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ThermalNews Pellet stoves sold 2010

2011

2012

Italy

176,000

182,000

195,000

France

27,000

38,000

53,200

Spain

16,000

10,000

11,000

Germany

15,000

7,000

7,000

Austria

3,273

5,000

7,000

SOURCE: EUROPEAN PELLET COUNCIL, 2012

PFI conference predicts growth Presentations at the annual Pellet Fuels Institute conference held in July show that the outlook for the industry is still positive, both domestically and internationally. Daniel Saloni, assistant professor in forestry at North Carolina State University, pointed out that both aggressive and conservative economic models for the pellet industry are predicting growth. Although U.S. pellet stove sales dropped when natural gas prices nosedived over the past couple of years, Seth Walker, an associate economist with RISI Inc. estimated the U.S. currently has approximately 845,000 pellet stoves installed. According to

Walker, an additional 50,000 to 60,000 stoves are expected to be added annually over the next several years. While the EU power market has gotten much attention, the heating market comprises 40 percent of the EU pellet market, with no subsidy required. “Pellets are 30 percent cheaper than heating oil,” said Gordon Murray, executive director of the Wood Pellet Association of Canada. “The consumer market in the EU has grown into a very stable market,” added Arnold Dale with Sweden-based Ekman & Co. “It is no longer seasonal. People prefer to buy pellets in the summer months.”

30 BIOMASS MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2013

Metso supplies plant to Finland district heating project Metso has announced it will supply a 10 MW biomass plant for hot water district heating to energy company Elenia Lämpö in Turenki, Finland. The facility will be fired using locally sourced biomass, such as forest residues and peat and utilize Metso’s advanced BioGrate combustion technology, which enables a wide selection of fuels. The plant is scheduled to be operational in early 2014. BioGrate is a rotating grate with a conical primary combustion chamber. The fuel input can range from 4 MW to 20 MW and is fed from underneath the center of the grate. Fuel dries in the middle of the grate by the heat radiating from the refractory lining bricks and by the flames without disturbing the burning fuel bed in the combustion zone. According to Metso, after the near complete combustion of the residual carbon, the ash falls from the edge of the grate to the ash space filled with quenching water. “Elenia Lämpö's investment in the heating plant is an excellent example of a project that increases the utilization of local Finnish fuels in an energy-efficient and environmentally friendly manner. The Turenki site highlights the need for a flexible and highly adjustable plant solution that is able to effectively respond to heating needs throughout the year. The advanced BioGrate combustion technology enables a wide selection of fuels, low internal consumption and highly flexible adjustability,” says Teemu Koskela, who is in charge of bioheat plant sales at Metso.

October 13 Biomass Magazine  

October 13 Biomass Magazine

October 13 Biomass Magazine  

October 13 Biomass Magazine