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baystateparent FREE

JULY 2018

Best Of

Massachusetts’ Premier Magazine For Families Since 1996

2018

WINNERS REVEALED ON PAGE 28

JULY’S BEST FAMILY EVENTS

FROM CHASING STORMS TO CHASING BABY METEOROLOGISTS MATT & DANIELLE

12 WAYS TO BOOST SUMMER LEARNING


This summer, let your family rekindle the joy and wonder of this timeless children’s classic with a live performance featuring talented musicians and skilled storytellers in the unparalleled setting of the Freeman Farm at Old Sturbridge Village. The Summer of Charlotte’s Web Presented by Beyond the play, experience the summer of Charlotte’s Web in the Village: see our costumed historians working to reconstruct the Allen Piggery, help out with farm and garden chores, listen to 19thcentury children’s stories, see daily hand milking demonstrations and meet our all of our farm animals—especially PIGLETS!

Extend your visit with an overnight stay at our award-winning Old Sturbridge Inn & Reeder Family Lodges, call 508-347-5056 and ask about our Charlotte’s Web packages.

July 5 – August 26 Wednesday – Sunday | 11:00 am and 1:30 pm TICKETS ON SALE NOW visit www.osv.org Tickets and general admission required

MEDIA SPONSORS

Produced by special arrangement with Dramatic Publishing, Woodstock, Illinois | Photo by BreeAnne Clowdus 2 JULY2018


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Because it takes expert care to deliver a miracle

Bringing miracles to life is our passion at the LaChance Maternity Center at Heywood Hospital. Our expert team of physicians, nurses and doulas, provide personalized attention in a state-of-the-art environment that promotes a tranquil and natural birthing experience, resulting in the lowest caesarean birth rate in the state. And our specialty services – from our post-birth celebration dinner to our rejuvenating spa treatments including relaxing whirlpool hydrotherapy, post-partum massage therapy, music therapy and aromatherapy – will leave you feeling just heavenly. To find out more about the services offered at the LaChance Maternity Center visit www.heywood.org. To register for a Childbirth Class or schedule a tour of the LaChance Maternity Center call (978) 630-6216.

242 Green Street, Gardner, MA 01440 | (978) 632-3420 | heywood.org

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table of contents JULY 2018

VOLUME 23

NUMBER 3

Isabella, age 3

12

Weathering Parenthood: Life with Meteorologists Matt & Danielle

16

Oh, The Places You’ll Go: July Calendar of Family Events

in every issue 7 8 9 16

features

Editor’s Note: A Letter to My Son on His First Birthday Add to Cart: Backyard Picks By The Numbers: Fourth of July

10 12

38

Very Special People: Summer Fun for All Abilities

42 43 44

50

Finally Forever: July’s Child & Area Adoption Events

46

51

Take Eight: Blue Man Bryce Flint-Somerville

49

52

Captured: Readers’ Summer Fun Pics

Oh, The Places You’ll Go: July Calendar of Family Events

meet team president PAUL M. PROVOST

associate publisher KATHY REAL 508-749-3166 ext. 331 kreal@baystateparent.com

6 JULY2018

38

Photography by Shawna Shenette shawnashenettephotography.com

Very Special People: Summer Fun for All Abilities

Best of baystateparent 28

Best Spots for a Festive Fourth

Your Picks for the Best Of 2018

Weathering Parenthood: Life with Meteorologists Matt & Danielle

ripe

Backyard Camping with Kids 80 Ideas for Summer Fun 12 Ways to Boost Summer Learning Open-ended vs. Structured Toys & How Children Benefit From Both

40

Bites: Mommy & Me Aprons; Family Grilling Night; BBQ Fruit Recipes

41

Ask the Nutritionist: Does Your Child Need a Mulitvitamin or Probiotic?

Confessions of a Closet Hoverer

baystateparent.com editorial & creative

advertising

editor in chief AMANDA COLLINS BERNIER 508-865-7070 ext. 201 amanda@baystateparent.com

director of sales REGINA STILLINGS 508-865-7070 ext. 210 regina@baystateparent.com

creative director and events coordinator PAULA MONETTE ETHIER 508-865-7070 ext. 221 pethier@holdenlandmark.com

account executive KATHY PUFFER 508-865-7070 ext. 211 kathy@baystateparent.com

senior graphic designer STEPHANIE MALLARD 508-865-7070 design@baystateparent.com

account executive CHERYL ROBINSON 508-865-7070 ext. 336 crobinson@holdenlandmark.com

8

baystateparent is published monthly 22 West Street, Millbury, MA 01527 508-865-7070 It is distributed free of charge throughout Massachusetts.


A Letter to My Son, on His First Birthday

My sweet boy, When I think back to that hot July morning when you came into the world, it feels like just yesterday, but also like a lifetime ago. Kind of like you, my love: you changed everything in my world, yet I can’t remember what life was like without you in it. I went into labor on my 31st birthday. I had taken about 10 long walks, bounced on a birthing ball in the living room and eaten more than my share of birthday cake when I resigned myself to belief that you were never coming out, and I went to bed. I guess you didn’t want me to sleep (a preview of our year ahead, huh?). Twelve hours later, you were here, and in an instant, I would never be the same. The first year of being your mom has been a whirlwind: the 12 most exhausting and sometimes frustrating months of my life – but the very, very best that I have ever lived. My sweet boy, you will never know how much you’ve taught me about myself. You brought out strength, empathy, fear, and pride that I never knew I possessed – not to mention showed me how many things I could master one-handed! But most of all you’ve shown me that there is infinite, unwavering love that lives in me. And on your first birthday – and every other day of your life – that is my greatest gift to you. I will love you short or tall, athletic or awkward, silly or sappy; however and whoever you are. Here's who you are at this moment in time, my chunky little 1-yearold boy: you have two tiny teeth, just a wisp of blonde hair, and already a taste for adventure like your dad. You're curious, trusting, and always learning. As your life unfolds, I hope these remain your guiding pillars. You’ve spent the last few weeks really trying to walk. Pulling yourself up on the couch, you’ll let go with one hand, and then bravely with the other, before wobbling a bit and falling on your bottom. But you never get discouraged. You get up and you try again. You know you’ll get there. No rush. Watching you is a daily lesson in patience and persistence. While I can have the tendency to always be looking ahead, impatiently wanting to “get” to the next place, you remind me that life cannot be rushed, and everything happens on its own perfect timing. Thank you, my love, for this year. For making me a mommy, and picking me to be yours. Thank you for all that you teach me, for your patience with me, and for all your wet kisses. Happy Birthday, my son. As long as I’m living, my baby you’ll be.

Amanda (aka Mommy)

BAYSTATEPARENT 7


BACKYARD PICKS

add to CART

WIN THIS

baystateparent.com/freebies

Summer is here and that means you’re spending more time in the yard. Check out these four finds to cook, play, learn, and hang out in your backyard.

No need for delivery. Homemade pizza gets taken to the next level with the Primo Grill Ceramic Pizza Stone. Get that authentic wood-fired pizza taste when used on a charcoal grill, or use the 13-inch heavy duty pizza stone on any traditional size BBQ. Works in a conventional oven, too. $53. primogrill.com. Turn the backyard into a video game. With sensors, light and sound effects in a variety of gaming modes, ROXs 2 is an interactive gaming system designed to take kids away from behind their screens and let them run, jump and play. The real-life video game utilizes a main sensor that looks similar to a tap light and chips called PEBBs that can be scanned by the sensor and used to play a variety of games. Designed for kids ages 6-10, but customizable to be enjoyed by the entire family. $129. playroxs.com.

Stomp Rocket Stunt Planes help kids explore STEM concepts through active outdoor play. These three different planes were designed by aeronautical engineers to do amazing tricks, from loops and flips to glides and rolls. The 100% kid-powered air rockets teach children about gravity, motion, force, and more. Various models to choose from. $15-$30. amazon.com.

Let kids hang out -- literally! The Hearth Song Woodland HugglePod HangOut, which can be used indoors or outdoors, is a comfy, cozy personal space that features three windows and a fabric door, and is wreathed with LED lights inside the top. $249. wayfair.com.

8 JULY2018


15,000

FOURTH OF JULY

Weight, in pounds, of the fireworks launched at the annual display in Boston

By the Numbers

$3 million

Approximate cost of the Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular

1781

The year Massachusetts became the first in the nation to declare Fourth of July a state holiday

1.5 million:

1941

#1:

3

80%

Congress declared Independence Day a federal holiday Number of states, including Massachusetts, that ban consumer fireworks

The number of hot dogs eaten in America on the Fourth of July Independence Day is America’s top beer-drinking holiday People who attend a cookout or BBQ to celebrate the Fourth

Sources: Boston Magazine, WalletHub, CNN, History.com

Unleash their inner scientist! Experience the largest family-friendly indoor/outdoor museum in Central Massachusetts, featuring 3 oors of interactive exhibits, wildlife habitats, an Express Train, a Planetarium and a 50+ acre campus with ponds and trails.

Learn more at

ecotarium.org BAYSTATEPARENT 9


The Best Spots for a Festive Fourth

The Fourth of July is one birthday bash we can all celebrate together. Cities and towns all across the Bay State host their own Independence Day celebrations, with most featuring music, parades, and, of course, fireworks! Here are some of the bigger familyfriendly festivities you’ll find this year as our nation celebrates the big 242! Check out baystateparent.com for a list of local happenings and fireworks displays.

Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular Wednesday, July 4: 8-11 p.m., Gates Open at 9 a.m. Free, Open to the Public Charles River Esplanade

Call today! 888-974-1138 www.smuggs.com/bsp 10 JULY2018

This birthday bash on the banks of the Charles River, one of the country’s oldest and largest Independence Day celebrations, draws thousands of people every year. Newton’s own Rachel Platten, whose hit “Fight Song” topped multiple charts worldwide in 2015, will headline the concert at the DCR Hatch Memorial Shell on the Esplanade. The annual event will also feature Grammy Awardwinning artists Rhiannon Giddens, of the Carolina Chocolate Drops; Amy Ray and Emily Saliers, of the Indigo Girls; and Rita Moreno, who’s perhaps best known for her role as Anita in “West Side Story.” A 20-minute fireworks show set to the sounds of the Boston Pops, including a rendition of Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture” complete with real cannons, will top off the evening.

Independence Day at Old Sturbridge Village Wednesday, July 4, Village open 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Included with daytime admission, a season pass, or Village membership 1 Old Sturbridge Village Rd., Sturbridge Join a citizen’s parade or militia march, play 19th century “baseball,” make a tri-cornered hat or put your John Hancock on a giant copy of the Declaration of Independence. An exciting feature of the festivities is the firing of a reproduction cannon, a working model of a “Heavy 3-Pounder,” meant to fire 3-pound balls. Two times during the day, six costumed re-enactors will render the words of the Declaration line by line, assisted by a narrator who sets these words in their rich historical context, drawing out their meaning and challenging the audience to consider their relevance and power for today. In true patriotic spirit, you can alsowatch and be inspired by a citizen naturalization ceremony on the Village Common.

Marblehead Fireworks & Harbor Illumination Wednesday, July 4, 9 p.m. Free, Open to the Public Marblehead Harbor Head the North Shore for a sparkly oceanside fireworks show and breathtaking harbor illumination.


Reliant Midwives – dedicated to delivering great care.

The community will light the harbor up in patriotic red and white and blue at 9 p.m., with the fireworks display lighting up the sky 15 minutes later. Find a spot on a public beach to catch the show, or check out marbleheadfireworks.org for their list of the best places to take it in.

multi-day celebration features athletic events, food festivals, and dazzling fireworks. The fun kicks off Friday, June 29 with a community bonfire at Rutland Heights. Weekend events include Junior Olympics, a Volleyball Tournament, road race and concerts on the Common.

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Offices in Holden, Leominster, Milford, Webster, Westborough and Worcester Rutland Fourth of July Celebration Friday, June 29-Sunday, July 1, July 2-3, various times Most events free, Open to the Public Rutland The little town of Rutland does it up big each year for Fourth. The

Head to town on July 3 for a Chicken BBQ, Strawberry Festival, more music and the fireworks display. The fun rounds out on the Fourth with a pancake breakfast and a massive parade. Find the full schedule at rutlandma-4thofjuly.org.

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Learn more at reliantmedicalgroup.org/midwife (508) 368-3110 BAYSTATEPARENT 11 18-060 Midwifery Baystate Parent half page_ALT.indd 1

4/16/2018 4:36:29 PM


Weathering Parenthood Life With Married Meteorologists

Matt Noyes & Danielle Niles BY AMANDA COLLINS BERNIER, PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHAWNA SHENETTE

12 JULY2018


IN

the last year Danielle Niles, morning meteorologist on CBS Boston/ WBZ-TV, has gone from chasing thunderstorms to chasing after a precocious one-year-old. Which is harder to track? That depends on nap time. Charlotte, the daughter Niles shares with fellow forecaster, Matt Noyes, has brought a new kind of whirlwind to the Haverhill’s couple’s world. Matt and Danielle can’t remember the last time they slept through the night, though that has nothing to do with their little one (who happens to sleep up to 12 hour stretches). The former colleagues and now work rivals -- he’s chief meteorologist on NBC 10/NECN -- are usually up at 1 and 2 a.m., respectively -- and that’s on a good day. It’s 1 to 2 hours earlier on a busy storm day. How do they balance their crazy work schedules, parenting baby Charlotte and Matt’s 8-year-old son from a previous marriage, Brandon -- not to mention the pressure of delivering the weather to tens of thousands of viewers on television every morning? “It takes a village,” said Matt. “It’s truly a family affair.” The couple, who celebrate their third wedding anniversary this month and are expecting Baby No. 2 later this year, talked to baystateparent about weathering parenthood, come rain or shine.

for Matt. Danielle finishes up with work during the morning and shares the rest of the day with Charlotte. They play and get things done for our family and around the house, take care of errands like grocery shopping and Danielle prepares food for dinner that day and/or the rest of the week. Charlotte always gets an afternoon nap, her Mom usually does, too. As Chief Meteorologist, Matt usually has enough work to keep him busy until midday or early afternoon, and either shoots home for a quick bite to eat while the girls are napping before get his son, Brandon, from school, or just heads straight there. The four of us meet up for a couple of hours in the afternoon, then Brandon is off to sports while Charlotte gets ready for bed. After our day is about 17 hours old and we’ve logged a combined 215 miles on our cars, it’s time for Mom and Dad to finally have dinner, get to bed (even though we know bed right after dinner is one of the most unhealthy eating habits), and grab about 5-6 hours of sleep before we wake up in exhausted pain, smile and channel our necessary positivity to do it all again.

Q: What’s a typical work day look like in the Noyes/Niles household?

Danielle: We split up a lot of the parenting tasks for Charlotte and work as a team to take care of both her and Brandon. I put her to bed most nights. We loving getting her up together on weekend mornings! She is so happy when we go in to get her!

On a normal, quiet weather day, Matt’s up at 1 a.m., Danielle is up at 2 – make that 1-2 hours earlier on a busy storm day. Matt’s first weathercast is a taping at 3:40 a.m. (live at 4 a.m.), Danielle is live at 4:30. Work in television is fast-paced and it’s important to bring positive energy, optimism and a can-do attitude to a morning show, where we are each waking our audiences up, be it on CBS for Danielle or NBC

Q: We’re exhausted just learning that! How do you share the parenting duties?

Matt: Danielle will tell you we divide the parenting tasks – she is very generous. There’s no question she handles the vast majority with the baby, partly because she has more time with Charlotte, but also in no small part because she is an endless well of good natured

compassion. It doesn’t matter how long or hard her day was, Danielle never runs out of smiles, kisses and cute baby voices. I try to make up for that when it comes to running Brandon around, but she usually gives me a run for my money there, too.

Q: What have you learned about yourself through parenthood? Danielle: I think I’m more relaxed and laid back as a parent than I thought I’d be. In the beginning I was pretty strict about sticking to a schedule but now I’m more flexible since she’s a bit older. Matt has really helped me with that. Matt: You know those commercials that say you don’t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent? I’m not a perfect parent but I definitely subscribe to the truth in that premise: I’ve made so many mistakes, especially with my 8-year-old son because I’ve had eight whole years to make them, but those imperfections often are what we find the most laughter, love and lasting memories from.

Q: What kind of family traditions do you want to carry on -- or start -with Brandon and Charlotte? Being a blended family means you take traditions where you can get them, and you can’t be picky about them. We try to take our first dip of the year in Newfound Lake, New Hampshire, as close to Memorial Day as possible. If that doesn’t work, we make sure to all take our last trip of the year together in the fall – either first or last together. At Easter we “bash eggs,” a tradition handed down by Matt’s 98-year-old grandmother, to see whose hard-boiled egg will hold up longest when tapped point-to-point or butt-to-butt against everyone else’s. We are working on creating new family traditions as we grow as a family of 4 and soon to be 5 in the fall! BAYSTATEPARENT 13


One thing we try to do is go to the Deerfield Fair every year in the fall, and if we can’t make it to that one, a different fall fair. When it comes to Christmas, Matt actually was very lucky to run into the real Santa years ago, and his son saw them talking. Santa agreed to come on whatever night is closest to Christmas Eve that we can all be together. He has kept that promise every year.

