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February 2010

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine SERVING THE INDUSTRY SINCE 1912

ABMA Convention Heads To Orlando, FL Company Interviews With Brush Producers: Hill Brush Culicover & Shapiro Milwaukee Dustless Brush The Malish Corp.

Import/Export Figures Continue To Show Declines


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

February 2010

Broom, Brush & Mop A RANKIN PUBLISHING PUBLICATION

February 2010

Volume 100, Number 2

CALENDAR

FEATURES

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 3, 2010

Tucel Industries Specializes In Innovative Hygienic Cleaning Tools ________________________6

International Hardware Fair, Cologne, Germany Information: 773-326-9928

ABMA Annual Convention ______________________18

MARCH 14 - 16, 2010

ABMA Schedule _____________________________19

International Home & Housewares Show, Chicago, IL Information: 847-292-4200

Brush Manufacturers Optimistic About Future Business_________________________24

MARCH 17 - 20, 2010

Import/Export Overview________________________34

ABMA Annual Convention, Orlando, FL Information: 630-631-5217

October Imports & Exports _____________________36

APRIL 26 - 29, 2010

ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Information: 847-982-0800

Broom Corn Dealer Survey _____________________49

MAY 4 - 6, 2010

STAFF CO-PUBLISHERS Don Rankin

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Rick Mullen

drankin@consolidated.net

rankinmag@consolidated.net

Linda Rankin

GRAPHIC/PRODUCTION Jennie Grace David Opdyke RECEPTION Sandy Pierce

lrankin@consolidated.net

EDITOR Harrell Kerkhoff rankinmag@consolidated.net

National Hardware Show, Las Vegas, NV Information: 203-840-5622

MAY 22 - 25, 2010

National Restaurant Association Annual Show, Chicago, IL Information: 312-853-2525

NOVEMBER 9 - 12, 2010

ISSA/INTERCLEAN®, Orlando, FL Information: 800-225-4772

Rankin Publishing, Inc.

ASSOCIATIONS

204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130 • Arcola, Illinois 61910-0130, USA Phone: (217) 268-4959 • Fax: (217) 268-4815 • Website: www.rankinpublishing.com BROOM, BRUSH & MOP (ISSN 0890-2933) is published monthly at 204 E. Main St., P.O. Box 130, Arcola, Illinois 61910. Telephone: (217) 268-4959. Subscriptions are $25 in the United States; $35 in Canada and Mexico; all others $110. The $110 foreign subscriptions include first class air mail postage. Arrangements can be made for first class postage for the United States, Canada and Mexico. Single copies of issues are $2 for subscribers; $5 for nonsubscribers, postage extra. The Suppliers Directory issue is $10 per copy. BROOM, BRUSH & MOP is a monthly trade magazine devoted to news of broom, brush and mop manufacturers and allied industries. It was established in 1912 as the Broom & Broom Corn News. It was entered as second class mail matter Feb. 27, 1912, at the U.S. Post Office in Arcola, Illinois, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Arcola, IL, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: send address changes to P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910.

MOVING?

AMERICAN BRUSH MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 2111 W. Plum St., Aurora, IL 60506 • (630) 631-5217 AMERICAN HARDWARE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 801 North Plaza Drive, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4977 • (847) 605-1025 FEIBP EUROPEAN BRUSH FEDERATION P.O. Box 90154, 5000 LG Tilburg, The Netherlands • 00 31 13 5944 678 INTERNATIONAL SANITARY SUPPLY ASSOCIATION 7373 N. Lincoln Avenue, Lincolnwood, IL 60646-1799 • (847) 982-0800 INTERNATIONAL HOUSEWARES ASSOCIATION 6400 Shafer Court, Suite 650, Rosemont, IL 60018 • (847) 292-4200

Clip & return to Broom, Brush & Mop P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910

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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

February 2010

John Lewis, founder and president of Tucel Industries, has been instrumental in developing the process of manufacturing hygienic brushes, brooms and other products.

By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor

T

continues its mission of being a leading research-driven manufacturer that discovers, develops, innovates, manufactures and markets a broad range of high-quality hygienic cleaning tools for habitat, health and hygiene. Tucel’s products are designed to be cost effective and heat, bacteria and chemical resistant as well as easy to clean. Tucel divides its product offerings into seven basic categories. They are: Food Prep™; Equip Clean; Special Equip; Floor and Wall; Infectious Control; Sanitary Maintenance; and Kits and Handles. These products are designed and manufactured using FDAapproved raw materials to assure that the enduser’s job is completed quickly and efficiently with bacteria free surfaces as the end result.

ucel Industries, Inc., of Forestdale, VT, is a leading manufacturer of a broad range of innovative hygienic cleaning tools for the foodservice, infection control, sanitary maintenance and janitorial market segments. The company’s three foundational priorities are habitat, health and hygiene. Tucel’s patented manufacturing techniques and brush and broom products have been revolutionary in the hygienic cleaning tools field. “Tucel offers a complete line of fused brush products,” said Tucel President and founder John Lewis recently in an interview with Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine. “We offer A Green Mission 100 percent recyclable, green and HACCP In The Green Mountain State (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) compatible products. Sales are provided to disermont gets its nickname, “The Green tributors as well as OEM customers.” Mountain State,” from the beautiful Lewis, who is also a chemist, founded the Green Mountain range that runs north company 40 years ago and immediately set and south for about 250 miles in the middle of about revolutionizing how hygienic brushes, the state. The Green Mountains, a virtual wonderland for hikers, skiers, nature lovers and brooms and other products were made by A complete line of fused brush vacationers, are a part of the Appalachian developing fusion technology. Lewis came up products are available from Tucel. Mountains that stretch from Canada to Georgia. with the idea of fusing bristles as opposed to In a state with an abundance of greenery and natural beauty, stapling and, in 1969, the year prior to the founding of Tucel, Tucel was “green” from the beginning. It would be many years received his first patent. Today, Lewis holds more than 35 U.S. patents for fusing and after Lewis founded Tucel, however, that “green” became the brush design products as well as foreign patents. The company buzzword for all things deemed environmentally friendly.

V


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The idea of fusing bristles to brushes in lieu of stapling or other than any brush company in the world.” Lewis warns that many times when companies tout their prodmethods came to Lewis while he was working for a fiber compaucts as ‘green,’ that designation might not tell the whole story. ny prior to founding Tucel. “While a company might say a brush is recyclable, the truth is “I used to visit factories where they would be drilling holes in wood and plastic. Then they would double the fiber and stick it in a person would have to take the brush apart. The fiber would have the hole,” Lewis said. “I kept thinking about how they were wast- to be separated from the block because the two components would ing a lot of thickness making the brushes as well as doing weird be made from different materials. Then you would have to get rid things by having to put staples in them — in a toothbrush it is of the metal. Who is going to do that?” Lewis said. called an anchor.” Lewis wondered if there was a way of making a brush other Other Colors Involved In Being ‘Green’ than the “drill and then fill” processes he was observing. Two ideas began to germinate. ewis started Tucel in Middlebury, VT, just west of the “I thought if a fiber tuft could be duplicated, you could put them Green Mountains, with one employee and a picnic table. all on at the same time,” Lewis remembered. Tucel remained in Middlebury for 10 years and then The second part of the moved several miles south to equation involved using the Forestdale, where Lewis pursame material for the fiber chased a factory. tuft as the material to which it Tucel’s current operation, is fused. located on 11 acres, is a “It took me a long time to 45,000 square-foot facility, figure it all out,” Lewis said. 10,000 square feet of which is “I also started to build a a warehouse. The building machine and that took what also houses a complete seemed to be a longer time to machine shop and a complete make it work. As soon as I molding and brush machine did, I kind of revolutionized department. the whole field.” One of the things Vermont The material of choice is known for is its colorful these days for Tucel’s fused autumns when all the green products is polypropylene, leaves turn an array of vivid which it uses almost exclucolors. People travel from all Tucel staff members include, left to right, Operations Manager Chris sively. Polypropylene is a over the world to take advanCourcelle, Vice President Joanne Raleigh and Customer Service thermoplastic polymer used tage of this visual treat. Representative Tina Bilodeau. in a wide variety of applicaAs Lewis’ ideas concerning tions such as plastic parts, reusable containers of various types, fused products began to come into fruition, color would also play laboratory equipment, foodservice, and more. an important role in Tucel’s green world. Polypropylene is often used for food containers, especially One of the first light bulbs that went off in Lewis’ mind as he those that need to be dishwasher safe. The melting point of germinated the fusion concept was that the process had the potenpolypropylene is very high compared to many other plastics. tial to result in products that would be extremely efficient in elimPolypropylene is also very easy to dye, and does not soak up inating cross-contamination and in controlling infectious disease. water, making it ideal for uses “I started reading articles where it is constantly subjected about toothbrushes. Some of the “We are very lean. Everyone of my to moisture. articles talked about people who employees can do just about any job, “We use polypropylene 99.9 had an oral virus and how they whether it is working on making percent of the time,” Lewis said. reinfected themselves as the “It is ‘the world.’ In other words, virus stayed alive in their toothbrushes or running the molding if you buy a bottle of pills, or a brushes,” Lewis said. machine or packaging.” jug of wine, or container of solLewis realized that if both the vent — these items are all stored toothbrush bristles and the brush -John Lewis, Tucel Industries in a polypropylene container. itself was made of polypropyWith polypropylene, nothing can get into the container and noth- lene, there would be little or no chance for reinfection to occur. ing can get out of the container. It is the best substance in which Immediately, Lewis knew his ideas for fused products would be a to store anything. perfect fit for the foodservice industry. “If you wash dishes, items made out of polypropylene can never Lewis was right, and today, with what is now known as its rust. You can make it wet, and it will take the heat and cold. patented TUCEL® tufting process, the company’s fusion methods Polypropylene is made with only carbon and hydrogen. There is result in products that are chemically recyclable, withstand all no oxygen or chlorine or nitrogen in polypropylene. It is the safest chemical cleaning solvents and compounds and have no places for chemistry in the world and you can grind it up and use again. This bacteria and pathogenic substances to collect. is why we say we have the best green manufacturing operation In addition, as an even further-reaching safeguard against cross-

L


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February 2010

At left is ground waste to be remolded into black paintbrush handles. Examples of finished fused paintbrushes from Tucel Industries are shown at right.

contamination, especially in the foodservice field, Tucel began “At the Tucel booth during our first ISSA show, we displayed introducing color-coded products. white blocks and brushes. We also displayed the same products, “A long time before anyone heard of the ‘green’ movement, and but in various colors such as yellow, green, black, blue, etc. We let before Uncle Sam started emphasizing using only one brush for a our customers know they could have all those colors using the particular task to avoid cross-contamination, we were implement- same block,” Lewis said. ing these concepts,” Lewis said. “We are the only ‘true’ green With its innovative approach and techniques, Tucel has gone company.” According to Tucel’s Web site, “A long time before anyone heard of the ‘green’ movement, www.tucel.com, there are two types and before Uncle Sam started emphasizing using only one of brush products for foodservice. brush for a particular task to avoid cross-contamination, They are brushes and brooms that clean the non-food surfaces in we were implementing these concepts.” kitchens, in food process plants and in large food, medical and chemical -John Lewis, Tucel Industries institutions, and those that are used directly on food for cleaning and basting cooked and pastry type beyond the janitorial and sanitary maintenance industry’s stanfoods. dards by offering complete color-coded, fused brush and broom Color-coding is used to distinguish between cleaning tools used configurations, bacteria resistant filaments and non-porous moldon non-food surfaces, and those used on surfaces in direct contact ed blocks. with food. The color of the brush filaments is designed to alert the user to double check the danger of cross-contamination, reducing Operating Lean In A Lean Economy the risk of food poisoning. Associations such as the FDA recommend that brushes and espite the company’s strong position in the marketplace brooms used directly and indirectly in food preparation be colordue to its high quality, unique and innovative products, coded. The use of color codes helps to prevent cross-contaminathe recent economic woes worldwide have had an impact. tion. Tucel’s products are color-coded with the following suggest“Business this past year has been tough for everyone,” Lewis ed scheme (these are only suggestions under the HACCP regula- said. “With the rising costs of raw materials, manufacturers have tions): had to raise prices. We have tried to hold the line on our prices. We n Red: Raw product preparation contact area; have not had a price increase since 2008, but companies can only n Green: Cleaning produce and fruits; absorb so much. n White: Pasteurization and food contact areas; “We are also seeing a trend toward distributors seeking cheaper n Blue: Seafood preparation areas; products from sources overseas, thus foregoing quality in many n Yellow: Non-food contact surface areas; and cases.” n Black: Drains and other non-food areas. Some of Tucel’s former OEM customers, especially larger cor-

D


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February 2010

ary times. The company’s porations, have also moved to ability to manufacture high purchasing products manuquality products that are factured overseas, opting for effective and last longer, pricing over quality, Lewis while using fewer raw matesaid. rials, has also helped its cus“A positive for us is consistomers when it comes to tently introducing new prodpricing. ucts that are not yet available outside the United States,” Lewis said. Employees Are Key Also on the positive side To Success regarding commerce overseas, Lewis said Tucel is hen it comes to growing with its customers in Tucel’s philosophy Japan who are purchasing concerning perpetfoodservice and pharmaceutiuating growth, Lewis points to cal cleaning tools. introducing new products, The Internet has also increasing sales and continuing The 45,000 square-foot Tucel Industries’ facility includes helped Tucel streamline its to be on the cutting edge of a 10,000 square-foot warehouse as well as a machine shop operations as it has eliminated innovation. However, none of and complete molding/brush machine department. the need for some outside these principles work very well sales representatives. without outstanding employees. “We used to have representatives across the United States to “Without our employees, Tucel would not exist,” Lewis said. whom we paid rep fees,” Lewis said. “We no longer do that. If “They are the very core of our company. All of our employees are a company does not have a Web site, it runs the risk of going out longterm and are somewhat like a small family.” of business as most everyone relies on the computer today.” Tucel currently employs 13 full-time, highly skilled workers. Tucel’s practices, such as just-in-time delivery, and others, The company’s streamlined management setup does away with have helped customers stay competitive during these recession- unnecessary and oftentimes cumbersome levels of bureaucracy.

