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Mayor boosts construction jobs numbers Contractors now required to hire 40 percent people of color By YAWU MILLER

When former City Councilor Chuck Turner pressed for the Boston Residents Jobs Policy in 1981, the plan’s 25 percent goal for hiring black, Latino and Asian workers on construction jobs was ambitious. Although people of color made up 25 percent of the city’s population, building trades unions were widely seen as resistant to diversifying their ranks. Now more than 30 years later, Mayor Martin Walsh has announced plans to raise the hiring goals to 40 percent people of color, reflecting the increased percentage of blacks, Latinos and Asians living and working in the city. “The success of Boston’s growing economy relies upon our ability to open the doors of opportunity to

all our residents, and remove barriers causing economic inequity throughout our city,” Walsh said in a press statement. “We must work to ensure that the construction industry reflects both the great talent and the great diversity Boston has to offer. By setting new goals for ourselves, we honor our commitment to creating a more prosperous, more inclusive city.” The change comes as the city is undergoing a major construction boom, with luxury high-rises and multi-unit developments rising downtown and in the city’s neighborhoods. The policy applies to all projects built on city land as well projects totaling 100,000 square feet or more. “These are clearly good jobs and we’re in the middle of an economic

See BOSTON JOBS, page 21

BANNER PHOTO

Chief of Economic Development John Barros, BPDA Deputy Director for Community Planning Lara Mérida and Deputy Director for Community Economic Development Dana Whiteside answer questions during a Plan Dudley meeting.

City officials, residents debate Dudley plan goals

Affordability guidelines, displacement are concerns By YAWU MILLER

For much of 2016, the Boston Planning and Development Agency’s Plan Dudley process has been low-key. During the year, a small collection of community residents, developers, community development corporation staff and city officials have attended nine planning events in and around Dudley Square. Yet simmering tensions between community residents and city officials boiled to the surface last week when BPDA

officials presented design principles aimed at guiding area development. Community residents pushed back, questioning whether the agency’s efforts will displace current Roxbury residents amidst a building boom. BPDA officials began the planning process in January, concentrating on six vacant publicly-owned parcels of land between Dudley Square and Roxbury Crossing. They solicited community views and concerns regarding land use, transportation, economic development and other issues.

Beyond the vacant parcels are several large construction projects in the immediate area with 4.9 million square feet that either are approved for construction or currently under construction. This development is expected to yield 2,118 residential units and 1,091,065 square feet of retail and office space. Among the major projects in various stages of review are: n Tremont Crossing at Whittier and Tremont Streets, where developers are planning 694 residential units in addition to retail

See PLAN DUDLEY, page 20

Forging connections on the Fairmount Opportunities seen for local job seekers By SANDRA LARSON

PHOTO: MAYOR’S OFFICE PHOTO BY ISABEL LEON

Mayor Martin Walsh has revised the Boston Resident Jobs Policy numbers to reflect the growing population of blacks, Latinos and Asians in Boston.

A strategy for boosting economic development along the Fairmount Corridor by attracting and retaining businesses and jobs — and particularly, connecting corridor residents to those jobs — appears to be gaining traction. The corridor, which surrounds the route of the Fairmount Line of the MBTA commuter rail, is

home to 135,000 residents and thousands of businesses, from small shops to larger food distribution operations and construction supply companies. The Fairmount Line cuts a diagonal path through the city, its trains running from the Readville area of Hyde Park to South Station in 30 minutes, serving parts of Mattapan, Dorchester and Roxbury along the way. A forum last month highlighted

the release of a new report, “Fairmount Indigo Corridor Business and Job Attraction and Retention Strategy,” produced by Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), The American City Coalition (TACC) and the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC) along with a working group of community stakeholders. The report contains numerous recommendations for stimulating business and job growth along the Fairmount Line and providing

See FAIRMOUNT, page 6


2 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

Panel, report decry push for privatization in Massachusetts By SANDRA LARSON

From the MBTA’s recent outsourcing of its cash-counting operations to the heavily-funded campaign to lift the cap on charter schools, Massachusetts is witness to a push for greater privatization of services that traditionally have been public, or government-provided. Privatization advocates tout cost-saving efficiencies and higher performance of privately-run services, but experts on a recent panel discussion about privatization in Massachusetts said that evidence for such positive outcomes is lacking and that relinquishing public accountability for essential services is cause for alarm. The Nov. 22 panel was convened by Community Labor United, a Boston-based coalition of community and labor groups. Speakers from local and national nonprofits and institutions sought to debunk common notions about the benefits of privatizing and aired concerns about potential negative impacts. “There’s a strange conventional wisdom that the market can do things cheaper and more efficiently than government,” said Jeremy Mohler, a communications specialist with In the Public Interest, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that tracks the impact of privatization nationally. “[But] it’s just wrong. The evidence is mixed at best that it’s cheaper, and it’s certainly not better in a lot of cases. On top of that we end up giving away important control to private actors.” He cited some examples of failed efforts, such as Iowa’s privatization of Medicaid earlier this year. Within just a few months, health care providers were not being paid on time and the program was in crisis, jeopardizing the health of nearly 600,000 vulnerable Iowa residents. In another example, a private bus company in Washington, D.C. pays drivers low wages, yet its strict cost-cutting mode has failed to ensure safe brakes and emergency windows.

PHOTO: SANDRA LARSON

Darlene Lombos, executive director of Community Labor United, speaks at a Nov. 22 panel discussion on the privatization of government services in Massachusetts. Panelists included (l-r) Abby Scher of Political Research Associates; Jeremy Mohler of In the Public Interest; Neenah Estrella-Luna of Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs; Nia Evans of Boston NAACP; and Chris Faraone of the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism. Not shown: moderator Elena Letona of Neighbor to Neighbor. “Privatization is when the market replaces democracy in determining how and to whom public goods and services are provided,” Mohler said. “So this issue really gets to the heart of what we value in our society and what we feel the role of government is.”

Dubious benefits

Neenah Estrella-Luna, a Northeastern University public policy professor and a public health and environment activist, said that rigorous research in and outside of the U.S. over decades dispels the “myth” of privatization’s cost savings and service improvement. She noted that with services like public transit, it’s not even realistic to expect those benefits. “Privatization can only reduce costs to government by limiting

access to the service, lowering the quality of service or impoverishing the workers,” Estrella-Luna said. Last week’s event coincided with the release of a report, “Privatizing Massachusetts: The Right Wing’s Blue State Game Plan,” by Political Research Associates (PRA), a Somerville organization that tracks the conservative right wing in the U.S. The new report describes how the Pioneer Institute, a Boston-based research and policy think tank influential in Massachusetts policy, displays a nonpartisan face while furthering a right-leaning agenda that favors limited government and free market principles. “Pioneer wants the government to operate by market principles,” said PRA Research Fellow

Abby Scher, author of the new report. “The goal of the market is efficiency. This produces a kind of moral blindness. If the only thing we’re going for is economic efficiency, we can’t pursue other things, such as the living standards of the people doing the work.” Scher noted that Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker and James Peyser, the state’s education secretary, both are former executive directors of the Pioneer Institute. Also of concern, President-elect Donald Trump shows clear signs of favoring privatization in infrastructure projects and education.

Education

Scher said that charter schools are an excellent example of how privatization removes public control.

“Charter networks displace public school boards in getting public funds to provide education. Charter networks are private. They are not accountable to the voters,” she said. “It’s a new governing rationality, and people don’t know that it’s going on.” While Massachusetts voters in November roundly rejected ballot Question 2, which would have allowed more charter schools in Boston and other cities, the anti-privatization victory came despite a whopping $24.2 billion spent in support of the measure by local and out-of-state interests that included members of the Walton family that owns Walmart and financial industry players as well as “dark money” whose donors are not disclosed. At last week’s discussion, NAACP Boston Executive Director Nia Evans noted that her organization has opposed privatization of education for decades. “We are concerned with differing standards for transparency and accountability between charter and traditional public schools,” Evans said, “and about diverting public funds.” The discussion was moderated by Elena Letona, executive director of Neighbor to Neighbor, a grassroots group working to combat income inequality, environmental degradation and racism in Massachusetts. Other speakers and panelists were Darlene Lombos, executive director of Community Labor United; Steven Tolman, president of Massachusetts AFL-CIO; and Chris Faraone, founder of the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism.

ON THE WEB

PHOTO: SANDRA LARSON

NAACP Boston Branch Executive Director Nia Evans makes a point.

“Privatizing Massachusetts” report: http://bit.ly/2fDL7Cq Community Labor United: massclu.org CLU public information project: EyeOnPrivatization.org In the Public Interest: Inthepublicinterest.org Pioneer Institute: http://pioneerinstitute.org


Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 3

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4 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

EDITORIAL

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INSIDE: BUSINESS, 12 • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT, 15 • COMMUNITY CALENDAR, 18 • CLASSIFIEDS, 21

Established 1965

A loss of national unity Political conflict still persists between those supporting Donald Trump and those who voted for Hillary Clinton. After a heated election for U.S. president, the ideal conclusion is for the spirit of national unity to prevail, but with so many unresolved conflicts, political solidarity now seems to be quite distant. One of the most touching calls to national unity occurred 12 years ago at the Democratic National Convention in Boston. Sen. John Kerry had been nominated for president and Barack Obama, the junior senator from Illinois, was called upon to give the keynote address. Obama eloquently called upon the strength of America’s racial diversity. He said: I stand here today, grateful for the diversity of my heritage, aware that my parents’ dreams live on in my two precious daughters. I stand here knowing that my story is part of the larger American story, that I owe a debt to all of those who came before me, and that in no other country on Earth is my story even possible. Obama made it clear that the nation’s strength came from the unity of the people in support of democratic values. He

was harshly critical of those who would divide us. Well, I say to them tonight, there is not a liberal America and a conservative America — there is the United States of America. There is not a black America and a white America and Latino America and Asian America — there’s the United States of America. Obama’s identification with national unity helped to carry him to two terms as president (2008-2016). However, Donald Trump’s campaign played to the anger of those who had lost their middle class status and he enlivened America’s latent bigotry. Trump’s early administration appointments indicate his commitment to those who are racially and religiously divisive. Gen. Michael Flynn, an avowed opponent of Islam, has been named national security adviser; Sen. Jeff Sessions from Alabama has been named Attorney General despite his conflict over the years with African Americans; and Steve Bannon, a proponent of the white supremacist alt-right perspective has been named chief strategist. Trump will name others with loftier reputations to his administration but the message is clear. The spirit of racial harmony that was a hallmark of the Obama era has come to an end.

Every vote counts In every major political campaign citizens encourage their friends and neighbors to vote. Those with an unclear understanding of the significance of the electorate in a democracy are often less committed to show up at the polls. When they consider the magnitude of the election, it is easy to conclude mistakenly that the absence of one vote won’t make much difference. A review of the results in the recent presidential election should cure that thinking for all time. An estimated 120 million votes were cast and Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by almost 2 million more votes than Donald Trump. However, the winner is chosen by the number of electoral votes from the various states.

“With Trump in the White House you can’t say, as Obama did, ‘There is not a black America and a white America.’” USPS 045-780 Melvin B. Miller Sandra L. Casagrand John E. Miller Yawu Miller

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Sometimes loss or victory will be determined by the outcome in so-called battleground states. In this election the vote in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan determined the outcome. If only an estimated 53,667 voters in those three states has voted for Clinton instead of Trump, then the U.S. would have its first female president. The estimated change in vote would be Pennsylvania (34,119), Wisconsin (13,699) and Michigan (5,919). Jill Stein, a third party candidate, is raising funds for a recount in those states because of some alleged electronic impropriety with accuracy of the count. Whatever the final outcome, it should be abundantly clear that every vote counts.

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The Boston Banner is published every Thursday. Offices are located at 1100 Washington St., Dorchester, MA 02124. Telephone: 617-261-4600, Fax 617-261-2346 Subscriptions: $48 for one year ($55 out-of-state) Web site: www.baystatebanner.com Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA. All rights reserved. Copyright 2016. The Banner is certified by the NMSDC, 2016. Circulation of The Bay State and Boston Banner 27,400. Audited by CAC, June 2015. The Banner is printed by: TC Transcontinental Printing 10807, Mirabeau, Anjou (Québec) H1J 1T7 Printed in Canada

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Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 5

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OPINION

Why Hillary is right to back a recount, but...

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What do you think the city can do to make housing more affordable?

By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is right to back a vote recount in the three states — Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania — that gave Trump the White House. But there’s a big “but” after that. First, here’s why she’s right to support the recount and how it will work. She conceded too quickly on election night. Yes, President Obama reportedly urged her to concede in part because it appeared that she had little chance to win the three contested swing states, and in part because the established and near-sacrosanct truism in American presidential politics is that there must be a quick, fast and orderly transition to the Oval Office. The horror of what happened in Florida in the Gore versus Bush tiff in 2000 still hung in the air. However, 2016 is not 2000. There’s a cloud over how the vote totals were gathered in some precincts in Wisconsin. Michigan is still up in the air with the state yet being too close to call. As for Pennsylvania, it’s one of a handful of states that still use electronic voting machines that are old, outdated and with no paper ballot back-ups to cross-check the totals. It’s true that the bulk of the two to three million popular vote bulge that Clinton got over Trump came from the two-big lock down Democratic states, California and New York. The fact is that the pre-election projected vote differentials between Trump and Clinton were skewed heavily toward the Democrats. Put simply, more Democrats were projected to vote than Republicans in these states, and not one of them had voted majority for a GOP presidential candidate in recent presidential election cycles. This doesn’t mean that that didn’t change this election. And that the GOP got more of its voters out than the Democrats. That’s certainly what the GOP and Trump claim, and they may be right. But Clinton did get a record breaking majority of popular votes over Trump, and that makes it imperative for Clinton to ensure that the vote count was as fair and accurate as possible. The recount will also continue to stir the healthy debate and discussion over how America elects presidents. If Democrats keep getting popular vote majorities, as is almost certainly the case in future presidential elections, the great danger is that this will permanently jade voters — deepening the perception that the process is unfair, even “rigged,”— and this will badly taint the notion of what and how a true democracy should work when it comes to elections. Nearly one hundred million adults didn’t bother to show up at the polls this election. That number could swell even higher in coming presidential contests if men or women keep winning the presidency with a minority of the nation’s votes. All the exhortations in the world about being a good citizen, doing your civic duty and guilt-tripping people about how many died for the right to vote will fall on deaf ears with millions who will continue to shrug off going to the polls. Now here’s the “but” part of the recount call. It almost certainly won’t change anything. Clinton campaign officials have pretty much said as much. The number of votes Trump got over Clinton in Pennsylvania appear to be too great to overcome, even if irregularities are found in some voting districts. This means the electoral vote win Trump got in the state will stand. Though there is suspicion about the vote in some precincts in Wisconsin, there as yet is no tangible evidence of theft, tampering or hacking to boost Trump’s numbers there. Clinton is also bumping up against deadlines in the three states for the recount to proceed. She’s also bumping against the deadline of December 19 when the Electoral College voters will formally meet and vote to make Trump’s win official. Just how many, if any, electoral voters will have second thoughts about Trump is anybody’s guess. The betting odds, though, are that barring any colossal evidence of fraud or vote improprieties such as the starry-eyed hope that Russians or some shadowy intel operatives hacked the vote machines in state after state, Trump will be the legally constituted president. There would have been no Clinton talk of recount if Green Party candidate Jill Stein hadn’t quickly hauled in a few million dollars to pay for a recount. She was honest in saying that she had no chance of changing the outcome of the contest, with the paltry one percent of the vote she got. But she was on to something when she said that the recount was one way to make sure that the vote was really what it purported to be. A reluctant Clinton agreed, there were just too many millions who backed her and who want genuine assurance that Trump really got the votes he appeared to get for her to ignore this perfectly reasonable request to make sure America really got it right about its next president.

