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2015

ANNUAL REPORT

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT This year has been such an exciting one with so many tremendous steps forward for animals. Thank you — we know none of them would have been possible without our special partnership with you.

ABOUT US We are World Animal Protection. We were known as WSPA (World Society for the Protection of Animals). Our vision is a world where animal welfare matters and animal cruelty has ended. Together we can move the world to protect animals.We end the needless suffering of animals. • We influence decision makers to put animals on the global agenda. • We help the world see how imporWtant animals are to all of us. • We inspire people to change animals’ lives for the better. • We move the world to protect animals. 2

We save animals from suffering in some pretty tough places. To help us, wherever we work, partnerships are key. Whether they are with local people, global organizations or governments, they are vital in creating and delivering solutions for animals. Their far-reaching effect is highlighted in so many ways throughout this report. Take the Philippines for example. At the end of 2013 Typhoon Haiyan left hundreds of thousands of animals dead and even more injured and exposed to the elements. We decided not just to help meet their immediate need but to help protect them in the future from the typhoons that regularly devastate the region.

WORKING SIDE BY SIDE Thanks to your generosity we worked throughout 2014 with local farmers, governments and universities to develop underground and typhoon-proof animal shelters. We also offered our practical help, working side by side with local people to build them. During this incredibly rewarding experience we met Jeniffer Inamarga, whose life was turned upside down when Haiyan killed most of her chickens and pigs. “We have nothing without our animals and we thought we would be forgotten… But you have given us the beginning of life again,” she said. The work we did with Jeniffer is just the start of the story. We are already using her example to show other typhoon and hurricane-stricken regions throughout the world how these shelters can protect animals and their owners’ livelihoods. 3


BUILDING COMMERCIAL PARTNERSHIPS

LEADING GLOBAL POLICY

Through commercial partnerships we can improve the care and treatment of animals on a huge scale. Our agreement with Nestlé, launched this year, will help us improve the welfare of animals throughout their whole supply chain.

Our partnerships cannot work in isolation. Your support helps us fight for global policies with animal welfare and protection at their core. These policies must reflect our strategy: protecting animals in farming; animals in disasters; animals in the wild and animals in communities. And during 2014 our global policy team worked hard and painstakingly to make sure that these four areas were included in the draft UN Sustainable Development Goals.

In practice, this means positive steps are being taken to put an end to keeping pregnant sows in gestation crates so small they can’t turn round, and to condemning hens to a lifetime in small barren cages. We hope you will be as proud as we are of what we’ve achieved together.

INSPIRING WORLDWIDE CHANGE Throughout this report you will find examples of how partnerships are essential to success. Look at our work to end the brutal culling of stray dogs. We are building showcases of effective and humane rabies control programmes in China, Bangladesh, the Philippines and Zanzibar. These pioneering programmes have the potential to save millions of dogs’ lives worldwide. Similarly, the effectiveness of our Sea Change campaign will depend on relationships we are building with the fishing industry, governments and international and local marine mammal experts. We want to save 1 million marine animals by 2018 from the 640,000 tonnes of fishing gear abandoned in our oceans each year. 4

WHY WORLD ANIMAL PROTECTION? Why? Because animals have a right to live free from pain. How? By tackling cruelty and suffering worldwide. Today we’re working on projects worldwide — helping governments and communities to protect and care for their animals.

Did you know? 3,000 dogs used to be culled every year in Cali, Colombia for fear of rabies. We persuaded the government to sterilize dogs instead. The number of strays fell by 25%. Dog bites reduced. And when the project ended, 10,000 people paid to sterilize their dogs, rather than returning to culling.

This is a monumental achievement. These goals, once adopted in 2015, will influence policy making and set the pace and direction of development in every country in the world from 2016 onwards. They will open doors and help us formally raise animal protection issues with national governments and UN organizations. The potential for positive change is enormous. We hope you will be both encouraged and inspired by the achievements in this report and we look forward to sharing our future successes. We know that with your help we truly are moving the world for animals. Thank you so much for your tireless commitment to our work.

Mark Watts President 5


WE HELP THE WORLD SEE HOW IMPORTANT ANIMALS ARE TO ALL OF US Why? Because millions of people depend on animals. How? By demonstrating the vital relationship between people and animals. Today we’re campaigning for a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare, and over 2 million people, 330 animal groups and dozens of governments have already pledged their support.