W


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John Lewis and Joanne Raleigh are shown at Tucel Industries’ company booth during the 2009 ISSA/INTERCLEAN. The annual event helps showcase Tucel’s wide variety of cleaning products.

“We do not have layers of management. We have only myself, a vice president and an operations manager,” Lewis said. “They are the ones who keep the wheels turning in the right direction on

February 2010

a daily basis. “Joanne Raleigh, who has been with Tucel for 30 years, is our vice president. She knows all aspects of the company. Operations Manager Chris Courcelle has been with the company for 12 years and keeps the production floor running. Also, Tina Bilodeau, customer service, has been here for 23 years and has great relationships with all our customers.” Cross-training of employees is a big deal at Tucel as it helps the company to be flexible, to be quick to react to needs and to meet its goal of running a lean and efficient operation. “We are very lean. Everyone of my employees can do just about any job, whether it is working on making brushes or running the molding machine or packaging,” Lewis said. “We have very, very good workers. They have stuck by us while working shortened hours, regular hours and overtime when needed.” With Tucel’s track record of quality and innovation, along with a dedicated and highly skilled work force, Lewis is optimistic about the company’s future. “I don’t think anyone can predict what will happen with the economy, but we remain positive that we are in the right place and have the best products to offer,” Lewis said. “We feel very positive about the future as we have always considered ourselves a leader in the industry.” Contact: Tucel Industries, Inc., 2014 Forestdale Road, Forestdale, VT 05745-0146. Phone: 802-247-6824; Fax: 802-247-6826. Web site: www.tucel.com. E-mail: info@tucel.com.


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February 2010

Zahoransky’s Shuttle-system Designed To Improve Brush Head Production the drop of costs per piece. The complex production cell consists of a multicomponent injection molding machine and an external demolding and cooling station made in-house. The connecting element between the three production stations is a six-axes robot, which allows the individual phases of a classic injection molding process to be made synchronously, saving as much as 75 percent in cycle time, particularly for thick-walled components. For the process sequence, this delivers a simple equation: injection time equals cycle time from the external cooling and demolding station. After injection, the robot removes the entire mold block and places it in the cooling station consisting of one cooling rack. At the rack, the robot grips a cooled block from another rack and swivels it to the demolding station developed by Zahoransky. A second robot takes the finished parts and places these in the storage box provided. The six-axes robot takes over the empty mold, latches it into the injection molding machine and reaches for the newly filled mold at the ejector side. A new cycle begins. All subsequent jobs can be different in shape, m~Š{ f„{ w„z jw‹wˆ ^w„z‚{‰ size and color. For each product, a separate and Xˆ‹‰~ X‚…y‰ C f‚w„ŠwŠ…„ [‹yw‚†Š‹‰ C jw‹wˆ distinct software menu for the process paramemwˆ{~…‹‰{‰ „ d{ eˆ‚{w„‰B bW C Y…„ˆ…{B jn C Y…ˆ„Š~B ci ters of every component is stored in the SPC developed by Zahoransky. In-between shots, automated production processes for as many as 24 different products, in a maximum of four i_p[i WlW_bWXb[ _d ekh mWh[^eki[ colors, are feasible at the same time. The standard injection molding IEJ¬ Ž HJ¬ Š… JN¬ MEN¬ Ž GH¬ Š… JN¬ machine used is equipped with five injection units. Using the four side units, GKEGL¬ Ž JH¬ Š… MH¬ GCGEN¬ Ž IL¬ Š… GJJ¬ the skin of the component can be injection-molded in different colors. The core material is then injected. Cost-effective fDeD X…Ž IIFFLK recycled material with added blowing \…ˆŠ m…ˆŠ~B j{Žw‰ MLGII kiW agent is used for this purpose. There are no downtimes during color or mold changes. Zahoransky says, the unit costs are reduced with this shuttle solution. This production technique is excellent >NFFCJC^WdZb[? for thick-walled parts which are required in small quantities, but in different sizes and colors. Beside brush heads, screw drivers and plastic shoe soles are ideal examples of f~…„{P NGMCILGCNGNF \wŽP NGMCILGCNLKN application, too. [Cƒw‚P wƒ{ˆ……zV‰xy}‚…xw‚D„{Š Visit www.zahoransky-group.com or call 630-466-1901 for more information.

The Zahoransky Group Shuttle-system is a fully automated cell to produce brush heads of various sizes and colors 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. According to the company, it combines maximum flexibility in production planning with an efficient way to reduce production costs. This technology was the recipient of the FEIBP Innovation Award (European Brushware Federation) in Bristol, UK. Alreadyinstalled production cells at various German brush and broom manufacturers enable them to compete against exporters due to

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Here today. Here tomorrow. Here next week. Here next decade. Here next century. Here next millenium.

Here today. Gone tomorrow. Made with a blend of natural and synthetic fibers yielding 100% biodegradability, BIO100 yarn contains PLA polyester produced with cornstarch instead of petroleum, leaving the earth green while still meeting cleaning and durability needs. ™ real solutions for a green environment

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O

rlando, FL, is the site for the 93rd Annual American Brush Manufacturers Association Convention. The event is scheduled for March 17-20 at the Omni Orlando Resort at ChampionsGate. The ABMA event is billed as four days of networking, fellowship and information sharing. The theme of this year’s conference is “Succeeding in Difficult Times.” The convention will also include the awarding of the 2010 William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award, the Suppliers Display, divisional meetings, receptions and other key events. (A complete schedule accompanies this article.) Convention Program Highlights

S

t. Patrick’s Day (Wednesday, March 17) is the first full day of activities for the ABMA Annual Convention this year. The Convention Committee Breakfast Meeting is scheduled from 8 to 9:20 a.m., followed by the Public Relations Committee Meeting from 9:30 to 10:20 a.m., and then the Membership Committee Meeting from 10:30 to 11:50 a.m. All three committee meetings will be conducted at the St. Andrews Room. A day earlier, on Tuesday, March 16, the Officers Finance Meeting will take place from 5 to 6 p.m. in the Legends Boardroom and will be followed by the 100th Anniversary Task Force Meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. ABMA Convention registration on Wednesday will take place at the International Foyer from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. A Statistical Committee Lunch Meeting is set for noon to 12:50 p.m. to be fol-

February 2010

lowed by a Safety & Standards Committee Meeting from 1 to 1:50 p.m. Both events will be at the St. Andrews Room. This year’s ABMA Divisional Meetings are also slated on Wednesday. The Industrial Maintenance Division Meeting will convene from 2 to 2:50 p.m.; the Paint Applicator Division Meeting from 3 to 3:50 p.m.; and the Broom & Mop Division Meeting from 4 to 4:50 p.m. All three of these divisional meetings will be conducted at the Royal Dublin Room as well as the Suppliers Division Meeting, which is set for 5 to 5:30 p.m. Technical presentations will be incorporated into this year’s first three divisional meetings. Officials from Stainless Steel Products, of Deer Park, NY, will discuss Improve Fatigue Life By Using Stainless Steel Brushing during the Industrial Maintenance Meeting. Representatives from Fielco Adhesives, of Huntingdon Valley, PA, will present All Epoxies Are Not The Same during the Paint Applicator Meeting, while Handles USA officials, of Arcola, IL, will give a presentation during the Broom & Mop Meeting titled Species/Material Characteristics Of Wood/Metal Handles. Division meetings are open to everyone who attends the convention. Wednesday evening events include the New Members & First Time Attendees Welcoming Reception from 6 to 7 p.m. in the St. Andrews Room. This will be followed by the Welcoming Reception from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Golf Course Commons. Dress is business casual for both events. The main program to start Thursday, March 18, will be the Opening Business Session at the International Ballroom from 8 to 8:50 a.m. The event will feature a welcome by ABMA President


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Tuesday, March 16 5 to 6 p.m. Officers Finance Meeting — Legends Boardroom 7 to 9 p.m. 100th Anniversary Task Force Meeting — Legends

Wednesday, March 17

8 to 9:20 a.m. Convention Committee Breakfast Meeting — St. Andrews 9:30 to 10:20 a.m. Public Relations Committee Meeting — St. Andrews 10:30 to 11:50 a.m. Membership Committee Meeting — St. Andrews 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Registration / “Gathering Place” — International Foyer Noon to 12:50 p.m. Statistical Committee Lunch Meeting — St. Andrews 1 to 1:50 p.m. Safety & Standards Committee Meeting — St. Andrews 2 to 2:50 p.m. Industrial Maintenance Division Meeting & Technical Presentation by Stainless Steel Products — Royal Dublin 3 to 3:50 p.m. Paint Applicator Division Meeting & Technical Presentation by Fielco Adhesives — Royal Dublin 4 to 4:50 p.m. Broom & Mop Division Meeting & Technical Presentation by Handles USA — Royal Dublin 5 to 5:30 p.m. Suppliers Division Meeting — Royal Dublin 6 to 7 p.m. New Members & First-Time Attendees Welcome Reception — St. Andrews Dress: Business Casual 7 to 9 p.m. Welcoming Reception — Golf Course Commons Dress: Business Casual

Thursday, March 18 7 to 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast — International Ballroom 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration / “Gathering Place” — International Foyer 8 to 8:50 a.m. Opening Business Session President’s Welcome — International Ballroom

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9 to 10:45 a.m. ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute — International Ballroom Speaker: Sam Richter 11 a.m. Bonus Networking Time / Visit Theme Parks: Enjoy Remainder Of Day 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. All Exhibitor Display Setup — International Ballroom 5:30 p.m. Dinner on Own

Friday, March 19 7 to 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast — International Ballroom 7 to 7:45 a.m. All Exhibitor Display Setup — International Ballroom 7:30 a.m. to Noon Registration / “Gathering Place” — International Foyer

8 a.m. to Noon ABMA Suppliers Display — International Ballroom 9 to 10:30 a.m. Companion Program — St Andrews B 1:30 to 6:30 p.m. Golf Tournament (Shot Gun Start) — National Course 7 to 10 p.m. Suppliers’ Reception — Family Pool Theme: Pool Party Dress: Resort Casual, swimwear encouraged. This event includes an area of sandy beach so please consider appropriate footwear.

Saturday, March 20 7:30 to 9 a.m. Continental Breakfast — International Ballroom 8:30 to 9:20 a.m. Closing Business Session — International Ballroom 9:20 to 9:30 a.m. Innovation Award Presentation — International Ballroom 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute — International Ballroom Speaker: Stephen G. Salley, Esq. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Board of Directors Luncheon & Meeting — St. Andrews 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Board of Directors’ Dinner — Trevi Patio


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Mark Godfrey, of Felton Brush Inc., Londonderry, NH. Prior to the Business Session, a continental breakfast will be available in the International Ballroom from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Registration will open at 7:30 a.m. at the International Foyer and remain until 2 p.m. Following the Business Session there will be an ABMA AllAttendee Educational Institute session from 9 to 10:45 a.m. at the International Ballroom. The event features Sam Richter, who will present a program titled Know More — Sales Intelligence Secrets To Win In Any Business Climate. Richter is a speaker and author of Sales Intelligence. He is an expert in online information technologies, personal reputation management, marketing and leadership development. The remainder of Thursday is free for ABMA attendees to network and enjoy the various sights/theme parks of Orlando. An AllExhibitor Display set-up time is slated from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the International Ballroom. A full day of activities are planned for Friday, March 19, starting with a continental breakfast at the International Ballroom from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Registration at the International Foyer is scheduled from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The ABMA Suppliers Display will begin at 8 a.m. and run until noon at the International Ballroom. This event provides a showcase for ABMA members to see the latest products, ideas and components offered by exhibiting suppliers. In addition, the event is another opportunity for members to network.