Earl Ofari Hutchinson is an author and political analyst.

They need to make affordable housing more accessible. It takes two years to get in anywhere.

Larry Love Unemployed Roxbury

They need to build more affordable housing. It’s hard to find affordable units and the waitlists are long.

Michelle Chef Dorchester

They need to make all the institutions in Boston — Harvard, MIT, Northeastern — pay a real estate tax. They take up all the land and they don’t make it so poor people can live here or make funds available for housing.

I think they should make more Section 8 certificates available. And they should bring back rent control. There’s a majority of people who can’t afford to live here.

Pat Davis

Shirley Burton

Research Assistant Dorchester

They have to respect the aspirations of the people, not the people who want to profit from housing. The city is allowing landlords and banks to hike prices.

Nkumah Sebago Organizer Mattapan

I miss rent control. Think some form of rent control has to come back.

Sarajean Coles Retired Roxbury

Bus Monitor Dorchester

IN THE NEWS

EVA MITCHELL Eva Mitchell has been appointed director of the Boston Public Schools partnership with General Electric. Her entry into the corporate-district partnership began as vice-president of a division within the Mott MacDonald international management consulting group, but most of her background is in education. She was state associate commissioner for District and School Accountability at the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education during the period before and after the Race to the Top implementation. Prior to that, she was senior coordinator at Massachusetts’ state office of Educational Quality and Accountability. Besides working at the state level, Mitchell has extensive experience working in school districts. She served as the leadership team coach for low-performing schools in Boston and Springfield, the largest two urban school districts in Massachusetts. Experience outside of Massachusetts includes demon-

stration work and school quality reviews in several other states and Dubai. Mitchell was a founding member of a pilot school where she served as assistant principal and director of student support. Most of her teaching experience was at the middle and high school levels, but she has also worked with students at the elementary level as an afterschool program leader, and with young adults as a lead teacher in an alternative school. In total, Mitchell has 25 years of experience in public education. As a volunteer, Eva also has urban development experience, having worked on public school construction compliance teams, and led city-community urban development processes for a decade. She has served as a program developer, grant writer, advisory board member, and task force chairman for various educational and community development organizations. Mitchell received her B.A. from Harvard University and her

master’s in education from Boston University, where she was a recipient of the university-wide Martin Luther King Fellowship. Later she completed a year-long fellowship with the Education Policy Fellowship Program of the National Institute for Educational Leadership. Mitchell also aquired a training certificate from a national superintendent preparatory program. She is currently a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education.


6 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

Fairmount continued from page 1

opportunities to local residents who could access the jobs by train. The recommendations center around strengthening commercial and industrial clusters in the Newmarket and Readville areas, which are among Boston’s dwindling set of industrial-zoned areas. Sue Sullivan, executive director of the Newmarket Business Association, said that many of her member businesses have job openings but can’t find people to fill them. “And at the same time,” she said, “as I work with the Fairmount CDCs, [it’s clear that] these are some of the most underemployed areas of the city. So how do we connect those two needs?” The hope is that the Fairmount Line could help make that connection. “If you have people who can get to work easily, they would be good employees, arriving on time, able to get there. It would be a win-win for everyone,” Sullivan said.

Jobs connection

A key recommendation is to link employers and residents in the corridor. To that end, Dara Frederick recently came on board as a business employment specialist, a new position funded by the Fairmount Indigo CDC Collaborative. In her first few months on the job, Frederick has been meeting steadily with employers, starting in the Newmarket Square area. At least 30 jobs were available as of early November, she said, and some 13 residents had applied, with at least two making it to the interview process. “There are a lot of residents with great resumes, but maybe they’ve been laid off or been home with children,” Frederick said. “The CDCs know the residents, and part of the plan is that the CDC organizers notify residents in their areas. They’re starting to get the word out.” For those who are not ready for the available jobs, Frederick works to arrange on-the-job training or locate training with partner organizations, including STRIVE, JVS CareerSolution, Career Collaborative and New England Center for Arts and Technology (NECAT). Recent job openings have included catering and food service, entry-level jobs in warehouse shipping and receiving, customer service, office work, hotel management, sales management, certified mechanic, heavy equipment operation, truck driving and medical specialties. Many positions do

ON THE WEB Report: “Fairmount Indigo Corridor Business and Job Attraction and Retention Strategy”: http://bit.ly/2gQGp6s Fairmount CDC Collaborative:

Emerald Evening 2016

http://fairmountcollaborative.org Newmarket Community Partners:

http://newmarketcommunitypartners.org Dec. 7 Newmarket job fair info:

http://bit.ly/NewmarketBusinessDistrictRecruit or www.CareerSolution.org or call JVS at 617-399-3100. not require college degrees. Starting wages run from about $14 per hour to more than $22 per hour, Frederick said. Job-seekers typically come to Frederick through organizations such as the three community development corporations comprising the Fairmount CDC Collaborative — Codman Square NDC, Dorchester Bay EDC and Southwest Boston CDC. Employers with open positions should contact her directly, she said, at (857)302-9639 or dfrederick@dbedc.org. Next week, Frederick will be at a Newmarket Business District job recruiting fair hosted by JVS CareerSolution at 75 Federal Street in downtown Boston. She will represent employers including Brookline Ice Company, ReEnergy Holdings LLC, Wicked Catering and tCognition, an technology staffing and consulting firm profiled in the “business narratives” section of the new report. For information on the job fair, which will be on Wednesday, Dec. 7 from 12 to 3 pm, call JVS at 617-399-3100 or see http://bit.ly/NewmarketBusinessDistrictRecruit or www.CareerSolution.org.

Challenges

Around the same time the report was released last month, the Boston Globe reported that the Fairmount Line has more trains canceled than other lines, and that Fairmount trains are sometimes taken to fill gaps on other lines. Congressman Michael Capuano has asked the Department of Justice to examine whether such diversions of service from a line that serves minority and low-income riders to lines in more affluent communities might rise to the level of federal civil rights violations by the operator, Keolis Commuter Services. Speakers at the business and job retention strategies forum noted that rail service must become more frequent and reliable if the corridor’s full economic development potential is to be realized. Fairmount Line advocates have worked for many years to champion the line. Their

PHOTO: ENC

The Emerald Necklace Conservancy hosted “An Emerald Evening,” benefit fundraiser for over 250 guests and supporters in the Koch Gallery at the Museum of Fine Arts. Top: ENC president Karen Mauney-Brodek, Governor Michael Dukakis and “Olmsted Award” honoree Ben Taylor. Bottom: Committee member Linda Edmonds Turner, ENC advocates Leo Swift and Amy Auerbach, and ENC board member Martin Hall.

efforts have resulted in new and refurbished stations, the addition of weekend service and the reduction of passenger fares to match subway pricing — but the level of service that would attract a steady ridership has remained out of reach. At one point, plans were in the works to purchase a smaller type of car that would enable more frequent and efficient service, but under the administration of Gov. Charlie Baker, that expenditure is on hold. Nevertheless, the event ended with on a high note with a keynote and call to action by Steve Grossman, CEO of ICIC. “This corridor has immense

potential,” Grossman said. “We will never be able to guarantee equal outcomes for every resident and business, but we sure as heck should be involved in equal opportunity — leveling the playing field, catalyzing small business growth and development, keeping wealth in the community.”

Power in numbers

Could an increase in businesses and jobs bring a louder collective voice and greater clout for the Fairmount Corridor? ICIC’s Grossman and Newmarket’s Sullivan think so. “Any time you can put together

a larger, more powerful business community,” Grossman told the Banner, “it gives that community a more significant voice in recommending and insisting on changes in public policy that level the playing field.” Sullivan noted that her organization has 235 member businesses and that the Fairmount Network includes more than 20 organizations. “I think when we hear the voices of a combined group, everyone pays attention,” she said. “We spent millions of dollars on these new rail stops. Now we have to make sure they’re utilized.”


Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 7

The community’s legal protectors By JULE PATTISON-GORDON

Following the election of Donald Trump, phone calls poured into the offices of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice. The dominant theme: The climate at school and work had turned overtly hostile, as if many had taken the election as a cue to express any prejudices they had been holding back. Children had to endure racially derogatory slurs and were told by kids at school that they would be deported. One Muslim woman said her boss informed her she could no longer wear a hijab at work. Many callers feared that their rights would evaporate overnight Ivan Espinoza-Madrigal, executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee, had one message for those fearful of being treated as second-class citizens: “Not on our watch.” “We’ve had your backs in everything from housing to employment to policing,” Espinoza-Madrigal said, during a Banner interview at the nonprofit’s new offices. “We will keep you safe.”

Legacy of protection

The Lawyers’ Committee has a long history of defending civil rights, with the national organization forming in 1963. The Boston affiliate group, formed a few years after, has provided its services pro bono since 1973. The local team’s focus areas include voting rights, health disparities, economic justice, education, housing, education and employment. Recently, they have tackled issues such as disparate out-of-school suspension rates, charges of discriminatory

practices at the Boston Police Department and business conduct at e-commerce firms resulting in inequitable treatment. In recent years, the Lawyers’ Committee work has grown, with intake numbers more than doubling between 2014 and fall 2016, from 285 to 601 — not including the post-election uptick. With President-elect Trump’s ascension into office looming, the Committee’s agenda has shifted to address emerging concerns at home and in the workplace. Upcoming actions include a series of training sessions for students, parents, employers and employees. They include curricula designed to remind students and parents of their legal recourse and options in the face of identity-based bullying, employees of their rights in the workplace and employers of the liabilities they incur for any harassment they perpetuate or fail to address. Should the government violate any protections, the Lawyers’ Committee will be there to step in, Espinoza-Madrigal said.

Community guardians

The group’s purview encompasses any identity-based harassment or discrimination — be it based on race, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability status, English-language learner status or other conditions. The Committee’s repertoire of responses includes producing reports and advisory toolkits on matters such as school discipline, advocating for policies, providing free legal services and technical assistances to small businesses and bringing lawsuits. “We are the legal guardians for

directors on focus areas and an Equal Justice Works fellow. The nonprofit also has support of interns, volunteers, board of directors and member law firms and organizations.

CONTACT THE COMMITTEE: Phone: 617 482 1145 Website: http://lawyerscom.org/

communities of color and immigrant communities in Boston,” Espinoza-Madrigal said. Even if the Lawyers’ Committee is unable to take up a particular case, the organization’s team connects individuals to support systems that include self-advocacy or legal aid. One rule: “Anyone who approaches us has to leave better off,” Espinoza-Madrigal said. Cases come to the Committee through walk-ins, phone calls and alerts from community partners — such as the NAACP and Urban League — about problematic patterns, as well as incidents reported in the news or known to staff through their community ties. “People know when they’ve been wronged and they come to the Lawyers’ Committee because they know we have cultural competency to handle their case,” Espinoza-Madrigal added. Michael Curry, outgoing president of the Boston Branch of the NAACP, said the Lawyers’ Committee is a vital collaborator. Recently, organization provided key legal advocacy for improving hiring, promotion and retention of officers of color at the Boston Police Department as well as helping to change disparate discipline practices. “I would dare to say they’re our most important partner,” Curry told the Banner. “They’ve really been on the front lines of the battle to get equity in the Boston Police Department … and any change that

Personal mission BANNER PHOTO

Ivan Espinoza-Madrigal joined the Lawyers’ Committee as executive director in 2015. eventually comes will be a result of their legal activism, in conjunction with MAMLEO [Massachusetts Association of Minority Law Enforcement Officers].” While Espinoza-Madrigal is known for the passion he brings to the role, he and Curry are quick to say it is a whole team’s hard work that drives the Lawyers’ Committee.

Assembling a docket

Due to limited capacity, the Committee selects cases in which its members believe they can be most successful and bring results with broad impact. This includes consciously creating a portfolio reflecting a diverse spread of the issues affecting their target population, such as housing discrimination, education practices and workplace harassment. As of mid-November, the organization had a docket of 30 cases. The majority aim to address severe instances of discrimination, hold major public and private institutions to higher standards of conduct and hold accountable key players industries where people of color are a significant working presence, Espinoza-Madrigal said. Espinoza-Madrigal’s staff includes two attorneys, three

Espinoza-Madrigal joined the Lawyers’ Committee after serving as legal director for the Center for HIV Law and Policy. Since earning a law degree at New York University, he has worked defending the rights of immigrants, the LGBT community and people of color. In prior attorney roles he fought against the dismantling of New Haven, Connecticut’s municipal identification card program, advocated for immigrant rights and voting rights in the Southwest and promoted marriage equality and other LGBT concerns on federal and state levels. In 2016, Espinoza-Madrigal was named one of Boston’s 100 Most Influential People of Color, and among other honors, recognized as one of the Best LGBT Lawyers Under 40 by the National LGBT Bar Association in 2012. Speaking in the Committee offices, Espinoza-Madrigal said each case is personal. When he was 9, his family immigrated from Costa Rica to Chelsea before settling in New Jersey. He was raised by a hard-working single mother who struggled to make ends meet. Espinoza-Madrigal recalled that even as a child he wanted to become a lawyer so he could keep his family safe from threats affecting basic needs, such as a landlord who may take advantage of them. “I feel our mission very personally,” Espinoza-Madrigal said. “Each case I file reminds me of my family. Of my mom.”