WE INSPIRE PEOPLE TO CHANGE ANIMALS’ LIVES FOR THE BETTER Why? Because we all have the power to improve animal welfare.

cruelty by helping people everywhere to respect and protect animals.

Did you know? In 2013 we successfully moved the United Nations to include animal welfare in resolutions for the first time — a victory that will lead to policy change worldwide.

How? By moving communities and governments to stop animal suffering.

Did you know? We’ve been moving the world to protect bears for more than 20 years. In India, Turkey and Greece, we’ve helped to end bear dancing — for good.

Today we’re focusing on ending bear baiting in Pakistan — just one example of our work to end

WE PUT ANIMALS ON THE GLOBAL AGENDA Why? Because a sustainable future for the planet can only be achieved if both animals and people are part of the solution. How? By being part of the big global debates on how we live within the world’s resources now and in the future. Today we’re helping shape the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals that all countries need to adopt from 2016, to ensure animal protection is not forgotten. 6

Because animals have the right to live free from pain. Did you know? In 2013 we persuaded UN Member States to adopt animal protection language in two General Assembly Resolutions (on agriculture and disaster risk reduction). For the first time this places animal welfare at the heart of policy and decision making at the United Nations.

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OUR WORK

BETTER LIVES FOR DOGS

We work around the world to end the needless suffering of animals and inspire people to change animals’ lives for the better.

BETTER LIVES FOR DOGS

OUR SOLUTION

We move governments worldwide to create better lives for dogs by ending brutal inhumane culling practices. Humane alternatives to culling don’t only exist — they’re more effective.

Culling dogs is never an answer. The misconception that culling is the best way to reduce dog populations or stamp out threats to public health causes enormous suffering.

WHY ARE DOGS CULLED

We work with governments and communities around the world to show them that our proven methods of humane dog population management are the only way forward.

Stray dogs can cause problems in communities. They can pose a threat to public health by spreading rabies and other diseases, they can cause damage to livestock and wildlife, or they may behave aggressively towards people. But instead of examining the root causes of stray dog populations, such as irresponsible ownership and overbreeding, some governments look to culling as a quick-fix solution. Dragged through the streets, electrocuted, poisoned or gassed – culling is nearly always a horrendous and painful death.

Stray dogs can cause problems in communities.

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We move governments worldwide to create better lives for dogs by ending brutal inhumane culling practices. Humane alternatives to culling don’t only exist – they’re more effective

We follow the International Companion Animal Management (ICAM) coalition’s dog population management methodology. It’s a full cycle of action, addressing the root causes of large free-roaming dog populations, which we use to help governments manage dogs humanely and to help communities to live in harmony with dogs. The solutions we reach together can involve educating owners and communities, legislation, dog registration, vaccinating against rabies, sterilization, rehoming – or a combination of some or all of these. We help governments to monitor and evaluate progress too, ensuring we create humane change that lasts. 9


PROTECTING WORKING ANIMALS IN THE WEST BANK We work with owners of working animals in the West Bank to end abuse and improve levels of care.

THE PROBLEM At the mobile vet clinics we run with our partner, the Palestine Wildlife Society, we started to seemore and more horses, donkeys and mules showing signs of neglect and cruelty. So we began helping people care for their animals. By 2015, we'll be tackling this abuse in 26 communities across Palestine. Our vets were seeing animals that were lame, injured or malnourished. Others had been beaten or had pressure sores from badly-fitting harnesses. To bring about lasting change, we began to offer practical advice to help owners see the benefits of compassionate care. Many people in Palestine rely on working animals, but knowlege of animal care is limited. 10

To bring a lasting change, we began to offer practical advice to help owners see the benefits of compassionate care.

OUR SOLUTION In each community, we train a few people who can teach others about better animal care. They attend workshops and visit communities where our training is already having an impact. They then share what they learn. Word spreads. Habits change. Animals' lives improve. And, because their animals are healthier, owners can earn a better living too. 11


CHOOSE CAGE-FREE Join the campaign to give hens a healthier life.

ANIMALS IN FARMING In each community, we train a few people who can teach others about better animal care. They attend workshops and visit communities where our training is already having an impact. They then share what they learn. Word spreads. Habits change. Animals’ lives improve. And, because their animals are healthier, owners can earn a better living too.