From 9 to 10:30 a.m., meanwhile, the ABMA Companion Program will take place at St. Andrews B, featuring aromatherapy and personal spa blends. The annual ABMA Scramble Golf Tournament is also scheduled for Friday, taking place from 1:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the National Course at ChampionsGate. This course offers an authentic link style golfing experience, reminiscent of courses found on the British Isles. A tournament price includes greens fees, golf cart rental, range balls and prizes. Attendees are asked to make club rental arrangements directly through the pro shop by calling 407787-4653. For other tee times call 407-390-6664. Friday evening’s featured event will be the Suppliers Reception at the Family Pool area of the resort. The event takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. Those attending are urged to be dressed in resort casual attire and swimwear is encouraged. The event includes an area of sandy beach. The “pool party” also includes an old-fashioned cookout, outdoor games and DJ. The final day of the convention is Saturday, March 20, beginning with a continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. at the International Ballroom and followed in the same room by the Closing Business Session and the William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award presentation. This all takes place from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. After the award presentation, Saturday’s ABMA All-Attendee Educational Institute is slated from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the same location. The speaker will be Stephen G. Salley, Esq., senior partner with GenSpring’s Family Enterprise Center and Fiduciary Services Group. He will give a presentation titled


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Transition Strategies For Family Held Business. Salley lectures frequently on tax, succession and estate planning as well as fiduciary issues. From 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. the ABMA Board of Directors’ Luncheon and Meeting is scheduled at the St. Andrews Room. The final event of the ABMA Annual Convention will be the Board of Directors’ Dinner from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Trevi Patio. Registration, Travel And Entertainment Information

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ocated at 1500 Masters Boulevard, in ChampionsGate, FL, 33896, the Omni Orlando Resort at ChampionsGate can be found off I-4, exit 58. Travelers should pass through the gates on ChampionsGate Boulevard, go to the second stoplight and then turn right onto Masters Boulevard. The hotel is on the left. Phone numbers for the resort are 800-843-6664 (reservations) and 407-390-6664 (local). The fax number is 407-390-6600, and the Web site is www.omnihotels.com. Visit www.abma.org for further information about the ABMA Annual Convention. During ABMA events, comfortable and casual dress is appropriate. Daytime attire is casual and sportswear is customary (golf shirts and slacks or shorts for men; slacks, shorts or skirts/dresses for women.) Evening activities dictate “nice” informal or daytime business casual attire and may include sport coat for men; pantsuits, slacks, skirts/dresses for women. Orlando’s average daytime temperatures in March are in the high 70s to low 80s. Temperatures at night average in the low to mid 50s. ABMA Adds New Feature For Convention

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member’s literature drop off table will be added for the ABMA Annual Convention. The table will be set up at the registration area and is for the use of any ABMA member who wishes to display company literature for others to peruse. “The ABMA convention is adding the literature drop off table for 2010 as an extra member benefit,” ABMA Convention Committee Chair Ian Moss of Static Faction, Salem, MA, said. “The idea for the literature table was generated by an existing ABMA member from a comment on a 2009 evaluation form.” Members may bring their literature to the registration area for placement or may send literature ahead of time to ABMA headquarters before March 1, 2010. ABMA reserves the right to determine which literature may be displayed. For additional information, contact ABMA at 2111 Plum St., Suite 274, Aurora, IL 60506. Phone: 630-631-5217; Fax: 866-837-8450; E-mail: info@abma.org; Web site: www.abma.org. Innovation Award Candidates

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ne of the following candidates will be presented with the William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award during an award ceremony scheduled for 9:20 a.m. on Saturday, March 20 at the International Ballroom. This will be part of the ABMA Closing Business Session. The award, which recognizes innovation of manufactured products, components or services in the broom, brush, mop and roller industries, is named after William Cordes, who served as the first ABMA president from 19171928. This award serves as a reminder that all new and exciting endeavors have beginnings that connect with real people. All of the following products will be on display during the 93rd ABMA Annual Convention. The 2010 candidates are:


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Zahoransky AG Shuttle System — Fully Automatic Mold Injection Cell For Broom And Brush Bodies The Zahoransky Shuttle System is a fully automated cell to produce moldinjected parts 24 hours, 7 days a week. It combines maximum flexibility in production planning with an efficient way to reduce production costs, according to the company. The high flexibility of the shuttle system lowers lead times and reduces stock inventory which, in the case of using conventional mold injection units, must be maintained to avoid expensive changeovers from one product to another. The system runs 3 to 4 process cycles (injection, cooling, ejection, sorting) parallel instead of successively. It allows the production of up to 17 samples of different shapes and colors at the same time and in any order. Production planning software controls the product and allows for production as put into the ERP system (amount, priority). The system uses standardized molds to give maximum flexibility and to eliminate any change-over times, the company said. The shuttle system is designed to reduce overall cycle times by 50 to 80 percent, save operator costs by 33 percent and reduce space requirements. The system is flexible and enables the user to produce plastic parts just-in-time and on demand. Costs per piece can be reduced dramatically, according to Zahoransky. Shur-Line Deck Pads And Paint Pads With DuPont Teflon® Coating Designed to be faster than a brush and smoother than a roller, Shur-Line Deck Pads and Paint Pads with Teflon® coating are designed for exterior and interior projects. According to the company, the coating allows easy cleanup as paint will not adhere to the surface, even after drying. The Teflon coated pads allow for smoother coverage with more consistent load release and no pooling when compared to nonTeflon coated pads. The fibers remain soft for reuse and the pads are tear resistant. The 9-inch size also covers more area. Wooster Alpha™ Brush The new Wooster Alpha™ professional paintbrush features Micro Tip™ technology to produce a fine finish. According to the company, several years of development and analysis took place before this line was introduced. Lab tests have proven that each style of Alpha paints at least 30 percent farther than brushes of equal size. The company said Micro Tip filaments virtually eliminate brushmarks. Painters were enlisted to try Alpha

February 2010

in the field. Designed to carry more paint at the end of the brush, Alpha releases a larger amount of paint to the surface, according to Wooster, without needing to push as hard. This allows coatings to flow evenly to the working surface and avoid dripping. The product also cleans quickly and easily. Wooster Alpha brushes are made for use with all paints and are available in angle sash, Shortcut®, thin angle sash, flat sash, varnish, semi-oval and wall styles. Each brush has a stainless steel ferrule and a sealed maple wood handle. ScreenKleen™ From Linzer Products The ScreenKleen™ helps users clean window and door screens without the need for the screens to be removed. Specially formulated and patented micro-dirt technology penetrates each mesh of screen, removing dirt, grime and allergens. The user fills a bucket or pail with clean water and mild detergent. He/she then submerges the ScreenKleen into the soapy water and uses a ScreenKleen squeegee (included) to remove excess water. He/she rolls the ScreenKleen gently over the entire surface of the window or door screen, and then uses a dry clean cloth to wipe water off the screen. Shur-Line Eco Applicators™ Shur-Line has introduced eco products made from recycled and renewable materials. The handles of Shur-Line’s new eco brushes are 100 percent bamboo, a renewable material. The bristles are 100 percent recycled polyester and the metal ferrule that holds the bristles in place is made from recycled aluminum. Also, the packaging is made from 100 percent recycled material. These brushes are suitable for use with all paints and provide one-coat coverage, according to the company. Meanwhile, Shur-Line’s new eco roller covers are made of 100 percent recycled materials and the packaging is biodegradable. The premium roller covers work with all paints and stains and also provide one-coat coverage. All eco paint products can be cleaned after use, allowing them to be reused. Malish Corporation’s Diamabrush™ Diamabrush™ is a diamond abrasive floor preparation system for concrete floor polishing, mastic removal and hardwood floor prep. The Diamabrush System is comprised of four different tools (one each for concrete, polymer, hardwood prep and mastic removal), each designed to be used on standard low pressure commercial cleaning machines including single discs, walk-behind auto scrubbers and ride-on auto scrubbers. According to the company, Diamabrush™ is designed to rejuvenate concrete and hardwood floors.


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To better serve you • 8-colorPrinting Available


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By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

P

eople who are associated with the brush industry are often quick to point out that brush varieties and applications seem endless. Brushes can be found in many different types of machinery as well as those designed for cleaning by hand. Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine recently discussed the health of the household, utility, foodservice and other brush segments with representatives from four companies specializing in brush production. Although challenges with many North American and global economies remain, these representatives said they are optimistic about the future of their businesses and the U.S. brush industry as a whole.

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family-owned company started in the United Kingdom in 1922, The Hill Brush Company Ltd., has since expanded to now operate a U.S. subsidiary in Baltimore, MD. Hill Brush has come a long way since the early days of producing handmade brushes. It now uses some of the most advanced brushmaking machinery available. The company employs approximately 115 people, manufactures over 3 million brushes per annum and sells to over 1,000 customers in over 30 countries worldwide under the “Salmon Products” logo. Hill Brush now manufactures its hygienic (foodservice) brush products for industry and its Champion Brush range of equestrian products in Baltimore and distributes nationally. According to Hill Brush U.S. National Sales Director Jim Sokaitis, throughout its lifetime, the

February 2010

main objective of the business has been to provide customers with high quality brushes at reasonable prices. This could not be achieved without the hard work and conscientiousness of its workforce, some of whom are part of the third generation of families to be employed by the company. Despite today’s sluggish economy in many areas of the world, Sokaitis said Hill Brush continues to experience sales success due to its focus on product quality. “We are seeing a lot of quality concerns out there among customer groups. Many have been buying lower quality brushes from other sources for awhile and they are now interested in using brush products that will last longer,” he said. “With the current economy, they don’t want to keep spending money on brushes that don’t last. “We also focus on brush innovation, such as introducing products that are infused with antimicrobial technology to help prevent the spreading of bacteria from one room to the next. This is especially important for the foodservice industry, where people are also looking for brushes that feature bristles that won’t fall out of the block. They don’t want these bristles to enter machinery and eventually into food products.” With this focus, Hill Brush uses technology that allows brush holes to be filled with resin, keeping bristles tightly in place. “Thishasbeenverybeneficialforourcustomers,” Sokaitis said. “Besides the equestrian industry, our companyhas heavily focusedon thejanitorial,foodservice and industrial brush segments.We take these areas very seriously by making high-end products that are also cost-competitive. This focus has allowed us to make great inroads. “We have found many people today are willing to pay for a brush that will last twice as long compared to a cheaper item. Hill Brush is answering this need, whether it’s bristles that stay in place, anti-microbial features, etc.” Product innovation also continues to play a key role among other product categories for Hill Brush. One of the company’s latest products is a scoop that can detect metal filaments. The scoop's magnetic finish attracts these filaments and prevents them from entering a food source. Another benefit for Hill Brush is its ability to maintain smaller production runs for customers. “As with any manufacturer, it’s all about servicing the customer and keeping up with innovation,” Sokaitis said.


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When interviewed in mid-January, he added that business has started to pick up after a slow period with the U.S. economy. “The key is getting people to try our products. We do that through a quality sales force. These are Hill Brush people who are out there demonstrating products and helping solve problems,” Sokaitis said. “Problem solving is a crucial element. We help people solve whatever issues they may have. That is what we do. “Hill Brush has sales people across the country who are calling on customers. Our company’s owners also get involved, such as welcoming new clients.” Hill Brush products are mainly sold through distribution sources. Some of these distributors have clients that are considered major companies in the United States. “It’s a good feeling when a major company recognizes who we are and uses products made by Hill Brush,” Sokaitis said. “Again, we are a family-owned company that strives to service customers. We think our capabilities with innovation and product quality also set us apart, and we try to be as competitive in price as possible.” To help meet these goals, Hill Brush officials place a strong emphasis on production automation. “We do virtually all of our manufacturing in-house. This means we must be involved with cutting-edge technology when it comes to brush production. Part of that is being able to infuse brushes with anti-microbial properties,” Sokaitis said. “Our brushes are also 100 percent solid. They can’t be broken by a person’s hands. This is just one of the features that we incorporate.” As a new year and decade have arrived, he added company officials are very optimistic about what the future has in store for Hill

February 2010

Brush and the industry as a whole. “We feel Hill Brush is not only a leader in Europe, it’s also becoming a leader in the United States. It’s all about having a winning combination of employees and products,” Sokaitis said. “As far as the brush industry itself is concerned, I don’t see it ever going away. It’s pretty safe to say there will always be a need for brushes.” Contact: Hill Brush Inc., 811 Rolyn Ave., Baltimore, MD 21237. Phone: 410-325-7000; Fax: 410-325-6477. Web site: www.hillbrush.com.

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aving celebrated its 80th anniversary in 2009, Culicover & Shapiro, Inc., located in the Long Island community of North Bay Shore, NY, continues to produce high-quality brush and related products for such segments as janitorial, building supply, industrial and maintenance. The company mainly produces and sells to various distributors such items as floor, radiator, window and truck wash brushes as well as counter dusters and deck scrubs. “Our products are mostly found on the East Coast, although we do ship on a nationwide basis,” Culicover & Shapiro President Richard Shapiro, a third-generation family member at the company, said. Culicover & Shapiro was started in New York City in 1929 by Gershon Shapiro and a business partner by the last name of Culicover. Not long after the company began, however, Mr. Culicover died. “The story goes, my grandfather didn’t want to throw out the company stationary, so he just kept the name. There hasn’t been a


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Culicover work at our company for 79 or so years. Culicover, however, is an unusual name that people can remember.” Today, the company is represented by a second and third generation of Shapiro family members. Gershon Shapiro’s son, David Shapiro, is currently the company’s treasurer, while David Shapiro’s son, Richard, is president. “We have grown over the years from a small building in New York City to a large facility in Long Island. Our company’s products were once all handmade. Now, we have computer-operated machinery to make a fuller line of items,” Richard Shapiro said. “We have grown over time, but not as much as some other manufacturers. However, we enjoy a niche within the brush industry that works very well. “One of the better aspects of being a smaller company is that customers can call and get the president of the company on the phone. That is me. I help all types of customers. They can receive a prompt answer, which is one of our biggest advantages.” The core products at Culicover & Shapiro are standard types of brushes. There are new product innovations that the company is pushing as well, such as its Gibraltar Broom. This item features a different kind of handle connector where there are no threads in the block. It’s designed to feature a sturdier connector. Although some items are still handmade at Culicover & Shapiro, Richard Shapiro said the company relies on automated machinery for the production of most of its products. “Obviously, it’s important to be as efficient and competitive as possible these days. You need the most up-to-date machinery that your company can afford. Competitors, either those in this country or overseas, are becoming more automated as well,” he said.

February 2010

Keeping up with automation is important for Culicover & Shapiro as the company seeks to maintain and increase business during today’s challenging economic times. “I feel we (as a company) have ridden the slow economy out as well as anybody. All you can do is your best,” Richard Shapiro said. “We have done whatever cost-cutting measures possible without changing our customer service focus or the quality of our products. I feel our company runs efficiently. There are, however, factors within the economy that we can’t do anything about.” He added that staying true to the company’s basic business philosophy of providing customers with good products and service at a fair price helps when dealing with today’s challenges, such as higher taxes and increased insurance costs. “No one can foretell what the future will truly bring. I hope the worst of the economy is behind us. It’s going to be a long climb to get back to where many companies want to be,” Richard Shapiro said. “As a country, I feel one problem we have dug ourselves into is that of getting away from U.S. manufacturing. This situation is not going to turn around over night, but I’m seeing glimmers of hope. In certain industries, including the brush segment, there are people who want to buy more products made in the United States. That is not to say there isn’t a place for imported goods as well. “Most U.S. manufacturers have a hard time competing on price alone with foreign producers, so they have to beat these producers on service and by providing faster lead times. As domestic suppliers, I think we are all trying to do the same thing in this regard.” Contact: Culicover & Shapiro, Inc., 220 South Fehr Way, North Bay Shore, NY 11706. Phone: 631-918-4560. E-mail: culicoverbrush@aol.com.