Q: Do you have any advice for other working parents? Danielle: Put the cell phone and devices down, even if it’s just for a set short amount of time each day. That really allows you to connect fully with your children and spouse, without distraction of work emails/ texts etc. Matt: Compartmentalize - if we can’t compartmentalize, work clouds

home and home clouds work – trust yourself to crush it when you’re working, even if you have to take work home sometimes, so after you own that project you can put it down and crush it when you’re parenting. Also, look at parenting as a multi-decade marathon, not a ten year sprint – but you only see each mile once. Pace yourself, breathe, let your kids breathe and take it all in so you’ll have something more than just rushing between games and events to remember when the nest is empty and you can’t have that time back. Matt also would offer advice for divorced parents: No matter how hard, try to forgive and let go of anger, which unknowingly takes energy that should be going entirely into love and compassion – two qualities no child has ever suffered from receiving too much of.

Imperfections often are what we find the most laughter, love and lasting memories from.

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14 JULY2018

ER OV R E G A IN AT OF C R S LEB R C E 6 YE A 3


BAYSTATEPARENT 15


OH,

THE PLACES YOU’LL GO

Photo by Paul Franz

Congratulations! Today is your day. You’re off to Great Places! You’re off and away! - Dr. Seuss

Arms + Armor Demonstrations. Worcester Art Museum. July 7. 16 JULY2018

22nd New Bedford Folk Festival. New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park July 7.

Photo Courtesy of the Discovery Museum

Photo Courtesy of Worcester Art Museum

Photo Courtesy of the Zeiterion Performing Arts Center

The Green River Festival. Greenfield Community College, Greenfield. July 13-15.

Cold as Ice: Exploring 300lb Block of Ice. Discovery Museum, Acton. July 13.


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! MELTDOWN WARNING: Before you pack up the minivan, please confirm your destination. Although we’ve done our best to ensure accuracy at press time, things can and do change.

1 Sunday

Photo Courtesy of the Discovery Museum.

Dirtopia. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Scoop, sculpt, squish, dig, climb, burrow, make mud pies, and mud paintings, during this messy fun. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Dr. Seuss’s Super-Dee-Dooper Bus Tour Stop. Springfield Museums, 21 Edwards St., Springfield. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Celebrate imagination and fun in the way that only Dr. Seuss can, featuring a walk-through interactive exhibit starring his books and characters, kid-friendly activities, photo-ops with the Cat in the Hat, and more. Through Monday. Free with admission. Adults $25, youths 3 and up $14, ages under 3 free. springfieldmuseums.org.

2 Monday Rock to the Beat: Spin Drums. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-11 a.m. Rock to the beat craft and story-time featuring the book “Punk Farm on Tour” and a spin drum craft. For ages 3 to 7. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. MFA Playdates: Birds of a Feather. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 265 Huntington Ave., Boston. 10:15-11 a.m. Enjoy story time and looking activities in the gallery, followed by artmaking as you explore and become inspired by the feathery friends that dot the Museum’s collections. Recommended for ages 4 and younger. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $25, ages 7 to 17 $10, children under 7 free. mfa.org. Basket Weaving and Pet Rock. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Learn how to weave a small basket and then choose a smooth beach rock to decorate with a face and hair to place inside of it. For ages 7 to12. Register ahead. leominsterlibrary.org. Love, Simon. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 6:30 p.m. Join for this adaptation of the favorite Young Adult novel following a high school student hiding a secret from his family and friends while talking to an anonymous classmate who too is gay. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Riders in the Sky. Shalin Liu Performance Center, 37 Main St., Rockport. 8 p.m. Enjoy these venerable musical cowboys as they deliver their particular brand of comedic country and western music, which has been tickling audiences for over 40 years. $39-55. rockportmusic.org.

3 Tuesday Take Aparts, Jr. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Grab tools and discover

LEGO Zone. Discovery Museum, Acton. July 23. resistors, capacitors, gears, and more to uncover the inner workings of household gadgets and gizmos. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Dance Workshop: Hip Hop. Worcester Public Library: Main Branch, 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 6-7 p.m. Get your feet tapping to the beat as dance teacher Becky Marrone shows you how to move and groove to hip hop dancing. For ages 6 to 10. Free. mywpl.org.

4 Wednesday Independence Day. Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Rd., Sturbridge. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Enjoy an old-fashioned good time as visitors can take part in a citizens’ parade, play 19th-century style ‘baseball’, march with the militia, make a tri-cornered hat, and sing their ‘John Hancocks’ on a giant copy of the Declaration of Independence. Adults $28, youths 4 and up $14, ages under 4 free. osv.org. July 4th Celebration. Concord Museum, 200 Lexington Rd., Concord. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Prepare for your Fourth of July festivities at the Concord Museum, as you learn about the American Revolution, and take part in patriotic crafts, gallery activities, and collection spotlights. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $10, youth $5, ages under 6 free. concordmuseum.org.

5 Thursday Make a MESS: Paint with What? Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Use unconventional painting tools, discover our favor-

ites, and create wondrous works of art. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Take Aparts. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 2-4:30 p.m. Look behind the inner workings of electronics by deconstructing items from telephones to computers to radios. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Games Day. Worcester Public Library: Great Brook Valley Branch, 89 Tacoma St., Worcester. 2-5 p.m. Join in some old time favorite games or try something new. Free. mywpl.org. Summer Fun @ the Library. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Join comic mime Robert Rivest to celebrate everything you love about summer, learn how to mime, and act out stories. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Summer Concert Series. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7:15-9 p.m. Gather on the lawn for the annual Summer Concert Series featuring The Concord Band, where lawn chairs, picnic baskets, and blankets are always welcome, with food vendors on staff. Member cars $15, walk-ins $5; nonmember cars $20, walk-ins $10. fruitlands.org.

6 Friday Backyard and Beyond: Forest Friday. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-10:45 a.m. Explore a nature-centric activity based on the weather and season. Recommended for ages 2 to 6. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org.

Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. Enjoy an evening to explore the museum and Discovery Woods at night, during this summer celebration when food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry are accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org 1776. The Regent Theatre, 7 Medford St., Arlington. 7 p.m. Watch as this Tony-winning comedy musical is brought to screen, following your favorite Founding Fathers as they go about declaring America’s revolution from Great Britain. Through Sunday. Adults $12, youths 12 and under $10. regenttheatre.com.

7 Saturday Scavenger Hunt Challenge. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Adults and children must work together to follow clues around the grounds before collecting prizes. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $15, children 5 to 13 $6, ages under 5 free. fruitlands.org. Families @ WAM Tour. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11 a.m. Explore the Worcester Art Museum galleries with your family on a docent-guided discovery tour, as we enjoy stories and sharing observations. Free. worcesterart.org. Exploring Science Together: Bugs. Harvard Museum of Natural History, 26 Oxford St., Cambridge. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Take a closer look and explore the world of minuscule bugs, learn through hands-on activities, and create your own scientific equipment to study at home. Recommended for ages 6 to 12. Register ahead. Members $10, nonmembers $20. hmnh.harvard.edu. Beyond the Spectrum: Portrait Stories. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Come for this adventure in art, talk about portraits, create your own, and forge friendships during this time for youth on the Autism Spectrum. For ages 8 to 12. $9. mfa.org. Make a Mess: Spray and Splatter. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Experiment with spraying, splatting, and dripping different types of paint to make a truly messy masterpiece. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. 22nd New Bedford Folk Festival. New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, 33 Williams St., New Bedford. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Celebrate this two-day family-oriented festival offering continuous folk music, artists and artisans from across the country and globe, food, and more. Through Sunday. Prices vary, children under 12 free. newbedfordfolkfestival.com. BAYSTATEPARENT 17


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!

Highland Street Foundation’s Free Fun Fridays offers free admission for your family at any of these amazing institutions this month! July 6 • Boston Children’s Museum - Boston • Peabody Essex Museum - Salem • Cape Cod Maritime Museum - Hyannis • Battleship Cove - Fall River • Amelia Park Children’s Museum - Westfield • Gore Place - Waltham • Falmouth Museums on the Green - Falmouth • Hancock Shaker Village - Pittsfield • Pilgrim Hall Museum - Plymouth • New England Quilt Museum - Lowell July 13 • Edward M. Kennedy Institute - Boston • Charles River Watershed Association - Weston • Larz Anderson Auto Museum - Brookline • Chesterwood - Stockbridge • The Telephone Museum - Waltham • Venfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum - Lenox • The Sports Museum - Boston • Children’s Museum at Holyoke - Holyoke • International Volleyball Hall of Fame - Holyoke • Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center - Great Barrington July 20 • Museum of Fine Arts - Boston • Gloucester Stage Company - Gloucester • The Garden at Elm Bank (Mass Hort) - Wellesley • Chatham Shark Center - Chatham • New Bedford Whaling Museum - New Bedford • Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association - Nantucket • Spellman Museum of Stamps & Postal History - Weston • Springfield Museums - Springfield • The Discovery Museum - Acton • The Hall at Patriot Place - Foxborough July 27 • Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum - Boston • Boston Symphony Orchestra at Tanglewood - Lenox • Commonwealth Shakespeare - Boston • JFK Hyannis Museum - Hyannis • Fitchburg Art Museum - Fitchburg • Old Colony History Museum - Taunton • Boston Athensaeum - Boston • Sandwich Glass Museum - Sandwich • Arnold Arboretum - Boston • Museum of Russian Icons - Clinton

18 JULY2018

Arms + Armor Demonstrations. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 11:30 a.m. & 2 p.m. A fun interactive program to learn all about different kinds of arms and armors used from figures including Roman soldiers and Medieval knights. Free. worcesterart.org.

Photo Courtesy of the Revere Beach Partnership

Free Fun Fridays in July

Wrinkle in Time. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 2 p.m. Watch as a young girl, her brother, and her friend join three magical beings to travel across the universe and rescue her father. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. The Lion King. Prudential Center, South Garden, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Enjoy the Magic 106.7 Family Film Festival through children’s activities, giveaways, entertainment, and gather on the South Garden for a showing of the classic Disney animated feature. Free. prudentialcenter.com.

8 Sunday Children’s Workshop: Matryoshka and Me. Museum of Russian Icons, 203 Union St., Clinton. 12:30-1:30 p.m. Learn about the history of the Russian nesting dolls and the Russian folk tales ‘The Magic Turnip’ and ‘The Bun’ with the help of special matryoshka. Recommended for ages 7 and up. Register ahead. Free with admission. Adults $10, youth 3 and up $5, ages under 3 free. musuemofrussianicons.org.

9 Monday Grandparents and Grandchildren Day. Springfield Museums, 21 Edwards St., Springfield. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Join for a day filled with adventures, discoveries, and activities, for grandparents and grandchildren to enjoy alike. Free with admission. Adults $25, youths 3 and up $13, ages under 3 free. springfieldmuseums.org. Karen K and the Jitterbugs. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Bug out with Karen K and her imaginary friends, the Jitterbugs, during this fantastic family concert from a favorite performer by kids and adults. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Sophisticated Stories. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 7:45-8:30 p.m. Enjoy cool, strange, weird, and wacky picture books, and brownies. For grades 3 and up. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

10 Tuesday

International Sand Sculpting Festival. Revere Beach. July 29. Ave., Lexington. 10:30-11:15 a.m. A special performance of classic and original songs get children moving and grooving. For ages up to 6. Register ahead. Free. carylibrary.org. Teddy Bear Picnic Day. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Pack your favorite lunch, bring your best teddy bear friend, and join this Teddy Bear Picnic. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Rockabye Beats. Worcester Public Library: Roosevelt Branch, 1006 Grafton St., Worcester. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join professional musician Marcos Valles for a baby, toddler, and preschoolfriendly concert with a hands-on, and interactive performance. Recommended for ages up to 5. Free. mywpl.org. MOS: Reptiles. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4-4:30 p.m. Join the Museum of Science’s Live Animal Care Center to learn about reptiles and what makes a reptile a reptile. For ages 5 and up. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Folk Open Mic: Snake. TCAN: Center for Arts, 14 Summer St., Natick. 8 p.m. Enjoy the best folk and acoustic music during one of the most successful and entertaining open mic nights on the East Coast, featuring special artist Snake. Members free, nonmembers $5. natickarts.org.

11 Wednesday

Dance and Movement Class. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 10-10:45 a.m. Join the Joanne Langione Dance Center as it presents a music and movement class. Recommended for ages 2 to 5. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

Bring-A-Bear Picnic. Cary Memorial Library, 1874 Massachusetts Ave., Lexington. 10:3011:30 a.m. Bring you bear and a blanket for a special story-time and picnic. Crackers and juice supplied. Free. carylibrary.org.

Dance and Sing Along with Charlie Hope. Cary Memorial Library, 1874 Massachusetts

Wednesday Wonderings: Rooting for Trees. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill

Rd., Harvard. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Join on the hillside to hear a story, make a craft, and explore the museum and grounds to illuminate the wonders of the natural world. Registration encouraged. Member children $5, nonmember children $10, adults free. thetrustees.org. Everyday Engineering: Scribble Bots. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 2-4:30 p.m. Create dynamic drawings using simple DIY robotic contraptions made of spinning and wiggling motors, markers, tape, pipe cleaners, and a variety of recycled and repurposed materials. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Interactive Drum Circle. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Explore and experience dozens of different instruments from around the world, featuring rhythm-based games, open jam drumming, and a sing-along. For ages 6 to 12. Register ahead. leominsterlibrary.org.

12 Thursday Mobile Ed’s STEAM Museum. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 9 a.m.5 p.m. Experience library as it is transformed into a state-of-the-art, hands-on, interactive children’s museum focused on STEAM education. For ages 5 to 12. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Family Sing Along. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 10-10:30 a.m. Join children’s librarians for songs and movement. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Make a MESS: Make an Impression Like Monet. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Drop-in outside for painting al fresco like impressionist Claude Monet, as you


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! find inspiration and create artwork of your own. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Hercules. Worcester Public Library: Great Brook Valley Branch, 89 Tacoma St., Worcester. 3 p.m. Enjoy Disney’s take on the classic story of a demi-god trying to find his identity, featuring music and the backdrop of Ancient Greece. Free. mywpl.org. Pet Rock(stars). Worcester Public Library: Goddard Branch, 14 Richards St., AND Tatnuck Branch, 1083 Pleasant St., Worcester. 3:304:30 p.m. Have some crafternoon fun as you take a spin on this no-fuss, fun pet, the rock. For ages six and up. Free. mywpl.org. Little Beats Yoga and Dance Party. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4:30-5 p.m. Bring your yoga mat and join Little Beats for an outdoor yoga and dance party. For ages 1 to 5. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Wonder Woman. Worcester Common, Front & Church St., Worcester. 6:30 p.m. Enjoy vendors selling goods from beverages and sandwiches to popcorn, and bring your chairs and blankets to enjoy this film following an Amazon princess who leaves her island and journeys to the outside war-ravaged world. Free. worcesterma.gov/ worcester-common-oval.

Summer Concert Series. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7:15-9 p.m. Gather on the lawn for the annual Summer Concert Series featuring The Concord Band, where lawn chairs, picnic baskets, and blankets are always welcome, with food vendors on staff. Member cars $15, walk-ins $5; nonmember cars $20, walk-ins $10. fruitlands.org.

13 Friday Truck Day. Cary Memorial Library, 1874 Massachusetts Ave., Lexington. 9:30 a.m.12 p.m. Stop by the library parking lot to get a close-up look at your favorite vehicles from Lexington’s Department of Public Works, Police Department, and Fire Department. Free. carylibrary.org. Cold as Ice: Exploring 300lb Block of Ice. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Get ready for a cold day in July; make chilly discoveries around a 300pound block of ice, salt, coins, keys, liquid watercolors, and more. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Special Storytime: Scott Magoon. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 10:30 a.m. Join illustrator Scott Magoon as he reads from his new picture book

‘Misunderstood Shark’ that will have kids rolling with laughter. Free with admission. Adults $9, youths $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org. The Green River Festival. Greenfield Community College, 1 College Dr., Greenfield. 5-11 p.m. Enjoy a day filled with music, fun, activities, and more as the Arts Garden Family Music Stage opens up. Spread out lawn and carnival games, enjoy a family Mardi Gras parade, hot air balloons, and more. Through Sunday. Sat. 12-11 p.m., Sun. 12-8 p.m. Price varies. Ages under 10 free. greenriverfestival.com. Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. Enjoy an evening to explore the museum and Discovery Woods at night, during this summer celebration when food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry are accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org Jazz at Sunset. The Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts, 2 Southbridge St., Worcester. 6:30 p.m. Join WICN Public Radio with this concert featuring Nathan Williams and the Zydeco Cha Chas, for an outdoor, picnic-style concert featuring food trucks, and cultural highlights. $20. thehanovertheatre.org.

