10,940 Belgium 600 3,015 600 3,015 France 3,961 41,053 3,961 41,053 Fr Germ 1,938 17,725 1,938 17,725 9,300 1,017 9,300 1,017 Switzld Spain 5,562 49,710 5,562 49,710 Italy 1,857 3,083 1,857 3,083 Iraq 847 7,750 847 7,750 6,450 705 6,450 705 India Thailnd 2,467 22,563 2,467 22,563 7,201 67,898 7,201 67,898 China 8,121 626 8,121 626 Kor Rep Japan 87,103 58,137 87,103 58,137 TOTAL 492,452 1,070,587 492,452 1,070,587

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9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar Brushes for the Application of Cosmetics January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 329,650 924,657 329,650 924,657 Mexico 53,813 199,028 53,813 199,028 Panama 9,005 32,620 9,005 32,620 Cayman 1,742 10,652 1,742 10,652 Ecuador 789 10,797 789 10,797 Brazil 1,131 8,087 1,131 8,087 Norway 650 3,768 650 3,768 Finland 804 2,968 804 2,968 U King 12,147 61,412 12,147 61,412 Ireland 1,641 6,053 1,641 6,053 Nethlds 50,546 186,499 50,546 186,499 Belgium 14,229 52,500 14,229 52,500 France 7,215 32,363 7,215 32,363 Fr Germ 18,502 81,519 18,502 81,519 Czech 1,355 5,000 1,355 5,000 Switzld 1,537 5,670 1,537 5,670 Russia 17,317 63,895 17,317 63,895 Italy 857 3,162 857 3,162 Arab Em 4,500 9,152 4,500 9,152 Thailnd 717 5,458 717 5,458 Singapr 1,438 5,307 1,438 5,307 China 758 2,797 758 2,797 Hg Kong 3,829 15,767 3,829 15,767 Taiwan 1,553 6,621 1,553 6,621 Japan 42,397 185,206 42,397 185,206 Austral 5,691 22,610 5,691 22,610 Algeria 17,630 68,717 17,630 68,717 TOTAL 601,443 2,012,285 601,443 2,012,285

Country Canada Mexico Bermuda Bahamas Jamaica Dom Rep Colomb Peru Brazil Finland U King Nethlds Fr Germ S Arab Arab Em China N Zeal Fiji TOTAL

9603402000 Paint Rollers January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 155,725 516,918 155,725 396,780 1,090,689 396,780 2,444 5,349 2,444 1,812 4,058 1,812 1,168 20,503 1,168 1,500 39,652 1,500 481 8,450 481 2,640 2,956 2,640 6,198 20,007 6,198 8,000 13,340 8,000 1,051 5,328 1,051 560 2,808 560 2,050 8,247 2,050 1,215 21,333 1,215 464 5,721 464 450 11,988 450 1,644 6,700 1,644 1,452 7,586 1,452 585,634 1,791,633 585,634

Value 516,918 1,090,689 5,349 4,058 20,503 39,652 8,450 2,956 20,007 13,340 5,328 2,808 8,247 21,333 5,721 11,988 6,700 7,586 1,791,633

Country Hondura Grenada Israel Taiwan Japan TOTAL

9603404020 Paint Pads January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 20 3,400 20 3,083 21,882 3,083 809 5,740 809 13,624 17,711 13,624 5,160 3,769 5,160 22,696 52,502 22,696

Value 3,400 21,882 5,740 17,711 3,769 52,502

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) Year To Date January Net Q/No. Value Value Net Q/No. Country 300,226 23,826 300,226 23,826 Canada Mexico 139 2,877 139 2,877 Guatmal 54 5,998 54 5,998 1,069 22,176 1,069 22,176 C Rica


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PAGE 32 Bermuda Bahamas Cayman Trinid N Antil Venez Peru Brazil Argent Sweden Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds France Israel S Arab Singapr China TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 2,246 320 402 1,689 400 501 120 478 18 1,040 1,370 578 516 14,665 935 1,121 711 22 736 52,956

7,453 5,622 8,338 11,695 4,864 10,398 3,084 21,355 3,906 15,600 6,328 11,975 3,806 304,171 21,934 31,807 14,742 4,960 25,543 848,858