8 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

Inspired by young activists, King reprints ‘Chain of Change’ By YAWU MILLER

In September last year, former state Rep. Mel King picked up a copy of the Banner and saw in a front-page photo an image of his 1981 book, “Chain of Change: Struggles for Black Community Development,” prominently displayed by a young activist who was speaking out against the Boston Police Department’s treatment of young blacks and Latinos. That front-page photograph set off a chain of events that one year later led to the 35-year-old book being republished with a new epilogue, “Future Links in the Chain of Change,” written by King, Alex Ponte-Capellan, and fellow members of the organization Young Abolitionists. “‘Chain of Change’ is a beacon through the haze of history, allowing us to finally connect dots that were for so long obscured for us,” the Young Abolitionists write. “In reading, we found that successful mass mobilizations were not restricted to other parts of the country, as decades of persistent, and many successful, examples of community organizing stood right here in our own neighborhoods.” King’s book chronicles his life as an activist — from the 1950s, when he witnessed the Boston Redevelopment Authority’s urban renewal program leveling the New York Streets section of the South End where he grew up, through his historic 1983 campaign for mayor, during which his Rainbow Coalition created a model for the black,

BANNER PHOTO

Former state Rep. Mel King speaks while Eastern Bank Executive Vice President Nancy Stager, who funded the reprinting of ‘Chain of Change,’ looks on during a forum at Northeastern University in November. Latino, Asian and progressive white alliances that have become a dominant force in Boston politics. While several books have written about the 1960s and ’70s in Boston, most, like J. Anthony Lukas’ “Common Ground” or Larry Harmon and Hillel Levine’s “The Destruction of an American Jewish Community” were written from a white perspective. King’s work as a former state legislator afforded him an insider’s perspective on the issues and events that shaped Boston’s social and political life. In his

chapter “Court-Ordered Desegregation,” King counters the notion that blacks pursued desegregation as an end in itself, recounting blacks’ struggles to secure equal resources for students, control over school curriculum and teaching jobs for people of color over the objections of the all-white Boston School Committee. On the subject of the 1967 Grove Hall Riots, King quotes veteran organizer Chuck Turner who countered the narrative that blacks caused the melee.

“When the Banner talked about a ‘Police Riot’ it pulled to covers off the police and everybody had to look at the reality,” Turner is quoted.

A new perspective

For the Young Abolitionists, the book represented a window to a past that none had heard of. “We were trying to learn more about what activism had happened in Boston to inform the work we we’re doing,” said Armani White, a member of the group, which began organizing around police abuse, the school to prison pipeline and other social justice issues in 2012. “You hear a lot about Malcom and Martin, but you never hear about what happened here.” White came across King’s book

after searching “black Boston history” on Google. He shared the book with other members of the group. “We were inspired by what we read,” he said. When Ponte-Capellan met a Banner reporter last year for a story on the difficulties faced by teens erroneously placed on the Police Department’s gang list, he insisted on being photographed with “Chain of Change” in his hand. King said the photograph reminded him of his original inspiration to write the book. “The reason I wrote it was so that the youth would see what we’ve tried to accomplish and what we were able to accomplish,” he said. King contacted the Banner and obtained Ponte-Capellan’s phone number. He then invited the Young Abolitionists to meet with him. “I asked them to talk about what the book meant to them. I had them put their thoughts and ideas into the book.” King secured funding from Eastern Bank for the 1,000-copy reprint, which was done through Boston-based Hugs Press. In the 1981 edition, King included an epilogue that featured interviews with 16 community activists including Paul Parks, Melnea Cass and Archie Williams. In 2016, King interviewed the four surviving activists — state Rep. Byron Rushing, Turner, former journalist Sarah-Ann Shaw and former Roxbury Action Program director George Morrison — and appended their interviews to the epilogue. But for King, it’s the four pages from the Young Abolitionists that stood out the most. “Seeing that picture and having them do this article has been one of the most moving moments in my life and work,” King said. “It’s what the book was written to do.”

BANNER PHOTO

Young Abolitionist member Alex Ponte-Capellan was photographed holding ‘Chain of Change’ in this September, 2015 photograph.


Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 9

NEWSBRIEFS VISIT US ONLINE FOR MORE LOCAL NEWS: WWW.BAYSTATEBANNER.COM Listening sessions will help develop state Communities of Color legislative agenda With the state legislative session slated to begin in January, members of the Massachusetts Black and Latino Caucus are preparing their agenda. The in-development 2017-2018 Communities of Color Agenda will include legislative solutions to concerns most impacting black and Latino communities. To solicit public participation in identifying these solutions and building community support for them, the Caucus plans to convene a listening tour throughout the state. They aim to bring together Caucus members, residents and advocates. Three listening sessions are scheduled this December — one each in Lawrence, Springfield and Roxbury. Community members are asked to further spread word to their networks. Attend a listening session n Lawrence Session: Wednesday, December 7, 2016, 6 p.m. to 8p.m. Lawrence Public Library, 51 Lawrence St, Lawrence, MA nSpringfield Session: Tuesday, December 13, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Rebecca Johnson Elementary School, 55 Catharine St, Springfield, MA n Boston Session: Tuesday, December 20, 2016, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Hibernian Hall, 184 Dudley St, Roxbury, MA

Walsh launches #5onMain challenge Mayor Martin Walsh kicked off the City of Boston’s annual “Holidays on Main Streets” campaign, a small business initiative to encourage Boston residents to shop local this holiday season. At the celebration held at the Roslindale Village Main Street holiday tree lighting, Walsh announced the relaunch of the “#5onMain” challenge, and recognized Small Business Saturday and related activities throughout the City of Boston Main Street Districts. “I’m urging every holiday shopper to enjoy what our Main Street districts have to offer this holiday season by participating in the ‘5 on Main’ challenge,” Walsh said. “Our Main Street districts are an important part of our local economy. Out of every dollar spent in a local business district, 58 cents will be returned to that community, fueling our

local economies and contributing to more vibrant neighborhoods.” Participants in the “#5onMain” challenge pledge to support local businesses at least five times during the holiday season, either by purchasing gifts, dining or participating in local holiday events in Main Streets districts. Holiday shoppers are encouraged to accept the challenge via social media, using the hashtag “#5onMain.” Recent data from Deloitte University Press’ 30th Annual Holiday Survey indicates that there will be an increase in consumer holiday spending, with average holiday spending projected at $1,462 in 2015, up from $1,299 in 2014. The survey shows although consumers are moving to shopping online, they still prefer to buy locally and in-store to support their local community and economy, find one-of-a-kind gifts and enjoy the convenience of shopping in their neighborhoods. According to the Small Business Association, nearly half of the working adults in Massachusetts are employed by a small business. To participate in the Mayor’s Holiday Challenge on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook, use the hashtag #5onMain.

In order to help shoppers and businesses participate in the Challenge, draft tweets for participants are available in the social media kit found here and a package of shareable graphics can be found here. For a list of Main Streets districts and to learn more about the program, visit: https://www.boston. gov/economic-development/ boston-main-streets.

City Public Works commissioner leaves office Public Works Commissioner Michael Dennehy leaves the City of Boston to become the Town Administrator of Milton. Dennehy is a twenty-year member of the Public Works Department. For the last three years, he has led the department, which handles all residential recycling and trash collection as well as builds, lights and maintains the city’s streets, sidewalks and bridges. Dennehy’s last day was on Friday, November 25. “We owe great thanks to Michael for his incredible service to the City,” said Mayor Martin Walsh. “Whether it was leading our City through our snowiest

winter or ensuring that a 311 call was responded to quickly and well, Michael delivered for our residents.” Michael Dennehy joined the Public Works Department in 1996, working in the Highway Division. He helped lead the implementation of the City’s first constituent relationship management system, assisted with the development of the BOS:311 app and inspired the creation of the companion app used by City employees called City Worker. He has served as the Public Works Commissioner since 2014. Chris Osgood, the city’s Chief of Streets, Transportation & Sanitation, becomes the Acting Public Works Commissioner. With the addition of this role, Osgood will chair the Public Improvement Commission and support the work of the Public Work’s Construction, Engineering & Permitting Divisions. Deputy Commissioner Michael Brohel will lead all core city service operations for the Public Works Department. This includes the City’s response to snow, as well as overseeing Central Fleet, Code Enforcement, Highway Operations, Street Lighting and Waste Reduction.

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Trump’s ed reform a non starter? Checkered record of education privatization in Massachusetts By YAWU MILLER

In the weeks leading up to the Nov. 8 election, opponents of Ballot Question 2 swayed Massachusetts voters to reject charter school expansion with arguments that the proposed law would drain funding from local school districts while opening the door to privatization of public education resources. While 62 percent of voters said no to Question 2, squashing the Great Schools Massachusetts campaign by a 22 percent margin, the battle over privatization in Massachusetts is by no means over. Both President-elect Donald Trump and his pick for Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos, are firmly committed to charter schools and school vouchers that would allow parents to use district funding to send their children to private and parochial schools. Trump has proposed funding vouchers to the tune of $20 billion at the expense of federal Title I funding for low-income students and Title III funding for special education. DeVos is widely credited as the architect of the charter expansion plan that has pushed school systems in Detroit and other Michigan cities to the brink of disaster. “Betsy DeVos has been an advocate of private corporate profiteering on the backs of our children, masked as education reform,” said District 7 City Councilor Tito Jackson, a vocal opponent of Question 2. “Devos has promoted the unlimited, unchecked expansion for forprofit and privately-run charters in Michigan and has severely harmed Detroit schools with her tactics. She is not prepared to lead education policy nationally.” Although conservatives have advocated school voucher programs for decades, the idea has

met stiff resistance in most states. Currently, 15 states have some form of voucher program in place. Massachusetts does not. If the administration goes forward with voucher plans, which Trump has outlined with little detail, the U.S. Department of Education could withhold education funding from states that don’t comply. In Massachusetts, that funding accounts for $791 million, just 4.8 percent of total state education dollars. But in Boston, the portion is higher — about $114 million in the city’s $1.3 billion 2017 BPS budget.

Battle lines

The debate over charter school expansion in Massachusetts fits within a wider conflict over school reform efforts on display in cities and states around the U.S. On one side are charter school proponents, advocates of school vouchers and a collection of nonprofit and for-profit companies that contract with cities and states to provide services to school districts and operate schools. In Massachusetts those organizations have been countered by a growing movement of parent and student activists, teachers, union activists, school committee members and other local officials arguing for local control over education policy decisions. Locally, private foundations, education entrepreneurs and charter school advocates who favor private sector solutions to education challenges have been picking up steam over the last ten years. One such firm, the nonprofit school management company UP Education Network, drew fire from parent activists after it suspended 233 of its 755 students, including 68 kindergarteners — more than any other Massachusetts school. (In February, Up Education Network announced that it will no longer suspend its youngest students.) That school’s 31 percent suspension rate is not

LEARN TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

uncommon among charter schools and other privately-run, publicly-funded schools. Parent activists also vociferously opposed many of the objectives of the Boston Compact, a Gates Foundation-funded effort aimed at encouraging greater coordination between district, charter and Catholic schools. That organization’s push for unified enrollment — a plan that would combine the waiting lists for district ant charter schools — sparked ire from parent activists who attended a series of outreach meetings last year. Unified enrollment is one of the school reform strategies being advanced by the Seattle-based Center for the Reinvention of Public Education’s Portfolio School District program, which Boston joined in 2011. CRPE has cited charter school expansion as one of its major reform efforts.

Vouchers draw fire

While parent activists and teachers unions have focused much of their attention on charter expansion in recent years, the idea of school vouchers never gained much traction in Massachusetts. In fact, the nascent Trump administration’s voucher plan is so controversial, it continues to draw fire from charter advocates and opponents. Democrats for Education Reform, a national pro-charter expansion group with an active Massachusetts chapter, issued a sharply-worded repudiation of the president-elect. “DFER encourages no Democrat to accept an appointment to serve as Secretary of Education in this new administration,” DFER President Shaver Jeffries was quoted in The 74, a pro-charter news site. “In so doing, that individual would become an agent for an agenda that both contradicts progressive values and threatens grave harm to our nation’s most vulnerable kids.”

Noble and Greenough School offers an exceptional academic, athletic and creative experience with an emphasis on service-learning and community. The school supports intellectual, social and personal growth to encourage a lifetime mission of leadership for the public good.

CRPE Director Robin Lake told The 74 she would not work in the Trump administration, but said she would offer education advice, if given the opportunity.

School reform

In Massachusetts, the debate over privatization — to the extent it’s been debated at all — revolves around competing views of school reform. Those pushing privatization argue that public education is failing and that students should be given public funding for alternatives to the schools in their local districts. Those pushing back against it believe that public education, which began in Massachusetts in 1644, is a sacred value, helping to cultivate an educated citizenry — a cornerstone of democracy, as Thomas Jefferson used to say. In many poorer districts across the United States, voters and policy makers have found the privatization argument compelling. In some cities with long-struggling school districts, like New Orleans and Detroit, charter school networks have expanded with few limits and no appreciable increase in student performance. Arguments for privatization in Massachusetts run up against strong support for school districts that are among the most competitive in the country. The state consistently is ranked number one in school performance in the U.S. Although Boston schools are not ranked as high in student performance as many of its surrounding suburbs — one of the stumbling blocks in the Boston school desegregation case — Boston is widely regarded as having the best school system of any large U.S. city.