14 Saturday Second Saturday Storytelling. Institute of

Contemporary Art: Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Dr., Boston. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Connect with family and friends at the ICA Watershed through the art of storytelling, as we look, listen, and participate while making connections to artwork. Recommended for ages 3 to 8. Free. icaboston.org. Sherlock Gnomes. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 2 p.m. Watch as Garden gnomes Gnomeo and Juliet recruit renowned detective Sherlock Gnomes to investigate the mysterious disappearance of other garden ornaments. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Backyard and Beyond: Shelter Building with ‘PrimiTim.’ Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 2-4 p.m. Learn the basic skills for building a shelter from primitive materials and work together to build a shelter to protect you from the elements, during this drop-in activity. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Especially for Me: Autism-Friendly Evening. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 5-8 p.m. Come explore the new Discovery Museum building and the Discovery Woods, as we join us during this special evening of tinkering for families with members on the Autism Spectrum, with dinner provided. Register ahead. Free. discoverymuseum.org.

THE 136

TH

BOLTON FAIR 2018

Thursday August 9th Preview night for midway

• Expanded Midway • Food • Entertainment • Exhibit Hall • Animal Shows & Contests • Commercial & Craft Vendors • Demolition Derby • Monster Trucks • Petting Farm with Pony Rides • Horse Drill Team • Magic & Hypnotist Shows • Lumberjack Show • Kenya Acrobats • Sheep Herding Demo • Kids Country Entertainment & Games

Friday August 10th thru Sunday August 12th

See Website for schedule of events, entertainment, prices & hours

www.boltonfair.org

The Fairgrounds at Lancaster, Rt. 117, Exit 27 off Rt. 495

Sponsored by BAYSTATEPARENT 19


Kids Woo

Challenge

Run, Jump, climb,

Crawl

OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! SING! Prudential Center, South Garden, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Enjoy the Magic 106.7 Family Film Festival through children’s activities, giveaways, entertainment, and gather on the South Garden for a showing of this fun animated animal movie featuring aspiring singers. Free. prudentialcenter.com.

15 Sunday Special Sundays in the Studio: Steve Light. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 1-4 p.m. Join author and illustrator Steve Light for a very special Sunday exploring paint and cardboard printing. Free with admission. Adults $9, youths $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org.

The Kids Woo Challenge is for little ones who are ready for fun, excitement, and ready to cool off in the heat of the Woo! Dry clothes not included. Centralized to Worcester Common, cheer your kids on as they compete in their own Challenge! For kids 5 to 10 years old.

Boston Area Chantey & Maritime Sing. USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown Navy Yard, Building 22, Charlestown. 2-5 p.m. Listen, learn, and lift your voices, as you participate in your Maritime Heritage by joining a rousing chorus of sea chanteys at the USS Constitution Museum. Free. ussconstitutionmuseum.org.

JUly 28, 2018 | Downtown Worcester

Garden on the Go with Growing Places. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-10:45 a.m. & 11-11:45 a.m. Visit the traveling garden and discuss gardening while learning what plants need to grow. For ages 5 to 12. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org.

Kids Woo Challenge is $15 races are 9a and m Noon. Registr to at includes a t- ion shirt and medal.

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telegram.com/woochallenge 20 JULY2018

Farm Visits Petting Zoo. Worcester Public Library: Goddard Branch, 14 Richards St., Worcester. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Pet and cuddle a variety of adorable farm animals. Free. mywpl.org. The Lion King. Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. 7 p.m. Enjoy this showing of one of Disney’s favorite films, following one lion cub as he grows and reclaims his title as rule of the Pride Lands. Adults $12.75, children $10.75. coolidge.org.

17 Tuesday

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16 Monday

Rockabye Beats. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 10-10:45 a.m. Come dance and sing during this concert featuring Spanish songs, freestyle dance, an instrument show and tell, and more. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Try It Out Tuesday. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Drop-in to try out new ideas for programs at the museum with you, our friends. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Pet Rock(stars). Worcester Public Library: Roosevelt Branch, 1006 Grafton St., AND Burncoat Branch, 526 Burncoat St., Worcester. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join us for some crafternoon fun as we take a spin on this no-fuss, fun pet, the rock. For ages six and up. Free. mywpl.org.

Beatles Animator Ron Campbell. TCAN: Center for Arts, 14 Summer St., Natick. 4-7:30 p.m. Celebrate the 50th anniversary of The Beatles film Yellow Submarine, with a gallery showing the original cartoon paintings created especially for the exhibit and new Beatles pop art paintings from the man behind the classic film. Free. natickarts.org. Dance Workshop: Jazz. Worcester Public Library: Main Branch, 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 6-7 p.m. Get your feet tapping to the beat as dance teacher Becky Marrone shows you how to move and groove to jazz dancing. For ages 6 to 10. Free. mywpl.org.

18 Wednesday Wednesday Wonderings: Baby Birds. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Join on the hillside to hear a story, make a craft, and explore the museum and grounds to illuminate the wonders of the natural world. Registration encouraged. Member children $5, nonmember children $10, adults free. thetrustees.org. WAM Stroller Tours. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a docent-led story, as we explore the galleries, before enjoying a story and light refreshments. Recommended for ages up to 3, siblings welcome. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $16, youths $6, ages under 4 free. worcesterart.org. Break-A-Leg Troupe. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 1:30-2:15 p.m. Enjoy this production written, designed, and performed by kids for kids, featuring Watertown Children’s Theatre’s group of actors in grades 3 to 8. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Family Karaoke Night. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 7-8 p.m. Come sing your heart out, as you bravely sing alone or make it a family ensemble. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Sinkane. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. 7:30 p.m. Enjoy as New York jazz fuses with Bob Marley, the hypnotic repetition of Sudanese desert sounds, and funk rock to spread a message of community and social justice. Members $24-34, nonmembers $30. mfa.org. Astronomy Night. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 8:15-9:30 p.m. Join local Astronomer for a Fruitlands Museum Star Party. Register ahead. Member adults $5, nonmember adults $10, children free. thetrustees.org.

19 Thursday Doggy Days: Out for a Walk. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Learn about keeping a dog healthy alongside our friend and certified Therapy Dog Abby. Free with


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!

All Hands Drumming. Worcester Public Library: Burncoat Branch, 526 Burncoat St., Worcester. 3-4 p.m. Learn sound and rhythm during this hands-on, interactive drumming entertainment, with a variety of drums, shakers, tambourines, and blocks featuring West African, Cape Verdean, and Afro-Cuban rhythms. Free. mywpl.org. Mike Bent’s Rock, Roll, & Read Magic Show. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Join for hilarious comedy, amazing magic, crazy puppets, music, and sound effects during this show that will bring a rock legend magically to life. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Make Your Own Maracas. Worcester Public Library: Goddard Branch, 14 Richards St., AND Tatnuck Branch, 1083 Pleasant St., Worcester. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join some crafternoon fun as we create our own musical maracas. For ages six and up. Free. mywpl.org. ArtWalk: Natick Center Cultural District. Natick Center, Natick. 5 p.m. Celebrate downtown’s largest summer arts festival featuring painters, photographers, potters, jewelers and more, with food booths and exploration. Free. natickarts.org. Summer Concert Series. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7:15-9 p.m. Gather on the lawn for the annual Summer Concert Series featuring The Concord Band, where lawn chairs, picnic baskets, and blankets are always welcome, with food vendors on staff. Member cars $15, walk-ins $5; nonmember cars $20, walk-ins $10. fruitlands.org.

20 Friday Stuffed Animal Sleepover. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 9 a.m.5 p.m. Drop-off your stuffed animals anytime during our regular hours so they can spend a fun-filled night at the library, with a slideshow the next morning to see their adventures. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. International Sand Sculpting Festival. Revere Beach, 350 Revere Beach Blvd., Revere. 10 a.m. Kick off the annual international event on America’s first public beach and enjoy the magnificent sand sculpting competition, delicious Food Trucks and Vendors, and amusements and fun for the whole family. Thru Sunday. Free. reverebeachpartnership.com. Free Fun Friday. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Visit the MFA for hands-on art-making activities, engaging tours, and see thought-provoking exhibitions and collaborate art. Free. mfa.org. Special Storytime: David Hyde Costello. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West

The Ultimate Children’s Discovery Farm

Bay Rd., Amherst. 10:30 a.m. Join intrepid Little Pig as he finds a way to save the day when things get tough, as told by author David Hyde Costello. Free with admission. Adults $9, youths $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org. Museum of Science presents Reptiles. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Learn and become acquainted with some incredible animals from the Museum of Science, as we learn about reptiles. Recommended for ages 5 and up. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Family Fun. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 3-5 p.m. Drop-in for family games and activities, during this opportunity to spend time together as a family and with new friends. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. Enjoy an evening to explore the museum and Discovery Woods at night, during this summer celebration when food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry are accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org Rock Baby Rock. Regent Theatre, 7 Medford St., Arlington. 8 p.m. Enjoy this explosive show on the Golden Age of Rock and Roll, featuring hits of major artists from the 1950s and 1960s, with high energy showmanship and creative storytelling. $23-45. regenttheatre.com.

21 Saturday In the Yard: 1812 Marines. USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown Navy Yard, Building 22, Charlestown. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Come learn from the 1812 Marin Guard about the USS Constitution during the War of 1812. Free. ussconstitutionmuseum.org. 13th Annual Children’s Book Festival. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. A day celebrating winter, spring, summer, and fall, through exhibitions, story times, art projects, and more. Free with admission. Adults $9, youths $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org. MFA Playdates: Birds of a Feather. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 265 Huntington Ave., Boston. 10:15-11 a.m. Enjoy story time and looking activities in the gallery, followed by artmaking. We explore and become inspired by the feathery friends that dot the Museum’s collections. Recommended for ages 4 and younger. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $25, ages 7 to 17 $10, children under 7 free. mfa.org. The Jungle Book. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 2 p.m. Enjoy this reimagining of the classic collection of stories by Rudyard Kipling featuring live-action and stunning CGI to create a community of animals and human boy adopted by a pack of wolves. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

JULY Events

G O T K I D S ? SM

July 7th & 8th Splash Bash Weekend July 21 – Labor Day

(Daily) Rainforest Reptiles at Davis Farmland SUMMER EXCLUSIVE – HANDS ON REPTILE SHOWS BY RAINFOREST REPTILES! Tortoise exhibit, snakes, alligators and more slitherin’ summer FUN!

Acres Of Family Fun Await you! Experience the magic of hands-on animal encounters, award-winning discovery play areas and so much more… It’s a full day of fun for families with younger ones!

Great for Birthdays, Sleepovers and Corporate Events! *Adults must be accompanied by a child 12 years or younger.

DavisFarmland.com (978)422-MOOO (6666).

FREE! $3 Souvenir Cup of Animal Feed! One per family. Exp 7/31/18 Not valid with other offers, discounts, packages or special events. BSP7 S T E R L I N G ,

M A S S A C H U S E T T S

©2018 Davis Farmland

admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org.

BAYSTATEPARENT 21 DFL BSP7 4.5x11 AD 6-11-18.indd 1

6/11/18 10:52 PM


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! LEGO Block Party. Cary Memorial Library, 1874 Massachusetts Ave., Lexington. 2-3 p.m. Drop-in and build with our LEGO bricks, as we collaborate and spend the afternoon creating. Free. carylibrary.org. Photo Courtesy of Worcester Art Museum.

Turtle Island: An Indigenous View. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 2-3:30 p.m. Enjoy learning about the environment from an Indigenous lens through cultural belongings, music, dance, and audience participation. Register ahead. Member adults $5, nonmember adults $10, children free. thetrustees.org. Happier Family Comedy Show. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 3-4 p.m. Join the Happier Valley Comedy improv group as they encourage creativity and fun during performance. Recommended for ages 5 to 12. Free with admission. Adults $9, youths $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org. Coco. Prudential Center, South Garden, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Enjoy the Magic 106.7 Family Film Festival through children’s activities, giveaways, entertainment, and gather on the South Garden for a showing of this Academy Award-winning Pixar feature celebrating family and Mexican culture. Free. prudentialcenter.com. Massachusetts Pirates vs. Carolina Cobras. DCU Center, 50 Foster St., Worcester. 7 p.m. Watch Massachusetts’ premier National Arena League football team take on the Carolina Cobras during the Pirates inaugural season. $7 and up. dcucenter.com.

22 Sunday International Sand Sculpting Festival. Revere Beach, 350 Revere Beach Blvd., Revere. 10 a.m. Come down to America’s first public beach and enjoy the magnificent sand sculpting competition, delicious Food Trucks and Vendors, and amusements and fun for the whole family. Free. reverebeachpartnership.com. Horseshoes & Croquet. Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate, 2468 Washington St., Canton. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Look on the farmland, play some old favorite games, take a hike around the trails,

Families @ WAM Tour. Worcester Art Museum. July 7 and don’t forget to stop by and see what’s ready to pick in the kitchen garden. Register ahead. Members $5, nonmembers $10. thetrustees.org.

for a journey back in time with rocking songs, creative movement, and hand-crafted dino puppets galore. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

Meet the Machines and Summer Picnic. Appleton Farms, 299 County Rd., Ipswich. 4-7 p.m. Pack a picnic and spend your summer evening at Appleton Farms meeting and climbing aboard backhoes, tractors, and more, while listening to great music, lawn games, and farm animals. Register ahead. Member families $24, nonmember families $30. thetrustees.org.

24 Tuesday

23 Monday LEGO Zone. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Drop-in and bring your imagination as we supply LEGOS, special challenges and games, and space for you to build to your heart’s content. Through Friday. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Jurassic to Mammoth Puppet Show. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4-4:45 p.m. Join the esteemed Professor Diggins

MEDICAL ADVICE WHEN YOU ARE ON THE GO. Download our free symptom checker app today! Our Health eCheck app helps you make decisions on what type of medical care is needed when your child falls off their bike or has a persistant cough. Search from a list of symptoms or by body area.

22 JULY2018

Rock Out with Rainsticks. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-11 a.m. Rock out for a musical adventure listening to stories all about music and make a rainstick instrument to shake and dance with. Recommended for ages 3 to 8. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Magician & Juggler Robert Clarke. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Join us for a superb and stylish show, featuring awesome magic, cool juggling skills, hilarious comedy routines, and tons of audience interaction. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Make Your Own Maracas. Worcester Public Library: Roosevelt Branch, 1006 Grafton St., AND Burncoat Branch, 526 Burncoat St., Worcester. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join some crafternoon fun as you create our own musical maracas. For ages six and up. Free. mywpl.org.

Raiders of the Lost Ark. Wharf District Park, Rose Kennedy Greenway, between Milk & India St., Boston. 8 p.m. Come outside and watch this cinematic modern classic, following everyone’s favorite scholar and scavenger, Indiana Jones, to track down a supremely powerful artifact. Rain Date 7/25. Free. coolidge.org. Folk Open Mic: Chris Capaldi. TCAN: Center for Arts, 14 Summer St., Natick. 8 p.m. Enjoy the best folk and acoustic music during one of the most successful and entertaining open mic nights on the East Coast, featuring special artist Chris Capaldi. Members free, nonmembers $5. natickarts.org.

25 Wednesday Wednesday Wonderings: Then, Now, and Into the Future. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Join us on the hillside to hear a story, make a craft, and explore the museum and grounds to illuminate the wonders of the natural world. Registration encouraged. Member children $5, nonmember children $10, adults free. thetrustees.org. Sunset Drum Circle. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7-8:15 p.m. Join on the hillside at sunset for a facilitated drum circle, connecting with the landscape, Mother Earth, and the ancient wisdom of rhythm. Register ahead. Members $9, nonmembers $15. fruitlands.org.

26 Thursday Family Sing Along. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 10-10:30 a.m. Join children’s librarians for songs and movement. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Rock out with Puppets. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-11 a.m. Join a farm animal story and amazing farm animal paper bag puppet craft. Recommended for ages 3 to 8. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Paws to Read. Worcester Public Library: Main Branch, 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 11 a.m.-


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! 12 p.m. Read to a certified therapy dog, during this time to boost reading skills and confidence. Recommended for ages 5 to 12. Free. mywpl.org.

celebration when food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry are accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org

Let the Music Begin. Worcester Public Library: Great Brook Valley Branch, 89 Tacoma St., Worcester. 3-4 p.m. Come make your own drum and try out some homemade instruments. Free. mywpl.org.

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. The Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts, 2 Southbridge St., Worcester. 7 p.m. Watch live as dancers and singers perform this staging of the Tony Award-winning musical from the minds of Alan Menken and Howard Ashman bringing the Disney classic to life. Through Saturday. $18. thehanovertheatre.org.

No-Sew Tutus. Worcester Public Library: Goddard Branch, 14 Richards St. AND Tatnuck Branch, 1083 Pleasant St., Worcester. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join some crafternoon fun you we learn to craft fanciful tutus without needle and thread. For ages six and up. Free. mywpl.org.

Yellow Submarine: 50th Anniversary Release. Regent Theatre, 7 Medford St.,

Arlington. 7:30 p.m. Celebrate the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ classic animated film, during this truly unmissable event screening. Adults $15, children $12.50. regenttheatre.com.

28 Saturday Hay Bale Hangout. Appleton Farms, 299 County Rd., Ipswich. 10a.m.-12:30 p.m. Aweekend Hay Bale Hangout and spend the day at Appleton Farms for farmyard meet and greets, hands on activities, and all day learning stations and picnic space. Member children $5, nonmember children $10. thetrustees.org.