2,246 320 402 1,689 400 501 120 478 18 1,040 1,370 578 516 14,665 935 1,121 711 22 736 52,956

7,453 5,622 8,338 11,695 4,864 10,398 3,084 21,355 3,906 15,600 6,328 11,975 3,806 304,171 21,934 31,807 14,742 4,960 25,543 848,858

9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts for Broom or Brush Making, NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 213,230 2,275,475 213,230 2,275,475 Mexico 76,250 934,755 76,250 934,755 Panama 2,875 46,626 2,875 46,626 Dom Rep 678 3,359 678 3,359 S Vn Gr 83 2,877 83 2,877 Barbado 240 6,500 240 6,500 N Antil 1,320 24,131 1,320 24,131 Venez 858 13,910 858 13,910 Peru 11 3,159 11 3,159 Chile 7,455 94,833 7,455 94,833 Argent 295 4,780 295 4,780 Sweden 669 9,846 669 9,846 U King 3,061 36,905 3,061 36,905 Nethlds 514 8,338 514 8,338 Belgium 455 9,325 455 9,325 France 259 4,205 259 4,205 Fr Germ 1,640 18,966 1,640 18,966 369 5,988 5,988 369 Estonia Lithuan 880 9,050 880 9,050 Israel 433 7,021 433 7,021 S Arab 598 9,692 598 9,692 Qatar 191 3,100 191 3,100 Arab Em 467 11,024 467 11,024 4,676 598 4,676 598 Thailnd Singapr 458 18,356 458 18,356 Indnsia 2,082 25,524 2,082 25,524 China 291 4,719 291 4,719 Kor Rep 2,708 18,514 2,708 18,514 505 14,745 505 14,745 Hg Kong 18,777 974 18,777 974 Taiwan 35,011 2,260 35,011 2,260 Japan Austral 4,642 85,816 4,642 85,816 N Zeal 257 4,167 257 4,167 763 10,307 763 10,307 Rep Saf 328,369 3,784,477 328,369 3,784,477 TOTAL

Country China Hg Kong TOTAL

0502100000 Pigs’, Hogs’ or Boars’ Bristles and Hair and Waste Thereof January Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 40,450 657,612 40,450 2,212 24,071 2,212 42,662 681,683 42,662

Value 657,612 24,071 681,683

May 2009

Broom and Brush

IMPORTS January Imports By Country

Country Paragua China TOTAL

0502900000 Badger Hair and Other Brushmaking Hair and Waste Thereof January Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 12,987 141,848 12,987 4,237 61,628 4,237 17,224 203,476 17,224

Value 141,848 61,628 203,476

0511993300 Horsehair and Horsehair Waste, Whether or Not Put Up As A Layer With or Without Supporting Material January Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value China 13,075 181,587 13,075 181,587 TOTAL 13,075 181,587 13,075 181,587 1404903000 Istle Used Primarily In Brooms or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles January Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Mexico 34,226 170,779 34,226 170,779 TOTAL 34,226 170,779 34,226 170,779 4417002000 Broom and Mop Handles, 1.9 CM or More In Diameter and 97 CM or More In Length, Of Wood January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Hondura 374,476 214,041 374,476 214,041 Colomb 9,648 3,947 9,648 3,947 Brazil 1,602,243 1,312,109 1,602,243 1,312,109 Spain 32,064 14,758 32,064 14,758 Sri Lka 6,000 6,740 6,000 6,740 Vietnam 66,420 63,392 66,420 63,392 Indnsia 254,825 215,823 254,825 215,823 China 225,916 103,052 225,916 103,052 Taiwan 33,000 36,190 33,000 36,190 TOTAL 2,604,592 1,970,052 2,604,592 1,970,052 4417004000 Paint Brush and Paint Roller Handles, Of Wood January Year To Date Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Value Fr Germ 8,102 8,102 Italy 701,815 701,815 Indnsia 156,509 156,509 China 463,814 463,814 Taiwan 8,364 8,364 TOTAL 1,338,604 1,338,604

Country Canada Sri Lka Hg Kong TOTAL

4417006000 Brush Backs, Of Wood January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 42,132 14,264 42,132 34,104 34,060 34,104 25,000 16,944 25,000 101,236 65,268 101,236