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s a longtime brush industry professional, Milwaukee Dustless Brush President Kenneth L. Rakusin said he has been pleasantly surprised on how well U.S brush companies, as a whole, seem to be doing during the recent slowness of the U.S. economy. “For what I have been able to tell, U.S. brush companies have been able to survive. Yet, when I drive around locally, I see many retail shops and smaller restaurants that are closed,” Rakusin said. “We are in a very strong industry. Many (brush) companies are family held, so people have a lifetime invested. They can’t let the company go out of business or falter. And if it’s a very large company, there is usually enough cash to keep moving forward regardless of what the economy is doing. “A lot of brush companies have been around for a very long time and their debt is minimal. This allows them to operate in a successful way.” The history of Milwaukee Dustless Brush dates back over 110 years. The company currently produces a complete line of brush and broom products as well as a large selection of squeegees. The business was purchased in 2005 by Gordon Brush, of Commerce, CA, which is co-owned by Rakusin and Bill Loitz. Milwaukee Dustless Brush maintains its production facility in Delavan, WI. Among the products manufactured by Milwaukee Dustless Brush are heavy-duty push and upright brooms featuring handles with a reinforced metal segment to keep them from bending and breaking. The brush blocks of these brooms feature a metal cap which also helps prevent breakage, cracking and chipping; while a swivel feature allows the brooms to be used from two directions with just a quarter turn of the handle. “These features make the brooms last two to three times longer compared to competitive items,” Rakusin said. “The company has always been known for making the highest quality products. The biggest complaint we get from our distributors is that our products last too long, but that is a nice problem to have. “Our floor squeegees are made from the same concept, where everything is heavier-duty. This includes higher quality rubber and a heavier grade of metal. The squeegees also use the same 3/8-inch nut and bolt feature that our brooms have, which allows them to be tightened without coming loose, wobbling or splitting.” Milwaukee Dustless Brush also produces its high-end Speedy Corn® upright corn brooms designed to outlast similar products found in the marketplace. On the brush side, meanwhile, Rakusin estimated that the company produces nearly 500 different items including utility brushes. “Our customers are willing to pay a little more up front to get a very long lasting product,” he added. “The other thing we do that really helps our business is stocking a vast amount of inventory. Virtually every order we get is shipped the same day we receive that order or the following day.” Milwaukee Dustless Brush sells its line of cleaning goods to a large array of distributors, who then re-sell the items to end-users found in such locations as food processing facilities, automobile manufacturing plants, restaurants and hospitals. When interviewed in mid-January, Rakusin said that business for his company has been improving nicely over the past eight to nine months after a slow period during the first part of 2009. “We saw a decrease in business early last year (2009) but eventually realized it was due to the entire economy dropping by so much. We have found that customers who have our products love

February 2010

them and don’t want to switch. They know how long these items will last,” he explained. In the last two to three years, officials at Milwaukee Dustless Brush have been busy upgrading the company’s Wisconsin facility with modern CNC equipment, including a fully automatic machine that makes brooms. “You put the blocks in one end and get the finished product out the opposite side,” Rakusin said. “When a company spends money on automation and modern equipment, it saves money on maintenance and labor. We practice this philosophy by constantly updating our equipment. This also helps us to minimize downtime.” Another important area of success for Milwaukee Dustless Brush is customer service. Rakusin explained that most customers of a company become upset when there is a long delay in getting a product, the price of that product goes up dramatically or there is poor quality involved. “We have held our pricing for over three years, we have improved our inventory by tripling the amount of finished goods that are available, and we continue to provide quality that we feel is unsurpassed in the industry. This is all done in order to keep customer satisfaction as high as possible,” Rakusin said. “We have built a system that eliminates complaints. There is a cost for that, and we use funds for the warehouse to have our products on the shelf. We feel this is a good use of our money as we want our customers to be supplied as quickly as possible.” As 2010 continues to progress, there are other challenges most U.S. companies must address in order to remain profitable. Rakusin stated that one concern many business owners have regards possible changes with the country’s health care system. “The cost of health care has been an issue for a long time and continues to be a problem. We don’t know how this is all going to play out,” he said. “There is also the hope that the economy will experience an uptick soon, but I don’t think anybody knows for sure when this will take place. The one positive is there remains a plentiful supply of labor right now.” Despite the constant ups and downs of the business world, Rakusin is sure of one thing — the need for such cleaning items and brushes, brooms, mops and squeegees is not going away. “There will always be dirt, dust and debris that must be dealt with. As American manufacturers, however, it’s important to invest in modern equipment and keep costs low in order to maintain U.S. production,” Rakusin said. Keeping up with current events in the brush and broom industries is also vital. To help with this, Rakusin remains very involved with the American Brush Manufacturers Association and has served in the past as ABMA president. “I’m looking forward to attending the ABMA Annual Convention in Orlando (March 17-20) and hope there will be a nice turnout like last year,” he said. “It’s important to learn what is taking place within the industry, such as finding out about new machinery options, vendors and/or materials. “Since there is so much buying and selling that takes place between brush companies, networking opportunities make it easier for us in this industry to conduct business.” Contact: Milwaukee Dustless Brush, 1632 Hobbs Dr., Delavan, WI 53115. Phone: 323-724-7777. E-mail: sales@milwaukeedustless.com. Website: www.milwaukeedustless.com.


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ocusing on producing commercial and industrial brushes that either go onto floor cleaning machines or are used in other applications for the janitorial supply business is the speciality of The Malish Corporation, located in Willoughby, OH. “These are our strengths, but there are a lot of other product niches and categories that the company is focused on,” The Malish Corporation President & CEO Jeffrey J. Malish said. “The biggest markets we work with are janitorial/sanitary and foodservice.” The Malish Corporation’s history dates to 1946 and today manufactures products in both Ohio and China. “It really depends on the market that we are servicing as well as the volume when deciding where an item is made,” Malish explained. “If it’s a higher volume item, we will typically manufacture it overseas and export the product to the appropriate country. If it’s a lower volume item, we will produce it here in the United States.” Regarding overall business for his company, Malish said the impact of the recent sluggish U.S. economy has been felt, but that he feels The Malish Corporation has fared better than most. “Our business was down somewhat in 2009, but not to the extent of what we have seen with some other companies. We are looking for a very strong 2010 and were able to gain new customers throughout the past year (in 2009),” Malish said. “We feel 2010, with our broader customer base, will feature some very good growth.” Customers who purchase products made by The Malish Corporation include original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) as well as janitorial supply and foodservice distributors. Meanwhile, the type of end-users found with the company’s various products is extensive. “A lot of times, these end-users are either contract cleaners — those outside people hired to clean a facility on a regular basis — or the general in-house maintenance staff of a facility. They can be found working in such places as hospitals, restaurants, schools, etc.,” Malish explained. “Everybody is trying to introduce products that reduce labor. In the cleaning business, labor is usually the largest cost driver. Anything that can reduce labor is critical. Also, green products are becoming very popular. Being able to clean with fewer chemicals is now important for many people.” In an effort to better meet the changing needs of customers, officials of The Malish Corporation continue to focus on new product development. For example, the company is currently promoting its new Diamabrush™ diamond abrasive floor preparation system for concrete floor polishing, mastic removal and hardwood floor prep. The Diamabrush System is comprised of four different tools (one each for concrete, polymer, hardwood prep and mastic removal), each designed to be used on standard low pressure commercial cleaning machines including single discs, walk-behind auto scrubbers and ride-on auto scrubbers. The focus of Diamabrush™ is to rejuvenate concrete and hardwood floors. This product has been recognized by industry peers as it is one of the finalists for the ABMA William Cordes Innovation Excellence Award. This award recognizes innovation of manufactured products, components or services in the broom, brush, mop and roller industries. The award winner will be announced during the upcoming ABMA Annual Convention in Orlando.

February 2010

Staying focused on customer service is another key element to long-term success, according to Malish. “I feel customer service is one of our company’s main strengths. There is a lot of seniority in our customer service department. Many of these people have been here for 10 to 30 years. They know our customers very well and are able to educate these people on their true needs,” Malish said. “Sometimes a customer will not order the right amount or forget to order a certain item. Our customer service people are known for their ability to help customers with these issues. The objective is to know a customer’s business, inside and out. “The other service area we focus on very heavily is delivery performance. Our on-time deliveries in 2009 averaged over 99.5 percent. This means customers received their products when they needed them. We do not miss deliveries. That is critical.” Keeping up with production automation is also important, especially when trying to keep labor costs low while manufacturing in the United States. Malish feels equipment manufacturers in the brush, broom and mop industries are doing a good job with producing machines that go faster and reduce setup times. “This has always been very critical. Investing in new equipment is important when doing business in the United States. Even our facility in China is using state-of-the-art equipment, allowing us to produce better quality products compared to other methods found in lower-cost nations,” Malish said. He added it’s important to remember that when a softening of the economy takes place, this makes competitors very hungry and often drives the selling price of products down. “More people are willing to drop their prices to garner additional business. Pricing is an issue, and it’s now global competition that we are dealing with. It’s not just friendly U.S. competitors,” Malish said. “I think everybody in our industry is facing this same challenge. “There is also a lot of uncertainty as far as what our federal government is going to do with such issues as health care. Certain costs may increase over the next few years that may make it more difficult to be competitive in the United States.” Despite these ongoing challenges, Malish remains optimistic about the future health of his company. “We have positioned ourselves very well as far as being a high quality, highly-engineered products manufacturer while also remaining competitive on pricing,” he explained. “We feel very confident about the future. I believe the companies that focus on the global economy will be the most successful. If a company is strictly focusing on just one given market, this may be a bit more challenging.” According to Malish, being able to successfully work within niche markets can also help a company prosper during competitive times. “Niches are harder for competitors to penetrate. (The Malish Corporation) has a lot of niche markets that it services. We also implement strategic planning and have goals which are very attainable,” he said. “Because of these factors, I see ongoing growth for the company taking place within the next few years. It’s going to be a challenging year (in 2010), but businesses can be successful if they focus and plan accordingly.” Contact: The Malish Corporation, 4260 Hamann Parkway, Willoughby, OH 44094. Phone: 440-951-5356. E-mail: comments@malish.com. Web Site: www.malish.com.


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BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

February 2010

Imports, Exports Generally Down After 10 Months By Rick Mullen Broom, Brush & Mop Associate Editor U.S. government trade figures for the first 10 months of 2009 indicate raw material imports were up in one of the two categories outlined in this issue, compared to the first 10 months of 2008. Figures for metal handles prior to March 2009 are not available for comparison. For October 2009, raw material imports were down in both categories outlined, other than metal handles, compared to October 2008. Import totals for the first 10 months of 2009 were down in both of the finished goods categories outlined from the same time period in 2008. Also, in October 2009, both categories outlined recorded decreases, compared to October 2008. RAW MATERIAL IMPORTS Broom And Mop Handles The import total of broom and mop handles during October 2009 was 1.8 million, down about 25 percent from 2.4 million broom and mop handles imported in October 2008. During the first 10 months of 2009, 17 million broom and mop handles were imported, compared to 25.8 million for the first 10 months of 2008, down about 34 percent. During the first 10 months of 2009, the United States imported 6.1 million handles from Brazil and 4.7 million from Honduras. The average price per handle for October 2009 was 55 cents, down about 24 percent from 72 cents for October 2008. The average price for the first 10 months of 2009 was 68 cents, the same as the average price for the first 10 months of 2008. Brush Backs October 2009 imports of brush backs totaled 114,649, down about 15 percent from the October 2008 total of 135,225 brush backs. During the first 10 months of 2009, 2.4 million brush backs were imported, an increase of about 20 percent over the total for the first 10 months of 2008 of 2 million. The United States imported 1.3 million brush backs from Canada during the first 10 months of 2009. The average price per brush back was 48 cents during October 2009, up about 17 percent from the average price for October 2008 of 41 cents. For the first 10 months of 2009, the average price per brush back was 44 cents, down about 35 percent from the average price of 68 cents for the first 10 months of 2008. Metal Handles Imports of metal handles during October 2009 totaled 2.1 million, up from the September 2009 total of 1.8 million. During the first 10 months of 2009, 25.1 million metal handles were imported. The United States imported 12.2 million metal handles from Italy and 10 million from China during the first 10 months of 2009. The average price per handle for October 2009 was 63 cents, down from the previous monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s average price of 71 cents. The average price for the first 10 months of 2009 was 63 cents. FINISHED GOODS IMPORTS Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At Less Than 96 Cents The United States imported 7,872 brooms of broom corn valued

at less than 96 cents per broom during October 2009, compared to 22,368 in October 2008, a decrease of about 65 percent. During the first 10 months of 2009, 122,568 brooms of broom corn were imported, down about 41 percent from 206,862 imported during the first 10 months of 2008. Mexico shipped 115,368 brooms of broom corn to the United States during the first 10 months of 2009. The average price per broom for October 2009 was 74 cents, up slightly from 72 cents for October 2008. The average price per broom for the first 10 months of 2009 was 76 cents, up from the average price for the first 10 months of 2008 of 73 cents. Brooms Of Broom Corn Valued At More Than 96 Cents The United States imported 728,706 brooms of broom corn valued at more than 96 cents per broom during October 2009, compared to 756,802 in October 2008, down about 4 percent. During the first 10 months of 2009, 7.3 million brooms of broom corn were imported, down slightly from 7.4 million imported during the first 10 months of 2008. Mexico shipped 6.8 million brooms of broom corn to the United States during the first 10 months of 2009. The average price per broom for October 2009 was $2.33, the same as the average price for October 2008. The average price per broom for the first 10 months of 2009 was $2.45, up about 7 percent from $2.29 for the first 10 months of 2008. EXPORTS Export totals for the first 10 months of 2009 were down in both categories outlined, compared to the first 10 months of 2008. In October 2009, one of the two categories reported an increase in exports, compared to October 2008. Toothbrushes U.S. companies exported 7.9 million toothbrushes during October 2009, down about 43 percent from 13.9 million exported during October 2008. Toothbrush exports for the first 10 months of 2009 were 74.3 million, down about 51 percent from 151.1 million recorded for the first 10 months of 2008. The United States shipped 27.1 million toothbrushes to Canada and 17.5 million to Mexico during the first 10 months of 2009. The average price per toothbrush for October 2009 was 77 cents, up about 45 percent from the October 2008 average price of 53 cents. The average price for the first 10 months of 2009 was 75 cents, up about 108 percent from the average price of 36 cents for the first 10 months of 2008. Artist Brushes The United States exported 640,396 artist brushes in October 2009, up about 9 percent from the total of 588,999 exported in October 2008. During the first 10 months of 2009, 6.6 million artist brushes were exported, about an 8 percent decrease from 7.2 million exported during the first 10 months of 2008. Canada received 3.4 million artist brushes from the United States during the first 10 months of 2009. The average price per artist brush for October 2009 was $3.35, down about 13 percent from the average price for October 2008 of $3.85. The average price for the first 10 months of 2009 was $3.34, down from $3.46 for the first 10 months of 2008.