The organization pushing Question 2, Great Schools Massachusetts, repeatedly used “failing public schools” as a blanket term to describe district schools. Yet the resounding defeat of the pro-charter expansion campaign suggests that a majority of the state’s residents have faith in the public school systems here, even as they differ on how to make things better. The “system is broken” argument didn’t fly with voters, but it’s clear that there are schools in Boston that are failing, if you compare them to the state’s performance metrics. Level 5 schools like the Dever Elementary School and Up Academy Holland are where privatization efforts have gained a foothold, yet with little appreciable benefit to the students. Scores on standardized tests at both schools have remained low. At the Dever — now managed by Blueprint Schools Network, a firm that never before has run a school — a $1.3 million management contract and an additional $585,000 in state grants have failed to effect any appreciable change in student performance. The school has cycled through five principals in a twoyear period, according to a report in the Boston Globe. Given Boston’s checkered history with privatization schemes, it’s unlikely parents will support any plans hatched in Washington — or Trump Tower — to promote vouchers here. “It’s about public control and transparency,” said Megan Wolf, a member of the Boston group Quality Education for Every Student. “Parents value a system that’s publicly accountable and publicly controlled, not just publicly funded.”

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Next Step Soul Food Café owner Michelle White’s new restaurant is a gathering place with Wi-Fi access in Codman Square.

New café for Codman Sq. Soul food café serves as anchor in commercial district By KAREN MORALES

With 34 dining seats, free Wi-Fi and coffee options, Next Step Soul Food Cafe will be the first of its kind in the Codman Square district in Dorchester. It will be the only sit down restaurant in an area where other nearby establishments are either take-out or self-seated. It also will be the district’s community café, as designated by Codman Square Neighborhood Development Corporation. Since 1981, the Codman Square NDC has worked to rehabilitate the Dorchester neighborhood, once fraught with vacant homes and arson, by creating housing and commercial spaces that are safe, sustainable and affordable. The agency’s economic development department focuses primarily on supporting local businesses and cultivating local entrepreneurs, like Michelle White, owner of Next Step. “The whole organization is to prevent displacement and grow local community capital, and that means both socially and economically,” said Charles Vlahakis, small business development specialist at the Codman Square NDC. W h i t e , a l o n gt i m e Dorchester resident, ran a daycare business for 25 years. An avid cook, she then started a catering business with family members after completing a 12-week training course at Community Servings, a nonprofit food

enterprise in Jamaica Plain that sponsors a kitchen curricular program. “I knew I could cook, but I wanted to know if I could cut it in a fastpaced work environment in food,” White recalled. She said she graduated with top marks at the Community Servings program. When space became available at 657 Washington Street, White partnered with the NDC to put a plan together for her own restaurant. She also enrolled in DotBiz, the agency’s small business development program, where she drew up a business plan, strategized marketing, and was taught software programs such as QuickBooks and Clover. “You need a business plan, no matter what,” said White. “And technology is key. Period.” According to Vlahakis, who helps to teach the course, DotBiz is a 12-week program that meets two hours a week and occurs in conjunction with technology training program, Tech Goes Home. Currently, 41 people are enrolled in the tuition-free class that teaches participants basic business skills such as market analysis, startup costs and bookkeeping, as well as online tools to help manage a business. At the end, students have the option to purchase a laptop at a discounted price of $50.

See CODMAN SQ., page 13

Working hard may take a toll on your health. But what are your options when your work pays the price for your bad health? Chronic illness, an injury or a severe disability can create a financial crossroads for people. Often, people are torn between trying to keep working in ill health, losing important income and benefits, and trying to stabilize their health conditions. A cancer diagnosis, stroke or car accident is just the beginning of a challenging path. Usually, financial problems follow soon after. Many people have limited options and turn to investments and savings set aside for retirement, like a 401(k) or an IRA. “Many workers make the worst mistake when they borrow money against their 401(k) after a work-disrupting illness or disability,” says Tricia Blazier, personal health and financial planning director for Allsup, a private Social Security disability claims services company. “This devastates your financial future for the long term, and it’s very difficult to recover.” But nearly three times as many American workers are insured for Social Security Disability Insurance benefits because they pay FICA payroll taxes as those who establish a 401(k). That breaks down to 152 million workers insured for SSDI, according to the Social Security Administration, and about 52 million with an active 401(k), according to the Investment Company Institute. In addition, it’s estimated only 32 million workers have private long-term disability insurance through their employers. “Really you need all three — 401(k), LTD and SSDI — in your financial toolkit, no matter how old you are,” Blazier says. “You need to consider SSDI because you can access this income without penalty or trade-offs before you turn 59-1/2 years old, unlike your 401(k).” The SSDI program is insurance for workers who experience a severe disability. It pays monthly income for those people who qualify due to a severe chronic or terminal illness or disability, and it includes incentives to return to work if they medically recover. “The SSDI program has risen in visibility in recent years because of its importance for the aging workforce, especially since so few workers have private disability coverage,” says Blazier, who provides guidance with finances and budgeting for SSDI applicants. “The important thing to recognize is that SSDI has valuable benefits that go beyond monthly income,” Blazier added. “They include access to Medicare, dependent benefits, plus the future opportunity to return to work if you are able.” SSDI AS PART OF YOUR FINANCIAL TOOLKIT Blazier says many workers don’t consider filing SSDI applications because they don’t understand eligibility rules or feel conflicted about seeking benefits from the program. “This is an insurance program, and you’ve paid the premiums,” Blazier says. “You are making a huge mistake if you don’t at least find out if you’re eligible for SSDI when you are forced to leave work due to an injury, illness or disability.” Common questions about this proSee BIZ BITS, page 13


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“Next Step is one of ten businesses that exist, or will exist, that we’ve been working with, one-onone, and Michelle is our all-star,” said Vlahakis. It was May 2015 when White began developing a business plan, securing permits, procuring the space and then launching a soft opening in September 2016.

gram include: n How do I know if I’m eligible for SSDI? Social Security has stringent rules to receive benefits. Individuals must have paid FICA payroll taxes, usually worked five out of the last 10 years, and have a severe work-disrupting condition that is expected to last at least 12 months or is terminal. Applicants also must be under full retirement age (65-67). n What does it take to file an SSDI application? Options include answering simple questions online at your convenience and letting an expert SSDI representative complete and submit Social Security forms on your behalf, schedule appointments with Social Security weeks in advance, or complete forms and submit them on your own. n Why is SSDI important to my financial future? Receiving Social Security disability income does not have to be a permanent circumstance. Thousands of individuals who experience work-disrupting illness go through rehabilitation, recover and eventually return to work. Your SSDI application is the first step in this process to reclaiming the life that provides you with financial and health stability you need. Along with regular monthly income, SSDI includes access to health care insurance, dependent benefits, protection for your Social Security retirement income (so your retirement benefits are less likely to be reduced) and return-to-work incentives. “Your financial future doesn’t have to be over, and neither is your career, even though you have to stop working for a few years,”

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continued from page 12

Research

Before that, White surveyed residents of Codman Square on what type of restaurant and cuisine they would be most interested in having. According to White, about 88 percent of responses were soul food related. This was good news for White because her mother had spent 10 years making soul food for her local church, passing down her recipes to her daughter. With the café’s soft launch, White has continued her hyperlocal market-driven business model by adjusting and perfecting her menu according to customer feedback. “We take surveys all the time, asking people, ‘What could we better? What could be on the menu?’” said White. “We’ve catered to what the people in the community want and need.” One of Codman Square NDC’s initiatives is the Millennium

Blazier says. “Realize SSDI is an important support for you, and that you’ve already paid for it.” — Brandpoint

PHOTO: PRINCE CHARLES

Entrepreneurs in a business class at Codman Square NDC. Ten, a community planning process for the next ten years in the Codman Square and Four Corners neighborhoods. Goals outlined in the plan include establishing a Youth Job Hub, developing a Business Cooperative and opening a Community Cafe. As a Community Cafe, Next Step Soul Food will be a place for residents to gather and exchange ideas through partnerships, events and meetings. “We actually already had a Men of Color health meeting in the space,” said Vlahakis. Men of Color/Men of Action is another NDC-led initiative that focuses on issues of employment, education, parenting, health and leadership development.

“We’re going to be a hangout type café that happens to serve soul food,” said White who operates the business with her mother and brother. For the official opening in 2017, the hours will be slightly extended, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and complete seating will be available. White says she is planning to serve coffee and breakfast. “I was ready for a change,” said White about her new role as restaurant owner at age 50. “I retired at 45 and was looking for something to do.” Serving up authentic homemade southern food like fried pork chops smothered in gravy and onions or mac and cheese with candied yams is plenty to do.

THE LIST According to Forbes, the best states for business are: 1. Utah 2. North Carolina 3. Nebraska 4. Texas 5. Colorado 6. Virginia 7. Georgia 8. North Dakota 9. Washington 10. South Dakota

NUMBER TO KNOW

$1.85

per gallon: AAA reports that Oklahoma reporting the lowest gas prices in the nation, $1.85 per gallon, for the holiday travel weekend. The rest of the nation is seeing a 9 cent drop in gas prices compared to a month ago.

TECH TALK Recently, the Department of Justice filed paperwork on behalf of the IRS in federal court to request the identities of U.S. customers of Coinbase, one of the largest digital currency exchanges of virtual currency like bitcoin and ethereum. In the filing, the IRS is using ownership of virtual currency as probable cause for tax evasion investigations but the legal and tax status of virtual currency has been in question since its inception. — More Content Now

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14 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

AFTERWORK #where to be mix 12.2.16-12.8.16 YOUNG. BLACK. BOSTON.

FOR MORE EVENTS: WWW.LITEWORKEVENTS.COM

IN THE

By Stephanie Millions

Each Friday, Epicenter features a special “where to be” post on their blog to make sure every day of the week has some sort of cultural event to check out. We hope that you all can come out into the community, learn, and commemorate some influential people and events around Boston! Have something coming up that you’d like to see here? Tweet us @epicentercom #WhereToBe

PHOTOS: CHRIS ANDREW

DJ Amero and Chris Andrew, co-founder of Ballot Entertainment.

BENT Friday ‘All Black Affair’

The holidays are the best time to reunite with your family and friends and celebrate life. Sometimes life gets so busy you forget about the moments that make it all worth it. It’s really about the times you spend together creating memories that will be with you forever. After spending some quality time with family for Thanksgiving the next best thing is to link up with your friends and party! Coming off the 11th sold out party in a row, Ballot Entertainment (BENT) brought back the most popular monthly Hip Hop party in the city for an “All Black Affair” on November 25th. If you don’t know about Bent Fridays, you need to get familiar. Ballot Entertainment (BENT) is a New England company that specializes in event planning and they are known throughout Boston for hosting the best parties at Wonder Bar. This is one of the most prestige monthly hip-hop events in the city that you get to experience once a month and is a must-go! The “All Black Affair” was a pretty clever theme for the evening, seeing how it was also Black Friday. The bar was packed from front to end and the VIP tables were sold out weeks in advance. Young black Boston was in full effect Friday night. On the 1’s and 2’s were Boston’s own @djamero and New York’s hypest DJ @djtgif. The DJs had everybody off the walls, out of their seats and on the dance floor. This was the perfect event to let loose, have fun and dance life’s worries away. When you have to watch your friend’s Snapchat story to see how much fun you had that’s how you know your night was a success! Ballot Entertainment is definitely becoming a staple in the city for night life in Boston. For more information on BENT events follow them on Instagram: @b.ent_, Twitter: @BallotEnt3 and Facebook: Bent Bent or email them at BallotEntertainmentBENT@gmail.com.

Meet Stephanie Millions — our In the Mix reporter. Millions is passionate about media and works on many platforms. She anchors a morning motivational talk show called “Elevation with Stephanie Millions” on the Gag Order Network every other Satuday from 10 a.m. to noon, and also hosts “The Secret Spot” every Wednesday night from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. on WERS 88.9 FM. For more information, please visit www.stephaniemillions.com or email stephanie.millions@gmail.com to have her cover your event. Follow Stephanie on Twitter @StephMillions.

FRIDAY 12.2.16 How To Sell Yourself To Clients Hosted by: Boston Speaks BostonSpeaks invites you to join its monthly panel breakfast series for entrepreneurs. Learn, network and get inspired every month as we invite some of the most exciting entrepreneurs and top thought leaders in Boston to discuss tricks of the trade in their fields and the success principles they gained along the way. Our goal is to bring together local entrepreneurs to help local entrepreneurs. When: 8 a.m. Where: BostonSpeaks, 50 Milk St., Boston To RSVP, please visit: www.eventbrite.com/e/how-tosell-yourself-to-clients-breakfastseries-for-entrepreneurs-tickets-29036477887 SATURDAY 12.3.16 KREYOL Holiday Trunk Show Hosted by: KREYOL Friends, Romans, countrymen — lend me your ears, eyes, hearts and, yes ... your pockets. Join us on Saturday, Dec. 3 for Kreyol’s last shopping event of the year with music by Débo Ray and art at Dudley Cafe, one of our favorite community spots. Pick up pieces from our newest collection, Bohemian Warrior, and take advantage of our end-of-the-year CLEAR OUT sale. When: 10 a.m. Where: Dudley Café, 15 Warren St., Roxbury For more information, please visit: www.facebook.com/ events/1694962954165853/ SUNDAY 12.4.16 The Current Hosted by: ICA Teen Programs Created, implemented, and hosted by ICA teens, “The Cur-

rent” is a new, ongoing series of gatherings for youth dialogue and engagement around social issues through the arts. When: 2 p.m. Where: ICA Teen Programs, 100 Northern Ave., Boston For more information, please visit: www.facebook.com/ events/2019361178203445/ MONDAY 12.5.16 Body Positive: Free Photoshoot! Hosted by: UMass Boston Women’s Center Pose in any way you like. Bring friends. Take solo pictures. It’s all up to you! Take this time to express yourself however you feel. This will be an environment free of shame in any form. Your expression of body positivity could help encourage someone else’s journey to fully loving and embracing theirs. We will be handing out goodie bags and snacks. The photos will be displayed in our center and on our Facebook page about a week after so you all can see your amazing selves. When: 5:30 p.m. Where: UMass Boston Women’s Center, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Campus Center, 3rd Floor, Room 3100, Boston TUESDAY 12.6.16 Dudley Café Slam Night! Hosted by: The Society of Urban Poetry Dec the 6th! Tuesday! $8 cover charge at the door. ATM nearby. This is not an open mic. There is no feature — straight SLAM! There will be eight to 12 poets. You must have three of your poems and you have three minutes, 10 seconds. If you go over, you lose points. No props — mic and you only! $100 cash prize!

www.baystatebanner.com This slam is just for fun! When: 7 p.m. Where: Dudley Cage, 15 Warren St., Roxbury WEDNESDAY 12.7.16 Real Talk: Environmental Racism & Gentrification Hosted by: Latinx Action Group, College Democrats of MA, Latin American Student Organization (LASO) Join the Latinx Action Group and College Democrats of MA in collaboration with the Latin American Student Organization (LASO) for an interactive workshop in which we can begin to understand the reality of gentrification and environmental racism by highlighting their overlap. For the first part of the workshop we will be bringing in a few speakers from the Greater Boston community who have been directly affected by gentrification and/or environmental racism. These personal narratives given by empowering activists and community builders will set the stage for what will be one of our realest talks yet. During the second part of the workshop, you will have the opportunity to attend both workshops lead by two different community organizers. The workshops will focus on the issues of environmental racism and/or gentrification. When: 6 p.m. Where: Latino/a Student Cultural Center, 104 Forsyth St., Boston For more info, please visit: www.facebook.com/ events/220579251712755/ THURSDAY 12.8.16 Massachusetts Conference for Women 2016 Hosted by: Massachusetts Conference for Women Join us for a day of learning, networking, inspiration and 100+ speakers, including keynotes Anita Hill, Sara Blakely, Carla Harris and Annie Clark! When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, 415 Summer St., Boston For more info, please visit: www.facebook.com/ events/631050447060399

Stay connected to the

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Partygoers enjoy BENT Friday “All Black Affair.”


Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 15

ARTS& ENTERTAINMENT CHECK OUT MORE ENTERTAINMENT NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/ENTERTAINMENT

Q&A

Camaraderie with Eboni! Political commentator discusses the 2016 presidential election By KAM WILLIAMS

Eboni K. Williams is a political and legal commentator you can catch on numerous FOX News programs, such as “The Sean Hannity Show,” “The O’Reilly Factor” and “The Kelly File.” She also frequently serves as a co-host on “Outnumbered” and “The Five.” Prior to joining Fox, she worked as a correspondent at CBS News, as a contributor at the HLN network and as a talk show host in L.A. on radio station KFI. Raised by a single-mom, Williams received a B.A. in Communications and African American Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and her J.D. from Loyola University College of Law in New Orleans. She began her professional career in Louisiana, clerking for the secretary of state and the attorney general’s office as a law student. She worked for various politicians, including assisting city council members in the New Orleans rebuilding effort in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. . Williams subsequently specialized in family law and civil litigation, providing legal counsel on high-profile divorce, spousal support and child custody cases. In 2008 she transitioned to public defender before returning to private practice in 2010. Over the course of her career in criminal defense, Eboni represented clients in murder, rape, drug, sex crime and federal offense cases.

SHOES:

Pleasure

& Pain

PEM PRESENTS CLOSET STAPLES AS ARTWORK By CELINA COLBY

The Peabody Essex Museum debuts closet staples as art in “Shoes: Pleasure and Pain,” on view through March 12, 2017. The vibrant, extensive exhibit looks at the creation and style of shoes from both design and historical perspectives. Many of the pieces reflect the use of clothing and footwear to restrict and control women; others reveal artistry often neglected in other sartorial areas. The show’s entry rooms are some of the most dynamic from a curatorial standpoint. A pair of 17th century boots sits in a glass display case next to Naomi Campbell’s infamous Vivienne Westwood blue platform crocs with nine-inch heels. Digital feeds on video screens around the room show women, from the calves down, walking in contemporary styles. The effect is a little voyeuristic, a subtle allusion to the history of fetishism affecting shoes and feet. Mirrors sit under the display cases to reflect your own feet back to you, begging the question, What do your shoes say? Shoes made for Chinese foot binding offer a disturbing look at the usage of footwear for power and control. Fashionable society of imperial China considered tiny feet and the imbalanced swaying of those who bound theirs to be attractive. The popular belief was that the careful steps also strengthened vaginal muscles, though that was never proven. In the Shang Dynasty (1600-1046 B.C.E), the ideal shoe was made of silk and only measured 3 inches long. “Shoes: Pleasure and Pain” features a vast number of these contraptions, and seeing them next to an average sized shoe is chilling. Comparisons between male and female shoes are equally revealing. Although high heels were first invented for men to hook into stirrups when riding a horse, even the heeled masculine shoes are more practical than the women’s.

Style and substance

See WILLIAMS, page 16

ON THE WEB To listen to Eboni Williams talk about

why Hillary Rodham Clinton didn’t get the same percentage of the black vote in 2016 as President Obama did in 2008 and 2012, visit: www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0wiFuzvRU0

PHOTO: COURTESY EBONI K. WILLIAMS

Eboni K. Williams

www.baystatebanner.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY THE PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM

At times the exhibit veers on kitschy, with displays mimicking cutesy closets and quaint throw pillows with quotes like “Cinderella: proof that a new pair of shoes can change your life.” Stations with seating and books on the history of footwear are available throughout the exhibit for those seeking more background. One section of the show goes into shoe business, dissecting the process of creation from design to execution. This beautifully melds entertainment with education, and covers ground all the way to the sneaker culture of the last 10 years. A number of the shoes on display were manufactured for local distribution, a nice nod to nearby industrial towns. Over ten pairs of Jacques Heim shoes are displayed. Heim designed them in Paris in 1960 for Shain’s Shoe Manufacture, who then distributed them in Ralph’s, a popular shoe store in Newton and Boston. For many viewers, these are shoes they might inherit from parents or grandparents, a tangible connection to the history of footwear. In another effort to connect locally, PEM partnered with Dress for Success Boston and hosted a two-week shoe drive after the exhibit launch. The nonprofit organization empowers women to be economically independent by providing professional attire and developmental tools to help them thrive in the workplace. Though they are no longer accepting donations at PEM, visitors are encouraged to pass along their gently worn footwear to women in need. “Shoes: Pleasure and Pain,” is a fun and fascinating looks at history via the shoes we’ve worn through it. There’s something for the academic, the designer, and the shopaholic alike.


16 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT CHECK OUT MORE ENTERTAINMENT NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/ENTERTAINMENT

Williams

continued from page 15 Here, she shares her thoughts about the election of Donald Trump.

I have to start by asking what was your immediate reaction to the election results? Eboni Williams: Well, like most Americans, including Trump supporters and probably Donald Trump himself, I was surprised. I was surprised because the data leading up to the election didn’t show a lot of ways that this could happen. But a year ago, even six months ago, I did see the potential for this outcome. In fact, I bet a lawyer friend of mine a steak dinner

that Trump would win, specifically, by changing the electoral map in Rust Belt states with industrial populations like Indiana, Pennsylvania and Michigan. So, I saw the potential for a Trump victory, but as the campaign went on, I felt that he was his own worst enemy. Even back during the primary season, I said the only person who can beat Donald Trump is Donald Trump. Though he prevailed in the primaries, I thought he’d done enough damage to himself to take himself out of the game. But, on that point, I was wrong. He had a lot of different messages, but I would say the one that registered with most voters I spoke to was “Drain the swamp!” It was a forceful call for change and indictment of everything that’s

been going on in Washington for several decades now. America’s just sick and tired of the gridlock in Congress and of the inaction at every level of government. People found Trump’s message of change to be such a complete antidote to that and so compelling that they wrote this man a blank check. Think of all the things he could do and not lose their support. Whether it was the Access Hollywood tape or statements he made about communities of color or what not, people ultimately chose to overlook it, because they so believed in his ability to be a change agent.

I heard you say the other day that your own mother voted for Trump. EW: My mother has been on

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the Trump train since day one. And even though I, like many in the media, might not have seen the likeliness of Trump’s success as far back as the primaries, her being such an avid Trump supporter from the start did help me keep my finger on the pulse. What many people felt was most important to them was change in Washington.

Tell me a little about your mom. EW: She’s a small business owner and the only parent that raised me. Everything I am I owe to her. She’s a brilliant businesswoman, not formally educated. But she has incredible instincts when it comes to business and leadership. She gives me counsel all the time in my career and other dealings. And look, she called the election. She said, “You know what? He’s imperfect... He brags... He’s even rude... I’m totally appalled by some of the things he says about brown and black people and by the way he describes our community. However, I really like and appreciate his toughness, his authenticity, his authenticity and his leadership qualities.” She likes his prosperity and that he was unapologetic about finding ways to escape paying personal and corporate income taxes. And clearly, a lot of other Americans felt the same way.

How would you describe yourself politically? Most African American commentators on Fox are either way to the left or way to the right, but with you, it’s hard to discern where you stand. EW: I am a proud, registered independent. I have voted for candidates from both the Democratic and Republican Parties. I was a twotime Barack Obama supporter. In this election, I wrote in a candidate. I rejected both of the major party candidates, and I wasn’t impressed by any of the third-party candidates. I’ve been very clear about the fact that my politics don’t follow party lines. They follow policy. I’m a lawyer by trade, and I’m particularly concerned about policies that make life better for communities I feel are underrepresented ... whether that’s communities of color ... women ... or young people. But I’m really concerned about all people, because we’re all Americans, and I want opportunity for all of us. “Opportunity” is the key word. I think the Democratic Party really got it wrong when they started describing their economic policy in terms of “income inequality.” Well, in my playbook, income should reflect work effort which is not always equal. We don’t

all work the same, so why should all of our incomes be the same? What I think is fairer is “opportunity equality.” What we all should be afforded is the opportunity to determine our own income. That is very important to me.

What did you think of Trump’s “What have you got to lose?” appeal to the black community? EW: Did he make that urban renewal proposal for black votes or did he do it for white people who might have worried whether he might be racist? Maybe we’ll never know. But now that he’s about to become president, we’ll find out real quickly how sincere he was about those policy proposals. As a first-generation college graduate, I’m deeply concerned about his education agenda. I’m very much about school choice, because my mother pushed, pushed, pushed for me to have the very best public education opportunity, since she was a single mom and couldn’t afford much better. I’m also about vocation, because she became a successful business owner after putting herself through beauty school and opening a beauty salon. And she now owns a trucking company, and employs people in her community who are CDL licensed truck drivers. So I know vocational training works and I believe in it wholeheartedly, because I’ve seen it in my own life. And I am offering myself up to be a part of President-elect Trump’s plans around bringing school choice and vocational training and any other betterment opportunities to inner-city communities. I’m very much about that.

What do you make of all the demonstrations and the tidal wave of fear of Trump we see among minorities in the wake of the election? EW: It doesn’t surprise me at all. I knew, just based on my social media network which is diverse but probably predominantly African American, that there was a strong, visceral reaction against Donald Trump leading up to the election. So, I’m not surprised to see people literally crying, mourning, protesting or saying “He’s not my president.”

Why is it that you don’t seem as frightened of him as so many other African Americans? EW: Maybe it’s the lawyer in me, maybe I’m just a more pragmatic

See WILLIAMS, page 17

COMING TO HALEY HOUSE BAKERY CAFÉ: THU 12/1 - Jazz By Any Means Necessary featuring the Fulani Haynes Jazz Collaborative, 7pm THU 12/8 - Outside of the Box presents #Lifted, 7pm FRI 12/9 - The House Slam, 6:30pm THU 12/15 - Nina LaNegra’s AiLi Live Year End Celebration, featuring Suhayl Azan (Poet, Photographer) + Open Mic

There will be no Community Tables on Saturday Dec 3. Come By The Bolling Building to check out our new enterprise, Dudley Dough Haley House Bakery Cafe - 12 Dade Street - Roxbury 617 445 0900 - www.haleyhouse.org/bakery-cafe


Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 17

A&E MORE ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/ENTERTAINMENT

Williams

continued from page 16 person. In the same way that I could fight a district attorney toothand-nail, and 30 minutes later hammer out a very favorable, plea bargain agreement for my client, I am happy, willing and able to work with this new president.

Do you think the press, in general, went overboard in demonizing Trump and his constituency instead of taking his candidacy seriously? EW: Yes, I think the press did themselves a huge disservice by making a mockery of his candidacy. It’s ironic that this was a billionaire with an Ivy League education who came from a rich family, and he was allowed to fashion himself throughout the campaign as a self-made man of the people.

As a blue-collar billionaire. EW: Absolutely! It’s really quite fascinating when you think about, especially when you consider how his wealth was really the death of Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign in 2012. But in 2016, we had media that came off as very smug, elite, self-righteous and all-knowing. And the media attempted to tell America that Trump was not to be taken seriously. The Huffington Post even went so far as to refuse to cover Trump in the political section of the website, because it decided he belonged in the entertainment section. I think that strategy completely backfired. It only served to fuel Donald Trump’s candidacy, because Americans really resented being talked down to.

What inspired your transition from lawyer to journalist? EW: My favorite thing about being a lawyer was being a voice for the voiceless because, as you have probably noticed, I have a loud voice and a lot to say. But effecting change inside our judicial system is a very slow process, because you can pretty much only do one case at a time. So, I switched to journalism in order to be able to continue advocating for the underdogs but on a macro level. What better way to do that than by getting into media where instead of effecting change one client at a time, I could hopefully do it for thousands or even millions of people.

What was the best decision you made to advance your career, moving to FOX News? EW: I don’t know. I didn’t really seek out Fox. Fox came to me while I happened to be covering the George Zimmerman verdict for radio. Someone with “The O’Reilly Factor” happened to hear my segment and asked me to come on the show that night to discuss my reaction to and legal analysis of the verdict. I had never seen “The O’Reilly Factor” before I went on the show, so I didn’t know enough to be intimidated, though I quickly

learned. But I really, really enjoyed my interaction with Bill. I was on with him and another gentleman. We had a very candid discussion about a delicate but critically important topic. And after that night, I was hooked. That’s really how my association with Fox came about, and I’ve been doing Fox News and Fox Business all the time ever since. It’s not all roses and sunshine, but I really appreciate Fox for the opportunities that I get to go on. And no one has ever told me what to say or what position to take. I’m there to present positions that make good, common sense to me, and to bring clarity where I can share my expertise as an attorney and policy maker.