Play Date: Creating Hope Together. Institute of Contemporary Art: Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Dr., Boston. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Enjoy artmaking projects, gallery games, harborside family yoga, and work together on a large-scale sculptural collage during this day of fun. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $15, youth free. icaboston.org. Special Storytime: Casey Robinson. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 2 p.m. Join author Casey Robinson in reading her book following Iver and his good friend Ellsworth, a rooftop bear, as they venture in a search for a new somewhere. Free

STEAM and a Story: The Three Little Pigs. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4 p.m. Enjoy a story and then create a STEAM inspired project that goes along with the story, around the entire theme of The Three Little Pigs tale. For ages entering Kindergarten to 2nd Grade. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Secret Life of Pets. Worcester Common, Front & Church St., Worcester. 6:30 p.m. Enjoy vendors selling goods from beverages and sandwiches to popcorn, and bring your chairs and blankets to enjoy this movie following mismatched mutts who get lost in NYC. Free. worcesterma.gov/worcester-common-oval. Yellow Submarine. Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. 7 p.m. Celebrate the 50th anniversary of this psychedelic pop icon, as you enjoy the colorful musical spectacle on screen. Adults $12.75, children $10.75. coolidge.org. Summer Concert Series. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7:15 p.m.9 p.m. Gather on the lawn for the annual Summer Concert Series featuring The Concord Band, where lawn chairs, picnic baskets, and blankets are always welcome, with food vendors on staff. Member cars $15, walk-ins $5; nonmember cars $20, walk-ins $10. fruitlands.org.

27 Friday

HELL we’re welcoming new pediatric patients Meet the pediatricians who are welcoming new patients at reliantmedicalgroup.org/kids.

Backyard and Beyond: Forest Friday. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-10:45 a.m. Come outdoors to explore a nature-centric activity based on the weather and season. Recommended for ages 2 to 6. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Family Fun Afternoon. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 3-5 p.m. Drop by this afternoon for a time to spend quality time with your family and other patrons, during a day of activities and games. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. Enjoy an evening to explore the museum and Discovery Woods at night, during this summer

A Division of Reliant Medical Group

Reliant-35211Hello-6875x818.indd 1

BAYSTATEPARENT 23 4/4/18 3:27 PM


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! with admission. Adults $9, youths $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org. Let’s Go Fly a Kite. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 2-4 p.m. Join on the Fruitlands hillside for a kite making craft that will inspire outdoor play for the whole family. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $15, youth 5 to 13 $6, ages under 5 free. fruitlands.org. Wonderstruck. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 2:30 p.m. Enjoy this film interlacing two stories set fifty years apart, following a young girl in 1927 and a recently orphaned boy in 1977. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Especially for Me: Evening for Families with Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or KODA Children. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 5-8 p.m. Come explore the museum and Discovery Woods for a night of fun, with ASL interpreters on hand and dinner. Register ahead. Free. discoveryacton.org. The Block. Downtown Beverly, 248 Cabot St., Beverly. 5:30-9 p.m. Join Beverly Main Street during this downtown street party, featuring live bands throughout the night, and plenty of food sold by local restaurants. Adults $5, youth free. beverlymainstreets.org.

31 Tuesday

Wonder. Prudential Center, South Garden, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Enjoy the Magic 106.7 Family Film Festival through children’s activities, giveaways, entertainment, and gather on the South Garden for a showing of this family-flick starring Julia Roberts about the power of love. Free. prudentialcenter.com. SONG & Celebration. Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St., Worcester. 8 p.m. Join us for an evening of fantastic music, and dancing to benefit orphaned children. $35-50. mechanicshall.org.

29 Sunday Summer Sundays: Juggling. Francis William Bird Park, 41 Rhoades Ave., East Walpole. 3-4 p.m. Experience a high-energy, familyfriendly comedy and juggling act during this gravity-defying performance, with ice cream from Crescent Ridge Dairy on hand. Register ahead. Member families $9, nonmember families $15. thetrustees.org.

30 Monday Spirited Away. Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. 7 p.m. Enjoy this Academy Award-winning animated fantasy adventure featuring dazzling creatures, mystery, and imagination. Adults $12.75, children $10.75. coolidge.org.

Music with Emily. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 10-10:45 a.m. Join Parents’ Choice Award-winning singer and songwriter Emily Hall for this sing-along musical adventure with familiar tunes, original songs, visuals, and surprises. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Make a Mess: Explore Kinetic Sand. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Squish it, sculpt it, drip it, and more, as we drop-in and discover the unique properties of this special materials as you play, create, and experiment using your hands and some simple tools. Free with admission. Members free, nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. No-Sew Tutus. Worcester Public Library: Burncoat Branch, 526 Burncoat St. AND Roosevelt Branch, 1006 Grafton St., Worcester. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join us for some crafternoon fun as we learn to craft fanciful tutus without needle and thread. For ages six and up. Free. mywpl.org. Dance Workshop: Lyrical/Contemporary. Worcester Public Library: Main Branch, 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 6-7 p.m. Get your feet tapping to the beat as dance teacher Becky Marrone shows you how to move and groove to lyrical and contemporary dancing. For ages 6 to 10. Free. mywpl.org.

Check out our Best of 2018 Winners Starting on page 28

All things animal for ages 5 - 14! Animal Treats & Training, July 2 - 6

Get an up-close look at animal care and training at the EcoTarium! Find out what zookeepers do to keep animals well taken care of and healthy.

Creature Features, August 6 - 10

Discover how different animals talk, eat, move and play while exploring the EcoTarium’s ponds, forest and meadow. Plus, get a sneak peek behind the scenes to meet our resident wildlife.

Learn more at ecotarium.com/summercamp 24 JULY2018


For your child’s next milestone celebration, make it special at the Beechwood Hotel where our exquisite Four Diamond and Award Winning property is the perfect backdrop for your event. Impress your guests and enjoy the ease of planning with our onsite event planners who will work with you to ensure your event is everything you want it to be – whether large or small – the Beechwood will ensure it is memorable and spectacular. Call our onsite party planner at 508.453.1112

3 6 3 P L A N TAT I O N S T R E E T WO R C ES TER , M A | 5 0 8 .75 4.5789 BEECHWOODHOTEL .COM

BAYSTATEPARENT 25


THE OTHER CITY ON THE CHARLES

Why You Should Be Visiting Cool

Photos Courtesy of the Royal Sonesta Boston

CAMBRIDGE

B

oston may be the first destination that comes to mind when you think of a bustling Bay State hub, rich with history, museums, theater, and restaurants. But if you’re looking for a nearby escape with lots to offer, don’t overlook the other city on the Charles: Cambridge. Situated right across the Charles River from

26 JULY2018

Boston, Cambridge is just minutes away from the hustle and bustle of Beantown, but this historic city has a charm and persona all its own. Home to an eclectic mix of merchants, restaurants and cafes, student hangouts, leafy parks, and not to mention two of the nation’s most prestigious universities, Cambridge is as worthy of a stay as any other hub on the Massachusetts harbor.

baystateparent recently visited this storied city, and though there are plenty of family-friendly things to do, we left the kids at home. We spent a weekend savoring top-notch cuisine, sipping wine, cruising the harbor, and enjoying the Boston skyline from our hotel room. Cambridge proved to be the perfect spot for a grown-up getaway – while not having to go very far at all.


Photos Courtesy of City Winery Photos Courtesy of City Winery

Photos Courtesy of Classic Harbor Line Boston Brian Samuels Photography

Photos Courtesy of the Royal Sonesta Boston Brian Samuels Photography

Where We Stayed

What We Saw

Located on the banks of the river, Royal Sonesta Boston is newly renovated to offer stylish rooms and first-class amenities along with unparalleled views of the Boston skyline. It’s within walking distance of historic attractions, museums, Kendall Square and steps from the Charles River’s famous walking path. The Museum of Science is within a 15 minute walk, and the CambridgeSide Mall is across the street where you can also take a sightseeing cuise down the Charles. The atmosphere is refined, with the lobby and hallways doubling as art galleries of original art by many contemporary artists of our time and high-end restaurants with locally inspired cuisine. The hotel also hosts a state-of-the-art fitness center, locker rooms and a 30’ x 40’ chlorine-free salt based pool with a seasonal terrace. On our stay we found the service and staff second to none.

Some of the best sightseeing in the area can’t be done from land. We took a Classic Harbor Line Boston Brunch Cruise, which was the perfect way to spend a sunny Saturday afternoon. Sailing through the Boston Harbor, we sipped mimosas and Bloody Mary’s and dined on a gourmet threecourse brunch while taking in panoramic views of the city. We learned some interesting tidbits on the two-and-half hour cruise: the maritime history narrated by our captain was interesting and informative, especially the history of Spectacle Island. It was a relaxing way to kick off the weekend, and the avocado eggs benedict alone was worth the trip. Classic Harbor Line also offers: Day Sail, Sunset Sail, City Lights Sail, Boston Harbor Island Picnic Sail, a one-hour Inner Harbor Cruise, and a Sails & Ales, which features tastings from the Harpoon Brewery.

Luminaries who have played exclusive multicity runs include Josh Ritter, John McCauley of Deer Tick, Blue Rodeo and Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell. Other acts that have graced the City Winery stage on consecutive nights include Gregg Allman, Frank Turner, Marianne Faithfull and Bruce Hornsby, among others. City Winery’s top-notch restaurant features menus that borrow from Mediterranean history to pair with their wines. Seating is available in the main venue space and in the Haymarket Lounge up to two hours before a performance. There’s also The Barrel Room, a 140-seat tasting room and restaurant housed within the space. City Winery is now offering tours where you will be educated on the art of winemaking. Guests will sample three differnt City Winery Boston wines as well as a food pairing for $25 per person. Tours are available Saturdays and Sundays from 4:30-5:00 p.m. and 5:30-6:00 p.m. To make a reservation go to citywinery.com/boston/, or through their box office concierge at bostonconcierge@citywinery.com.

Classic Harbor Line Boston 60 Rowes Wharf, Boston boston-sailing.com

City Winery Boston 80 Beverly Street at One Canal, Boston citywinery.com/boston

What We Loved

What We Learned

Boston’s up-and-coming music mecca, City Winery, is a club where you can enjoy a show, a meal, and a good glass of wine. The concert venue, fully functioning urban winery and restaurant opened last fall in Bulfinch Triangle – an upscale 300-seat spot that’s the newest in a string of City Winery establishments in six cities. Separating itself from the standard arena concert venue, this is an intimate spot that blends the worlds of good wine and good music. Guests are invited to enjoy the Barrel Room tasting bar and restaurant, where they can try house wines served fresh on tap, straight from the cellar. Tasting flights are offered to sample the many wines made in house, along with an award-winning wine list featuring over 400 wines from many of the top producers from all over the world.

• Cambridge (originally Newtowne) was founded as the capital of Massachusetts

Royal Sonesta Boston 40 Edwin H Land Blvd., Cambridge sonesta.com

What We Ate We didn’t have to go far to find an exciting culinary adventure. ArtBar, located right at the hotel, is an intimate and innovative restaurant that lives up to its tagline, “Food is Art.” The inviting space has an outdoor patio with fire pits and river views. ArtBar serves brunch, lunch and dinner, with menus that feature seasonal and regional ingredients. For dinner, we noshed on tuna tartar, Parisian gnocchi, and steak frites. Our favorite part of the meal was a skillet of s’mores, made with decadent Belgian chocolate and house made marshmallows. Yum! The hotel also hosts Restaurant Dante, featuring Italian cusine. And if you’re in a hurry, there is the casual Studio for a quick bite. ArtBar Located at the Royal Sonesta Boston artbarcambridge.com

• The Longfellow Bridge, which opened in 1793, reduced the distance from Boston to Cambridge from 10 to 3 miles • The first computer was invented in Cambridge, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1928 • Kendall Square has been called “the most innovative square mile on the planet,” due to its the high concentration of entrepreneurial start-ups.

BAYSTATEPARENT 27


Photography by Elizabeth Brooks

ARTS & ENRICHMENT

Best Liquor Store and Best Wine Selection: Wyman’s Liquors

Best Art Studio Worcester Art Museum 55 Salisbury St., Worcester 508-799-4406 www.worcesterart.org Runner-up: Art on the Rocks 96 Main St., Gardner 978-503-9340 80 Franklin Rd., Fitchburg 978-503-9340 www.artontherocksma.com Best Dance Studio H&H Dance Academy 175 W Main St., Millbury 508-865-0083 hhdanceacademy.com Runner-up: Diane Kelley Dance Studio 76 Central St # E., West Boylston 508-835-2678 dianekelleydance.com Best Day Camp Girls Inc. of Worcester 125 Providence St., Worcester 508-755-6455 www.girlsincworcester.org Runner-up: Holden Recreation Summer Camp 1420 Main St., Holden 508-829-0263 www.holdenma.gov/recreation Best Gymnastics Studio The Little Gym 342 W Boylston St.Suite #34b., West Boylston 508-232-7678 www.thelittlegym.com

Best Women’s Boutique: French Twist Boutique

Best Barbershop: Matt’s at the Buzzer

Runner-up: Giguere’s 148 Main St., Cherry Valley 508-892-3797 gigueregym.com Best Martial Arts Studio McCoy’s Action Karate 770 Southbridge St., Auburn 508-832-4110 www.mccoysactionkarate.com Runner-up: America’s Best Defense 274 South St., Shrewsbury 508-925-8942 abdshrewsbury.com Best Music School Worcester Music Academy 9 Irving St., Worcester 508-635-6900 www.worcestermusicacademy.com Runner-up: Pakachoag Music School 203 Pakachoag St., Auburn 508-791-8159 www.pakmusic.org

Best Orchard (Pick Your Own): Tougas Family Farm 28 JULY2018

Best Sleep-Away Camp Treasure Valley Boy Scout Camp 394 Pleasantdale Road., Rutland 508-886-2213 www.tvsrbsa.org


Runner-up: Camp Marshall 92 McCormick Rd., Spencer 508-885-4891 www.campmarshall.net Best Theatre Program/Camp Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts 2 Southbridge St., Worcester 877-571-7469 hanovertheatre.org Runner-up: Theater at the Mount 444 Green St., Gardner 978-630-9388 mwcc.edu/campus-life/tam/

Best Independent Bookstore Tatnuck Bookseller 18 Lyman St., Worcester 508-366-4959 www.tatnuck.com

Best Children’s Photographer Shawna Shenette 22 West St. #21., Millbury 508-685-0885 shawnashenettephotography.com

Best Flower Shop Windmill Florist and Gifts 448 Mechanic St., Fitchburg 978-342-2347 windmillfloristandgifts.com

Annie’s Book Shop (Worcester) 65 James St., Worcester 508-796-5613 www.anniesbooksworcester.com

Runner-up: True Life Photography 243 Stafford St.,Worcester 774-293-8165 www.truelifepics.com

Runner-up: Danielson Flowers 660 Main St., Shrewsbury 508-842-8992 danielsonflowers.com

Best Car Dealer (New) Herb Chambers 809 Washington St., Auburn 508-832-8000 herbchamberstoyotaofauburn.com

Best Consignment Store Cutie Patutie’s Consignment1021 Central St., Leominster 978-534-6604 www.ecistores.com/home-cuties.php

Best Haircut for Kids Snip-its 157 Bedford St., Burlington 781- 221-9939 95 Washington Street., Canton 781- 821-1900 25 Boylston Street., Chestnut Hill 617-566-7647 1 Worcester Road., Framingham 508-370-0006 92 Derby St. Suite 133., Hingham 781-740-2306 70 Worcester Providence Tpke Suite 531., Millbury 508-865-7647 544 Turnpike St., North Andover 978-655-7120 300 Andover St., Peabody 978-532-1400 231C Highland Avenue., Seekonk 508-336-2626 snipits.com

BUSINESSES & SERVICES Best Bank Fidelity Bank 75 Main St., Leominster 978-534-5222 9 Leominster Blvd., Leominster 800-581-5363 675 Main St., Leominster 978-345-4331 Runner-up: Cornerstone Bank 2 Center Depot Road., Charlton 508-248-7323 1073 Main St., Holden 508-829-0865 121 South Main St., Leicester 508-892-4100 253-257 Main St., Southbridge 508-765-9103 495 East Main St., Southbridge 508-765-1555 130 West Main St., Spencer 508-885-2221 72 West Main St, Route 9 West., Spencer 508-885-9707 176 Main St., Spencer 508-885-5313 200 Charlton Road, Route 20., Sturbridge 508-347-2701 968 Main St., Warren 413-436-7726 86 Worcester Rd., Webster 508-949-2600 230 Park Ave., Worcester 508-421-8070 70 West Boylston St., Worcester 508-853-6899 cornerstonebank.com Best Barbershop Matt’s at the Buzzer 118 Elm St., Millbury 508-865-2047 mattsathebuzzer.com Runner-up: Goodfellas 1124 Pleasant St., Worcester 508-796-5522 Best Bike Shop Barney’s Bicycle 582 Park Ave., Worcester 508-799-2453 barneysbicycle.com Trek Stop 49 N Main St., North Grafton 508-839-9199 www.trekstop.com

Runner-up: D’Iorio’s 335 Plantation St., Worcester 508-756-7791 dioriossalon.com Best Home Heating Peterson Oil 75 Crescent St., Worcester 508-368-1000 petersonoil.com

Best Gymnastics Studio: The Little Gym Runner-up: Patrick Motors Subaru 3 Elm St., Shrewsbury 888-266-3979 www.patrickssubaru.com

Runner-up: Children’s Orchard 18 Lyman St., Westborough 508-366-5437 childrensorchard.com

Best Car Dealer (Used) Linder’s 211 Granite St., Worcester 508-756-5125 lindersinc.com

Best Credit Union Digital Federal Credit Union 220 Donald Lynch Boulevard., Marlborough 508-263-6700 dcu.org

Runner-up: Patrick Motors Subaru 3 Elm St., Shrewsbury 888-266-3979 www.patrickssubaru.com Best Car Wash Ernie’s Auto Wash 888 Southbridge St., Auburn 1 Meadow Road., Spencer 114 W Boylston St., West Boylston 215 Grove St., Worcester 579 Millbury St., Worcester erniescarwash.com Runner-up: Fitzy’s Car Wash 85 Worcester St., North Grafton 508-839-5252

Runner-up: Leominster Credit Union 137 Shrewsbury St.,Worcester 978-537-8021 50 Sunset Ln., Paxton 800-649-4646 20 Adams St., Leominster 978-537-8021 910 W Boylston St., Worcester 978-537-8021 715 Main St., Holden 978-537-8021 159 Mechanic St., Clinton 978-537-8021 7 Main St., Sterling 978-537-8021 leominstercu.com

Runner-up: ckSmithSuperior 99 Crescent St., Worcester 508-753-1475 www.cksmitsuperior.com Best Home/Auto Insurance Company Commerce Mapfre Insurance 11 Gore Rd., Webster 800-221-1605 mapfreinsurance.com Runner-up: Liberty Mutual 110 Tpke Rd, Ste 201., Westborough 508-755-7326 libertymutual.com Best Jewelry Store Elliott’s Jewelers 63 Whalon St., Fitchburg 978-342-9107 elliottsjewelers.net Runner-up: Pucci’s Fine Jewelry 205 W Boylston St., West Boylston 508-835-6855 puccisjewelers.com Best Liquor Store Wyman’s Liquors 30 Pleasant St., Leominster 978-537-5537 wymanliquors.com BAYSTATEPARENT 29


Thanks for Voting Us Best Dance Studio!