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EXPORTS October Exports By Country

Domestic Merchandise 1404902000 Broomcorn (Sorghum Vulgare Var. Technicum) Used Primarily In Brooms Or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles October Year To Date Country Net Q/Ton Value Net Q/Ton Value Mexico 16 58,590 Denmark 1 3,434 Ireland 1 4,379 4 16,241 France 5 17,280 17 58,058 Fr Germ 1 4,262 1 4,262 Malaysa 1 3,530 TOTAL 7 25,921 40 144,115 9603100000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles October Year To Date Country Net Q/Dozen Value Net Q/Dozen Value Canada 2,758 86,055 24,049 801,145 Mexico 154 11,123 2,104 113,623 Guatmal 24 4,530 Belize 1,108 40,124 Salvadr 361 8,573 C Rica 121 3,987 Panama 825 30,446 Bermuda 308 11,864 1,044 38,321

Bahamas Jamaica Antigua S Lucia Barbado Trinid N Antil Venez Ecuador Peru Chile Brazil Uruguay Argent Finland Denmark U King Ireland France Fr Germ Poland Italy Croatia Greece Turkey Iraq Israel S Arab Arab Em Afghan India Malaysa Singapr Phil R

February 2010

120

3,211

85

59,303

150 375

4,940 21,286

92 1,750

17,280 20,580

36 40

3,228 3,821

2,649 310 12 120 387 1,082 12 120 18 17 85 13 91 426 17 622 6,545 1,278 1,438 1,965 419 2,846 24 189 57 59 41 883 50 12 50 3 39 52

Royal Paint Roller Royal Paint Roller — a name known in the industry for over 35 years for top quality products, fine service and competitive prices. Manufacturer of paint rollers in ALL SIZES—from Slim Jim to Jumbo 21⁄4” I.D. in VARIETY OF FABRICS—including lambskin, kodel, lambswool, synthetic blends & “Lint Free” woven line. Also a complete line of frames, trays, paint brushes & painting accessories for the professional and Do-It-Yourself markets. Specializing in private labeling at competitive prices.

ROYAL PAINT ROLLER 248 Wyandanch Avenue West Babylon, N.Y. 11704 Tel: (631) 643-8012 • Fax: (631) 253-9428

154,353 9,924 2,549 2,784 6,505 37,324 3,550 3,211 2,915 5,025 59,303 12,434 7,114 12,168 5,172 25,053 283,740 73,810 114,680 27,316 17,300 97,658 12,229 6,685 4,130 20,448 3,840 73,876 7,074 5,762 2,850 2,945 10,212 4,816


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PAGE 38 China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral Libya Nigeria Angola Rep Saf TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Belize Salvadr Hondura Nicarag C Rica Panama Jamaica Cayman Haiti Dom Rep Antigua Barbado Trinid N Antil Aruba Colomb

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 7,695 352 3,061 39 4,276 276 503 4 10 891 68,674

261,600 20,022 91,950 5,294 125,539 28,276 16,575 9,500 3,690 32,393 2,754,343

9603210000 Toothbrushes October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 2,998,488 1,618,344 27,074,063 1,672,374 586,237 17,474,986 6,912 5,691 8,999 107,712 32,457 222,315 43,767 31,541 137,881 3,456 5,184 10,368 8,535 33,720 137,851 11,580 3,853 39,785 666 22,224 58,536 17,282 437,351 15,840 21,291 444,194 9,552 2,955 35,402 19,872 8,227 260,464 43,235 7,415 24,009 34,286 150,147

Value 18,406,903 6,808,701 9,093 91,500 93,519 2,848 4,272 23,012 74,515 30,180 6,085 10,690 235,383 273,886 31,942 282,519 44,034 6,537 139,821

4 75

5,947

2,724 4,905

250,320

Supplier of Raw Materials to Manufacture Brooms, Mops, and Brushes • Galvanized & tinned wire for brush - broom - mop production • Processed Broom Corn & Yucca • Wood Broom - Mop - Brush Handles • Craft Broom Corn And Supplies • Other Materials - Broom Twine, Broom Nails, Mop Hardware We ship by pup or truck load direct from Mexico, or LTL/ UPS from our Greensboro warehouse.

P.O. Box 14634 • Greensboro, NC 27415 336-273-3609 800-213-9224 Fax: 336-378-6047 E-mail: sales@recaddy.com

Venez Guyana Surinam Ecuador Peru Chile Brazil Paragua Uruguay Argent Iceland Sweden Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium Luxmbrg France Fr Germ Austria Czech Hungary Switzld Lithuan Poland Russia Spain Italy Bulgar Turkey Lebanon Israel Kuwait S Arab Qatar Arab Em India Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Moroc Nigeria Rep Saf TOTAL

February 2010 41,496

43,268

294

3,007

40,516 337,749 219

21,738 179,801 9,136

34,515 7,680 912 2,111 81,296 432,000 41,233

104,279 6,816 4,026 18,644 466,777 126,546 328,010

281 80,297

2,880 765,164

214

2,969

1,308 439 10,799

11,424 4,487 62,537

350

5,532

140,832

270,950

206,359 1,036,023 35,783 63,727 70,184 208,080

258,993 412,325 40,327 67,445 321,045 139,435

7,853,707

6,048,260

414,402 10,440 529 137,421 208,800 378,339 1,626,950 1,202 6,245 941,155 10,560 5,408 8,957 195,796 2,187,405 3,000,847 6,931 278 1,444,615 1,630,302 5,580 1,163 4,894 24,059 247 3,096 1,308 405,456 99,251 908 350 3,083 9,250 144,927 12,840 2,000 18,056 678,240 237,348 207,330 7,152 1,150,928 12,069 643,142 5,892,796 1,230,030 1,318,012 1,410,230 2,056,370 1,772 168 360 10,368 74,348,703

209,239 9,180 6,115 59,552 83,863 204,844 786,414 19,191 38,710 629,113 16,341 39,739 44,462 1,051,488 2,431,648 4,514,217 6,971 2,849 742,411 4,206,003 6,294 11,899 5,875 17,677 2,526 2,509 11,424 185,284 131,454 4,449 5,532 31,548 57,098 66,640 12,457 12,500 91,979 1,347,205 125,630 106,200 16,858 554,398 11,898 1,681,593 2,591,352 814,785 645,542 4,331,359 1,194,280 11,958 6,090 3,681 3,648 55,781,412

9603290000 Shaving Brushes, Hairbrushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use on the Person October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q./No. Value Canada 310,742 345,080 2,551,463 2,517,462 Mexico 978,078 402,237 3,442,587 3,371,022 Salvadr 418 6,352 8,421 21,966 C Rica Panama 9,062 12,485 Bermuda 336 6,553 Bahamas 1,540 12,271 6,328 23,548 Jamaica 1,721 8,749 3,408 40,070 Dom Rep Barbado 172 6,377 Trinid 3,216 15,021 17,362 155,445


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February 2010 Aruba Colomb Venez Guyana Ecuador Peru Chile Brazil Uruguay Argent Norway Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Czech Hungary Switzld Poland Spain Italy Turkey Cyprus Lebanon Iraq S Arab Arab Em India Pakistn Thailnd Malaysa Singapr Indnsia Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Rep Saf TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

41,850

8,872

720 288

6,661 4,176

1,596 60,000 430

14,592 20,000 4,666

8,595 13 10,256

55,442 2,995 110,769

5,860 21,510

55,120 22,467

819

7,491

15

2,655

100 2,891 858 272

3,000 26,435 3,605 3,462

30 10,141 330 5,374

5,400 92,736 14,760 49,145

1,920 1,442 443 430 1,469,759

27,637 9,858 4,048 13,404 1,344,005

2,496 113,150 1,362 1,296 29,114 3,756 9,532 238,059 430 1,374 1,098 10,430 117 86,644 6,802 32,493 16,031 49,134 74,382 226 504 1,017 938 9,412 8,069 10,094 2,638 1,404 1,097 1,985 15,148 1,009 7,736 15,395 858 1,566 1,703 85,155 240,622 7,198 382,180 30 455,836 17,013 1,566 1,885 7,991,262

4,524 233,123 19,853 12,283 49,471 23,629 39,400 165,032 4,666 21,838 10,040 13,769 2,691 543,749 34,070 284,448 136,228 410,980 297,847 11,712 4,608 9,300 8,575 91,213 59,890 15,192 24,128 3,383 11,498 22,856 190,712 12,250 15,813 131,699 3,605 14,144 11,140 69,168 1,209,818 55,200 722,820 5,550 551,705 166,080 15,965 45,445 11,961,139

9603300000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes and Similar Brushes for the Application of Cosmetics

BROOM CAPS

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr Hondura Nicarag C Rica Panama Bahamas Jamaica Cayman Dom Rep Barbado Trinid Aruba Colomb Venez Ecuador Peru Bolivia Chile Brazil Paragua Uruguay Sweden Norway Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Austria Czech Slovak Switzld Estonia Poland Russia Italy Greece Bulgar Turkey Lebanon Israel S Arab Arab Em Oman

PAGE 39 October Net Q/No. 340,800 43,473

Value 820,626 161,219

76

4,284

2,578

2,872

828 8,118 11,860

10,438 29,952 81,020

1,051

3,878

340 3,867

6,240 15,943

63,137 5,344

379,646 19,715

32,411 10,314 2,434

123,591 43,554 8,980

2,530

9,335

9,610

37,227

1,246

3,376

7,091

26,163

Year To Date Net Q/No. 3,431,076 434,736 3,312 3,592 3,552 6,129 17,654 5,488 1,255 3,184 48,469 3,279 2,578 1,920 39,809 24,753 22,263 1,871 174 2,500 10,062 1,051 4,324 3,418 121,209 17,025 3,252 394,303 64,888 181,985 32,747 206,207 86,491 11,176 1,355 1,599 16,368 4,911 6,284 18,401 63,607 51,584 5,024 12,548 909 6,689 5,760 25,766 157

BRUSH and HANDLE FERRULES

MANUFACTURING INCORPORATED P.O. Box 6505

Value 8,346,373 1,836,157 8,348 11,229 3,817 39,165 67,747 7,386 4,629 17,846 64,379 3,908 2,872 3,010 120,391 59,712 109,850 9,232 7,490 8,551 43,127 3,878 77,753 12,611 454,749 73,280 12,000 2,546,578 221,245 677,001 120,826 967,252 339,322 41,233 5,000 5,900 70,402 17,033 23,186 72,942 248,651 190,326 18,538 23,125 12,631 23,436 7,819 183,651 3,211

Wolcott, CT 06716

Phone 203-879-1481


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PAGE 40 India Thailnd Vietnam Malaysa Singapr Indnsia Phil R China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Tokelau Moroc Algeria Ivy Cst Ghana Nigeria Rep Saf TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr C Rica Panama Bermuda Bahamas Jamaica Dom Rep B Virgn S Lucia Trinid Aruba Colomb Venez Ecuador Peru Brazil Argent Finland U King Ireland Nethlds France Fr Germ Austria Italy Croatia Slvenia Turkey Israel Jordan S Arab Arab Em Pakistn Singapr Indnsia China Kor Rep Hg Kong Japan Austral N Zeal Marshal Fiji

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 20,878 28,485 5,111 799 9,445 2,809 11,632 373,628 98,344 98,241 14,684 126,281 292,181 3,074 1,357 21,941 17,630 6,183 1,200 21,930 1,328 6,573,855

77,031 104,491 35,590 2,949 53,993 10,363 42,917 1,152,887 773,288 376,864 59,775 519,769 1,115,946 21,049 5,008 80,956 68,717 111,186 4,115 80,914 6,809 21,933,415

9603402000 Paint Rollers October Year To Date Value Net Q/No. Net Q/No. 278,929 771,716 2,065,601 26,827 29,178 1,134,084 100 2,009 10,310 20,478 2,816 4,591 5,140 10,270 1,600 25,000 104,892 3,804 200 1,152 2,880 1,790 175 6,005 113,127 3,432 7,660 9,163 169 2,970 1,362 10,334 374 6,564 3,071 150 560 197 3,534 5,555 32,244 177 170 322 3,560 507 9,400 190 1,528 5,929 35,000 29 796 11,681 388 52,300 43,214 279,512 2,888 8,500 37,000 28,495 4,836 706 14,228

Value 7,052,403 2,179,689 8,995 53,012 29,854 47,446 11,209 30,013 218,006 4,720 3,900 14,075 3,067 35,187 171,662 12,279 8,009 45,837 21,234 22,544 24,463 6,374 2,808 3,452 61,278 3,100 7,493 5,655 8,414 8,900 29,061 3,562 44,441 23,081 29,475 3,835 3,598 37,586 15,681 289,914 12,229 259,916 24,071 3,405 30,194

1,753

13,457

1,928

7,115

13,255

41,254

8,811

32,510

24,384 42,095 1,062

93,318 155,320 12,924

640,396

2,143,957

Rep Saf TOTAL

Country Mexico Hondura Panama Dom Rep Grenada Barbado Aruba Martinq Colomb Venez Peru Chile Brazil U King France Israel Arab Em Malaysa China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral Rep Saf TOTAL