Value 14,264 34,060 16,944 65,268

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr C Rica

4417008010 Tool Handles of Wood January Year To Date Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable 7,400 16,656 3,050 2,640

Value 7,400 16,656 3,050 2,640


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May 2009 Colomb Brazil Nethlds Indnsia China Taiwan TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 3,088 469,046 5,533 24,899 32,257 7,020 571,589

3,088 469,046 5,533 24,899 32,257 7,020 571,589

4417008090 Tools, Tool Bodies, Broom or Brush Bodies, Shoe Lasts and Trees, of Wood January Year To Date Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Value Canada 44,575 44,575 Mexico 3,100 3,100 Hondura 3,079 3,079 Colomb 2,696 2,696 Chile 702,610 702,610 U King 5,199 5,199 Italy 5,672 5,672 India 122,826 122,826 Sri Lka 104,266 104,266 Vietnam 18,499 18,499 Indnsia 36,631 36,631 China 278,286 278,286 Taiwan 21,576 21,576 Japan 205,627 205,627 TOTAL 1,554,642 1,554,642 9603104000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, Prior to Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year January Year To Date Mexico 22,992 16,752 22,992 16,752 China 2,520 2,456 2,520 2,456 TOTAL 25,512 19,208 25,512 19,208 9603106000 Other Brooms, Of Broomcorn, Valued Over .96 Each January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 552,005 1,249,747 552,005 1,249,747 Hondura 38,064 81,644 38,064 81,644 32,432 15,840 32,432 15,840 China TOTAL 605,909 1,363,823 605,909 1,363,823 9603109000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles, NESOI January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Value Net Q/No. Country Mexico 13,600 7,818 13,600 7,818 97,331 57,764 97,331 57,764 Sri Lka Thailnd 3,750 9,605 3,750 9,605 Vietnam 15,050 12,546 15,050 12,546 Phil R 1,000 2,504 1,000 2,504 24,856 12,688 24,856 12,688 China 103,852 154,660 103,852 154,660 TOTAL 9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 31,707 61,147 31,707 61,147 Mexico 521,581 226,732 521,581 226,732 Chile 38,016 9,216 38,016 9,216 242,169 896,184 242,169 896,184 Brazil Ireland 764,832 340,187 764,832 340,187 5,416 39,700 5,416 39,700 Nethlds France 447 4,287 447 4,287 Fr Germ 3,502,344 2,934,476 3,502,344 2,934,476 Switzld 6,036,912 1,566,908 6,036,912 1,566,908

Italy Israel India Thailnd Vietnam Indnsia China Taiwan TOTAL0

Country Vietnam China Hg Kong TOTAL

PAGE 33 74,880 113,576 4,168,990 1,102,360 600,648 134,000 47,642,938 1,461,306 67,130,421

37,425 74,249 560,184 135,337 195,629 8,896 8,022,604 195,259 14,620,121

74,880 113,576 4,168,990 1,102,360 600,648 134,000 47,642,938 1,461,306 67,130,421

37,425 74,249 560,184 135,337 195,629 8,896 8,022,604 195,259 14,620,121

9603294010 Hairbrushes, Valued Not Over .40 Each January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 7,200 3,086 7,200 3,086 6,140,923 1,162,728 6,140,923 1,162,728 136,512 25,214 136,512 25,214 6,284,635 1,191,028 6,284,635 1,191,028