THE GLOBAL FARMING CHALLENGE The treatment of farm animals is the world’s biggest animal welfare issue – and it’s getting bigger. By 2050, livestock production will be twice what it was in 2000. Right now, more than 70 billion animals are farmed for food each year – two-thirds in conditions that mean they can’t move freely or live naturally. We campaign for progress at every stage, from farming to transportation to slaughter. We know change is possible and since 2007, our humane slaughter training has made life better for eight billion animals. 12

THE PROBLEM At this very moment, throughout the US and Canada, over 300 million egg-laying hens are living in small cages that they share with five to seven other birds. Each hen lives in a space about the size of an iPad. It is one of the cruellest and most inhumane practices in modern farming. In typical North America large-scale farming, hens are confined in small wire cages, stacked in tiers and lined up inside huge warehouses. The hens are so crowded that they are highly stressed, cannot stretch their limbs and are often injured by friction against the cage.

With your support, we are: • Moving governments and global bodies to improve regulations to protect animals. • Influencing debates that will shape the future of world farming. • Partnering with food businesses to change the way they work and protect animals. • Working with farmers to demonstrate practical and affordable ways to protect animals. • Encouraging people to choose organic and free-range food options.

THE SOLUTION We are asking you, if you eat eggs, to purchase cage-free eggs. By choosing cage-free eggs, you support: • Better hen welfare • More sustainable food choices • Farmers who are doing it right 13


HUMANE SLAUGHTER Since 2007, our work to promote humane slaughter in Brazil and China has helped more than eight billion animals.

SUPPORTING HUMANE SLAUGHTER

HUMANE SLAUGHTER: OUR SOLUTION

Millions of farm animals face unnecessary stress and suffering before and during slaughter — because workers lack the expertise, skills and technology to ensure humane treatment. So we work with food companies, governments and scientists in Brazil, China and Indonesia to encourage humane slaughter. And our work with partners is helping vets in Indonesia, Cambodia and the Philippines introduce humane slaughter too.

Changes made in slaughterhouses following our training include:

To reduce animal suffering, we offer straightforward, practical advice and training to help companies and governments to take action. Most importantly, humane slaughter is better for animals — but it also has economic benefits.

Most importantly, humane slaughter is better for animals – but it also has economic benefits.. 14

• Use of humane handling techniques • Pre-slaughter stunning, which stops animals feeling pain • Correct use of stunning and restraining equipment

• Handling pigs in groups to reduce stress on individual animals • Installation of blue lamps to calm poultry • Use of non-slip floors and low-angle ramps to stop animals falling and getting injured To make sure change lasts, we: • Help companies introduce policies and guidelines on humane slaughter • Call for legislation and codes of practice on humane slaughter • Work with vet schools to introduce teaching on humane slaughter

BENEFITS FOR BUSINESS

THE VALUE OF TRAINING: IN NUMBERS

A five-year study of our humane slaughter training found that abattoirs earned a better reputation by using humane methods, helping them compete globally. Staff morale improved too, and because fewer animals were injured, fewer carcasses were bruised – improving meat quality. In one slaughter plant in Brazil, 63% fewer animals were bruised following our training.

Following our training, a lot changed at one Brazilian abattoir, where 2000 cattle are slaughtered every day.

81% reduction in animals slipping 89% reduction in animals falling 53% reduction in use of prodding equipment 15


TOGETHER WE... INSPIRED MORE THAN

PERSUADED

142,000

PEOPLE IN

BENEFITTED THE LIVES OF 220,000 DOGS ON FLORES & LEMBATA ISLANDS, INDONESIA, BY SUPPORTING RABIES VACCINATION PROGRAMMES.

4PEOPLE MILLION WORLDWIDE TO SUPPORT OUR NETWORK

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COLUMBIA TO SIGN A PETITION TO PROTECT BOTOS — AMAZONIAN PINK DOLPHINS FROM SLAUGHTER

LAUNCHED SEA CHANGE: OUR CAMPAIGN TO PROTECT MARINE ANIMALS FROM HORRIFIC DEATHS AND INJURIES CAUSED BY

TRAINED

183 TEACHERS FROM ONE OF THE POOREST AREAS OF PUEBLA, MEXICO TO MAKE ANIMAL PROTECTION PART OF THEIR EVERYDAY TEACHING.

640,000

TONNES OF FISHING GEAR ABANDONED IN OUR OCEANS EVERY YEAR.