February 2010 176,758 4,123,258

124,999 11,040,126

9603404020 Paint Pads October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 17,822 40,393 70,961 131 3,865 151 336 120 3,083 60 121 876 6,215 876 2,684 3,084 21,889 3,084 5,855 87 2,117 480 3,199 752 212 5,945 247 2,000 1,576 545 3,869 545 8,079 649 7,371 52,326 11,316 13,624 820 3,200 9,589 34,527 83,159 46,843 6,452 65,868 224,060 191,207

Value 166,156 7,265 2,768 3,720 21,882 2,910 8,260 6,215 19,056 21,889 41,560 2,981 10,427 12,320 10,445 16,857 11,190 3,869 57,353 4,608 80,326 17,711 33,050 218,260 45,800 826,878

376,201

928,668

9603404050 Paint, Distemper, Varnish or Similar Brushes (Except Brushes of 9603.30) October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 56,727 524,284 377,026 4,869,188 Mexico 918 18,636 9,522 121,391 Guatmal 948 19,662 6,343 95,111 Hondura 456 8,812 2,198 43,967 Nicarag 755 13,579 C Rica 4,084 80,148 Panama 1,132 27,291 11,331 159,089 Bermuda 1,209 15,756 8,280 114,169 Bahamas 182 3,771 15,515 331,506 Jamaica 1,357 28,138 Turk Is 78 7,820 Cayman 138 2,855 6,873 67,367 Haiti 126 2,608 126 2,608 Dom Rep 121 2,520 4,704 52,208 Anglla 246 5,093 B Virgn 484 11,475 Antigua 3,777 45,229 Monsrat 1,019 27,909 885 20,141 S Lucia S Vn Gr 498 10,334 498 10,334 Grenada 1,611 33,406 Barbado 551 24,261 Trinid 218 4,522 5,990 84,449 N Antil 533 10,950 Colomb 1,000 4,780 6,179 99,907 Venez 2,720 40,356 Guyana 175 3,636 Surinam 151 2,661 Ecuador 1,902 49,779 Peru 70 7,620 1,428 37,806 6,162 127,917 Chile Brazil 13,296 516,809 465 15,142 Argent


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February 2010 Sweden Norway Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium France Fr Germ Czech Lithuan Poland Russia Ukraine Spain Italy Croatia Greece Turkey Cyprus Lebanon Israel Kuwait S Arab Arab Em Afghan Thailnd Vietnam Singapr Phil R China

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 1,040

13,000

1,528 7,819 1,404 14,335

7,343 181,195 12,461 321,394

3,578

22,100

92 108

4,505 6,383

217

12,835

4,368

90,604

374 802

7,752 16,347

502

11,040

7,545 422 461 17,249 81,333 10,252 153,985 17,587 5,615 10,390 489 233 6,236 615 1,226 1,320 772 156 1,149 483 129 719 9,309 2,937 711 6,146 171 3,838 1,693 8,417 28 6,382

115,244 11,327 9,562 70,816 1,259,826 88,529 3,158,262 366,613 81,777 138,538 11,215 7,435 109,542 7,257 4,819 7,426 24,341 3,234 66,196 10,010 2,679 15,818 178,846 21,142 14,742 90,682 3,548 38,459 35,112 80,385 6,581 111,892

Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Eq Guin Ivy Cst Nigeria Rep Saf Namibia TOTAL

PAGE 41

1,782

28,823

138 2,999

2,858 24,701

120 104,949

3,099 1,419,891

4,385 2,849 850 7,998 9,467 5,517 98 969 750 1,329 120 888,594

92,425 90,559 3,410 94,182 130,795 87,078 2,780 20,104 6,525 27,566 3,099 13,863,927

9603900000 Hand-Operated Mechanical Floor Sweepers, Not Motorized, Mops & Feather Dusters; Prepared Knots & Tufts for Broom or Brush Making, NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 281,433 2,568,672 2,508,473 23,558,820 Mexico 64,488 848,420 611,068 7,712,788 100 3,000 820 8,434 Guatmal Salvadr 241 3,910 941 15,259 71,820 4,428 Hondura Nicarag 178 2,886 178 2,886 C Rica 2,600 9,481 5,659 40,978 235 6,656 12,347 197,226 Panama Bermuda 1,056 3,570 2,694 18,447 3,155 51,273 Bahamas Jamaica 244 3,962 Haiti 247 4,000 Dom Rep 238 3,853 6,272 46,643 B Virgn 152 3,314 St K N 1,073 17,410


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PAGE 42 S Vn Gr Barbado Trinid N Antil Aruba Colomb Venez Ecuador Peru Bolivia Chile Brazil Uruguay Argent Sweden Norway Finland Denmark U King Ireland Nethlds Belgium Luxmbrg France Fr Germ Czech Slovak Switzld Estonia Lithuan Poland Russia Ukraine Georgia

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

478 560

7,750 3,740

1,745

26,192

4,521 698 4,135 597 213 884 1,021 792

68,947 11,328 33,217 15,343 3,455 2,965 13,723 12,849

987

14,926

1,400

12,601

Carlson

83 1,476 3,756 3,896 221 9,644 7,849 35,974 9,076 215 28,422 16,305 116 2,760 1,293 860 3,317 4,337 87,531 4,510 39,567 20,583 213 10,812 28,470 792 341 5,592 369 902 2,592 6,717 203 420

2,877 9,890 33,550 45,009 3,580 101,012 100,845 578,142 138,287 3,480 376,864 248,126 2,601 28,730 20,119 12,329 58,479 31,495 1,017,567 73,677 342,175 207,925 3,455 155,761 445,373 12,849 5,524 91,165 5,988 12,806 53,170 90,730 3,140 6,804

Drills

Double Lip Spur Drills Drills For Plastics Special Half-Round and Spoon Drills

Often Copied But NEVER Equalled Standard Sizes Normally In Stock For Rapid Delivery For Availability And Pricing Contact Our Parts Dept.

TEL: 630.232.2460 â&#x20AC;˘ FAX: 630.232.2016 EMAIL: parts@carlson-tool.com

Kazakhs Spain Italy Greece Romania Lebanon Iraq Israel Jordan Kuwait S Arab Qatar Arab Em Bahrain India Pakistn Thailnd Malaysa Singapr Indnsia Phil R Maldive China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Zeal Moroc Angola Djibuti Uganda Rep Saf TOTAL

February 2010

2,339 186

32,191 3,021

720

4,688

291

4,714

330

11,926

40

3,092

10

2,520

1,227 1,390 5,546 3,242 3,215 6,074 4,085

22,740 22,943 89,947 15,862 49,157 58,825 37,413

397,295

4,036,523

497 1,948 10,616 1,013 1,541 1,192 8,298 2,329 400 1,744 5,447 675 11,522 215 850 356 1,751 658 1,202 5,643 285 14,875 19,270 20,446 13,778 11,850 50,375 77,395 11,979 135 1,499 546 150 813 3,778,258

8,072 32,467 128,190 11,772 25,000 12,340 132,194 42,907 3,220 9,698 58,026 11,829 180,870 3,485 15,438 5,782 38,294 8,595 43,849 77,559 4,628 92,960 382,302 204,866 205,906 162,233 497,230 761,766 86,717 2,624 25,195 8,850 3,338 13,337 39,378,323


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February 2010

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

Broom and Brush

IMPORTS October Imports By Country

Country Fr Germ Thailnd China Hg Kong TOTAL

0502100000 Pigs’, Hogs’ or Boars’ Bristles and Hair and Waste Thereof Year To Date October Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 7 3,891 59 155 26,901 111,789 272,364 2,212 26,908 115,680 274,790

Country Mexico Paragua U King Fr Germ Italy Thailnd China Japan TOTAL

0502900000 Badger Hair and Other Brushmaking Hair and Waste Thereof October Year To Date Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG 168 5,082 2,568 12,987 2 3,361 490 2,414 62 1,665 24 3,462 20,727 413 194 11,905 41,326

Value 7,190 11,524 2,201,868 24,071 2,244,653

Value 7,722 141,848 46,534 122,168 3,008 84,917 360,217 13,062 779,476

0511993300 Horsehair and Horsehair Waste, Whether or Not Put Up As A Layer With or Without Supporting Material October Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Fr Germ 700 10,981 China 6,651 93,935 135,702 1,420,137 TOTAL 6,651 93,935 136,402 1,431,118 1404903000 Istle Used Primarily In Brooms or In Brushes, Whether or Not In Hanks or Bundles October Year To Date Country Net Q/KG Value Net Q/KG Value Mexico 27,981 135,748 353,484 1,748,943 TOTAL 27,981 135,748 353,484 1,748,943 4417002000 Broom and Mop Handles, 1.9 CM or More In Diameter and 97 CM or More In Length, Of Wood Year To Date October Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 2,500 2,526 62,350 29,362

Hondura Colomb Brazil Argent Spain India Sri Lka Vietnam Malaysa Indnsia China Hg Kong Taiwan Egypt TOTAL

PAGE 43 486,744 30,024 518,143 27,950 80,680

193,561 12,605 378,608 19,286 38,890

7,200

8,070

51,200 162,728 413,141 27,500

37,835 177,043 101,625 16,050

1,807,810

986,099

4417004000 Paint Brush October Country Net Q/Variable Guatmal Fr Germ Czech Poland Italy India Indnsia China Taiwan TOTAL

Country Canada Hondura Brazil Sri Lka Indnsia China Hg Kong TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Salvadr C Rica Colomb Brazil

4,747,777 97,686 6,161,256 56,750 193,384 10,896 187,600 100,644 204,600 2,022,295 3,072,925 27,500 33,000 20,000 16,998,663

2,212,020 59,303 5,332,822 36,396 90,649 3,704 213,192 92,051 186,982 1,797,524 1,484,694 16,050 36,190 5,000 11,595,939

and Paint Roller Handles, Of Wood Year To Date Value Net Q/Variable Value 17,581 15,069 13,736 68,267 134,754 323,548 3,666,487 97,234 146,011 818,108 148,193 2,650,799 10,446 631,488 7,478,745

4417006000 Brush Backs, Of Wood October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 99,059 37,302 1,303,930 166,864 52,675 15,590 18,094 253,211 145,448 441,162 25,000 114,649 55,396 2,388,290 4417008010 Tool Handles of Wood Year To Date October Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable 11,859

142,256

Value 503,321 68,537 68,380 212,560 72,463 98,226 16,944 1,040,431

Value 51,159 98,530 24,924 24,283 6,328 2,612,582

Brush Manufacturers

STAPLE SET MANUFACTURER CUSTOM SHAPES: Wheel–Cylinder–Strip–Disc ALL MEDIUMS: Wood–Plastic–Metal–Leather Short Run and Private Label SEND US YOUR SPECIALS

YOUNG & SWARTZ, INC. CHERRY & SPRUCE STS.

BUFFALO, N.Y. 14204

PHONE 852-2171 AREA CODE 716 FAX (716) 852-5652


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PAGE 44 Paragua Nethlds Poland Spain India Pakistn Indnsia China Taiwan TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

5,612

53,436 213,163

31,818 5,533 30,568 18,514 11,117 2,340 53,868 517,084 33,979 3,522,627

4417008090 Tools, Tool Bodies, Broom or Brush Bodies, Shoe Lasts and Trees, of Wood October Year To Date Country Net Q/Variable Value Net Q/Variable Value Canada 37,013 647,377 Mexico 24,722 Hondura 7,543 34,854 Nicarag 2,542 10,305 Colomb Chile 732,344 5,591,991 Brazil 2,381 U King 47,950 France 6,933 12,318 Fr Germ 64,968 Austria 5,143 Russia 3,194 Spain 12,405 Italy 12,816 28,926 Slvenia 91,015 India 106,613 846,557 Pakistn 3,459 6,540 Sri Lka 108,926 896,918 Vietnam 27,280 Singapr 3,682 Indnsia 36,295 251,037 China 202,905 1,916,591 Taiwan 90,636 Japan 350,459 3,079,563 TOTAL 1,605,306 13,698,895 7326908576 Metal Handles For Brooms, Mops, Paint Applicators October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 391 14,456 Mexico 12,114 10,242 211,770 82,485 C Rica 4 2,929 Chile 8,040 3,699 Brazil 157,882 57,492 Denmark 687 5,446 1,647 14,631 Luxmbrg 450 3,272 450 3,272 France 78 2,851 78 2,851 Fr Germ 55,568 31,788 Spain 2,016,900 880,920 Italy 802,826 347,101 12,230,211 5,720,949 Malaysa 605 7,608 China 1,304,996 1,072,960 10,300,821 8,757,844 58,000 74,740 Hg Kong 23,148 34,273 Taiwan 6,142 616 Japan TOTAL 2,121,151 1,441,872 25,082,871 15,679,339 9603100500 Wiskbrooms, of Broom Corn, LT=.96 EA. Prior to Entry or Withdrawal for Consumption of 61,655 Dozen In Calendar Year Year To Date October Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 2,688 2,445 8,316 7,747 7,200 4,757 China TOTAL 2,688 2,445 15,516 12,504