9603294090 Shaving Brushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person, Valued Not Over .40 Each January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 4,336,154 413,229 4,336,154 413,229 France 167,911 34,551 167,911 34,551 Fr Germ 2,528,170 493,734 2,528,170 493,734 Italy 544,604 141,038 544,604 141,038 China 3,841,225 809,833 3,841,225 809,833 Kor Rep 1,452,600 41,042 1,452,600 41,042 Hg Kong 384,000 29,396 384,000 29,396 Taiwan 35,000 9,767 35,000 9,767 TOTAL 13,289,664 1,972,590 13,289,664 1,972,590 9603302000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Not Over .05 Each January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 269,200 4,945 269,200 4,945 Fr Germ 2,500,000 6,126 2,500,000 6,126 Italy 3,542,900 48,496 3,542,900 48,496 China 5,486,774 144,636 5,486,774 144,636 34,949 1,365,000 34,949 1,365,000 Kor Rep TOTAL 13,163,874 239,152 13,163,874 239,152 9603304000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application of Cosmetics, Valued Over .05 But not Over .10 Each January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 5,597,206 450,456 5,597,206 450,456 China 8,062,941 651,992 8,062,941 651,992 Kor Rep 300,000 16,600 300,000 16,600 3,037 30,000 3,037 30,000 Hg Kong Taiwan 900,016 52,989 900,016 52,989 TOTAL 14,890,163 1,175,074 14,890,163 1,175,074 9603306000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Over .10 Each Year To Date January Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 2,163 45 2,163 45 Canada 7,641,777 1,246,416 7,641,777 1,246,416 Mexico Dom Rep 87,705 88,571 87,705 88,571 U King 91,411 167,897 91,411 167,897 France 49,156 236,170 49,156 236,170 135,212 46,300 135,212 46,300 Fr Germ 7,299 32,459 32,459 7,299 Spain Italy 95,853 32,934 95,853 32,934 India 419,338 209,001 419,338 209,001 123,038 235,008 123,038 235,008 Sri Lka


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PAGE 34 Thailnd China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Maurit TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Fr Germ China TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 270,714 17,136,329 256,046 542,890 141,252 224,633 1,890 27,247,646

159,968 10,643,811 177,657 270,693 50,323 673,052 8,602 14,257,967

270,714 17,136,329 256,046 542,890 141,252 224,633 1,890 27,247,646

9603402000 Paint Rollers January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 39,008 32,377 39,008 708,692 446,163 708,692 242,000 74,843 242,000 2,443,646 1,678,628 2,443,646 3,433,346 2,232,011 3,433,346

159,968 10,643,811 177,657 270,693 50,323 673,052 8,602 14,257,967

Value 32,377 446,163 74,843 1,678,628 2,232,011

9603404020 Paint Pads (Other Than Of Subheading 9603.30) January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Italy 44 7,438 44 7,438 China 787,182 483,657 787,182 483,657 Taiwan 17,776 132,046 17,776 132,046 TOTAL 805,002 623,141 805,002 623,141 9603404040 Natural Bristle Brushes, Other Than Brushes Of Subheading 9603.30 January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value U King 13,480 14,680 13,480 14,680 Fr Germ 1,428 4,050 1,428 4,050 Turkey 23,112 69,943 23,112 69,943 Indnsia 2,689,610 433,114 2,689,610 433,114 China 24,280 34,244 24,280 34,244 Taiwan 3,000 8,590 3,000 8,590 Japan 1,800 16,144 1,800 16,144 TOTAL 2,756,710 580,765 2,756,710 580,765 9603404060 Paint, Distemper, Varnish/Similr Brushes Exc Brushes of Subheading 9603.30 NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 12,288 26,837 12,288 26,837 Fr Germ 12,920 42,497 12,920 42,497 6,078 6,416 6,078 6,416 Vietnam Singapr 10,750 4,309 10,750 4,309 Indnsia 3,473,488 739,267 3,473,488 739,267 China 13,863,668 5,675,684 13,863,668 5,675,684 59,400 73,456 59,400 73,456 Taiwan Japan 68,615 19,610 68,615 19,610 TOTAL 17,507,207 6,588,076 17,507,207 6,588,076

Country Mexico China Rep Saf TOTAL

9603908010 Wiskbrooms January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 2,893 1,520 1,520 60,108 50,462 60,108 768 2,467 768 62,396 55,822 62,396

Value 2,893 50,462 2,467 55,822

Country Mexico Colomb Brazil Italy China

9603908020 Upright Brooms January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 25,392 28,431 25,392 9,288 10,070 9,288 23,883 30,771 23,883 18,658 14,080 18,658 687,350 731,973 687,350

Value 28,431 10,070 30,771 14,080 731,973

TOTAL

May 2009 764,571

815,325

764,571

815,325

9603908030 Push Brooms, 41 CM or Less in Width January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 720 3,213 720 Sri Lka China 9,840 21,371 9,840 TOTAL 10,560 24,584 10,560