Open registration goes live Thursday, July 12th. Visit our customer portal online to register.

Open House Wednesday, August 1st 10am-1pm & 4-7pm 175 West Main St., Millbury 508-865-0083 hhdanceacademy.com

Best Flower Shop: Windmill Florist and Gifts Runner-up: Austin Liquors 117 Gold Star Blvd., Worcester 508-853-8953 370 Park Ave., Worcester 508-754-0149 20 Boston Turnpike., Shrewsbury 508-755-8100 austinliquors.com Best Mom’s Salon or Spa Tu Moda 574 Pleasant St., Worcester 508-754-1513 tumodaspa.com

Thank you for voting us BEST OB/GYN Practice whcma.com 508-755-4861

Runner-up: St. Cyr Salon & Spa 235 Park Ave., Worcester 508-752-2222 www.stcyrsalon.com Best Nursery/ Garden Center Sterling Greenery 44 Redemption Rock Trail., Sterling 978-422-0071 Runner-up: Bemis Farms Nursery 29 N Brookfield Rd., Spencer 508-885-4247 www.bemisfarmsnursery.com

325 Thompson Rd.

340 Maple St.

328 Shrewsbury St.

NEW LOCATION 164 South St.

Webster Lake

Marlborough

Worcester

Southbridge

Best Shopping Center/Mall The Shoppes at Blackstone Valley 70 Worcester-Providence Turnpike., Millbury 617-232-8900 www.shopsatblackstonevalley.com Runner-up: Natick Mall 1245 Worcester St., Natick 508-655-4800 natickmall.com

30 JULY2018

Best Store for Kids’ Clothes The Children’s Place 385 Southbridge., Auburn 508-721-0260 580 Donald Lynch Blvd., Marlborough 508-303-0277 100 Commercial Rd., Leominster 978-466-7408 1324 Worcester St., Natick 508-647-0063 childrensplace.com Runner-up: Children’s Orchard 18 Lyman., Westbrough 508-366-5437 childrensorchard.com Best Tire Store Townfair Tire 320 Southbridge St., Auburn 508-832-6227 886 Memorial Drive., Chicopee 413-593-5193 875 Merriam Ave., Leominster 978-466-8801 481 Boston Post Rd E., Marlborough 91 Medway Rd., Milford 508-422-9223 1276 Worcester Rd., Natick 508-653-2233 376 Boston Tpke., Shrewsbury 508-761-4880 townfairtire.com Runner-up: Pete’s Tire Barns 407 Hartford Tpke., Shrewsbury 508-754-9876, petestire.com Best Wine Selection Wyman’s Liquors 30 Pleasant St., Leominster 978-537-5537, wymanliquors.com


Best Buffet Nancy Chang Restaurant 372 Chandler St., Worcester 508-752-8899 nancychang.com Runner-up: Jasmine Restaurant 711 Southbridge St., Auburn 508-832-8868 jasmineauburn.com Best Burger Place The Fix Burger Bar 108 Grove St., Worcester 774-823-3327 thefixburgerbar.com Runner-up: Wahlburgers 132 Brookline Ave., Boston 617-927-6810 wahlburgersrestaurant.com Best Date Night The Sole Proprietor 118 Highland St., Worcester 508-798-3474 thesole.com Runner-up: 111 Chop House 111 Shrewsbury St., Worcester 508-799-4111 111chophouse.com

Runner-up: Julio’s Liquors 140 Turnpike Road., Westborough 508-366-1942 juliosliquors.com Best Women’s Boutique French Twist Boutique 1098 Pleasant St., Worcester 774-437-9192 facebook.com/shopfrenchtwist/ Runner-up: Paisley Boutique 40 N Main St., North Grafton 508-730-8585 45 Main St., Hudson 774-641-2678 paisleygraceboutique.com

DINING Best Bakery Gerardo’s Italian Bakery 339 W Boylston St., West Boylston 508-835-2200 gerardositalianbakery.com Runner-up: The Queen’s Cups 56 Water St., Worcester 508-459-9600 thequeenscups.com Best Breakfast Lou Roc’s Diner 1074 West Boylston St., Worcester 508-852-6888 Runner-up: Livia’s Dish 1394 Main St., Worcester 508-926-8861 liviasdish.com

Best Frozen Yogurt Shop Meola’s Wayside Ice Cream 165 W Boylston St., West Boylston 508-835-9747 110 Leominster Road., Sterling 978-422-3900 1134 Main St., Holden meolasicecream.com Runner-up: WooBerry 141 Highland St., Worcester 508-202-8894 wooberryyogurt.com Best Hot Dog Stand George’s Coney Island 158 Southbridge St., Worcester 508-753-4362 coneyislandlunch.com Runner-up: Hot Dog Annie’s 244 Paxton St., Leicester 508-892-9059 Best Ice Cream Stand Rota Spring Farm 117 Chace Hill Road., Sterling 978-365-9710 rotaspringfarm.com

Thanks for Voting Us #1 Dog Groomer 154 Riverlin Street Millbury barknbubblesmillbury.com 508-865-8155

Thank You for Voting Us The BEST Pick Your Own Orchard! It’s Blueberry and Cherry season! Check out our website for days and hours

he Fun For t ily m Whole Fa

• Barnyard Animals • Children’s Playground • Farm & Store • Cider Donuts, Smoothies, Fruit Slush and Ice Cream

Runner-up: Ronnie’s Seafood and Ice Cream 871 Southbridge St., Auburn 508-832-9068 Best Kids’ Meals O’Connor’s Restaurant 1160 W Boylston St., Worcester 508-853-0789 oconnorsrestaurant.com Runner-up: 110 Grill 123 Front St., Worcester 774-420-2733 www.110grill.com

234 Ball Street Northborough, MA (508) 393-6406 www.tougasfamilyfarm.com for hours and directions BAYSTATEPARENT 31


Best Pizza Parlor Antonio’s Pizza by the Slice 268 Chandler St., Worcester 774-530-6000 antoniospizza.com Runner-up: Pizza Chef 32 N Main St., Millbury 508-865-3700 www.pizzachefmillbury.com Best Place for Family Dinner The Boynton Restaurant 117 Highland St., Worcester 508-756-8458 boyntonrestaurant.com

Best Boarding Kennel: The Barkwood Inn Pet Resort

Runner-up: Wright’s Farm 84 Inman Rd., Harrisville RI 401-769-2856 wrightsfarm.com Best Restaurant The Sole Proprietor 118 Highland St., Worcester 508-798-3474 thesole.com Runner-up: Armsby Abbey 144 Main St., Worcester 508-795-1012 armsbyabbey.com

Best Children’s Library: Worcester Public Library

Best Restaurant for Families with Allergies O’Connor’s Restaurant 1160 W Boylston St., Worcester 508-853-0789 oconnorsrestaurant.com

Runner-up: 110 Grill 123 Front St., Worcester 774-420-2733 www.110grill.com

EDUCATION Best Afterschool Program Girls Inc of Worcester 125 Providence St., Worcester 508-755-6455 girlsincworcester.org Runner-up: Holden Recreation Department 1420 Main St., Holden 508-829-0263 holdenma.gov/recreation Best Childcare Shrewsbury Children’s Center 138 N Quinsigamond Ave., Shrewsbury 508-755-3922 shrewsburychildren.com Runner-up: Muddy Puddles Early Learning Program Whitinsville, MA 508-266-7046 thedomesticgoddess.us Best Children’s Library Worcester Public Library 3 Salem St., Worcester 508-799-1655 www.mywpl.org

Thank you for voting for us! Baystateparent Best Pediatric Dentist Dr. Tony Saito & Team 2016 - 2017 - 2018 32 JULY2018

67 West Boylston Street, West Boylston, MA


Runner-up: Beaman Memorial Public Library 8 Newton St., West Boylston 508-835-3711 www.beamanlibrary.org

Best Private School St. Peter-Marian 781 Grove St., Worcester 508-852-5555 spmguardians.org

Runner-up: Great Wolf Lodge New England 150 Great Wolf Dr., Fitchburg 978-343-9653 www.greatwolf.com

Best Parent/Child Class Worcester Art Museum 55 Salisbury St., Worcester 508-799-4406 worcesterart.org

Runner-up: Saint John’s High School 378 Main St., Shrewsbury 508-842-8934 stjohnshigh.org

Best Family Outdoor Attraction Davis Farmland 145 Redstone Hill Road., Sterling 978-422-6666 davisfarmland.com

Runner-up: Music Together at Pakachaog 203 Pakachoag St., Auburn 508-791-8159 www.pakmusic.org Best Parochial School Saint Bernard’s 45 Harvard St., Fitchburg 978-342-3212 www.stbernardscchs.org

FAMILY FUN Best Campground Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park 30 River Rd., Sturbridge 508-347-9570 Runner-up: Pine Acres Family Camping Resort 203 Bechan Rd., Oakham 508-882-9509 pinecresresort.com

Runner-up: Saint Peter-Marian 781 Grove St., Worcester 508-852-5555 www.spmguardians.org

Best Fair, Festival or Special Event The Big E 1305 Memorial Ave.,West Springfield www.thebige.com

Best Preschool Jack & Jill Preschool 693 Main St., Oxford, 508-987-3085 www.jackandjillpreschool.net

Runner-up: stART on the Street Park Ave., Worcester startonthestreet.org

Runner-up: Little Hearts Learning Center 155 Shrewsbury St., Holden 508-210-0273 littleheartslearningcenter.com

Best Family Indoor Attraction EcoTarium 222 Harrington Way., Worcester 508-929-2700 ecotarium.org

Runner-up: Old Sturbridge Village 1 Old Sturbridge Village Rd., Sturbridge 800-733-1830 osv.org Best Hiking Trail Purgatory Chasm 198 Purgatory Rd., Sutton 508-234-3733 mass.gov/locations/purgatorychasm-state-reservation Runner-up: Wachusett Mountain State Reservation 345 Mountain Rd., Princeton 978-464-2987 www.wachusett.com Best MA Beach Destination Salisbury Beach 1 Beach Rd., Salisbury 978-462-4481 salisbury-beach.org Runner-up: Horseneck Beach State Reservation

5 John Reed Rd.,Westport 508-636-8816 mass.gov/locations/horseneckbeach-state-reservation Best Movie Theatre Blackstone Valley 14 Cinema De Lux 70 Worcester-Providence Tpke., Millbury 800-315-4000 Runner-up: West Boylston Cinema 101 W Boylston St., West Boylston 508-835-8888 wbcinema.com Best Museum Museum of Science 1 Museum of Science Driveway., Boston 617-723-2500, mos.org Runner-up: Boston Children’s Museum 308 Congress St., Boston 617-426-6500 bostonchildrensmuseum.org Best Orchard (Pick-Your-Own) Tougas Family Farm 234 Ball St., Northborough 508-393-6406 tougasfamilyfarm.com Runner-up: Red Apple Farm 455 Highland Ave., Phillipston 978-249-6763 redapplefarm.com

The Greatest Gift You Can Give a Child... COMMUNITY FRIENDSHIP SHARING

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Fall Openings Available Call 508-752-5609 to schedule a tour of our school and to meet our teachers.

1220 Main Street, Worcester ourladyoftheangels.us BAYSTATEPARENT 33


520 N W Main St., Douglas 508-476-2664 breezysummer.com

Best Place to Picnic Tower Hill Botanic Garden 11 French Drive., Boylston 508-869-6111 towerhillbg.org Runner-up: Wachusett Mountain State Reservation 345 Mountain Rd., Princeton 978-464-2987 www.mass.gov/locations/wachusettmountain-state-reservation Best Skating Rink Worcester Common Oval

Best Place to Picnic: Tower Hill Botanic Garden

Runner-up: Roger Williams Park Zoo 1000 Elmwood Ave., Providence rwpzoo.org

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Runner-up: FMC Ice Sports 1275 VFW Pkwy., West Roxbury fmcicesports.com

Best Fertility Practice Brigham & Women’s Hospital 45 Francis St., Boston 617-732-5500 brighamandwomens.org

Best Ski, Boarding, or Tubing Wachusett Mountain 499 Mountain Rd., Princeton 978-464-2300 wachusett.com

Runner-up: Women’s Health of Central Massachusetts 328 Shrewsbury St., Worcester 508-755-4861 whcma.com

Runner-up: Ski Ward 499 Mountain Rd., Princeton www.wachusett.com

Best Health Insurance Company Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts 446 Main St #5., Worcester 508-791-0961 www.massachusetts-healthplans.com

Best Water Park Great Wolf Lodge New England 150 Great Wolf Dr., Fitchburg 978-343-9653 greatwolf.com

Best Special Needs Services: Worc. Center for Expressive Therapies

Best Zoo Southwick’s Zoo 2 Southwick St., Mendon southwickszoo.com

Runner-up: Breezy Picnic Grounds Waterslides

Runner-up: Fallon Community Health Plan 10 Chestnut St., Worcester 800-333-2535, www.fchp.org

Thanks for Voting Us

Best Breakfast! EAT IN OR

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• Breakfast Served All Day • Daily Specials • Kid’s Menu • Fresh Seafood on Fridays

Thank you for Voting us BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL! Serving Students from 42 Cities & Towns Vigorous College Preparatory Curriculum including Honors & Advanced Placement Courses MIAA Division 1 Varsity, Jr Varsity & Jr High Level Athletic Programs including Girls & Boys Hockey!