February 2010

9603104000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, Prior to Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year October Year To Date Mexico 54,456 40,808 China 2,520 2,456 56,976 43,264 TOTAL 9603105000 Other Brooms, of Broomcorn, LT=.96 EA, at Entry or Withdrawal For Consumption of GT=121,478 Dozen in Calendar Year October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Country Mexico 7,872 5,817 115,368 87,954 China 7,200 5,020 TOTAL 7,872 5,817 122,568 92,974 9603106000 Other Brooms, Of Broomcorn, Valued Over .96 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 708,606 1,664,124 6,821,938 16,882,509 20,100 36,389 386,700 781,580 Hondura Fr Germ 3,200 7,910 China 42,390 77,739 TOTAL 728,706 1,700,513 7,254,228 17,749,738 9603109000 Brooms & Brushes, Consisting of Twigs or Other Vegetable Materials Bound Together, With or Without Handles, NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 388 2,321 5,407 37,248 Mexico 10,122 37,087 85,174 174,942 Salvadr 22,080 20,139 Haiti 600 3,568 Colomb 25,208 31,718 Nethlds 36 3,883 36 3,883 Fr Germ 8 7,013 Estonia 2,400 17,042 Italy 3,849 21,959 Turkey 1,100 4,640 Israel 174 5,130 India 584 20,784 Sri Lka 51,394 109,208 691,061 1,273,577 Thailnd 10,460 23,431 92,884 178,765 Vietnam 21,200 20,790 139,510 133,469 Phil R 7,000 10,293 China 42,960 49,988 182,480 368,706 Taiwan 1,200 2,401 TOTAL 136,560 246,708 1,260,755 2,315,277 9603210000 Toothbrushes, Incl. Dental-Plate Brushes October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Country Canada 1,453 3,238 73,836 124,381 904,756 127,191 9,958,801 1,746,479 Mexico Chile 38,016 9,216 749,952 198,802 11,769,452 3,337,973 Brazil 11,368 8,028 129,768 157,322 Sweden Denmark 2,220 2,478 113,293 66,027 U King 156,312 98,422 6,554,616 2,484,546 Ireland Nethlds 152,154 13,982 576,729 59,249 France 447 4,287 Fr Germ 3,058,281 2,048,895 32,847,567 19,611,474 Hungary 3,696 7,930 630 3,466 Lichten Switzld 5,625,336 1,190,153 71,091,402 24,302,810 Italy 319,620 135,111 1,511,108 734,732 Turkey 670 10,261 5,710 13,872 Israel 765,896 164,236 2,162,194 200,592 22,949,172 3,962,277 India Thailnd 4,938,464 636,624


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February 2010 Vietnam Malaysa Indnsia China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Austral N Caldn Kenya TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

2,138,556 3,451,672 109,300 47,530,733

211,169 164,306 8,196 8,840,588

135,312 484,828 107,430

119,273 164,861 60,312

67,099,927

13,603,380

9,710,013 11,382,102 879,016 458,207,462 1,225,780 352,736 3,607,849 3,440,355 383,000 93,456 3,264 652,615,856

1,662,038 673,864 62,009 78,072,049 278,379 223,656 861,284 644,474 56,709 24,162 4,176 139,992,179

9603294010 Hairbrushes, Valued Not Over .40 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 13,824 4,460 Poland Thailnd 23,040 5,831 77,040 23,086 Vietnam 86,112 28,445 China 3,369,283 1,033,801 39,347,456 10,392,656 Kor Rep 149,030 28,307 Hg Kong 642,336 114,622 Taiwan 10,080 2,866 3,392,323 1,039,632 40,325,878 10,594,442 TOTAL 9603294090 Shaving Brushes, Nail Brushes, Eyelash Brushes & Other Toilet Brushes For Use On The Person, Valued Not Over .40 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 2,526,300 170,948 36,690,697 3,083,084 1,420,000 69,877 Nethlds 90,000 4,155 Belgium France 564,364 141,117 Fr Germ 2,410,000 549,806 38,955,459 7,018,912 Italy 3,023,337 676,119 India 220,000 5,293 1,058,580 32,574 China 6,609,976 494,794 34,302,329 5,007,063 Kor Rep 2,612,000 54,098 12,251,156 315,325 Hg Kong 469,000 56,993 Taiwan 247,240 56,872 TOTAL 14,378,276 1,274,939 129,072,162 16,462,091 9603302000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Not Over .05 Each Year To Date October Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 282,500 9,451 Mexico 1,791,000 37,774 5,040,200 86,997 U King 500,000 12,337 500,000 12,337 1,354,500 34,169 20,108,500 555,274 Fr Germ Italy 1,420,000 13,602 22,552,900 256,327 India 1,980,000 27,196 China 8,529,328 236,150 105,311,714 2,478,152 Kor Rep 3,170,000 81,697 27,105,000 717,725 318,288 6,729 2,292,260 68,563 Hg Kong Taiwan 1,478,080 33,329 TOTAL 17,083,116 422,458 186,651,154 4,245,351 9603304000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application of Cosmetics, Valued Over .05 But not Over .10 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Mexico 6,251,297 497,409 53,942,747 4,340,680 Dom Rep 33,060 2,874 384,000 26,986 Brazil U King 104,000 8,626 104,000 8,626 Fr Germ 50,000 3,307 1,232,500 88,813 India 33,480 2,498 739,308 60,200 Indnsia 261,504 27,476

China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan TOTAL

PAGE 45 9,468,069 1,508,400 62,000 50,000 17,527,246

799,240 110,123 5,842 3,203 1,430,248

100,092,777 5,513,320 652,000 1,396,776 164,351,992

8,171,989 372,932 54,486 95,015 13,250,077

9603306000 Artists Brushes, Writing Brushes & Similar Brushes For Application Of Cosmetics, Valued Over .10 Each October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value 377 13,243 5,480 208,136 Canada Mexico 11,141,339 1,832,591 101,809,329 16,156,542 Dom Rep 258,837 279,160 1,682,198 1,712,913 Denmark 220 3,020 U King 253,813 418,057 1,642,229 2,497,941 Nethlds 5,000 12,734 55,160 76,219 Belgium France 53,562 179,189 660,903 2,308,258 Fr Germ 51,832 140,793 2,814,421 2,035,615 Czech 120 2,267 Switzld 25 3,924 662 23,871 Spain 17,660 81,471 102,274 503,566 Italy 51,100 47,197 234,458 211,871 188 3,707 Greece Israel 875 2,761 5,242 14,991 714,559 292,295 4,619,232 2,020,745 India 186,990 109,319 1,199,098 675,171 Sri Lka 271,928 110,805 2,455,632 1,644,436 Thailnd 70,200 26,700 Vietnam China 20,496,533 13,539,307 138,755,027 95,091,184 Kor Rep 286,974 277,964 2,110,484 2,192,078 278,715 96,029 4,229,831 2,250,442 Hg Kong 51,000 37,913 1,365,875 483,959 Taiwan Japan 165,585 544,606 2,473,478 7,209,209

DORDEN & COMPANY, INC. Offering Floor Squeegees and Window Squeegees YOUR SOURCE, NOT YOUR COMPETITOR Special Co-manufacturer’s Pricing Available

ISSA Member

STRATEGIC DISTRIBUTION PROGRAMS

P.O. Box 10247 • Detroit, MI 48210 (313) 834-7910 • Fax: (313) 834-1178


BBM.Feb.x

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PAGE 46 Austral Microns Maurit TOTAL

Country Canada Mexico Brazil U King Nethlds Fr Germ Austria Czech Italy Singapr China Hg Kong Taiwan Japan TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP

2,240

3,114

34,283,944

18,009,738

4,348 2,240 38,500 266,341,829

9603402000 Paint Rollers October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 24,961 26,965 469,570 885,604 372,861 9,775,855 44,652 32,889 70,770 348,800 59,876 3,364,591 800 25,060 32,360 58,551 3,010,937 1,124,566 32,252,620 300,952 15,000 1,750 6,070 41,750 4,272,052 1,590,338 46,485,420

19,679 3,114 92,783 137,481,151

Value 446,750 5,571,501 32,369 31,023 9,613 808,918 4,009 9,777 44,694 12,524 16,600,232 58,194 15,525 34,546 23,679,675

9603404020 Paint Pads (Other Than Of Subheading 9603.30) October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 7,000 3,110 U King 94,715 59,140 Nethlds 1,315 6,600 Fr Germ 1,000 2,364 Italy 44 7,438 Thailnd 5,040 4,119 Indnsia 433,440 52,819 China 631,514 526,462 9,538,559 6,017,858 Taiwan 117,308 928,313 TOTAL 631,514 526,462 10,198,421 7,081,761 9603404040 Natural Bristle Brushes, Other Than Brushes Of Subheading 9603.30 October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 14,295 14,642 14,295 14,642 Sweden 100 4,542 U King 169,741 137,817 Nethlds 642 5,085 France 1,340 3,475 Fr Germ 1,344 5,214 43,752 37,633 Italy 10 3,288 75,810 157,109 Turkey 101,874 336,228 Israel 12,000 9,423 Thailnd 371,664 52,720 Vietnam 569,244 75,999 Indnsia 2,136,934 322,156 33,404,196 4,980,821 China 44,557 25,198 842,650 330,742 Taiwan 23,328 7,903 621,574 169,175 Japan 1,200 9,887 6,600 56,958 TOTAL 2,221,668 388,288 36,235,482 6,372,369 9603404060 Paint, Distemper, Varnish/Similr Brushes Exc Brushes of Subheading 9603.30 NESOI October Year To Date Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 2,180 11,067 149,440 191,621 Mexico 212 6,069 52,132 43,317 Guatmal 61,948 33,372 Brazil Sweden 220 14,959 25,331 39,324

U King Nethlds Fr Germ Czech Switzld Italy Turkey India Vietnam Singapr Indnsia China Kor Rep Hg Kong Taiwan Japan TOTAL

February 2010 720

4,317

103,396 3,918 68,596 24,000 517 51,053 10,332 30,000 902,852 20,250 35,304,435 136,083,496 216,400 48,000 1,965,674 341,651 175,454,818

82,306 17,540 216,096 15,098 2,358 77,207 30,236 3,381 244,428 8,805 5,999,579 45,723,500 37,030 7,340 513,908 133,925 53,435,255

11,700

28,476

26,112

27,452

792

3,685

4,442,791 8,379,717 30,000 48,000 148,844 73,775 13,164,851

786,555 2,897,641 6,850 7,340 60,001 25,958 3,874,301

Country Canada Mexico Brazil China Taiwan Rep Saf TOTAL

9603908010 Wiskbrooms Year To Date October Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 20,160 5,911 2,429 87,358 45,302 496,761 1,938 2,784 87,358 45,302 529,983

Value 10,482 10,254 30,033 420,003 6,446 9,233 486,451

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Salvadr Colomb Brazil Fr Germ Spain Italy Vietnam Phil R China Hg Kong Taiwan Japan Egypt TOTAL

9603908020 Upright Brooms October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 496 36,109 47,126 453,790 75,872 41,054 14,100 11,811 64,020 13,116 20,933 260,687 670 22,431 42,348 74,222 258,722 1,600 2,750 493,404 599,924 5,592,471 11,520 52,452 100 4,488 2,959 35,340 603,565 756,975 6,873,975

Value 12,171 478,797 109,762 39,858 51,978 377,620 6,848 85,218 385,215 39,336 2,841 6,075,401 15,366 53,208 15,000 24,094 7,772,713

9603908030 Push Brooms, 41 CM or Less in Width Year To Date October Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Argent 7,756 9,636 12,106 22,279 Sri Lka 3,636 16,215 18,504 39,501 72,090 168,896 China 300 2,545 600 5,090 Taiwan TOTAL 26,560 51,682 88,432 212,480

Country Canada Mexico Guatmal Salvadr Panama Dom Rep Colomb Venez

9603908040 Other Brooms, NESOI October Year To Date Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. 265,159 531,151 1,490,881 509,601 533,329 4,158,105 20,640 20,358 143,655 66,083 12,120 21,842 12,120 1,577 33,793 37,270 311,540 725,793

Value 2,256,641 6,976,042 142,780 120,562 21,842 27,278 374,703 86,988


BBM.Feb.x

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February 2010 Brazil U King Czech Hungary Spain Italy Israel India Sri Lka Thailnd Vietnam Indnsia China Kor Rep Taiwan Egypt Rep Saf TOTAL

BROOM, BRUSH & MOP 16,742

35,964

62,272

48,565

30,039

63,388

58,811

139,587

23,980

22,157

352,604

474,041

1,385,761

1,927,652

218,993 1,476 263,306 27,900 136,778 646,836 3,986 13,094 444,192 16,500 47,790 38,150 5,684,592 182 15,915 3,600 4,170 14,477,214

586,238 10,981 224,157 8,777 167,003 1,006,135 3,257 13,821 1,027,065 22,560 43,057 38,974 6,582,984 2,789 93,751 2,904 15,370 19,856,659

9603908050 Brooms, Brushes, Sqeegees, Etc., NESOI Year To Date October Country Net Q/No. Value Net Q/No. Value Canada 3,018,574 20,548,953 Mexico 3,030,151 33,442,214 116,796 Salvadr Hondura 1,253,581 14,147,714 Panama 9,716 Dom Rep 34,546 319,849 Colomb 138,801 1,166,580 Brazil 137,383 672,752 Argent 143,088 Sweden 23,492 158,730 Finland 10,595 Denmark 142,726 1,058,662 U King 125,379 852,908 Ireland 3,612 Nethlds 227,147 1,995,849 Belgium 150,718 1,601,240 France 6,806 126,886 Fr Germ 193,887 2,003,322 Austria 2,550 243,588 Czech 4,373 241,919 Switzld 14,420 245,726 Lithuan 30,545 Poland 2,534 47,469 Russia 4,643 Spain 28,526 493,011 Portugl 2,290 Italy 438,916 5,916,513 Serbia 29,056 Romania 8,611 Turkey 4,200 47,169 Syria 3,299 Israel 14,379 439,817 India 74,267 988,300 Pakistn 229,910 3,697,619 Sri Lka 220,453 3,466,401 535,825 6,536,722 Thailnd Vietnam 47,416 470,175 Malaysa 60,557 348,285 Singapr 33,662 Indnsia 61,179 494,062 China 22,307,166 250,167,166 Kor Rep 136,440 2,368,283 Hg Kong 522,075 4,356,512 Taiwan 788,895 9,821,519 Japan 73,933 462,677 Austral 202,708 1,531,954 83,464 W Samoa Egypt 29,282 187,236 TOTAL 34,283,195 371,147,159