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr Colomb Venez Brazil Hungary Spain Italy Sri Lka Thailnd Vietnam Indnsia China TOTAL

9603908040 Other Brooms, NESOI January Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 95,601 204,946 95,601 274,813 518,750 274,813 19,644 17,292 19,644 27,900 27,994 27,900 720,252 41,437 720,252 30,753 66,820 30,753 27,900 8,777 27,900 22,200 22,495 22,200 1,343 14,248 1,343 43,348 118,344 43,348 6,500 9,034 6,500 2,740 6,363 2,740 38,150 38,974 38,150 709,830 783,518 709,830 2,020,974 1,878,992 2,020,974

Value 3,213 21,371 24,584

Value 204,946 518,750 17,292 27,994 41,437 66,820 8,777 22,495 14,248 118,344 9,034 6,363 38,974 783,518 1,878,992

9603908050 Brooms, Brushes, Sqeegees, Etc., NESOI January Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 1,817,095 1,817,095 Mexico 3,801,318 3,801,318 Hondura 979,274 979,274 Panama 9,716 9,716 Dom Rep 7,173 7,173 Colomb 82,232 82,232 Brazil 53,988 53,988 Argent 70,906 70,906 Sweden 24,286 24,286 Denmark 54,347 54,347 U King 43,909 43,909 15,074 15,074 Nethlds Belgium 150,460 150,460 Fr Germ 162,216 162,216 Austria 166,219 166,219 Czech 8,093 8,093 Switzld 12,501 12,501 Poland 6,424 6,424 Spain 6,083 6,083 719,433 719,433 Italy 3,835 3,835 Romania Israel 87,487 87,487 India 190,977 190,977 Pakistn 476,679 476,679 Sri Lka 223,322 223,322 992,820 992,820 Thailnd Vietnam 77,240 77,240 Malaysa 25,652 25,652 18,615 18,615 Singapr 73,954 73,954 Indnsia 27,985,983 27,985,983 China Kor Rep 384,425 384,425 Hg Kong 335,931 335,931 Taiwan 845,577 845,577 77,097 77,097 Japan Austral 108,503 108,503 W Samoa 25,469 25,469 11,581 11,581 Egypt 40,135,894 40,135,894 TOTAL


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Alison Gannett Continued From Page 19 “This is the type of innovation that can help change the industry,” Gannett said. “By being ahead of the curve, (Pioneer) is going help save people money in the long run.” She added that suppliers are starting to be required by customers to package their products more efficiently to cut down on shipping costs. “There are all kinds of ideas while thinking outside the box when it comes to packaging,” Gannett said. The “O” of CROP™ that Gannett detailed has to do with “offsets” as in “carbon offsets.” She said there are two types of carbon offsets for a company. “An example of the first kind is when you contact your local electric company and say, ‘I would like to buy green power such as from wind, solar or hydro.’ Sometimes this requires paying extra, although in some areas, it’s becoming possible to get (green) power at the same price,” Gannett said. “The second type of offset is called ‘voluntary carbon offset.’ If a company calculates its carbon footprint at, for example 650,000 tons, it can actually offset that carbon (by purchasing offsets) and become what is called ‘carbon neutral.’ “That money then goes to alternative energy projects. A company is basically producing carbon at its manufacturing plant, and then offsetting that carbon by supporting a project which is absorbing carbon in another place,” Gannet explained. Producing Your Own Power

T

he final part of CROP™ is known as “producing your own power.” According to Gannett, many people feel they can’t afford to go green. However, for a typical house or business, there are many low or no-cost steps that can be taken to make a big difference. “Generally, 50 percent of the carbon footprint for a business can be taken care of with low or no-cost solutions. However, everybody looks at the big ticket items first, instead of reducing carbon footprints through efficient lighting, etc.,” Gannett said. “It is important to look at cuts that are first and foremost saving you money. Big ticket items that cost money include solar panels, replacing windows, etc. These things have a higher up-front cost.” Gannett recommends that companies calculate their carbon footprints first, then “reduce, reduce, reduce.”