What’s fun about watching you is that you’re not predictable. EW: I know for a fact that I frustrate many of my colleagues, because they feel that I don’t represent a true liberal, or that I am not a conservative. That frustrates them, because they don’t know how to engage on-air with me sometimes. I simply push back against the idea that it’s my job to represent a really liberal point of view when, like on “The Five,” I’m the most liberal person appearing on a panel alongside four conservatives. I say, “I’m not here to represent liberal views. I’m here to represent myself. And if you trust me, my goal when I’m on any show, is to add something unique, specific and nuanced to the conversation.

Lastly, as a woman and as a reporter, what is your analysis of Hillary Clinton’s failure to break the glass ceiling in the presidential election? Did you feel any disappointment? EW: My answer to that is a little more complicated than I usually like to give, but I’ll be authentic. I never supported Secretary Clinton. I was very vocal about that. But I will tell you that on the morning of the election a lot of the TV coverage showed women going to the polls in their suffragette whites, putting stickers on the headstone of Susan B. Anthony and talking about Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, the first woman ever to run for the Democratic presidential nomination. That, at some point, got to me, not to the point that I would consider voting for Hillary, but in the sense that there was a bit of an expectation in terms of that being a positive aspect of the day. That did connect and resonate with me. But when I put my political analyst hat on, I felt that playing the “Woman Card” was one of the most compelling pieces of the Hillary Clinton argument, the idea that she was a change agent, at least in that regard. I thought that was brilliant, and needed to be played up sooner and more frequently. But here’s the thing. As much as they wanted to position her as the first woman president, that was an impossible task, because she would always be dogged down by the Clinton legacy which she could never escape.

First Frid ay Fa mi ly Fun cti on

eef &B

s ink Dr

Open Monday through Friday, 7am to 9pm/Sat 11am-9pm

Holiday for Children’s Services of Roxbury Please join us on Monday, Dec. 12, 2016 5:30pm – 9:30pm

367 Neponset Ave • Dorchester, MA 02122

Free appetizers with a cash donation of $25 or toys valued at $25 or more. Raffle prizes • Cash bar Must RSVP by 5pm on 12/11

enorman@csrox.org or call (617) 989-9433 Watch the New England Patriots on multiple screens!

t Wish lis Literacy games

Arts & Craft Kits Barbie Doll & Clothing Baseball Basketball Board Games for Teens Books Celtics Gear Chemistry set Coloring Books Concert Tickets Digital camera Doc McStuffins Easy Bake Oven Etch-a-Sketch Ethnic dolls Fish Tank Football Footlocker Gift Card Game Stop Gift Card Hats & Gloves iTunes Gift Card Jewelry making kit

Jump Rope Kindle Leapfrog Legos Macy’s Gift Card Marshalls Gift Card McDonald’s Gift Card Movie Passes Museum Passes Musical Instruments Old Navy Gift Card Patriots Gear Payless Shoes Gift Card Pillow Pets Puzzles Remote control car Skateboard Stuffed Animals Tablet Target Gift Card Thomas the Train Toy Trucks

Children’s Services of Roxbury (CSR) is re-

en ick Ch

o

nd Veggie Smoothies n F ine ruit a F Des n ser ght i ts n r e N C a m e c I n Fai e anini r m c Ha T s r a o a T d la G eE l en s c pr a e p s S s

6

th Annual

garded as one of the largest, minority-operated, human services agency in Massachusetts, serving more than 6,000 people annually. Proceeds to benefit our children in the following programs: Foster Care, Housing & Stabilization, Behavioral Health, and Early Education and Care.

For more information, please visit:

www.csrox.org

Children ’s Services of Roxbury St rengt heni ng Fami l i es ac ros s Mas s ac hus et t s Roxbury • Tewksbury • Worcester • Northampton


18 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CHECK OUT MORE EVENTS AND SUBMIT TO OUR ONLINE CALENDAR: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/EVENTS

THURSDAY TAI CHI: MOVING FOR BETTER BALANCE This FREE evidence-based workshop focuses on preventing falls and improving balance through the regular practice of Tai Chi. Participants will learn 8 single forms, derived from the traditional, well known, 24-form Yang Style Tai Chi. The forms are tailored to older adults who wish to improve balance and mobility, and consequently, reduce the risk of falling. Classes meet twice a week for 12 weeks and is designed for beginners. Location: Curtis Hall Community Center, 20 South St. in Jamaica Plain. December 1 from 1-2pm. For more information or to register for this workshop contact Ann Glora at 617-4776616 or aglora@ethocare.org.

MORE THAN MY RELIGION The power of art transcends the boundaries of language, culture, nationality and faith. “More Than My Religion” is an art exhibition of diverse subject matter and a community outreach effort. Named and local Muslim artists from the Boston and Providence areas are contributing their work to illustrate their values using art as a medium. It is meant to separate the media image of Muslims being defined by acts of violence around the world from the reality of Muslims as peace-loving and forward-looking citizens and contributing members of society, in most cases no different from people of other faiths. Although media-portrayed stereotypes are quickly formed in the mind, the creative energy of visual art can help us unlearn those stereotypes and present a properly painted reality. More Than My Religion presents an enlightening perspective on shared values for community, life and coexistence across people of different backgrounds. Participating Artists: Noureen Sultana, Farah Hussain, Mehrjabeen Iftihkar, Poonam Javaid, Haroon Khimani, Sehr Jalal, Sana N. Mirza, Irum Haque, Muti Siddiqui, Niha Ahmed, Zainab-Ale-Rasool, Uzma Wahid, Sana Qureshi, Rozina Siddiqui, Rohma Shirwani, Malika MacDonald, Elena Fakhr, Ahmed Alkhateeb, Ehsun Mirza, Zahra Bhaiwala. Through December 2 at the Multicultural Arts Center, 41 Second St., East Cambridge. Gallery website: www.multi culturalartscenter.org/galleries/. Galleries are FREE and open to the public. Regular Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 10:30am - 6pm.

SATURDAY BLUE HILLS RESERVATION Moderate walk, with some hills, 2.5 miles. Walk around Tucker Hill on the green dot trail. Meet at the Houghton’s Pond main parking lot at 840 Hillside St. in Milton Saturday, December 3 at 1 pm. The Southeastern Massachusetts Adult Walking Club meets each weekend on either a Saturday or Sunday at 1:00 for recreational walks. This club is open to people of 16 years of age and older, and there is no fee to join. Walks average 2 to 5 miles. New walkers are encour-

aged to participate. The terrain can vary: EASY (mostly level terrain), MODERATE (hilly terrain), DIFFICULT (strenuous & steep). Walks will be led by a park ranger or a Walking Club volunteer leader. Occasionally, the Walking Club meets at other DCR sites. Some DCR sites charge a parking fee. The rangers recommend wearing hiking boots and bringing drinking water on all hikes.

TUESDAY HOLIDAY PARTY Please join the Center for African Studies, the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, and the Department of African and African American Studies to celebrate this holiday season. Enjoy seasonal refreshments, good food, and the company of friends from around the university and the Greater Boston Community! Tuesday, December 6, 5pm, CGIS-South Concourse, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge. Free and open to the public.

WEDNESDAY WINTER CELEBRATION/ HOLIDAY TRADITIONS December 7 from 5:30-7:30pm with light supper at 5:30pm at Jamaica Plain Community Center (Curtis Hall), 20 South St., Jamaica Plain. JOIN US for a FREE family workshop and time of sharing. Children (ages 5 – 13 with and without disabilities), parents, grandparents and friends create greeting cards, wrapping paper, ornaments, decorations and gifts. Presented in English, Spanish and American Sign Language upon request. Wheelchair accessible. FCT is a program of Community Service Care/Tree of Life Coalition. To register and for more information call 617522-4832 or email familiescreating @gmail.com. Additional information at www.familiescreatingtogether.org.

UPCOMING DCR WALKING CLUB HOLIDAY GATHERING OPEN HOUSE Meet at Brookwood Farm Conference Center at 11 Blue Hill River Road in Canton. Join us as we celebrate the holiday season at scenic Brookwood Farm Saturday, December 10 1-2:30pm. Hot beverages will be provided. Bring a holiday treat to share, if you like. Stroll through the fields and woodlands with friends or share some indoor holiday cheer. New walkers welcome. The Southeastern Massachusetts Adult Walking Club meets each weekend on either a Saturday or Sunday at 1:00 for recreational walks. This club is open to people of 16 years of age and older, and there is no fee to join. Walks average 2 to 5 miles. New walkers are encouraged to participate. The terrain can vary: EASY (mostly level terrain), MODERATE (hilly terrain), DIFFICULT (strenuous & steep). Walks will be led by a park ranger or a Walking Club volunteer leader. Occasionally, the Walking Club meets at other DCR sites. Some DCR sites charge a parking fee. The rangers recommend wearing hiking boots and bringing drinking water on all hikes.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1

75TH ANNUAL OFFICIAL TREE LIGHTING

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the Honourable Stephen McNeil, Premier of Nova Scotia, will host Boston’s 75th Annual Official Tree Lighting on Boston Common on Thursday, December 1, from 6-8pm. The holiday lights throughout both parks will light up in sequence shortly before 8pm when Mayor Walsh is joined onstage by Premier McNeil, members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Santa Claus. The show will close with a pyrotechnic display by Atlas PyroVision. WCVB’s Anthony Everett and J.C. Monahan will host Channel 5’s live broadcast of the event beginning at 7pm featuring Nova Scotia’s Town Heroes, country singer Timmy Brown, the cast of Bill Hanney’s North Shore Music Theatre’s “A Christmas Carol,” and this year’s headliner, Boston’s own Bel Biv DeVoe. This is the 45th year that Nova Scotia has given a tree to the people of Boston as thanks for relief efforts following the December 6, 1917, explosion of a munitions ship in Halifax Harbor. Within 24 hours of the disaster a train loaded with supplies and emergency personnel was making its way from Boston to Nova Scotia. For more information please call 617-635-4505, go to www.boston.gov/parks, or visit us on Facebook. For Boston Common parking information go to www.massconvention.com/bcg.html. BIRD WALK Brookline’s Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site (“OlmstedNHS”) is joining with the Brookline Bird Club, the Brookline GreenSpace Alliance, and the Emerald Necklace Bird Club in presenting a bird walk focused on ducks and waterfowl at Olmsted Park and Jamaica Pond on Sunday, December 11 at 9am. This 90-minute walk is suitable for beginning birders and novices, although people of all abilities are welcome. The walk will include visits to Leverett, Willow, and Ward’s Ponds in Olmsted Park as well as a portion of Jamaica Pond. Participants should bring a field guide and binoculars and wear boots or shoes they don’t mind getting muddy. No advance registration is required, and the walk is FREE and open to the public. Jamaica Pond and the ponds in Olmsted Park feature abundant waterfowl and other birds during the late fall and winter seasons. Mallards, buffleheads, mergansers, and coots are among the birds that are likely to be seen in the vicinity of these ponds. Olmsted Park and the landscape around Jamaica Pond were designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted as part of his Emerald Necklace park system. The meeting place is the Daisy Field parking area on Willow Pond Road, Jamaica Plain, between the Jamaicaway and Pond Avenue in Brookline. For those taking public transportation, Daisy Field parking area is nearest to the South Huntington Avenue -Bynner Street stop on the #39 bus and the High Street — Highland Road stop on the #60 bus. It is also a roughly 15-minute walk from the Brookline Village MBTA station on Green Line “D” branch. For further information on the walk, please email Brookline Bird Club walk leader Bob Mayer at rgmayer@comcast.net or call Olmsted NHS at 617-566-1689, extension 216 Tuesday through Saturday.

caregivers learn ways to use recycled and simple art materials in imaginative ways, celebrating winter and the holidays. Presented in English, Spanish and American Sign Language (upon request). Take home a bag of recycled materials and art supplies after each workshop. Led by creative teaching artist team. Wheelchair accessible. Bilingual child care provided upon request. FCT is a program of Community Service Care/Tree of Life Coalition. To register and for more information call 617-522-4832 or email familiescreating@ gmail.com. Additional information at www. familiescreatingtogether.org.

FAMILY HANUKKAH CELEBRATION Families are invited to a free Hanukkah celebration on Sunday, December 18, 10am - 4pm at the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Massachusetts. At 11am, visitors can learn Yiddish holiday songs at a sing-along workshop led by Paula Parsky and musician Brian Bender. At 1pm, families can hear readings of holiday-themed books and work on holiday crafts in our kinder vinkl (children’s corner). Throughout the day, young detektivn (detectives) can take part in scavenger hunts throughout the Yiddish Book Center. Guided public tours of the Center will be offered at 11am and 1pm. More information can be found at yiddishbookcenter. org/calendar.

ONGOING PUBLIC OPEN NIGHT AT THE OBSERVATORY The Public Open Night at the Observatory is a chance for people to come observe the night sky through telescopes and binoculars and see things they otherwise might not get to see, and learn some astronomy as well. The Open Nights are held most Wednesday evenings throughout the year, weather permitting. The program starts promptly at 7:30pm during the fall and winter months, and 8:30pm during the spring and summer months. Please arrive early as there is no admittance once the program begins. We start admitting ticketed guests 10 minutes before the program begins. Right before the program starts and after all the ticketed guests that are present are admitted, we will admit any non-ticketed guests until we reach capacity. Public Open Nights are open to everyone, however space is limited. To reserve a free ticket for admission visit: http://bit.ly/28QbEHr. The Public Open Night is held at the Coit Observatory at Boston University. We are located at 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, above the Astronomy Department. The stairwell up to the Observatory is on the fifth floor just to the left of room 520. Unfortunately, there is no disabled access to the Observatory. For information about Open Night, please call 617-353-2630, or check our Twitter feed (twitter.com/buobservatory).

SUDOKU ANSWERS FROM PG 20

CREATING ART AT HOME December 14 from 10am - 12noon at Jamaica Plain Community Center (Curtis Hall), 20 South St., Jamaica Plain. FREE WINTER CELEBRATION ART WORKSHOP where parents, grandparents,

The Community Calendar has been established to list community events at no cost. The admission cost of events must not exceed $10. Church services and recruitment requests will not be published. THERE IS NO GUARANTEE OF PUBLICATION. To guarantee publication with a paid advertisement please call advertising at (617) 261-4600 ext. 7799 or email ads@bannerpub.com. NO LISTINGS ARE ACCEPTED BY TELEPHONE, FAX OR MAIL. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Deadline for all listings is Friday at noon for publication the following week. E-MAIL your information to: calendar@bannerpub.com. To list your event online please go to www.baystatebanner.com/events and list your event directly. Events listed in print are not added to the online events page by Banner staff members. There are no ticket cost restrictions for the online postings.


Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 19

FOOD Cheers for T CHECK OUT NUTRITION AND HEALTH NEWS ONLINE: BAYSTATEBANNER.COM/NEWS/HEALTH

TIP OF THE WEEK

Holiday cookie baking tips

Embrace nostalgia and create the perfect holiday cookie that tastes delicious and is easy to decorate. Instead of displaying a gingerbread house, cut sugar cookies using some snowman, tree and star cookie cutters to set up a festive and tasty holiday scene. Scatter some coconut shavings or crinkled strips of paper for snow and place holiday candies behind the cookies, so they stand up. When making holiday cookies, remember to: n Cream the butter and vanilla together. Doing this beforehand will encapsulate the vanilla and prevent flavor loss. n Chill the dough in the fridge before shaping it. This will make for a softer, moister cookie that is less likely to spread when baking. n Remove cookies from the oven a few minutes early, as they will continue to cook on the sheet. n Let the cookies cool completely before you begin to ice them. — Brandpoint

chard The beautiful, funny-sounding veggie is packed with nutrition

125

EASY RECIPE

Sugar Cookie Bars

Roux: A roux is a thickening agent made from equal parts butter and flour. The mixture is cooked until the flour taste disappears and then combined with milk or stock to create a sauce. — Cookthink

errific in frittatas, soups and gratins, cooked Swiss chard is milder than spinach. You’ll recognize it by its showy good looks: Stem color ranges from white to orange to scarlet; the multicolored bunches marketed as “rainbow chard” are almost too pretty to cook. Chard is a nutritional powerhouse. If vegetables got grades for nutrients, Swiss chard would be a valedictorian. It has impressive concentrations of vitamins A, C, E and K, magnesium, potassium, iron, calcium, phosphorus and zinc — the list goes on and on. Here it’s cooked with Yukon gold potatoes into fresh-tasting casserole. Topped with cheesy breadcrumbs, the gratin makes a perfect, healthful side dish.

Serves 6 to 8 n 1 pound Swiss chard, ends trimmed, stems and leaves coarsely chopped n 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into ¼-inch slices n 3 T butter n 1 medium onion, vertically sliced into thin strips (1 cup) n 3 T all-purpose flour n 1 (14-ounce) can

Fruitcake made with alcohol is known to last for months or even years, if stored correctly. In 2003, a Michigan man appeared on the Jay Leno show to show off — and share — a fruitcake that had been in his family for 125 years. When Leno tasted the cake, baked by the man’s great-grandmother around 1878, he declared that it needed more time. — More Content Now

WORD TO THE WISE

BY THE EDITORS OF

RELISH MAGAZINE

Chard and Potato Gratin

NUMBER TO KNOW

n 3 cups all-purpose flour n ½ teaspoon baking powder n ¼ teaspoon sea salt n 1 cup unsalted butter, softened n 1 ¼ cups granulated sugar n 1 egg and 1 egg yolk n 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Lightly grease a 9-by-13-inch baking pan. Line with parchment paper so paper overhangs edges. In a large bowl, stir flour with baking powder and salt; set aside. In a separate bowl, beat butter with sugar until fluffy. Beat in egg, egg yolk and vanilla. Add flour mixture until fully incorporated. Press mixture into bottom of prepared pan. Chill for 30 minutes; preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until set in center and edges are lightly golden. — Brandpoint

www.baystatebanner.com

RELISH MAGAZINE

Look online for

NUTRITION & HEALTH NEWS at www.baystatebanner.com/news/health — and look in the pages of the Bay State Banner for Be Healthy, our quarterly health magazine. Be Healthy offers easy-to-understand analysis of common health issues as well as first-hand patient stories, exercise tips, nutrition news and healthy recipes. A publication of The Bay State Banner

reduced-sodium chicken broth n 1 ¹⁄³ cups whole milk n ¼ t ground nutmeg n ¾ t salt n ¹⁄8 t freshly ground black pepper n Nonstick cooking spray n ¼cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese n ½ cup fresh breadcrumbs

Rinse chard and place in large pot with water clinging to leaves. Add 1 cup water, cover and cook over medium heat until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain well. Place potatoes in another large pot and cover with cold water. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and boil gently until just tender, about 6 minutes. Drain. Melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add flour and whisk to combine. Add broth, milk, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until mixture comes to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Preheat oven to 400F. Coat a 13 x 9-inch baking pan or shallow 2 ½-quart baking dish with cooking spray. Arrange half the potatoes in pan. Top with chard and half the sauce. Cover with remaining potatoes and sauce. Sprinkle with cheese and breadcrumbs. Bake 25 minutes or until golden brown and bubbling.


20 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

Plan Dudley continued from page 1

and office space and parking; n Bartlett Place with 33 residential units and 54,000 square feet of commercial space; n the Whittier Choice plan, which calls for the redevelopment of the 200 units of affordable housing currently in the Whittier Street public housing development with an additional 272 units of market rate housing developed on the site; and n Melnea Hotel and Residences, with 52 units of housing and a 150-room hotel.

Affordability concerns

Attendees at Monday’s meeting, held just before Thanksgiving, questioned whether the BPDA’s requirement that 13 percent of new construction be affordable would be sufficient, given that most people in Roxbury earn less than half the area median income in the Greater Boston area. “We live in a community where the median income is $33,000 a year,” said former City Councilor Chuck Turner. “You’re talking about half the people in our community not being able to live here.” Turner pointed out that many of the units deemed affordable under BRA guidelines are affordable to people earning as much as $68,000, which is 100 percent of the area median income. “Your use of the term ‘affordable’ is very confusing,” he said. “It doesn’t tell us how much the people renting are going to have to pay. That ‘affordable’ term is a blanket word that covers the reality.” Boston’s Chief of Economic Development John Barros cautioned that it was too early to argue about affordability, given that the BPDA

BANNER PHOTO

City Councilor Tito Jackson makes a point during the BPDA’s Plan Dudley meeting. yet to release requests for proposals for the six vacant parcels where planning currently is underway. The RFPs will be released early next year and will be subject to review by the Roxbury Strategic Master Plan Oversight Committee. “When we come back, you’ll be able to look at the RFP,” he said. “It’s in the oversight committee’s purview to say ‘We’ve heard from the community. Here’s what we’re looking for.’ There are many steps in the process for the community to say ‘yes’ or ‘no.’” City Councilor Tito Jackson, who initiated a Roxbury-wide planning process called Reclaim Roxbury in 2015, suggested neighborhood residents would rather draft the RFPs for the vacant parcels themselves. “There is no more vacant land downtown and two-thirds of all

FUN&GAMES SUDOKU: SEE ANSWERS ON PAGE 18

the vacant land in Boston is in Roxbury,” he said. “The [BPDA] wants to determine what gets built here. That’s unacceptable. All I’m hearing is RFP, RFP. We’re not going for it. We are not planning to displace ourselves.” “People here are talking about community development,” said Roxbury resident Floyd Hardwick. “The language you’re using here is real estate development. We’re not even understanding each other.”

Planning challenges

The meeting was heated at times, mirroring the conflicts that roiled the Plan JP/Rox process, where a group of affordable housing activists protested against what they said was a lack of affordability in new construction along the Washington Street corridor in the area between Jackson Square,

Egleston Square and Forest Hills, where the BPDA is seeking to guide redevelopment efforts. In that area, BPDA officials pointed out that most of the land is privately owned, curtailing the agency’s leverage to demand more than the 13 percent affordability called for by the guidelines in the city’s inclusionary development policy. In the Dudley planning area, the process revolves around publicly-owned parcels of land, many of which were taken during urban renewal and the aborted Interstate 95 expansion plan. Jackson suggested that Barros, a former executive director at the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative, look into the same land trust schemes that organization used to preserve housing affordability in its catchment area. “You’re an expert in that area,”

he said. Barros said the planning process has not produced a consensus on affordability for the planning area, noting the conflicting calls for deeper subsidies and more market-rate housing. “Some people are talking about 1/3 [affordable], 1/3 [moderately affordable], 1/3 [market rate],” he said. “What does that look like in Roxbury?” While the BPDA officials plan to present final recommendations for Plan Dudley to its board in December, Turner said the agency isn’t ready. “The next step is for you not to develop RFPs, but to develop different strategies around housing,” Turner said. “If you’re trying to create housing through RFPs, it’s a real estate project, not a community development project.”


Thursday, Thursday,December December1,1,2016 2016••BAY BAYSTATE STATEBANNER BANNER••21 21

Boston jobs

continued from page 1 LEGAL boom,” said John Barros, the city’s Chief of Economic Development. “There’s no better time to make sure all people are benefiting.” In addition to the increased goal for people of color, the new guidelines up the objectives for hiring of Boston residents from 50 percent to 51 percent, in what Barros calls a symbolic increase. “It makes a statement that all jobs should have a majority Boston workforce.” The policy also increases the goal for women workers from 10 percent to 12 percent. “The women goal is representative of the lack of women in the

construction workforce,” Barros said. “The shift by the mayor is a statement that we have to do better.”

A new push

The bones of the new policy were developed in November 2014, when Turner and other members of the Boston Jobs Coalition began discussing changes to the then 31-year-old ordinance. In May of 2015, coalition members brought a draft of the new policy to Walsh’s office. After more than a year of review by city attorneys and others, the new goals were finalized. Turner worked on the original proposal in 1979, which he and other members of the Third World Jobs Clearinghouse presented to

then-Mayor Kevin White. White launched the residency policy that year with an executive order. In 1983, the late City Councilor Bruce Bolling filed the policy as an ordinance and it became law. In the years that have followed, the legislation was honored more in the breach than in compliance. During the two mayoral administrations that the ordinance has been in effect, compliance officers that the city uses to monitor job sites have been in short supply. Often local activists — including the late Herb Jackson — informally monitored construction sites in the Greater Roxbury area to document the frequent violations of the policy. As the population of people of color in Boston has more than

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doubled over the last 35 years, its numbers in the building trades have increased. In large construction projects in the city, people of color average 26 percent of the workforce. In construction projects on city-owned land, people of color average 40 percent of the workforce, according to Turner.

follow set procedures. If they haven’t followed the procedures, even if they can show that they couldn’t find people of color, they’re not in compliance.” Under the updated guidelines, compliance with the hiring goals will be reviewed at regular intervals during construction. The city currently has six compliance monitors. Turner says they will likely need more. “We can’t guarantee what’s going to happen, but we think we have a good framework,” he said. “We think this can work as long is the mayor is serious about enforcement and they have to staff to do the monitoring. As in every case, the community has to be vigilant about the projects that are happening in our community.”

LEGAL

Compliance

In addition to the new hiring goals, the plan includes beefed up compliance measures, Turner says. In the current ordinance, contractors are required to make a good faith effort to meet the goals. “You won’t find good faith language in the [new] ordinance,” Turner notes. “It says the contractors and subcontractors have to

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS LEGAL

LEGAL

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MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. W257-C1, BAGGAGE CART AREA CEILING REPLACEMENT, WORCESTER REGIONAL AIRPORT, WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly.

Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. AP1714-C1, FY17-19 AUTHORITYWIDE OVERHEAD DOOR REPAIRS, BOSTON, BEDFORD, AND WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly.

Sealed General Bids for MPA Contract No. AP1715-C1, FY17-19 AUTHORITYWIDE TERM DOOR REPLACEMENT, BOSTON, BEDFORD, AND WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS, will be received by the Massachusetts Port Authority at the Capital Programs Department Office, Suite 209S, Logan Office Center, One Harborside Drive, East Boston, Massachusetts 02128-2909, until 11:00 A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2016, immediately after which, in a designated room, the bids will be opened and read publicly.

NOTE:

NOTE:

NOTE:

PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT WORCESTER REGIONAL AIRPORT; 375 AIRPORT DRIVE, WORCESTER, MA 01602 AT 9:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2016.

The work includes INSTALLATION OF NEW EXTERIOR METAL PANEL CEILING SYSTEM.

PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 11:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2016.

PRE BID CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD AT THE CAPITAL PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT (ABOVE ADDRESS) AT 10:00 A.M. LOCAL TIME ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2016.

The work includes PROVISIONS OF LABOR, INCIDENTAL MATERIALS, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT, AND SERVICES TO REPAIR AND MAINTAIN OVERHEAD DOOR SYSTEMS ON AN AS-NEEDED BASIS OVER A TWO (2)-YEAR PERIOD AT ALL MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY AVIATION AND NONAVIATION FACILITIES, LOCATED AT BOSTON, BEDFORD, AND WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.

The work includes PROVISIONS OF LABOR, INCIDENTAL MATERIALS, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT, AND SERVICES TO REPAIR AND MAINTAIN OVERHEAD DOOR SYSTEMS ON AN AS-NEEDED BASIS OVER A TWO (2)-YEAR PERIOD AT ALL MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY AVIATION AND NONAVIATION FACILITIES, LOCATED AT BOSTON, BEDFORD, AND WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.

Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2016.

Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2016.

In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of GENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION.

Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form.

Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form.

The estimated contract cost is ONE HUNDRED THIRTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($130,000.00).

In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of DOORS & WINDOWS.

In order to be eligible and responsible to bid on this contract General Bidders must submit with their bid a current Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and an Update Statement. The General Bidder must be certified in the category of DOORS & WINDOWS.

The estimated contract cost is ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS, ($125,000.).

The estimated contract cost is TWO HUNDRED FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($250,000.).

Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44J inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44J inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid.

A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid.

The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater.

The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and / or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater.

The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of TEN MILLION DOLLARS ($10,000,000.00). Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details.

The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of ONE MILLION DOLLARS ($1,000,000.00). Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details.

No filed sub bids will be required for this contract.

No filed sub bids will be required for this contract.

This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246).

This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in the Non Discrimination and Affirmative Action article of Division I, General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246).

The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000.

The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000.

Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals.

Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals.

Complete information and authorization to view the site may be obtained from the Capital Programs Department Office at the Massachusetts Port Authority. The right is reserved to waive any informality in or reject any or all proposals.