Accepting Applications for Fall 2018! Find us on Facebook! Mon.-Fri. 6am-2:30pm Sat. 6am-2pm Sun 7am-1pm

Faith Formation · Commitment to Service · Academic Excellence

Lou Roc’s DINER

VOTED

baystate

parent

Best

OF 2018

1074 W. Boylston St., Worcester, 508-852-6888

ST. PETER MARIAN

JUNIOR · SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

781 Grove Street, Worcester, Massachusetts Admissions 508-852-5555 x 114 www.spmguardians.org A Catholic Diocesan School for grades 7 through 12

34 JULY2018


Runner-up: Tufts Health Plan Mercantile St., Worcester 617-972-9400 tuftshealthplan.com Best Hospital UMass 55 N Lake Ave., Worcester 508-334-1000 umassmemorialhealthcare.org/ umass-memorial-medical-center/ Runner-up: Saint Vincent Hospital 123 Summer St., Worcester 508-363-5000 stvincenthospital.com Best Local Gym or Exercise Facility YMCA of Central Massachusetts 4 Valente Drive., Westborough 508-870-1320 766 Main St., Worcester 508-755-6101 75 Shore Drive., Worcester 508-852-6694 55 Wallace Ave., Fitchburg 978-343-4847 108 Adams St., Leominster 978-401-2290 Runner-up: Worcester Fitness 440 Grove St., Worcester 508-852-8209 worcesterfitness.com

Best OB/GYN Practice Women’s Health of Central Massachusetts 328 Shrewsbury St., Worcester 508-755-4861 www.whcma.com Runner-up: Saint Vincent Hospital 123 Summer St.,Worcester 508-363-5000 www.stvincehospital.com Best Optometrist or Opthamologist Auburn Westboro Eye Associates 48 Auburn St., Auburn 508-832-9392 4 Lyman St., Westborough auburnwestboroeye.com Runner-up: Eyes on Worcester 488 Pleasant St., Worcester 508-756-6832 eyesonworcester.com Best Orthodontist New England Kids 48 Auburn St., Auburn 508-832-6278 newengland-kids.com Runner-up: Witt Orthodontics 42 Auburn St., Auburn 508-721-7900, wittorthodontics.com Best Pediatric Dentist Doctor Tony Saito 67 West Boylston St., West Boylston 508-835-6752, drtonysaito.com

Thank you baystateparent readers for voting us BEST PEDIATRICIAN for the third year! Auburn Office 105 Millbury St., Auburn, MA 508-832-9691

Shrewsbury Office 604 Main St., Shrewsbury, MA 508-842-1500

Runner-up: Wachusett Pediatric Dentistry 100 Whalon St., Fitchburg 978-342-3004 www.dentalhealth4kids.com/ Best Pediatrician Child Health Associates 105 Millbury St., Auburn 508-832-9691 604 Main St., Shrewsbury 508-842-1500 childhealthassociates.net Runner-up: Dr. Howard Zinman 299 Lincoln St., Worcester 508-856-0200 doctorzinman.com

PARTIES Best Birthday Party Entertainer Magic World Amusements & Entertainment 149 Memorial Dr., Shrewsbury 508-842-2177 magicworldamuse.com

Runner-up: Zoink’s Fun Factory 7 Pioneer Dr., North Oxford 508-987-1141 zoinksfunfactory.net Best Party Rental Magic World Amusements & Entertainments 149 Memorial Dr., Shrewsbury 508-842-2177 magicworldamuse.com Runner-up: Toomey’s Rent-All Center 35 Park Ave., Worcester 508-791-2383 toomeysrentall.com

SPECIAL NEEDS Best Advocacy Organization United Way of Central Mass. 484 Main St., Worcester 508-757-5631 unitedwaycm.org

Runner-up: Face Escape 70 Dudley St., Fitchburg face-escape.com

Runner-up: Horace Mann Educational Associates 6 Latti Farm Rd., Millbury 508-363-0290 hmea.org

Best Birthday Party Venue Sky Zone Trampoline Park 290 Turnpike Rd., Rt. 9, Westborough 508-870-5867 skyzone.com

Best After School Program Boys & Girls Club of Worcester 65 Tainter St., Worcester 508-753-3377 bgcworcester.org

Thanks for Voting us 2018 Best Barber Shop! • Custom Designs • Quality Cuts at Affordable Prices • Walk-ins Welcome

Visit us at www.childhealthassociates.net

118 Elm St., Millbury, MA, 508-865-2047 Tues-Fri 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 6 a.m.-7 p.m.

BAYSTATEPARENT 35


Runner-up: Whitin Community Center 60 Main St., Whitinsville 508-234-8184 whitincommunitycenter.com Best Camp YMCA of Central Massachusetts 766 Main St., Worcester 508-755-6101 ymcaofcm.org Runner-up: Kid Power Gymnastics 159 Worcester Rd., Charlton 508-439-9987 kidpowergymnastics.com Best Museum/Attraction Boston Children’s Museum 308 Congress St., Boston 617-426-6500 bostonchildrensmuseum.org Runner-up: EcoTarium 222 Harrington Way., Worcester 508-929-2700 ecotarium.org Best Special Needs Services Worcester Center for Expressive Therapies 255 Park Ave., Worcester 774-243-7792 www.wcetherapy.com Runner-up: Camp Shriver at UMass Boston 617-287-7250 https://www.umb.edu/csde/camp_ shriver Best Speech-Language Therapy Speech & Language Specialties 364 Boston Tpke., Shrewsbury 508-757-6981 Runner-up: Thom Child and Family Services 251 W Central St., Natick 508-655-5222 www.thomchild.org

THANK YOU AGAIN! 2017 & 2018 WINNER

Best Party Rental Best Birthday Party Entertainer Walter Derosier, Mr Magic 149 Memorial Drive, Shrewsbury, MA

508-842-2177 magicworldamuse.com

36 JULY2018

Best Therapy Facility Fairlawn Rehabilitation Hospital 189 May St., Worcester 508-791-6351 Runner-up: Worcester Center for Expressive Therapies 255 Park Ave., Worcester 774-243-7792 www.wcetherapy.com

PETS Best Animal Hospital Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic 1 Skyline Dr., Worcester 508-751-7670 vetmed.tufts.edu/tufts-at-tech/ Runner-up: Riverlin Animal Hospital 287 Riverlin St., Millbury 508-865-4075 www.riverlinvet.com

Best Boarding Kennel The Barkwood Inn Pet Resort 462 Worcester Rd., Charlton 508-248-7474 thebarkwoodinn.com Runner-up: Worcester Animal Rescue League 139 Holden St., Worcester 508-853-0030 worcesterarl.org Best Dog Groomer Bark ‘n Bubbles 154 Riverlin St., Millbury 508-865-8155 barknbubblesmillbury.com Runner-up: Ellie’s Pet Barn, Holden 785 Main St., Holden 508-829-8200 elliespetbarn.com Best Pet Store Maggie’s Foods for Pets 67 W Boylston St, West Boylston 508-835-2323 maggiesfoodsforpets.com Runner-up: Gibson’s Natural Pet 994 Grafton St., Worcester 508-926-8628 gibsonsnaturalpet.com Best Veterinarian Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic 1 Skyline Dr., Worcester 508-751-7670 vetmed.tufts.edu/tufts-at-tech/ Runner-up: Riverlin Animal Hospital 287 Riverlin St., Millbury 508-865-4075 www.riverlinvet.com Runner-up: Westside Animal Clinic 262 Mill St., Worcester 508-756-4411 westsideanimalclinic.vetstreet.com


Walk-In Urgent Care Open 7 Days a week 9:00am – 8:00pm

Our medical team is here to help adults and children of all ages with a wide range of non-emergency medical issues.

Check wait times online! www.readymed.org ReadyMED accepts most health insurance plans, cash, personal checks, VISA®, MasterCard® and American Express. 18-053 ReadyMED Bay State Parent Full page.indd 1

Four convenient locations: Auburn

460 Southbridge Street (Route 12)

Hudson

234 Washington Street (Route 85)

Milford

340 East Main Street (Route 16)

Worcester

366 Shrewsbury Street 4/4/2018 1:06:03 PM BAYSTATEPARENT 37


VERY SPECIAL PEOPLE

Photos Courtesy Mass. DCR

Summer FUN For ALL Abilities

W

hether it’s cruising in a kayak, trekking through the forest in an off-road wheelchair or racing down the rail trail with a hand-cycle, people of all abilities can enjoy recreation in the great outdoors at Massachusetts state parks this summer. Now in its 23rd year, the Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Universal Access Program provides year-round outdoor recreation experiences for people with disabilities. Last year, more than 5,000 individuals of varying abilities participated in UAP coordinated or supported recreation fun, such as adaptive ice skating or cross country skiing in the winter, or accessible camping in the

ur nar ck o or our Semi e h g C ite f in s ous web 29th H t. Sep

Universal Access Program Makes the Great Outdoors Accessible fall. This summer, kayaking, hiking, swimming, golfing, sailing rowing and cycling events for people of all abilities are being offered in every corner of the Bay State. You can find out more details about these upcoming events and pre-register at mass.gov/dcr/universal-access or call (413) 545-5760.

Kayaking $5-$10

Introductory Level: Ages 16 + • Saturday, July 14, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Lake Cochituate Kids Only • Tuesday, July 17, 1-3 p.m., Walden Pond

All Ages • Tuesday, July 24, 5-7 p.m., Walden Pond • Tuesday, August 7, 1-3 p.m., Walden Pond •Tuesday, August 14, 1-3 p.m., Walden Pond Intermediate Level: Ages 16+ • Saturday, August 4, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Malibu Beach Evening Paddles • Thursday, July 26, 12-2 p.m., Walden Pond •Thursday, August 16, 6-8 p.m., Lake Cochituate Cochituate State Park, Natick • Mondays July 9, 16, 23, and 30

and August 6, 13 and 20. Sign up for one hour paddles between 9:45 a.m.-3:15 p.m. Quinsigamond State Park, Worcester • Thursdays July 26 and August 1, 8, 15, and 22. Sign up for one hour paddles between 9:45 a.m.-3:15 p.m.

Swimming

$30 for six-week program Go for a recreational swim at Bennett Field Pool in Worcester on quiet Friday mornings before the pool opens to the public, July 13 through August 17. This swim program focuses on recreation skills and is not a learn-to-swim program. It is open to children and adults

We’re Here to Help Whether your loved one with special needs is an adult or a child, we can help with: • Special Needs Planning • Transition Planning & Adult Services • Advocacy • Guardianship & Alternatives Contact Frederick M. Misilo, Jr., Esq. 508.459.8059 or fmisilo@fletchertilton.com

Art by Dominic Killiany, an artist living with autism

38 JULY2018

WORCESTER | FRAMINGHAM | CAPE COD | PROVIDENCE


Thank You for Voting Us Best Speech & Language Therapy!

We believe every child is unique and through specialized programs help your child achieve success in school and life. with disabilities and their families.

Rowing Free

Learn to row or scull on the Connecticut River with Holyoke Rows, every Thursday, by appointment, through October. Specialized rowing shells and adaptive support as needed.

Golfing Free

Take to the green and enjoy competitive or recreational play at Ponkapoag Golf Course in Canton. All-terrain wheelchairs that assist golfers into a standing position to swing are available at this course. Mondays July 9 and 23, August 6 and 20 and September 17.

Sailing on the Charles River

$50 for season. Need-based, reduced fee of $1 available Take sailing lessons or go out for a recreational sail with Community Boating, Inc. Adaptive seating and hoyer lift are available. By appointment, 7 days a week through October.

Adaptive Cycling $3 per person

Explore a wide variety of adaptive

bikes for adults and children, including hand-cycles, trikes, tandems, and recumbent bikes. • Fridays July 6, 13, and 20 and August 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31 at Norwattuck Trail in Hadley Reserve one hour time slot between 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Hiking

$3 per person, $12 per family, $25 for groups Teamwork and assistive equipment such as the Terra Trek mountain wheelchair, GRIT Freedom Chair, and all-terrain walkers unite people of all abilities. Bring a lunch and enjoy activities like scavenger hunts and letterboxing. Sighted guides available.

• Social communication therapy • Executive function coaching • Individual speech & language therapy • Parent education/Consultation • Ages 2 through 22 years

Group Schedules School Year - Groups meet for 16 weeks, once a week for one hour Summer - Groups meet for 5 weeks, twice a week for one hour For further information, please visit our website at www.slspecial.com or contact Jessica Padula MS, CCC-SLP at 508-757-6981 or jpadula@slspecial.com 364 Boston Turnpike Road, Suite 1A, Shrewsbury MA 01545 www.slspecial.com

• Thursday, July 12: Blue Hills State Reservation, Milton • Thursday, July 19: Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle • Thursday, August 23: Moore State Park, Paxton

Canoeing on the Quabbin Reservoir $5 per person

Grab a paddle and enjoy canoeing along Pottapaug Pond in Petersham. An adaptive fishing instructor will be at some of the programs. Tuesdays July 24-August 28.

Simply Well Get recipes, parenting tips and more delivered right to your inbox.

Follow today: www.umassmemorial.org/simplywell Conversations to Keep You Healthy and Well BAYSTATEPARENT 39


Bites

Raclette: A New Idea for Family Dinner You want time to bond but the kids are sick of family game or movie nights. Ever thought of a family grilling night? Bring everyone to the table with a communal-style grill, where each person can cook their own meat, seafood, or veggies (this is probably best suited for older children and teens, obviously). Make it even more fun with a raclette grill, which allows each cook to experiment with different cheeses and sauce. Raclette (pronounced rah-kleht) is a centuries-old Swiss meal, and the name of the cheese used to make it. Think fondue. With a raclette grill, you can grill your food of choice, then pour melted cheese on top. (What parent hasn’t used the old vegetables-smothered-in-cheese trick before?) With a raclette grill you’ll cook your food on top while cheeses or sauce warm in individual trays below. There are quite a few electric raclette grills to choose from. We loved the PartyGrill ($99, partygrill.com), which comes with eight reversible grill tops – flat on one side and ridged on the other. The dual surfaces are great for cooking all sorts of different foods, like crepes, eggs, veggies or proteins.

Grilled Fruit 3 Ways Go beyond burgers this grilling season and throw some fruit on that BBQ. When you grill fruit, it evaporates some of the water in it and concentrates the sugar – making for a sweet treat and delicious summertime dessert. Stick with large, thinly sliced fruits on the grill; anything too small, like grapes, will fall through the grates. If you are working with smaller fruits, secure them together with skewers. And don’t forget to clean your grates before getting started, as the fruit is likely to take on the flavor of the last thing you grilled. Try these three different ways to enjoy grilled fruit. Grilled Brown Sugar Bananas

Too Cute! Mommy & Me Aprons Love cooking with your little chef? Make it even more fun with an adorable Mommy & Me apron set by Jessie Steele. The super cute patterns and retro designs, which have been featured on Sex And The City and 30 Rock, bring a sense of nostalgia to the kitchen. Mom and her mini me will both feel pretty in the Josephine or Audrey patterns, which feature sweet ruffles and bows. The aprons have adjustable ties at the neck and waist. Children’s size fits ages 3 and up. $22-$30. jessiesteele.com. 40 JULY2018

Preheat grill to medium-low heat. Without removing the peel, cut bananas in half lengthwise. Drizzle exposed halves with lemon juice, then coat with brown sugar. Place peel side up on a well-oiled grate. Cook 2-3 minutes, flip and cook another 2-3 minutes. Remove from the grill, then remove bananas from peel. Serve with ice cream. Grilled Mangoes & Strawberries with Honey Preheat grill to medium-low heat. Whisk together 1 tablespoon lime juice and 2 tablespoons honey; set aside. Thread two cubed mangoes and 1 cup of stemmed strawberries on skewers. Brush with canola oil. Grill, turning, 3-4 minutes, until fruit begins to caramelize; remove from heat. Drizzle honey lime mixture over the warm fruit. Grilled Maple Peaches with Pecans Preheat grill to medium-low heat. Cut peaches in half, remove pits. Brush exposed side with maple syrup, than place, cut side down, on well-oiled grill. Cook 2-3 minutes, flip, and cook another 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat, brush with more maple syrup and sprinkle with chopped pecans. Serve with yogurt or ice cream.


ask the

NUTRITI

NIST

Does Your Child Need a Multivitamin or Probiotic Supplement?

Q: A:

• Refusing to eat foods in a specific food group • Unable to eat certain foods in a food group due to allergies or cultural reasons • Eating a very small amount or limited variety within a food group or groups

add to beverages, smoothies or other foods like yogurt or oatmeal. The trick is to get them to consume everything that is provided, which can be difficult especially if they are already picky eaters. If none of these work, a gummy vitamin is often well tolerated. For more specific recommendations, reach out to a pediatric dietitian. Not only can he or she assess if your child needs supplementation and what vitamin supplement would be appropriate, they can also help you find an approach that works to get your child to eat a balance of nutrients to support their development. Unlike vitamins, probiotics are not essential for your child’s growth and development. Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts found naturally in the body and in certain foods. They help facilitate digestion and absorption of nutrients and optimize our body’s immune system. The research in the area of probiotic supplementation in children and adults is still preliminary and long-term effects of probiotic use in children are uncertain. Therefore, my recommendation is to find ways to incorporate probiotic-rich foods into your child’s diet. Some food sources of probiotics include yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut or other fermented vegetable, tempeh, kimchi and miso. Not only are kids getting a dose of potentially helpful probiotics, but these foods are also providing other nutrients their bodies need for growth and development.

For any of these reasons, a multivitamin supplement would be appropriate. As a reminder, multivitamins are supplementing your child’s diet. They are not a replacement for foods themselves. It’s still important to continue to offer food your child may be choosing not to eat or find alternatives to foods they may be unable to eat. So, what are the best multivitamins out there? The answer is what works best for your child. Start by trying chewable vitamins with no artificial dyes or added sugar. There are also some that come in liquid form and powdered form, which you could

Lauren Sharifi is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and food blogger at biteofhealthnutrition.com. Lauren works in private practice in Brighton at ASF-Peak Health( asfpeakhealth.com) and is passionate about helping individuals and families become competent eaters that find joy out of eating. Have a question for Lauren? Email editor@baystateparent.com.

Is it a good idea to give children daily vitamins or probiotics? How do you know if your child needs these supplements? Which ones are best?

