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2011 Revamp for Battered Viaduct, Page 2

Humboldt Park Kids Go Green, Page 13

Volume 5 • Issue 1

January 2008

Fritsche proposes expansion to grade 12

Korinthian Violins

takes bows on Delaware

Profound effect on BV High?

By Jay Bullock t its last meeting of 2007, the Fritsche Middle School governance council proposed a change to the school that could drastically alter the landscape of public schools in Bay View: it wants Fritsche to offer high school grades as well. The seeds of the idea were planted last year when DIAL, an MPS charter high school, approached Fritsche about sharing the building for the 2007-08 school year. DIAL ultimately decided against moving from its downtown location, but it got the Fritsche community “thinking,” according to Principal Robin Kitzrow. “Parents called me and said, ‘if you did [have high school grades], we’d stay.’” A survey of Fritsche students in fall found more than 100 eighth graders who expressed an interest in staying for high school, and a similar number of parents school-wide re-

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Korinthia Klein examines a violin. Klein’s store sells, rents, and repairs violins. It specializes in violins but services other string instruments as well.

Story & Photos By Michael Timm ery few people have the financial luxury to fully follow their dreams, especially when those dreams involve something as specialized as making, repairing, and selling violins. But at Korinthian

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Violins LLC, a small shop selling and servicing violins and other stringed instruments which recently opened at 2900 S. Delaware Ave., Korinthia Klein and her husband Ian Weisser are making Klein’s dream come true.

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More than a grain of salt Milwaukee County receives about 40,000 tons of this salt annually, which it uses to clear 2,400 lane-miles of interstate, state, and county highways, according to George Torres, Milwaukee County director of transportation and public works. Spread uniformly, that translates into more than 16 tons on every one-milelong, one-lane-wide section of road each year. The city of Milwaukee, which maintains 7,000 lane-miles of main roads and side streets, uses about 55,000 tons—close to eight tons per lane-mile—each year.

The Algorail, of Sault Ste. Marie, Canada, offloads its cargo of salt at the Port of Milwaukee.

Story & Photos By Jennifer Yauck f you’ve driven over the Hoan Bridge, you’ve probably seen them—white mountains of road salt, rising up from the Port of Milwaukee below. Roughly 900,000 tons of road salt arrive at the port each year. Most of those tons are spread on roadways in Milwaukee and neighboring areas. All that salt keeps roads safe for winter driving, but it also can negatively impact the natural and manmade environment—a conundrum that regularly keeps questions about how to use salt, and whether to use it at all, on the table.

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A Massive Industry Road salt—sodium chloride—wasn’t always the material of choice for snow and ice control. Prior to World War II, many transportation agencies relied on abrasives such as sand and cinders to help keep roads passable in winter. But in the 1950s and 1960s, as the nation’s highway system expanded and society became more mobile, salt use grew rapidly. Unlike abrasives, which only provide

traction, salt lowers the freezing point of water, causing snow and ice to melt. As melting occurs, the salt dissolves into a brine that prevents or breaks the bond between snow and ice and the pavement. Plowing or the action of traffic then removes the resulting slush from the road. Salt’s effectiveness, combined with its abundance and relatively low upfront cost, has made it today’s most commonly used snow- and ice-control material. About 16 million tons of road salt are sold annually nationwide, according to data provided by the Salt Institute, the North American salt industry trade association. A significant fraction of the salt used in the nation annually arrives at the Port of Milwaukee. It is mostly mined in Michigan, Ohio, and Ontario, and is supplied by Morton, Cargill, and North American Salt Company, according to Port Director Eric Reinelt. From the port, it is distributed by truck as far away as Fond du Lac, Madison, and Chicago’s O’Hare airport. Most of it, however, stays within about 50 miles of Milwaukee, where it is used by counties, municipalities, and commercial users, said Reinelt.

Monitoring by EPA shows Lake Michigan’s average chloride level— currently at about 12 milligrams per liter—is increasing by about 0.1 milligrams per liter every year, largely due to road salt and other human-generated inputs. High salt concentrations can harm fish by drawing moisture from their bodies through their gills, thereby altering their electrolyte balances. High salt concentrations may also cause longterm problems like reproductive failure or disease susceptibility. And in small, enclosed water bodies like ponds or lakes, salt can settle in a dense layer that impedes the circulation of water and transport of needed oxygen to bottomdwelling organisms. Although DNR regulates the extent to which a variety of pollutants can be discharged from storm sewers into Wisconsin waters under the Clean Water Act, it does not regulate chloride. After Salt Hits the Road But where does all that salt go after its job is finished? Some works its way into the concrete or metal of roads, bridges, parking garages, and vehicles. Some accumulates in roadside soils, where it is retained or taken up by plants. Much of

it, however, is eventually flushed into area waters. More specifically, some is carried into surface waters by runoff that flows over land or through storm sewers; and some infiltrates into groundwater, which Milwaukee County receives about 40,000 tons of this salt annually, which it uses to clear 2,400 lane-miles of interstate, state, and county highways. Spread uniformly, that translates into more than 16 tons on every one-mile-long, one-lane-wide section of road each year. The city of Milwaukee, which maintains 7,000 lane-miles of main roads and side streets, uses about 55,000 tons—close to eight tons per lane-mile—each year. remains below ground or feeds back up into surface waters. Because salt isn’t biodegradable, it can then accumulate, particularly in still or slow-moving water. UW-Milwaukee researchers, in fact, have observed a slow, variable increase in chloride concentrations—averaging about two milligrams per liter every year—in southeastern Wisconsin’s shallow groundSEE PAGE 3

INSIDE Pg 2 Your Favorite Restaurants Pg 3 Salt in Wilson Park Creek Pg 4 Primary Elections Feb. 19 Pg 5 VFZ Impacts BVHS Pg 7 MPS HS Enrollment Numbers Pg 7 Army Reserve Demolition Pgs 8-11 Special Section: Bay View Schools Pg 12 Tews Glassworks Pg 13 Butterflies & Poetry Pg 14 27th Street Interchange Pg 14 Gift Card Inequity Pg 16 Five Major Deicers Pg 17 Britney Spears Reviewed

January 2008  

January 2008 Issue