BROOM CAPS

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“I would say most companies should spend 5 to 10 years reducing their carbon footprints before they tackle producing their own power,” she said. When the time comes, however, for a company to look into producing its own power, it’s important to seek all alternatives. “For example, many companies are looking at installing either solar electric panels or solar hot water panels. I believe solar hot water panels have a much higher return on investment,” Gannett said. “Right now there are great tax incentives to use alternative energy for buildings.” She added that companies like Borghi s.p.a., of Italy, have installed solar panels on top of their manufacturing plants. Because of the Kyoto Agreement, many European companies have become very aggressive in reducing their carbon footprints due to mandates already in place. Gannett also discussed hydro-power and its many benefits. She explained that there are companies finding a higher return on investment with hydro-power compared to other power sources. Another good prospect for future electricity generation is wind power. “There are small-scale windmills now that can be placed at the perimeter of your manufacturing facility and are very cost effective. Technology is changing by the day. Again, there are many tax incentives available,” she said. “It’s important to think about your return on investment.” When marketing a company’s green efforts, Gannett discussed the importance of being transparent about not only improvements a company is making but also current weaknesses. “We have found that customers love it when a company says, ‘Here is what we are doing well and here is where we are going to improve’ when it comes to green,” she said. Greening a business also helps improve employee retention, Gannett added. For example, she has found employees in warehouses love to show off new green improvements being implemented. If a company is truly green, this can provide an authentic marketing story to present to customers as well. “It’s important to separate yourself during a tough economy. How are you going to differentiate your manufacturing plant from another company? By going green, you can become more cost effective and improve your bottom line while also reducing overhead costs and waste ... all of the things that are good for business,” Gannett said. For more information, visit www.alisongannett.com.

BRUSH and HANDLE FERRULES

MANUFACTURING INCORPORATED P.O. Box 6505

Wolcott, CT 06716

Phone 203-879-1481


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

May 2009

U.S. Imports 21 Short Tons Of Broom Corn In February By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor A total of 21 short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States during February 2009. Total value of this import was $63,921, with a cost per ton of $3,044 ($1.52 per pound). The import total for February was quite smaller compared to the amount of broom corn brought into the United States during the second month of the past five years. These totals are as follows: February 2004 - 113 short tons; February 2005 - 44 short tons; February 2006 - 215 short tons; February 2007 - 90 short tons; and February 2008 - 91 short tons. February of 2009 also marked the fourth month in a row that U.S. broom corn imports averaged less than 30 tons per month. After the first two months of 2009, a total of 35 short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States, all of which came from Mexico. Total value of this broom corn was $110,998, with a cost per ton of $3,171 ($1.59 per pound). In comparison, 180 short tons of broom corn were imported into the country after the first two months of 2008, with a total value of $458,608. The cost per ton of this import was $2,548 ($1.27 per pound). Richard Caddy of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, feels that the very low U.S. broom corn import figures for the past four months is reflective of today’s slow economy, which includes fewer broom corn brooms being sold. “People just are not purchasing as they once did. Most of the (customers) who we contact still have inventory left over from what we had previously shipped to them. Even if (broom corn) prices were lower, I feel people would still be reluctant to purchase,” Caddy said. “I had a little more optimism during this time last month (middle of March) compared to now (middle of April). It’s tough when most of the larger accounts are just not in the position to buy much.” When interviewed on April 15, Caddy said Mexican broom corn pricing has come down a little but not enough to get customers excited about buying. As far as the near future is concerned with Mexican broom corn, Caddy said he had not received any news as of late regarding the expected size of the first Torreon crop that will become available this summer. There is hope, however, that lower prices for other crops such as corn and cotton will persuade farmers to grow more broom corn in this area of Mexico. “We are hoping that if the weather cooperates, there will be a good crop (in Torreon). The economy has to cooperate, too,” Caddy said. There has been recent good news to report relating to the broom corn fumigation issue. In a letter dated March 26, 2009, from