PAGE 47

2009 Crop Shows Validity For Machine Harvestable Dwarf Broom Corn For the second year in a row, longtime broom corn professional Dr. Sam Moyer, of Mount Laurel, NJ, has reported that a longtime objective of producing machine harvestable dwarf varieties of broom corn has been achieved. He acknowledged that results from crops grown in 2009 have been favorable. “There are slight genetic differences in some individual varieties, gene pools and hybrids. All have no center stems and do have handles (peduncles) at least 10-inches long, but might vary in how much the top leaf covers the knuckle,” Dr. Moyer said. “The brush is bright/dark green early, then many colors develop when fully mature. I might have also established an aqua/blue variety. Dr. (Henry) Hadley has sent seeds of a dark green variety that I will maintain.” Dr. Hadley is well known for his many years of broom corn research at the University of Illinois. He has collaborated with Dr. Moyer over the years regarding the development of machine harvestable dwarf broom corn varieties. One of the goals of this project has been to develop broom corn that will not require such labor-intensive harvesting, a problem with standard broom corn. Dr. Moyer said weather is now the main performance factor. Planters in Michigan, Wisconsin, North Dakota and Wyoming reported short brush due to cool weather. Planters in Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas had good performance. One in New York tried no herbicide and had a weed problem with too much rain. “Thanks to excessive rain and enough hot days, my 1 1/2 acres yielded 498 pounds (including 10-inch peduncles) of which 272 pounds were 18-inches or longer,” Dr. Moyer said. “This could have been more if I hadn’t experimented with some low yielding varieties. For those who request seed, I will send four kinds in order to learn which performs better in different environments.” He noted that limited free seed samples are available. Dr. Moyer also reported experiencing good performance while planting “no-till” and spraying Roundup® and Bicep® (herbicide) mix two weeks before planting. In an experiment at a small area, seeds not treated with Concep® (herbicide safener) sprouted nearly as good as treated ones. In another experimental area, Bicep® was not reapplied after six weeks with no weed problem. “Both experiments might have been (influenced) by constant and excessive rain. Therefore (the experiments) need replicating,” he said. “I also learned the hard way that (certain) seeds are too large for the radish plate (when planting). The okra plate is needed with most holes taped shut. I will check seed sizes after cleaning (debearding and winnowing) and tell about my results when sending seeds.” He added that broadcasting seeds might not be good due to inadequate spacing control. Rows might be needed for weed control and using a reaper. “The big news is a local fabricator completed a reaper attachment to a sickle bar mower, but not in time for harvest. It needed some minor alterations. Details are available,” Dr. Moyer said. For more information, contact Dr. Moyer at: The Jersey Jerry Broomsquire, 911 Larkspur Place, S., Mount Laurel, NJ 08054-4960. Phone: 856-222-0713 E-mail: moyerbase@aol.com. Web site: www.broomcrafters.com.


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Zephyr Manufacturing Promotes R.J. Lindstrom To President Zephyr Manufacturing Co., located in Sedalia, MO, has announced the promotion of R.J. Lindstrom to president. Previous president, John Lindstrom, retains his positions of chief financial officer and chairman of the board. Zephyr Manufacturing was founded in 1927 and R.J. R.J. Lindstrom Lindstrom represents the fourth generation of family leadership. R.J. Lindstrom graduated with honors from Truman State University with a degree in

Business Management and Psychology. He was a manager with Enterprise Rent-a-Car before joining Zephyr. Since 2008, R.J. Lindstrom has been directly involved in all aspects of manufacturing, operations and sales in preparation for the duties of president. He will be working closely with Zephyr’s experienced management team which has over 170 years of industry experience. Zephyr is a broad line manufacturer of janitorial, institutional, industrial, and food service cleaning tools such as mops, brooms, brushes, handles and associated products. Contact: Zephyr Manufacturing Co., 200 Mitchell Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301. Phone: 800-821-7197. Web Site: www.zephyrmfg.com.

PFERD Introduces SG-FLEX Premium Grinding Wheel The new depressed center (Type 27) Ceramic Oxide grinding wheel from PFERD is a high performance, bonded tool designed to handle a broad range of tasks including blending, deburring, shaping, sanding, finishing and polishing. According to the company, the SG-FLEX’s versatility is due to its greater flexibility which increases its surface area contact for aggressive grinding on steel, stainless steel and aluminum in shipbuilding, automotive, fabrication, tank construction, metal con-

tracting work or wherever large area curved metal surfaces are involved. Available in 4 1/2, 5 and 7-inch diameters with a 1/8-inch thickness, this new addition to the PFERD broad line of bonded products also absorbs more grinding vibration, which may reduce operator fatigue and costly downtime. The PFERD SG-FLEX can be seen on the PFERD Web site www.pferdusa.com by clicking on “Videos.”


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U.S. Imports 53 Short Tons Of Broom Corn In November By Harrell Kerkhoff Broom, Brush & Mop Editor

rate compared to past monthly reports. “I still think there is some raw broom corn in the mix, bringing the price down, but ($1.55 per pound) is more reasonable. The tonAccording to the U.S. Department of Commerce, a total of 53 nage figure also matches more closely to what is actually being short tons of broom corn was imported into the United States dur- imported and used. This is the first time in awhile,” Pelton noted. ing November 2009. Total value of this import was $163,910, with There is also good news to report regarding the late 2009 broom corn a cost per ton of $3,093 ($1.55 per pound). All of the month’s harvest from theTorreon region of Mexico. Pelton said this harvest netbroom corn arrived from Mexico. ted a larger quantity of broom corn than expected, by 50 to 100 percent. November’s broom corn import mark was a bit higher compared “They didn’t get a hard freeze (in the Torreon region) until fairto one year prior, when the government reported 29 short tons ly late in the season. Weather was more favorable, and thus there entered the United States during November 2008. is now more broom corn available in Cadereyta (for processing) It should be noted that Broom, Brush & Mop has been in the compared to any time in the past 12 months,” Pelton explained. He added that the larger than expected second crop from process of working with officials from the U.S. Department of Commerce about the possibility that not all imported broom corn Torreon was a nice surprise. “Even if prices don’t move down much, at least we know broom entering the United States as of late is being correctly classified and/or counted. However, the publication did receive a letter on Dec. corn will be available. This wasn’t the case last spring. Sometimes 15, 2009, from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Commodity there just wasn’t broom corn available to buy,” Pelton said. Analysis Branch — Foreign Trade Division. The letter states, “We “People were also having to substitute sizes.” When interviewed on January 15, he added that Mexican broom have spoken with the importers and brokers involved and have detercorn prices have not decreased. However, conditions are more mined that no revisions to the reported statistics are necessary.” Therefore, according to current government figures, 308 short favorable for a decline to take place in the coming months. This is tons of broom corn were imported into the United States after the due to the extra inventory and the continued slowness of the first 11 months of 2009. Total value of this import was $841,942, broom business in Mexico. “If there is plenty of inventory still available as we start to get with a cost per ton of $2,734 ($1.37 per pound). In comparison, after the first 11 months of 2008, there were 961 short tons of closer to the next Torreon crop (this coming summer), I feel prices broom corn imported. Total value of this import was $2,501,452, will come down,” he said. One obstacle to a possible price decline taking place is the with a cost per ton of $2,603 ($1.30 per pound). The 2009 import breakdown in short tons by country after 11 recent strength of the Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar. “It’s still running stronger compared to most of last year. If the months is as follows: Mexico, 271 tons; India, 11 tons; Sierra Leone, 10 tons; Chile, 9 tons; and the Dominican Republic, 7 tons. peso were to weaken some, I think we would start to see broom corn prices decline,” Pelton said. “It’s also important to remember Bart Pelton of PelRay International, LLC, in San Antonio, that there are fewer (Mexican) broom corn processors, and they are TX, said that November’s Mexican broom corn import number of holding the bulk of the inventory. It’s not as competitive of a mar53 short tons and the $1.55 per pound figure look to be more accu- ket as it used to be.” Although the next Broom Corn Imports large Mexican broom 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total Cost corn harvest will not Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Tons Value Per Ton take place until this January 174 125 61 116 89 14 $47,077 $3,363 ($1.68) summer, there is always some broom February 113 44 215 90 91 21 $63,921 $3,044 ($1.52) corn grown in the March 168 77 65 83 41 50 $108,699 $2,174 ($1.09) Apatzingan region of April 122 120 56 48 150 11 $27,195 $2,472 ($1.24) Mexico. Pelton said May 167 36 135 172 98 24 $62,849 $2,619 ($1.31) it’s typically a small June 147 65 81 63 65 20 $57,489 $2,874 ($1.44) crop, with harvesting July 162 124 160 80 66 23 $67,889 $2,952 ($1.48) usually taking place August 183 177 216 80 76 42 $93,296 $2,221 ($1.11) during the middle to September 215 124 152 131 133 22 $67,313 $3,060 ($1.53) late February. October 202 133 184 92 123 28 $82,304 $2,939 ($1.47) “In the past few November 194 200 96 160 29 53 $163,910 $3,093 ($1.55) years, a typical yield December 127 164 76 101 17 from Apatzingan was 1,974 1,389 1,497 1,216 978 308 $841,942 $2,734 ($1.37) about 150 to 200 tons.


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This crop has been important in recent years as broom corn inventories were low,” he said. “This year, however, there should be more broom corn already available when Apatzingan is harvested. Therefore, this crop won’t need to ‘save the day’ as much. However, it may add more pressure on prices.” Meanwhile, “stability” remains a key word when discussing yucca fiber, a market that has not seen a lot of change during the past several months. “We have entered the time of year when holidays and winter weather can cut into yucca fiber production, but nothing seems to have much of an impact on prices or supply right now,” Pelton said. Regarding overall business, he added that conditions in the broom and other industries seem to be more positive compared to this time last year, but not as good as two years ago.

ed, this increase has not been reflected in the price. “If it’s bigger, (Mexican broom corn processors) may either be keepingpricingupbysittingonabiggerinventory,orthe(firstTorreon)crop was short enough to keep prices at the same level,” he said. Monahan doesn’t expect the upcoming Apatzingan harvest to make much of a dent regarding future broom corn pricing. “They always raise a little bit of broom corn (in Apatzingan), but as far as I know there is no big contracting being done,” he said. Meanwhile, what little movement that has taken place with yucca fiber as of late is mostly due to activity among Mexican broom makers, according to Monahan. He noted that pricing remains unchanged as of the middle of January.

Richard Caddy of R.E. Caddy & Co., Inc., in Greensboro, NC, agreed with Pelton that November’s Mexican broom corn import statistics looked to be better aligned with true activity compared to statistics released in the recent past. “The price is more accurate, but ($1.55 per pound) still seems a bit too low,” Caddy said. He added that as of late, there does seem to be fewer troubles with broom corn inspections taking place at the U.S.-Mexican border. “We recently brought in some broom corn where there was no damage done (to the contents). It’s been a long time since I brought in a load without at least one broken bale,” Caddy reported. Caddy was pleased about the possibility of more broom corn becoming available than expected from the second Torreon crop. “I have also not had problems with getting certain sizes like what took place last October through December,” he explained. “The extra broom corn from the second crop should help us get some of shorter lengths. Meanwhile, the current quality still looks consistent and fairly good. No. 1 and No. 2 (broom corn) appears to have been graded correctly. I have not looked at any raw broom corn as of late, but the processed broom corn we are seeing is of pretty good quality.” Caddy does expect the Apatzingan harvest to help the overall Mexican broom corn picture. “Sometimes, there is enough longer material where they can actually export (some of the Apatzingan crop) to the United States. Most of the time it’s only suitable for the Mexican market.” Caddy has no complaints with the recent status of yucca fiber. He said quality remains good, while pricing did edge up for a time but has since been steady. When interviewed in mid-January, Caddy reported as well that overall business has been “decent” for the first half of the month. “People are still not spending much on discretionary items, and to some extent, cleaning supplies are discretionary. It’s important to remember that the (U.S.) economy is still in pretty tough shape and the unemployment rate remains high,” Caddy said.

ABMA ......................................................................48 Amerwood ................................................................16 Borghi s.pa. ...............................................................11 Borghi USA ................................................................9 Boucherie USA ...........................................................2 Caddy & Co., Inc., R.E.............................................38 Carlson Tool ............................................................42 Chung Thai Brushes Co............................................26 Creative Poly, Inc. ....................................................25 Crystal Lake..............................................................37 Culicover & Shapiro, Inc..........................................42 Deco Products Co. ....................................................27 Distribuidora Perfect, S.A.........................................28 Dorden. .....................................................................45 DuPont ......................................................................15 Gordon Brush Mfg. Co. Inc......................................29 Hahl Filaments............................................................7 Jewel Wire Co...........................................................20 Jones Companies ......................................................17 Keystone Plastics ......................................................12 Lemieux Spinning Mill Inc.........................................3 Line Manufacturing, Inc. ..........................................39 Manufacturers Resource ...........................................13 Michigan Brush ........................................................41 Mill-Rose Company..................................................35 Monahan Co., The Thomas ......................Front Cover Mount Joy Wire .........................................Back Cover Paul Marsh Co. .........................................................33 PelRay International .................................................51 PMM .........................................................................21 Rol-Brush Mfg..........................................................41 Royal Paint Roller ....................................................36 St. Nick Brush Co.....................................................43 Stainless Steel Products ............................................31 Vonco Products, Inc. .................................................23 Young & Swartz........................................................43 Zahoransky .................................................................5 Zelazoski Wood Products .........................................14

Tim Monahan of The Thomas Monahan Co., in Arcola, IL, said that although recent broom corn import statistics seem to be off, the U.S. broom corn broom industry still appears to remain down. “The (import) numbers, while they are suspicious and a little bit on the low side, are not off by 100 or so tons. It’s more like 20 tons at times,” he said. “(The monthly statistics) may be missing a load that has not been reported or it could be a timing issue.” Monahan added that even though he has heard that the second broom corn harvest from Torreon is somewhat larger than expect-

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS


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Broom, Brush & Mop Feb 2010  

Broom, Brush & Mop Magazine's February 2010 issue. The trade magazine for the broom, brush and mop industry.

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