It’s important that our children get the appropriate vitamins for proper growth and development. In most cases, children are able to get the vitamins their bodies need by consuming a variety of foods in each food group. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy products and animal and vegetable proteins are examples of vitamin-rich foods. Offering a balance of these foods in your child’s diet will help to ensure that they are getting the nutrients their body needs. But in some cases, children either choose or are unable to eat a variety of foods and may be lacking in certain vitamins. Here are some examples of when a multivitamin might be needed:

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DIY

Flowerpot Fire Pit & Custom Roasting Sticks Fire Pit

Backyard Camping with Kids Tech-free play time, dinner cooked over an open fire, and sleeping under a blanket of stars. Nothing says summer like camping. But with all the packing and prep required, nothing says hassle like camping, too. Enter the backyard camp-out: full of all the fun stuff camping is about, but without all the work (and within a walking distance to your bathroom). Camping in the yard is a cheap and easy alternative to a family getaway (and a good way to ease younger children into the idea of sleeping in the woods), but still a great way to create lasting memories. Instead of trekking gear miles into the woods, carry some stuff outside and let the fun unfold. To get the most out of it, you’ll make your backyard adventure as authentic as possible. This means gather your gear: a tent (borrow one if you don’t have one), sleeping bags or blankets, pillows, flashlights, snacks and beverages. Even though you’re close to home, have the kids pack anything they would need for a real trip (pajamas, a change of clothes, favorite toy, etc.) into a backpack. Have children help set up the “campsite.” Let them pick the perfect spot to pitch the tent, and unroll their sleeping 42 JULY2018

bags inside. If you’re going all out, set up a fire pit, or keep things a little simpler with our DIY idea and make your own personal flowerpot fire pit. Entertain the kids with some outdoor games. Try a Backyard Scavenger Hunt (look for things like an anthill, a mushroom, a pine cone, the biggest rock you can find), or a game of “Squirrels.” For this, one person will be the catcher, and the rest will be squirrels, clinging to trees (if you don’t have trees, pick another stationary object). When the catcher shouts “Run!” the squirrels have to dash to another tree without being caught (tagged). Once caught, you’re the new squirrel catcher. After dark, flashlight tag, or some good old fashioned stargazing is always a hit. If you opt for a real campfire, you can cook up quite the feast for dinner. Go for the classic food-on-a-stick, like hot dogs, or make a foil packet recipe, which you cook in the hot coals, not in the fire itself. Try this easy foil dinner: Combine ½ pound ground beef, ½ can mixed vegetables, ½ can cream of mushroom soup, salt and pepper. Place mixture in the center of a sheet

What You Need: • Terra Cotta Pot (base optional) • Heavy-duty Aluminum Foil • Charcoal • Charcoal Lighter Fluid • Lighter Directions: Line clay pot with foil and fill with charcoal. Drizzle with lighter fluid. Stand to the side of charcoal and light. When the charcoal begins turning white, you’re ready to roast! Note: This is an open flame! Adult supervision is required.

of foil, wrap it up, and place in the hot coals for 25 minutes. (This will be very hot when you open it – definitely a job for mom or dad.) When it comes time for bed, remember you might not get the

Roasting Sticks What You Need: • 1-inch wooden dowel • Uncoated wire hangers (check with your local dry cleaner) • Electric drill and Drill bit • Glue • Paints and Brushes Directions: • Cut dowel into 8-inch sections • Straighten wire hanger, cut ends off and to desired length • Drill a small hole into one end of the dowel, about 1 inch deep • Insert wire (Use glue to secure in place if needed. Ours fit snug enough that no glue was needed.) • Paint your dowel and let it dry before using

best night’s rest, but still encourage the kids to stay the night in the tent instead of venturing back inside to their bed. Don’t worry about bedtimes and routines – you’re camping, after all!


Summer Bucket List

80 Ideas for FUN Ah, summer! There’s no shortage of fun to be had in the season of sun. We put together a summery summary of things kids and families might want to do. Be sure to check items off this Bucket List as you go, and add your own seasonal to-do’s!

Catch Fireflies Have a Picnic Watch Fireworks Visit a Farmer’s Market “Unplug” For a Day (no TV, phone, computer) Make Ice Cream Sundaes Go Hiking Go Swimming at Night Build a Sandcastle Make S’mores Have a Water Balloon Fight Collect Seashells Fly a Kite Have a Pillow Fight Play Mini Golf Build a Fort Play Flashlight Tag Run Through a Sprinkler Skip Rocks Stargaze Go Berry Picking Climb a Tree Go to the Movies Draw with Sidewalk Chalk Eat Breakfast in Bed Go to a “Free Fun Friday” event Make Homemade Lemonade Take a Family Bike Ride Go to the Beach Bake Cookies Visit the Boston Public Garden Go Fishing Watch a Thunderstorm Keep a Journal Paint a Picture

Try a New Food Visit a Museum Play at a Park Take (and print out!) Pictures Visit Mom or Dad at Work Go to the Library Climb (or drive up) a Mountain Read at least 5 books Jump on a Trampoline Plant Vegetables Play Hide and Seek Go Bowling Watch the Sunset Play in the Rain Have a Slumber Party

Watch Movies in Your PJs Do a Random Act of Kindness Play Marco Polo Go Camping (even in your yard!) Eat Watermelon Write a Letter Visit an Aquarium Write & Illustrate a Story Blow Bubbles See a Drive-in Movie Play Whiffleball Cook (or help with) Dinner Swim in a Lake See an Outdoor Concert Make Homemade Pizza

Find a Yard Sale Treasure Pick Wildflowers Volunteer Go to a Fair/Carnival Wash the Car Watch the Clouds Start a Collection Have a BBQ Feed the Ducks Walk the Freedom Trail Make Homemade Jam Go Geocaching Bake a Pie Have a Game Night Mother/Son or Father/Daughter Date

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12 Ideas to

Boost Summer Learning BY KRISTIN GUAY

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ummer offers children a much needed break from the hard work and drudgery of the school year, but it’s important that they not “slide” back. Did you know that children can lose months of academic progress over the summer? “Summer slide” is a term used to describe the academic loss students may experience during the summer months away from school. But the good news is that you can easily infuse learning into plenty of summertime activities. Keep your kids’ math and science skills sharp with these games and activities that are both fun and educational. The best part? All of these ideas can easily be folded into any of your summer plans.

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Create traditional carnival games. Try bean bag toss, bowling, floating ducks, ring toss, or darts with balloons tacked on a board. When playing, actually take a minute and

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determine the probability of winning: “If there are 30 ducks floating in the water barrel and one duck has the winning mark on the bottom, what is the probability of winning if

each player gets three tries?” Explore the backyard. Learn about the different plants, trees, and animals that live near your home.

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Create an observation journal to record how an area changes during the summer (or even continue into the other seasons as well). There is a wealth of resources online to help identify the different trees and plants in specific areas based on bark, leaves, and flowers. Chart it out. Have your child track what they eat in a week and then compare this to the food pyramid created by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This chart shows the amount of grains, vegetables, fruit, milk, and meat and beans that should be eaten as part of the healthy diet. It is a great way for kids to learn what their body needs to function properly and how they can make healthy choices. Shop around. Compare prices of grocery items, gas at different stations, hamburger meals at different fast food restaurants, movie tickets at different times of the day, the electric bill at different times of the year, etc. This helps kids become more aware of the cost of everyday items for the family. An added bonus: some of these can be done while simply running errands (gas prices can be seen while driving in the car). Study shapes. Take photos of shapes and patterns in your world and create a photo book with the

pictures. Identify the shapes and describe the patterns. Think of all the things that have a triangular shape (slice of pizza, wedge of cheese, side of roof) or a circular shape (top of birdbath, cake, button), or even a rectangular shape (brick on the sidewalk, building, photo album). Shapes are everywhere if you look closely.

sugar and ¼ teaspoon of vanilla in a tightly sealed baggie. Place this baggie into a larger bag filled with 10 cups of ice and 7 tablespoons of salt. Shake for about five minutes or until the milk mixture is solidified. The science behind this is that in order to make the milk mixture solidify, the ice needs to be even colder -- and salt does the trick.

Make colored flowers. Learn about the capillary action of plants and how it delivers nutrients from the root system, up the stem, to the rest of the plant -- and get a colorful bouquet of flowers at the same time. Place a few inexpensive white flowers, such as a carnations, in glasses of water colored with food coloring. Over time, the flowers will change color as the water is absorbed.

Do puzzles together. Before you begin, start by sorting the pieces. Find all the end pieces first then sort the pieces by color. Puzzling develops many cognitive and physical skills in children as they manipulate the pieces to fit properly. A larger puzzle is also a great exercise in patience in that many of these puzzles require hours to complete.

Price out your day trip. Do some research on the cost of different family attractions. How much would it cost for your family to attend an event, museum, or special amusement park? Is there a discounted time of day you can go that would save money? See if you can also find the best time to go to a restaurant (early bird special), movie, (matinee), or free or discounted days at museums. Make homemade ice cream. Place ½ cup of milk, 1 tablespoon of

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Let them play sous chef. The next time you prepare a meal, instead of shooing your child out of the kitchen enlist their help. Depending on age and safety concerns, children can learn to wash fruits and vegetables, tear lettuce, measure ingredients, stir, knead and roll out dough, drop batter into pans, put icing on cakes and cupcakes, and even cut with assistance. Older children can learn to prepare their own fun healthy snacks (cookie cutter sandwiches, fruit and vegetable kabobs, yogurt and fruit parfaits, toast and smoothies). The is a perfect opportunity to teach your children about

food nutrition and making healthy choices. Learn about rocks in your area. Each rock stores a brief history. Learn about the three different types of rocks (sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous) and how they are formed. If you travel over the summer, be sure to gather rocks of that region and compare those to rocks found in New England. Have fun using rocks as cairns along a path or trail to mark your way. Experiment with ‘paintbrushes.’ Get out the paints use different kinds of “brushes” like feathers, cotton balls, sponges, even fingers add a unique element to any painting. A straw can be used to blow paint across the paper. Bubble wrap dipped in paint creates a unique textured design. Plastic forks and spoons create unique designs as well (a fork is especially great for creating the truffula trees in the Dr. Seuss book The Lorax). Kristin Guay lives on Cape Cod with her husband, two daughters, and beloved black lab. A former middle school language arts teacher, she is currently Youth Services Director at Centerville Public Library.

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STORY Open-Ended vs. Structured Toys: How Children Benefit From Both BY JODI DEE

Through play, children explore, develop ideas, experiment, learn, and construct knowledge about the world around them. Both structured and unstructured play are important in learning and development. Children learn while they play. Structured play is a predetermined or prescribed activity, such as giving a child a craft with a set outcome -- for example, making a paper snowman. This art activity provides a child a paper cutout of the body of a snowman with buttons for eyes and shirt, and other accessories to complete the look (stick for a broom, small orange triangles for a nose, and so forth), along with a completed sample snowman. The child is encouraged to do it alone but will make use of the materials provided and follow the example as a guide. Unstructured play, or free play, is when a child is able to play at their leisure and explore in an unstructured way, with toys, resources, or materials available to use or do whatever they choose (in a safe way) -- for example, playing in a sandbox or with dolls. 46 JULY2018

The Benefits of Different Types of Toys There are many different types of toys, but all toys are not all created equal. Toys set the basis for how children experience life, and the right ones can be tools for understanding rather than just trying to keep them busy. Stuffed animals are not my favorite, not only are they dust collectors but also home to dust mites that can be horrible for children with allergies. That said, children absolutely love how cute and cuddly they are, so they are an unavoidable part of childhood. Children do see these as “friends.” A stuffed animal is great to cuddle and feel, and often one becomes a favorite transitional toy, but too many are a waste of money! If a child is given other resources, stuffed animals are great when playing veterinarian or as an audience to a puppet show. When using the right toys, a child’s development will dictate its use rather than it becoming obsolete. Open-ended toys tend to be

the best to have at home as they host limitless possibilities. Once a child masters a structured toy (such as a puzzle), they will rarely use it again. A child often spends more time with the empty box and packaging than with the toy itself. Sometimes a box of plain sticks and buttons will keep children busy for close to an hour! You will be amazed at how much time they spend with toys that are openended. Playing with blocks, for example, will evolve as a child grows and develops. First a child will learn by exploring the different types of blocks and objects (touching, biting, feeling, holding, carrying, throwing). This play will progress to stacking and sorting, to making and knocking down towers. The play will then evolve to building different types of structures. Older children will begin to use the blocks in complex and dramatic play (building structures and playing with them, such as building a city with a friend or friends and having dinosaurs invade it). Provide a mix of open-ended toys

and structured toys. Offer a higher challenge as children grow in competency. The brand or type isn’t as relevant as the way it is used and rotated into a day. Make sure the toys are child safe, quality products, and age appropriate.

Open-Ended Toys Open-ended toys offer open ended possibilities and provide years of learning! A child can use his or her imagination, experiment, and every time they use it, they can create something different or the toy can be used in a variety of ways, such as play dough, dress-up clothes, Legos, or musical instruments. Little hands are comfortable and attracted to something that can be touched and used, and taken apart and put back together over and over again. And this also saves a lot of money! A manipulative is an object that is designed for a child to learn by “manipulating” it. The use of manipulatives provides children the opportunity to learn concepts


such as counting, stacking, sorting and unsorting, matching, construction, patterning, classifying, and comparing, while also learning about quantitative concepts like shapes, numbers, number symbols, in a hands-on and experimental way. Playing with manipulatives also developes and enhances fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination. Manipulatives are objects like texture links, sorting shapes, rings, balls, puzzles, or stacking toys. The Melissa & Doug Company have some wonderful products as well as Environments.com. Other important open-ended toys involve role play, such as action figures, dolls, Fisher Price houses, farm animals and trucks, kitchens, dinosaurs, and dollhouses. Even various books stimulate creative thinking because they provide “food for thought” and enliven imaginations. Whenever I bought something new for my children I always tried to make sure it was something open ended; something that could be used in multiple ways, over and over again or, more importantly, would add to the current foundation of toys I had. Play money and a cash register and regular calculators were added when the children started understanding the concept of money and how money was used to pay for things, adding an entirely

new element to playing store than how it was played before. The children went from simple to complex play, attaching price tags, calculating, and exchanging money.

• Dominoes • Card and board games

Sample Open-Ended Toys

Structured toys have a clear beginning, middle, and end. It refers to toys that can only be put together one way, such as puzzles or nesting blocks. There is generally a rule or set of rules, and each piece or type of piece plays a clear role in the completion of the play activity. The materials themselves often indicate the method of play. A child solves a puzzle or matching game, maybe with a little help at first but then independently. Not only has the child solved a problem toward mastery and independence, but he or she is beginning to memorize concepts (like the letters of C-A-T, and what a cat looks like, for example). These types of toys change as a child develops. More difficult puzzles will be needed as a child masters easier ones.

Infants & Toddlers • Play kitchen with pretend food • Stacking cubes • Baby dolls • Wooden blocks • Mr. Potato Head Preschoolers • Dress-up items (superheroes, princesses, pirates) • Toy trains, cars, and trucks • Puppets and other storytelling materials • Role-playing kits (doctor, veterinarian, others) • Blocks • Magnetic letters and numbers • Interlocking links and cubes • Felt boards • Pegs and pegboards • Matching games (starting with colors or pictures to adding words) Elementary-Age Children • Fashion dolls • Action figures • Make-believe school or house • Battle/war games • Legos

Structured Toys

Sample Structured Toys Infants & Toddlers • Ring stacker • Stacking cups • Shape sorter • Graduated cups • Inset puzzles • Puzzles (one to five large pieces)

Preschoolers • Basic board games (like Candyland, Chutes & Ladders) • Floor puzzles • Building blocks • Lacing cards • Pegboards with a set number of pegs • Puzzles (ten to 30-plus pieces) Elementary-Age Children • Pre-designed Lego sets (like Star Wars, Harry Potter) • Jigsaw puzzles • Board games for older children • Model vehicle sets (cars, airplanes) • Puzzles (30-plus pieces)

Creating Collections Establishing collections of the right toys will lead to years of play and learning. People often buy one toy when a child wants it, instead of creating an “open-ended” collection. For example, a child may express interest in “Army guys,” so one or a few are purchased. All new toys are played with temporarily, because they are new and interesting to explore (the uniforms, the color, the texture, the size, even the packaging). With just one or two, there is little else to do with these toys, but if this “Army guy” is added to a collection, with different colors of Army

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“…Mary was a bookworm. Sometimes when her siblings went out to play, she’d stay at home reading. Other times when she joined them, as often as not she’d eventually slip away to a secluded spot where they’d find her later, engrossed in a book.” — From A World More Bright: The Life of Mary Baker Eddy by Isabel Ferguson and Heather Vogel Frederick

In this children’s program, young visitors will not only listen to stories but also engage in playful activities. Recommended for bookworms 5 years old and younger with adults. No registration required. 200 Massachusetts Ave., Boston MA 02115 For more information, please contact our Educational Programs Coordinator 617-450-7203 | palladinom@mbelibrary.org

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guys and trucks, equipment and tools, the play becomes much more open ended and involved.

Sample Toy Collections • Fisher-Price people, Fisher-Price houses, accessories • Action figures, superheroes • Service heroes • Melissa & Doug food sets • Army soldiers, Navy sailors, Army trucks and accessories, barracks, hills, fences • Barbie dolls, dollhouse, clothes and accessories, house accessories • Shopkin houses, accessories • Full-size babies or life-size dolls, clothes, and accessories • Wooden puzzles, floor puzzles, jigsaw puzzles • Dinosaurs, environmental accessories

• Farm animals, farm equipment, barn, farmhouse, accessories • Matchbox cars, garages, trucks, monster trucks exhibition setup, accessories • Sea creatures (whales, fish, sharks, other) or Insects Jodi Dee has more than 30 years’ experience in Early Childhood Education and business, and over 11 years as a full-time mother of three. She has a B.A. in Psychology and a Masters in Education from Clark University. A columnist, blogger and children’s book author, she recently launched createahomeoflearning.com to promote education and early learning.