William E. Thomas, director of Quarantine Policy, Analysis, and Support from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and sent to Mark D Quinn, of Quinn Broom Works, Inc., Greenup, IL, it was announced, in part, that broom corn imported from Mexico will no longer be required to be fumigated at the U.S.-Mexican border. Instead, broom corn from Mexico will be fumigated, “only if a pest of concern is found.” A letter writing campaign among various people involved with the U.S. broom and broom corn industry began shortly after the 2008 National Broom & Mop meeting was held in St. Louis last November. These letters were sent to various U.S. representatives and senators, as well as to the USDA, asking for a review of the fumigation issue. Quinn, who is now a co-chairman of the group that meets every November, served on a committee formed at the conclusion of the St. Louis meeting to address the fumigation issue. The fumigation matter began in October 2008 when the USDA required that all incoming broom corn from Mexico be fumigated at the border in an effort to protect against corn bores, although corn bores have been in the United States for decades. The fumigation requirement caused concerns from U.S. broom corn dealers and users over what influence the requirement would have on supply and costs. Caddy reported that as of the middle of April, it’s now at the discretion of inspectors at the border on whether a load of broom corn is to be fumigated or not. “For the most part, it’s an inspect and release situation rather than fumigation,” he explained. Tim Monahan of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, said it’s sad to see such low broom corn import numbers occurring for the United States. However, he was not surprised, adding that there has not been much corn broom-making activity in this country as of late. “I also didn’t see or hear about too much broom corn entering the United States during March, but surely somebody is going to be needing something pretty soon. I would suspect March may be a little higher with (broom corn) imports,” Monahan said. As of the middle of April, he added that Mexican broom corn prices have remained high, which is part of the reason why imports into the United States have been so low. Of course, today’s slow economic conditions have also influenced this situation. “The economy needs a kick start and so does the broom, brush and mop industry. It may be premature, but I think a lot of industries are at the bottom (of an economic cycle), and I don’t see it picking up real soon,” Monahan said. Along with broom corn imports, he added that the level of finished corn brooms being imported from Mexico is also down. Regarding the next major broom corn crop expected out of Mexico, Monahan said harvesting in the Torreon region could start


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May 2009

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

as early as the end of May. However, it’s hard to determine how big a crop to expect. Demand has also been down concerning yucca fiber. “There is not much movement. It parallels broom corn. What sales of yucca are occurring are mostly taking place (among broom manufacturers) in Mexico,” Monahan said. Bart Pelton of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, TX, said there are several factors that have caused broom corn imports to be quite low during the past several months. One reason is due to the slow overall economy. Also, due to some buying taking place among U.S. broom factories late last year to hedge against expected higher prices, less broom corn has been required as of late by these same companies. He added that Mexican broom corn prices remain high as of the middle of April. “There was some softening in broom corn prices in March due to a weakening Mexican peso. However, this (softening) did not last very long. Since March 9, the peso has strengthen around 20 percent, which is a big move,” Pelton said. “For awhile, we were getting price relief due to the exchange rate, but this has pretty much disappeared in the past month. I would expect any broom corn that enters the United States during April to be high in price.” When interviewed on April 15, Pelton reported that the Apatzingan broom corn harvest in Mexico was nearing completion. He expected around 250 tons of broom corn on a processed basis to be the result of this harvest — an approximate 20 percent increase over last year’s final figure. “Broom corn is still in tight supply in Mexico. There is not

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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS ABMA ......................................................................38 Borghi .......................................................................40 Brush Expert .............................................................37 Caddy & Co., Inc., R.E.............................................11 Carlson Tool .............................................................11 Chung Thai Brushes Co..............................................7 Crystal Lake................................................................9 Jones Companies ........................................................1 Line Manufacturing, Inc. ..........................................35 Manufacturers Resource .............................................3 Monahan Co., The Thomas .......................................5 Mount Joy Wire ..........................................................8 PelRay.........................................................................2 St. Nick Brush Co.....................................................15

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going to be a lot of broom corn available until the new Torreon crop comes in around late June or early July,” Pelton said. He added that due to today’s drug violence and kidnappings in the Torreon region and other areas of Mexico, there has been a reluctance among processors to seek updated information on current broom corn crop conditions. “As a result, there is not nearly as much crop information available as in past years,” Pelton said. “Therefore, I can only speculate that since broom corn prices have been fairly high while prices for competing crops have fallen, that farmers may take advantage of this situation and plant more broom corn (in 2009). My personal expectation is that there will be a larger Torreon crop compared to last year. “There is also some broom corn planted in Sinaloa. Most of this, however, will go to one large Mexican broom factory.” Pelton added that the Mexican government is working to help control the violence in the country. However, the situation is still serious. “It’s discouraging and the violence will probably impact how much broom corn is available this year,” he said. On a more positive note, Pelton feels the fumigation issue has pretty well been solved, although closer inspections of broom corn loads at the U.S.-Mexican border remain the norm. “We often will now find a bale or two broken for inspection on a load (arriving from Mexico), but that’s not a big deal,” he explained. For those seeking bargains in the broom industry, yucca fiber might be the best option. Pelton said pricing on some truckload purchases has been as low as experienced in several years.