CELEBRATED

50 YEARS OF PROTECTING ANIMALS FROM DISASTERS

MOVED NEARLY

EXPOSED THE TERRIBLE CRUELTY OF ELEPHANT RIDES WITH

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1 11 8 NORTH AMERICANS TO SUPPORT OUR CHOOSE CAGE-FREE CAMPAIGN AND IMPROVE THE LIVES OF EGG-LAYING HENS.

MAJOR TOUR OPERATORS

RESCUED

5 BEARS

FROM CRUEL CONDITIONS AND GAVE THEM A SAFE HAVEN IN OUR ROMANIAN BEAR SANCTUARY.

NOW PLEDGING TO STOP OFFERING THEM

MOTIVATED 40,000

0 0 0

ASSISTED

PEOPLE IN DENMARK TO ASK THEIR MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT TO CALL FOR BETTER PROTECTION FOR DOGS IN EUROPE.

260,000

ANIMALS IN OUR DISASTER RESPONSE WORK AROUND THE GLOBE.

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HELPING ANIMALS MEANS HELPING PEOPLE Pets, farm animals, working animals and wildlife have a profound impact on the lives of everyone on earth. For billions of people around the world, animals are essential to their livelihood. By working with the people who rely on their animals, World Animal Protection provides welfare intervention and support that is both practical and long-lasting.

ECONOMIC AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT The livestock sector employs around 1.3 billion people. Additionally, a billion of the world's poorest people depend on animals for food, income, transport, social status, and security. In developing countries, the loss or incapacity of an animal can mean poverty. A well cared for and healthy horse or donkey means that goods get to market and that there is a steady income for carriage drivers. World Animal Protection works to provide owners with the equipment and training they need to care for their animals. We also work to increase access to veterinary services through our mobile clinics.

FARM ANIMALS, THE ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH Better animal welfare on the farm can also support more sustainable food production, less impact on the environment and a reduced risk of diseases and bacteria (like Salmonella) ending up in the food produced. World Animal Protection works to promote humane livestock and pasture-based systems as they often require less grain, fuel and 18

water resources. These systems also keep the number of livestock on a farm low enough to reduce the risk of major pollution and disease spread. For example on cage-free egg farms, when smaller flocks of hens forage outdoors, the manure can be absorbed into the ground, acting as fertilizer. When tens of thousands of hens are kept on one farm, the huge amount of manure produced must be transported and stored at a steep environmental cost. Also, recent research indicates that caged hen operations have an increased risk of Salmonella infection.

RABIES IN COMMUNITIES In developing countries, rabies can be fatal for animals and humans alike. Local governments often resort to randomly culling animals (mostly dogs) by poisoning, electrocuting or shooting them. These methods are inhumane, causing the animals great pain and suffering. They are also ineffective in the long term as they do not address the root cause of the problem. Killing dogs in response to rabies has never been shown to eliminate the disease. But rabies is completely preventable. There is a scientifically-proven, humane and sustainable alternative to fear and cruelty – it's vaccination. We have a global initiative to establish dog vaccination programs in countries where dogs are killed in response to rabies.

Our approach to rabies control has already proven successful in many countries. This work has included a mass vaccination project in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where more than 70 percent of the dog population was immunized; each dog was given a red collar to show local community members it was vaccinated. The project mirrored another successful World Animal Protection-funded project in Bali, where 210,000 dogs were vaccinated and – as a result – cases of rabies in dogs and humans dramatically decreased.

PROTECTING LIVESTOCK TO REBUILD LIVES Some of the world's poorest and most disaster-vulnerable communities are also those who are most reliant on livestock, poultry and working animals for survival. To neglect to prepare and respond to the health and welfare needs of these animals in disasters is to also neglect the health, welfare and livelihoods of the people who depend on them for food, transport and income. The loss of livestock and working animals in disasters can result in their owners and the local community suffering malnutrition and food insecurity, debt, dependency and despair. World Animal Protection's work to provide for the health and welfare of animals in disasters benefits both the animals themselves and the communities who depend upon them.