Confessions of a Closet Hoverer

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loset hovering: the act of pretending not to be a “helicopter parent,” when, in fact, you expend almost all of your mental energy blocking the instinctual urge to interfere. Or obsess. Like a director of your very own movie, relentless fretting and over-analyzing plays out, with some scenes in excruciating detail…but only in your mind. I’m a classic closet hoverer. I’m not sure if that’s a big secret. In fact, I suspect few will be surprised. Every “what if” and worst case scenario brews in an almost-constant whirl within my crazy mind. It’s a parallel plane of make-believe parenting that I keep neatly, and expertly, tucked away from public observation. Or, at least I try. Parenting is hard work. And so is fake parenting. Fortunately, sanity usually saves me from myself and keeps my neurosis stuffed deep within. I’d like to think I am a master at keeping this at bay. At least, I try like mad to fake parental calm and coolness for the benefit of my kids. Every urge to inappropriately interfere or show the breadth of my worry is valiantly resisted as I watch them fall and get up again, over and over and over. This, however, all at the expense of quietly giving myself a nervous breakdown.

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If I had any censor whatsoever, I’m sure I would pull this off to perfection and the only casualty would be me. But, unfortunately for a select few of my “lucky” friends, I can’t keep my “crazy” to myself for long before bursting. It’s usually only a matter of time before someone is cornered and I sing like a canary about every single scenario, and over-analyze and troubleshoot every appropriate anticipated parental response. They so enjoy my company. I actually do make a great friend – just don’t invite me to a party. Somewhere along the lines of “normal” levels of motherhood worry, there is a black hole of anxiety that tempts even the coolest of parents. This hole doesn’t represent the natural interventions that inevitably arise, but, rather, the resulting worrying that goes along with it. It represents the dark side. The black hole calls for you to over-obsess about even those very real issues – and some imagined, farfetched potential scenarios. Resist

the call. If you jump in, you’ll quickly find that the spiraling array of potential “what ifs” and if…thens” is endless – and useless. I unwittingly jumped sometime after my oldest entered the land of school-aged living and I learned that everything I thought I knew and could predict about his school experiences was…wrong. Left with an appalling, and surprising, absence of total control over his well-being, was something that this control freak just couldn’t handle. At some point I made the deal with the devil. The tempting taunts to play out each issue in a thousand sub- parts, prepare for all potential outcomes – and, thereby, regain some measure of control – became too overpowering to resist. But, rather than helping to deal with every scenario, that black hole of worry ruthlessly ushered my inner thoughts into the land of out-ofcontrol. The tricky part here became trying like mad to present the appearance that my anti-hovering ways were

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simply a natural extension of my “authentic” ultra-calm and cool persona. It is doubtful that I have ever actually pulled this off. My penchant for worrying goes way back. In fact, “worry” is a pose I have perfected over the years, as evidenced by the deep wrinkle between my eyes, a “worry line” that began forming when I was just a kid. My specialty, worrying about others. Perhaps I never had a chance against that darn black hole after all. And, though I haven’t found my way out yet, I’ll be damned if I stop trying. It’s only a matter of time – that calm and cool mom is in there somewhere, just waiting to get out. Brenda Donoghue juggles a full-time career with raising two boys in Central Massachusetts. Her writing is inspired by occasional flashes of insight during the chaotic daily grind, which she strives to navigate with humor and grace.

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Circle of Friends Area Adoption Info & Matching Events

Finally Forever July’s Child: Meet David Hi! My name is David and my wish is to find a forever family who will always believe in my potential! David, 16, is a sweet and easygoing young man of Caucasian descent. He interacts well with the adults in his life and enjoys exploring his environment in many ways; his favorite being through sense of touch. David is on the Autism spectrum and benefits from tactile experiences that include knocking over objects to hear how they sound and banging toys together to examine how it feels. Some of David’s other favorite activities include swinging on swings and riding his bike. David is mainly non-verbal but knows some sign language and uses picture exchange communication (PEC) as well. David needs some assistance with daily living activities but others he has mastered. David is well liked by all of his caretakers and they feel that he has enormous potential, as he is learning new skills all of the time. David attends a specialized school and receives extra support to assist with academic needs. Legally freed for adoption, David will do well in a family of any constellation, as an only child or with older siblings. However, his social

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worker would prefer a family that has knowledge about children on the Autism spectrum. David’s ideal family will be open to providing constant supervision and also be a strong advocate for David throughout his life. David has the ability to grow, learn and thrive under the guidance of a patient and loving family that will help him to reach his full potential. Can you provide the guidance, love and stability that a child needs? If you’re at least 18 years old, have a stable source of income, and room in your heart, you may be a perfect match to adopt a waiting child. Adoptive parents can be single, married, or partnered; experienced or not; renters or homeowners; LGBTQ singles and couples. The process to adopt a child from foster care requires training, interviews, and home visits to determine if adoption is right for you, and if so, to help connect you with a child or sibling group that your family will be a good match for. To learn more about adoption from foster care, call the Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange (MARE) at 617-6273 or visit www.mareinc.org.

Ready to learn more about adoption? Join an information meeting in your area to hear directly from social workers and experienced families, have your questions answered, and receive and application.

Monday, July 2 -- Northern Region Adoption Information Meeting, Jordan’s Furniture, 50 Walkers Brook Drive, Reading. IMAX Conference Room. 6-7 p.m. Contact: Fredia Torrence (978) 557-2743 or fredia.torrence@state. ma.us. Walk-ins welcome. Wednesday, July 11 -- Central Region Adoption Information Meeting,

Central Region Office, 13 Sudbury St., Worcester. 6 p.m. Contact: Valerie Fluitt (508) 929-2143. No registration required. Monday, July 23 -- Southern Region Adoption Information Meeting, Canton Police Department, 1492 Washington St., Canton. 6-8 p.m. Contact: ADLU line (508) 894-3830.

Adoption Bears Celebrating Patchwork Bear, a company that creates keepsake teddy bears, puppies, quilts and totes out of special clothes (a baby’s coming home outfit, grandpa’s favorite t-shirt or a game winning jersey, for instance), has created a special stuffed animal that celebrates adoption. The personalized Signature Adoption Bear features the child’s name across its chest and the flag of their birthplace on its foot. A snuggly celebration of all children’s roots!


TAKE EIGHT

with ‘Blue Man’ Bryce Flint-Somerville Donning a bald cap, grease paint and blue eyeliner is all in day’s work for Bryce Flint-Somerville. A member of the Blue Man Group for two decades, his job has taken him around the country and overseas, but he’s returned to the cast in Boston just in time for the group’s 5th annual Drum-Off competition, a showcase of the area’s extraordinary drumming talent where one lucky winner gets the opportunity to play with the famed performance group. (You can check out the finals, which are open to the public and will be held on Saturday, July 7 from 5-6 p.m. during the free Summer Block Party at The Lawn on D in Boston.) When Flint-Somerville isn’t judging drum competitions or covered in blue paint, he’s just dad, balancing the parenting act like the rest of us.

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What’s your background and how did it lead you the Blue Man Group? I am first and foremost an actor. I trained at University of North Carolina School of the Arts, whose acting conservatory concentrated on the classics: Shakespeare, Moliere, Shaw, etc. Needless to say, all of the intensive language study went out of the door when I became a Blue Man! During my studies, I was introduced to mask and physical acting. This excited me to the point of obsession, and when I moved to New York in the mid ‘90s, I made it a point to see Blue Man Group. I volunteered to be an usher one night and was completely blown away by the performance. I knew I had to be a part of it. There was absolutely no question about it. I went to an audition and 20 years later I’m still loving it.

What experiences stand out in your years as a member of the group? I was in Chicago and performed in the first show after 9/11, when the feeling of shock and bewilderment was very palpable in the city. I was uncertain as to what it would be like onstage. Would anyone laugh? Was it even OK to make jokes at this time? I personally didn’t feel like being up there. Our country was mourning. I reminded myself of the amazing ability Blue Man Group has in connecting people with each other. It was my responsibility to facilitate that connection. The show was amazing. I was a lightning rod for the audience’s angst, fear and frustrations. The laughs were huge, but it was the sense of connection with every member of the audience that I remember so vividly. We were working things out, all of us. It was a profound lesson in the power of the performer and in live theatre.

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Your schedule must be quite hectic. How do balance family life and “Blue” life? I don’t think “hectic” is the right word. My work week is shorter than a traditional 40-hour week, although the hours I put in require an intensive focus. Working nights and weekends does allow me to be an active parent in my child’s life, picking up and dropping off from school, preparing meals, errands, the whole shebang.

Tell us a little about the makeup process. How did you get blue? The process itself takes about 30 minutes and involves a bald cap and grease paint, but we really view it as more of a transformation into a character. The makeup is just part of becoming a Blue Man and the other part is embodying the character and starting to think like a Blue Man.

You’ve recently returned to performing in Boston, after performing with Blue Man Group in Chicago, New York, Las Vegas, and Berlin. What’s special about the Beantown? I always return to Boston. It was the first city I performed in. It’s where I met my wife. She was a barista at Curious Liquids, a coffee shop that used to be right across from the Massachusetts Statehouse (RIP). The view from the Longfellow Bridge is reason enough to live here.

You are a proud dad to an 8-year-old daughter. She must think that Dad has a pretty cool job? She thinks it’s completely normal for her dad to come home with bits of glue and traces of blue eyeliner on him. For her, going to the theatre to become a post-modern-vaudevillian is the same as going to the office. She is keen, however, on informing me that I am a “Weirdsmobile”.

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The Blue Man Group Boston is hosting their 5th annual Drum-Off competition. What impresses you most about this event and the local talent? Exciting for you to share the stage with the Grand Prize winner? Seeing people from all walks of life come together with the common language of drumming is absolutely amazing. To be able to meet someone for the first time, yet already have a shared experience is special, and I cherish such connections. It’s just another example of how Blue Man Group connects people.

The Blue Man Group is known for their drumming. Was this already a talent of yours or did you have to learn? I was not a drummer. When I decided to audition for the show, I bought some sticks and practiced for many hours a day. When they hired me, it was on the stipulation that I continue with drum lessons. I found myself getting instruction at Berklee! Never in my life had I thought that I would be in that situation. I still feel like I’m a novice sometimes, although the reality is that I have been drumming for 20 years now.

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CAPTURED

Summer of Fun Two-year-old Paislee, of Douglas, soaks up the sunhsine.

Addison, 8 months, from Douglas, loving the swing.

From splashing in a backyard pool to walking a Cape Cod beach at sunset, our readers – and their little ones – are making the most of Summer 2018. Thanks for sharing your memories with us.

Braden, 8 months, from Fitchburg, enjoys his first visit to the beach.

Wes, 6, Ben, 4, and Maria, 1, from Plympton, all scream for ice cream! 52 JULY2018

Lucy, 2, Jack, 6, Connor, 13 and Blayke, 10, all from North Brookfield, hangin’ out at Janine’s Frostee in Ware.

Bay State teens enjoy a summer night making s’mores by the campfire.

Northbridge sisters ShyAnn and KateLyn, 14 and 7, take a walk along Boardwalk Beach in Sandwich.


Liam of Fitchburg splishing and splashing.

One-year-old Theodore, from Gardner, squeals with delight.

KateLyn, of Northbridge, enjoys her 7th birthday at Salisbury Beach.

Clad in shades, Michaela, 3, from Ware, takes on the playground slide.

SKY RIDER ROPES COURSE 26’ CLIMBING WALLS BATTLE BEAM WARRIOR OBSTACLE COURSE

DODGEBALL ARENAS TUBES PLAYGROUND TRAMPOLINES ARCADE CAFÉ

189 Mechanic St. Bellingham, MA 02019 (508) 232 4604

www.UrbanAirBellingham.com

Six-year-old Adrianna, from Jefferson, gets her bounce on.

Alivia and Kylee, both 7, of Belchertown in their stars and stripes.

BIRTHDAY PARTIES CORPORATE EVENTS GROUP OUTINGS

For more photos, visit www.baystateparent.com BAYSTATEPARENT 53


A GOOD PARTY IS ALWAYS IN SEASON

“Hands on Science” offers science programs that are interactive, educational and fun for the whole family.

arties, Birthday Pstivals, Fairs & FeCamps Schools,

As a wacky energetic scientist, “Kosmic Kelly” uses creative ideas to engage children on variety of topics. Learn the science behindfizzing rainbow volcanos, elephant toothpaste, “Albert Eggstein”, CO2 gas, burping beakers, bubble snakes, and much much more!

www.kosmickelly.com Book 978-320-7249 ! d a e h A kosmickelly@yahoo.com

Presenting puppets, princesses, pirates, storytelling and much more! Call today for more information

Big Joe

the Storyteller

Storytelling fun for Birthday Parties, Schools, Daycare Centers, Library Programs, Special Events and TV Featuring: • Original & Classic Stories • Puppets, Props and Surprises For Bookings and Info Call: 617-713-4349 E-mail: BigJoe@BigJoe.com Visit me on the web at: www.BigJoe.com

Violet the Clown

All Ages. Birthday Parties, Schools, Fairs, Day Care Centers, Etc.

Specializing in birthdays, corporate events, libraries and schools. Face painting, magic shows and balloons sculpting.

www.rosalitaspuppets.com 617-633-2832

www.violettheclown.com 781-344-1852 violetheclown@gmail.com

54 JULY2018


July

INDEX

Summertime FUN! Call us for all your party or event needs • Tents • Bouncy Houses • Magicians • Catering • Music • Casino Nights & More

Something to Rent for every event!

Serving Up Fun For 17 Years!

We Also Do Corporate Events 144 Shrewsbury St. Boylston, MA 01505 800-796-1001 • 774-614-1300 www.mikesmoonwalkrentals.com

Birthday Parties Bounce Houses Magic Entertainment Interactive Games and More

Walter Derosier, Mr. Magic 149 Memorial Drive, Shrewsbury, MA • 508-842-2177 • magicworldamuse.com

Bark ‘n Bubbles........................................................... 31 Beechwood Hotel / Sonoma Restaurant........................ 25 Big Joe Productions..................................................... 54 Big Y Foods, Inc........................................................... 15 Boston Paintball.......................................................... 54 Breezy Picnic Grounds.................................................. 44 Child Health Associates................................................. 35 Davis Farmland........................................................... 21 Digital Federal Credit Union......................................... 53 Discovery Museums..................................................... 44 Doctor Tony Saito......................................................... 32 Ecotarium................................................................. 9,24 Fletcher Tilton PC......................................................... 38 FMC Ice Sports............................................................... 5 Gymnastics Learning Center......................................... 47 H & H Dance Academy................................................. 30 Heywood Hospital.......................................................... 4 Kosmic Kelly................................................................ 54 Lou Roc’s Diner............................................................ 34 Lowell Summer Music.................................................. 22 Magic World........................................................... 36,55 Mall At Whitney Field..................................................... 7 Mary Baker Eddy Library (The).................................... 48 Matt’s At The Buzzer.................................................... 35 Mediation Advantage Services...................................... 47 Mike’s Moonwalk Rentals............................................. 55 Millbury Federal Credit Union....................................... 41 National Dental Pulp Laboratories, Inc.......................... 50 New England Kids Orthodontics ..................................... 3 Old Sturbridge Village.................................................... 2 Our Lady of the Angels School...................................... 33 Pakachoag Music School.............................................. 49 Reliant Medical Group.................................................. 11 Reliant Ready Med................................................. 23,37 Rosalita’s Puppets........................................................ 54 Rota-Spring Farm........................................................ 49 Shrewsbury Children’s Center....................................... 14 Smuggler’s Notch Resort.............................................. 10 Southwick’s Zoo........................................................... 45 Speech & Language Specialties Inc............................... 39 St. Peter-Marian C.C. Jr./Sr. School............................... 34 The Bolton Fair............................................................ 19 Tougas Family Farm, LLC.............................................. 31 Tower Hill Botanic Garden............................................ 41 UMass Memorial Medical Center......................... 22,39,56 Urban Air.................................................................... 53 Violet the Clown........................................................... 54 Women’s Health of Central MA..................................... 30 Worcester Art Museum................................................. 43 Worcester JCC.............................................................. 48 YMCA Central Branch................................................... 36

BAYSTATEPARENT 55


LET’S SIMPLIFY Being a Woman Is Complicated – Your Care Shouldn’t Be.

From puberty to pregnancy to menopause and beyond, UMass Memorial Health Care provides women of all ages and stages access to exceptional care throughout our system. LEARN MORE: www.umassmemorial.org/simplywomen JOIN THE CONVERSATION: #SimplyWomen

To find a doctor or book an appointment, call 855-UMASS-MD (855-862-7763). UMass Memorial - Community Healthlink | UMass Memorial HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital UMass Memorial - Marlborough Hospital | UMass Memorial Medical Center | UMass Memorial Medical Group 56 JULY2018

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July 2018 issue of baystateparent Magazine

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July 2018 issue of baystateparent Magazine

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