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ABMA Divisions Continued From Page 16 Suppliers Division Chair Ian Moss, of Static Faction, Salem, MA, also discussed the success of this year’s Suppliers Reception that took place Friday evening (March 27) of the ABMA Annual Convention. Moss said ABMA suppliers pay for the majority of this reception, and the event has been well received. During the Suppliers Division meeting, members also discussed and approved the divisional assessment for 2009 regarding the Suppliers Reception. It was noted as well by Moss during the Suppliers Division meeting the large number of attendees from overseas who took the time to attend this year’s ABMA Annual Convention. “It’s wonderful that we (ABMA) have a good relationship with the FEIBP (European Brushware Federation) and attend each other’s functions,” Moss said. “I would like to thank everyone who came from Europe and elsewhere, especially during this tough economy.” Suppliers Division 3rd Vice Chair

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Carlos Petzold, of Borghi USA/ Bodam International, Aberdeen, MD, reported that space for this year’s annual ABMA Suppliers Display, held on Friday (March 27), was sold out and that there were several Finished Goods Displays as well, which was also held on Friday. Attendees of the Industrial & Maintenance Division meeting also discussed the need to seek greater ABMA membership among Mexican manufacturers. It was noted that supplier members can help by identifying likely candidates from Mexico in an effort to increase the overall ABMA membership base. In one of the final acts at the meeting, the Suppliers Division elected the following people as new officers for 2009-2011: J. Andrew Dailey, Jones Companies Ltd, Chair; Daniel Sinykin, Monterey/Roller Fabrics, Vice Chair; Carlos Petzold, Borghi USA/Bodam International, 2nd Vice Chair; David Kalisz, MFC Ltd., 3rd Vice Chair; Jill Shinners, Pioneer Packaging, At Large (2011); and Chris Monahan, Brush Fibers Inc, At Large (2013).

May 2009

Harper Brush Announces Acquisition Of Feather Duster Harper Brush Works, of Fairfield, IA, completed the acquisition of Feather Duster Corporation, of Amsterdam, NY, on Feb. 1, 2009. Harper Brush and Feather Duster had been working on joint manufacturing, sales and marketing ventures since April, 2008 prior to the acquisition. All production and inventory has been moved to Harper’s Greenville, NC, manufacturing and distribution facility. All sales and administrative support will be handled at the Fairfield location. Harper looks forward to servicing FDC’s customers with the same product line and high service they have previously received. Harper launched the completely new duster line recently at the International Housewares Show under the Harper brand. Harper is the only company in the world that has the exclusive rights to use the Klein Karoo’s “Blue Ostrich Hallmark of Quality” trademark.


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Broom, Brush & Mop

SUPPLIERS 2009 Deadline: May 15, 2009 The following form will be used to compile a company profile to be included in Suppliers 2009, an international suppliers directory that will be read all year long by broom, brush and mop manufacturers. Please fill out and return as soon as possible. Thank you for your help in making this suppliers directory the most helpful and most comprehensive yet.

SUBMITTED BY: COMPANY NAME: ADDRESS: CITY:

STATE:

TELEPHONE:

FAX:

EMAIL:

WEBSITE:

ZIP:

COUNTRY:

COMPANY OFFICERS:

PRODUCTS:

Mail to: Broom, Brush & Mop, 204 E. Main, P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910 - USA Phone 800-598-8083 (US) • 217-268-4959 • FAX 217-268-4815 • Email: drankin126@aol.com


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Broom, Brush & Mop May 2009  

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine's May 2009 issue. The trade magazine for the broom, brush and mop industry.

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