We are working hard to convince governments, farmers and consumers that humane and sustainable farming is better for animals, people and the environment. At the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (a major global conference on the environment and sustainable development) we worked to ensure that animal welfare was firmly on the agenda. We asked delegates to recognize the importance of livestock in economic development and the role farm animals play in helping to lift people out of poverty and build sustainable livelihoods in developing countries. Learn more and read our submission. 19


INCOME 2014

PETS ARE A SOURCE OF COMFORT Where pets are caught up in a disaster, their owners will often try to rescue them. Those that are forced to abandon their pets have been shown to have an increased risk of post-traumatic stress as a result. Our work to rescue, shelter, feed and treat pets, and hopefully reunite them with their owners (or re-home them if needed) benefits both the animals and their owners.

FINANCIAL SUMMARY In 2014, our global income totaled $66.9m. This was thanks to the continued generous support and commitment of World Animal Protection donors to improving the lives of animals around the world despite difficult economic conditions. These conditions resulted in a 12% reduction in gross income compared to 2013. Regular giving from individual supporters, which represent the majority of our global income, remained strong despite this downturn. Given the reduction in income available in 2014, programmatic spend was reduced accordingly, although a strategic decision was taken to use some of our accumulated reserves to maintain our momentum in moving the world to protect animals. This resulted in a $4.6m deficit for the year. Total expenditure was reduced by 7% to $71.4m in 2014 to reflect the lower income levels, but this was 20

achieved through careful management of our resources. We were able to increase programmatic expenditure ($53.5m) as a proportion of total expenditure, to 75% of overall expenditure (73% in 2013). We hope to be able to further increase our expenditure allocated to our animal welfare programmes in the future. However, this is dependent on growing our income.

GLOBAL ADVOCACY FOR ANIMALS

$ 15,803

ANIMALS IN THE WILD

$ 14,380

ANIMALS IN FARMING

$

9,390

ANIMALS IN DISASTERS

$

7,749

ANIMALS IN COMMUNITIES

$

6,182

FUNDRAISING

$ 15,925

ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT $ 2,002 ......................................................................................... $ 71,431

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GOVERNANCE

EXPENDITURES 2014 Our disaster response teams helped protect nearly 300,000 animals globally this year, providing emergency aid to thousands of affected animals in the wake of serious disasters. These included the Philippines, following Typhoon Haiyan, in Vanatu following Tropical Cyclone Lusi and in Bolivia following the droughts. DONATIONS FROM INDIVIDUALS

$ 55,222

INSTITUTIONAL FUNDING*

$

700

LEGACY GIFTS

$

9,913

INVESTEMENTS AND OTHER $ 1.023 ......................................................................................... $ 66,853 * Funding from trusts and foundations, businesses, inter-governmental and international organizations.

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Our expenditure on our animals in communities was marginally lower at $6.2m, compared to $6.5m in 2013. This programme has achieved significant success in demonstrating to governments in key countries such as the Philippines, Indonesia, and Bangladesh that mass culling is simply not effective in controlling rabies. It provides effective alternatives, primarily rabies vaccination. We remain committed to keeping animals, as well as our generous supporters who make our work possible, at the heart of our organization and

of the financial decisions we make. World Animal Protection appreciates the generosity of people around the world who share our values and have joined our global movement to protect animals. We look forward to working with you in 2016 to achieve even more for animals.

Paul Baldwin Chair of the Finance and Audit Committee

World Animal Protection's Canadian office is based in Toronto and is a registered charity. World Animal Protection is the operating name of World Society for the Protection of Animals Canada. We work with other affiliated World Animal Protection offices around the world. World Animal Protection's International office, which coordinates the work of the global organization, is based in London. Our offices are linked together through collaboration agreements, ensuring that they work in a unified and consistent way in support of a strategy developed by staff from across the global organization

WORLD ANIMAL PROTECTION CANADA BOARD Mr Dominique Bellemare (President) Mrs Silia Smith Mr Normand Joly Mr Carter Luke Mrs Edith Myers Mr Oliver Sterbinsky World Animal Protection International Board Mr Mark Watts (President) Ms Hanja Maij-Weggen (Deputy President)

Mr Paul Baldwin Mr Dominique Bellemare Mrs Nesta Hatendi Dr Chinny Krishna Mr Carter Luke Mrs Marcelle Meredith Mr Joseph Nhan-O’Reilly Mrs Cecilia Vega Leon 23


Š World Animal Protection We were known as WSPA (World Society for the Protection of Animals) Tel: 416 369 0044 Email: info@worldanimalprotection.ca. Canadian Charitable Registration #12971 9076 RR0001 24


Annual Report