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

MASSACHUSETTS PORT AUTHORITY THOMAS P. GLYNN CEO & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Bid documents will be made available beginning WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2016. Bid Documents in electronic format may be obtained free of charge at the Authority’s Capital Programs Department Office, together with any addenda or amendments, which the Authority may issue and a printed copy of the Proposal form.

Bidding procedures and award of the contract and sub contracts shall be in accordance with the provisions of Sections 44A through 44H inclusive, Chapter 149 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A proposal guaranty shall be submitted with each General Bid consisting of a bid deposit for five (5) percent of the value of the bid; when sub bids are required, each must be accompanied by a deposit equal to five (5) percent of the sub bid amount, in the form of a bid bond, or cash, or a certified check, or a treasurer’s or a cashier’s check issued by a responsible bank or trust company, payable to the Massachusetts Port Authority in the name of which the Contract for the work is to be executed. The bid deposit shall be (a) in a form satisfactory to the Authority, (b) with a surety company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth and satisfactory to the Authority, and (c) conditioned upon the faithful performance by the principal of the agreements contained in the bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and a labor and materials payment bond, each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract price. The surety shall be a surety company or securities satisfactory to the Authority. Attention is called to the minimum rate of wages to be paid on the work as determined under the provisions of Chapter 149, Massachusetts General Laws, Section 26 to 27G, inclusive, as amended. The Contractor will be required to pay minimum wages in accordance with the schedules listed in Division II, Special Provisions of the Specifications, which wage rates have been predetermined by the U. S. Secretary of Labor and/ or the Commissioner of Labor and Industries of Massachusetts, whichever is greater. The successful Bidder will be required to purchase and maintain Bodily Injury Liability Insurance, Auto Liability Insurance, and Property Damage Liability Insurance for a combined single limit of THREE MILLION DOLLARS ($3,000,000.00). Said policy shall be on an occurrence basis and the Authority shall be included as an Additional Insured. See the insurance sections of Division I, General Requirements and Division II, Special Provisions for complete details. No filed sub bids will be required for this contract. This contract is subject to a Minority/Women Owned Business Enterprise participation provision requiring that not less than THREE POINT FOUR PERCENT (3.4%) of the Contract be performed by minority and women owned business enterprise contractors. With respect to this provision, bidders are urged to familiarize themselves thoroughly with the Bidding Documents. Strict compliance with the pertinent procedures will be required for a bidder to be deemed responsive and eligible. This Contract is also subject to Affirmative Action requirements of the Massachusetts Port Authority contained in Article 84 of the General Requirements and Covenants, and to the Secretary of Labor’s Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Opportunity and the Standard Federal Equal Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications (Executive Order 11246). The General Contractor is required to submit a Certification of Non Segregated Facilities prior to award of the Contract, and to notify prospective subcontractors of the requirement for such certification where the subcontract exceeds $10,000.


22 • Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

LEGAL

LEGAL

INVITATION TO BID The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority is seeking bids for the following: BID NO.

DESCRIPTION

DATE

TIME

*WRA-4317

Diver Assisted Suction Harvesting Services (per Specifications)

12/13/16

12:00 p.m.

**7517

RFQ/P Nut Island Headworks 01/13/17 Odor Control and HVAC Systems Improvements, Inspections, Evaluations, Design CA/RE Services

11:00 a.m.

*To access and bid on Event(s) please go to the MWRA Supplier Portal at www.mwra.com. **To obtain the complete RFQ/P MWRADocumentDistribution@mwra.com.

please

email

request

WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: November 14, 2016 Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department Docket No. SU16P2436EA

Citation on Petition for Formal Adjudication

Respondents to this RFP shall submit their proposals in PDF format via email, to Desiree Ladd, dladd@brooklinehousing.org, no later than 2:00 p.m. December 16, 2016. For more information and a complete copy of the RFP please visit our website: http://brooklinehousing.org/Business&employmentOpportunities.html Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department Docket No. SU14P2987EA

Citation on Petition for Order of Complete Settlement of Estate Estate of Edward Idowu Ezedi Date of Death: 10/30/2014 To all interested persons: A Petition has been filed by Egobudike E. Ezedi, Jr. of Dorchester, MA requesting that an Order of Complete Settlement of the estate issue including

You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on 12/22/2016. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you.

SUFFOLK Division

The BHA is seeking proposals in accordance with Massachusetts General Law (MGL) c. 30B from qualified firms to conduct a comprehensive Salary and Benefits Comparability Study as outlined in the RFP available on our website. The key services required include a complete salary and benefits comparability study (Phase 1) based on existing job descriptions. Upon mutual agreement BHA may contract with the Respondent to conduct an organizational audit of job classifications, titles, and descriptions (Phase 2).

SUFFOLK Division

to adjudicate a final settlement and other such relief as may be requested in the Petition.

to:

BROOKLINE HOUSING AUTHORITY (BHA) REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) COMPENSATION STUDY CONSULTANT

Estate of Anelle Williams Date of Death: 08/13/2016 To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by Maura Watson of East Dennis, MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that Maura Watson of East Dennis, MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before 10:00 a.m. on the return day of 12/22/2016. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken without further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised administration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration.

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

Affordable Housing Opportunity Dorchester, Massachusetts

Trinity Management will begin accepting applications for affordable rentals (30% & 60% of AMI) for the Treadmark Apartments beginning on December 14th, 2016 and ending on February 14, 2017 for occupancy beginning in June of 2017. Due to the anticipated demand for the affordable rentals, a lottery will be held. The Leasing Center for The Treadmark Apartments is located in the Carruth Building located at 1916 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, MA 02124. Applications can be picked up at the Leasing Center, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. With extended office hours on Saturday, January 7th 2017 from 10am until 1:00 pm (see location below) and Saturday, January 21st, 2017 from 10:00 am - 1:00 pm, in the Management Office. Please call the Leasing Center at (617) 265-5800 if an alternate application delivery method is required. (TDD #: 800-545-1833, ext. 945) Informational meetings will be held on Saturday, January 7th, 2017 from 10am - 1pm and Tuesday, January 10, 2016 from 6:00pm - 8:00pm at the All Saints Church located at 209 Ashmont Street, Dorchester, MA 02124. Applications will be available. Please note that the last day to pick up an application is Tuesday, February 7th, 2017 at 5pm in the Leasing Center. To be eligible to participate in the affordable unit lottery, completed applications must be either received in the Leasing Center before 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 14th, 2017, or be postmarked by Tuesday, February 14th, 2017. Reasonable Accommodations will be made upon request. Unit sizes range from: Studio, 1BR & 2BR. There are 5 Accessible Units: 1 - Studio, 2 - 1BR & 2 - 2BR. Additionally, the are 2 Hearing and visually Impaired units: 1 - 1BR & 1 - 2BR. Amenities: • Spacious Apartments • A Variety of Floor Plans • Outdoor Community area • Central Air Conditioning

• On-Site Laundry • Across from Ashmont Station • Heat and Hot water included • City Conveniences within walking distance

35 of the affordable units will have a Boston residence preference for the lottery & initial rent up and six units with have a Homeless preference (2-Studio , 3-1BR & 1-2 BR) Rent Limits

Income Restrictions Apply HH Size

30%

60%

1

$20,610

$41,220

2

$23,550

$47,100

3

$26,490

$52,980

4

$29,430

$58,860

5

$31,800

$63,600

6

$34,140

$68,280

LEGAL

Unit Size

30% Rent

60% Rent

Fair Market Rent

Studio

$515

$1,030

$1,056

One Bedroom

$552

$1,104

$1,261

Two Bedroom

$662

$1,324

$1,567

WITNESS, HON. Joan P. Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: November 10, 2016 Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Department SUFFOLK Division

Docket No. SU16A0109AD In the matter of Javian Martinez Lopez CITATION G.L. c. 210, § 6

To Diana Lopez of Dorchester, MA and Reinzy Martinez of Dorchester, MA and any unnamed or unknown parent and persons interested in a petition for the adoption of said child and to the Department of Children and Families of said Commonwealth. A petition has been presented to said court by Heather Johnson of Boston, MA requesting for leave to adopt said child and that the name of the child be changed to Javian Lyndon Johnson Lopez. If you object to this adoption you are entitled to the appointment of an attorney if you are an indigent person. An indigent person is defined by SJC Rule 3:10. The definition includes but is not limited to persons receiving TAFDC, EACDC, poverty related veteran’s benefits, Medicaid, and SSI. The Court will determine if you are indigent. Contact an Assistant Judicial Case Manager or Adoption Clerk of the Court on or before the date listed below to obtain the necessary forms. IF YOU DESIRE TO OBJECT THERETO, YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY MUST FILE A WRITTEN APPEARANCE IN SAID COURT AT BOSTON ON OR BEFORE TEN O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING (10:00 AM) ON 01/19/2017. WITNESS, Hon. Joan P Armstrong, First Justice of this Court. Date: November 3, 2016

Felix D. Arroyo Register of Probate

ADVERTISE YOUR CLASSIFIEDS (617) 261-4600 x 7799 • ads@bannerpub.com Find rate information at www.baystatebanner.com/advertise

REAL ESTATE


Thursday, December 1, 2016 • BAY STATE BANNER • 23

BANNER CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

Parker Hill Apartments Brand New Renovated Apartment Homes Stainless Steel Appliances New Kitchen Cabinets Hardwood Floors Updated Bathroom Custom Accent Wall Painting Free Parking Free Wi-Fi in lobby Modern Laundry Facilities

Two Bedrooms Starting at $2200 888-842-7945

REAL ESTATE

Wollaston Manor

Enjoy Country Living in Our Quiet Community Setting

91 Clay Street Quincy, MA 02170

PLANTATION APARTMENTS

Senior Living At It’s Best

Accepting Applications for waitlist Subsidized Elderly/Disabled Housing in Stow, MA

A senior/disabled/ handicapped community

ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS

MAXIMUM INCOME LIMITS 1 Person $34,350 2 People $39,350

0 BR units = $1,027/mo 1 BR units = $1,101/mo All utilities included.

On-site management, wall-to-wall carpeting, heat and hot water included, laundry facility, generous closet space, Community room with Cable TV, 24-hr. maintenance, Security entrance with intercom system, nature trail.

Call Sandy Miller, Property Manager

#888-691-4301

Rent is equal to 30% of income.

For more information call 978-897-4404 TDD: 1-800-545-1833, ext. 179

Program Restrictions Apply.

$34,500

$27,600

2

$39,400

$31,520

CUSTODIAN

TWITTER

Janitorial and light maintenance duties. Full-time with excellent benefits and starting pay. Résumé and cover letter to careers@uua.org.

@BAYSTATEBANNER

Are you interested in a

First Units Ready For Occupancy In March 2017

Project Hope, in partnership with Partners HealthCare and Boston Medical Center, is currently accepting applications for a FREE entry level healthcare employment training program.

RE150 is a 282 unit rental apartment community. 8 of these apartments will be made available to households with incomes at or below 80% AMI (the affordable units) and 6 apartments will be made available to households at or below 120% AMI (the Middle-Income units). Unit features include fully applianced stainless kitchens, 42” designer kitchen cabinetry, solid surface counter and island tops, bathroom ceramic tile flooring and bath surround, in unit washers and dryers, and include one parking spot.

Program eligibility includes: • • • • •

Have a high school diploma or equivalent Have a verifiable reference of 1 year from a former employer Pass assessments in reading, language, and computer skills Have CORI clearance Be legally authorized to work in the United States

For more information and to register for the next Open House please visit our website at www.prohope.org/openhouse.htm or call 617-442-1880 ext. 234.

Experienced parking and revenue control professionals needed

MAXIMUM Household Income Limits for AFFORDABLE units: $51,150 (1 person), $58,450 (2 people), $65,750 (3 people), $73,050 (4 people) MAXIMUM Household Income Limits for MIDDLE-INCOME units: $82,404 (1 person), $94,176 (2 people), $105,948 (3 people), $117,720 (4 people)

To request an application online, go to www.affrental.com/backbay ________________________

follow us on

Nonprofit in Seaport (near South Station or Courthouse stations) seeks custodian for afternoon/evening hours.

Healthcare CAREER?

Affordable Units (80% AMI): Five 1BRs @ $1,297*, Three 2BRs @ $1,430* Middle-Income Units (120% AMI): Six 2BRs @ $2,435* *Rents subject to change in 2017. Utilities not included. Tenants will pay own Gas Heat and Hot Water, Electricity (including cooking), and Water.

1

HELP WANTED

Affordable & Middle-Income Housing Lottery RE150 150 Rivers Edge Drive, Medford, MA

HH Size 50% Area Median Income 40% Area Median Income

Completed Applications and Required Income Documentation must be received, not postmarked, by 2 pm on January 17th, 2017. A Public Info Session will be held on January 10th 2017 at 6:00 pm at the Medford Fire Department (0 Medford Street in the Arthur Dello Russo Community Room). The Lottery will be held in the same location on February 7th, 2017, at 6 pm. For Lottery Information and Applications, or for reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities, go to www.s-e-b.com/lottery or call (617) 782-6900 (x1 and then x2) and leave a message. Applications and Information also available at the Medford Public Library on 11 High St Library Hours (M-Th 9-9, Fri 9-6, Sat 9-5)

› Parking Facility Managers › Parking Shift Supervisors › Parking Cashiers › Lobby Attendants › Parking Attendants Full and Part-time Positions available in the Boston area. Competitive wages and employee benefits. Military veterans are encouraged to apply. Please send resumes to mmsgroup@aol.com. Vanguard Parking & General Services Corporation 795 Columbus Avenue Roxbury Crossing, MA 617-585-3150-employment office 617-585-3153-FAX

United Housing Management is currently seeking the professionals below. Please forward resumes no later than December 9, 2016 to 530 Warren Street, Dorchester, MA 02121 or fax to 617-442-7231.

Property Manager:

NEW CONSTRUCTION:

‘Two Beautiful BRAND NEW Income Restricted 1 Bedroom Units in Dudley Square’

Two brand new beautiful one bedroom units at 10 Roxbury Street, steps to Dudley Square. Building was built in 2015. Brand new construction. Amenities include: n n n

ADVERTISE

Quartz kitchen countertops Stainless steel appliances White Oak and Hardwood Floors

THIS AD IS FOR AN INCOME RESTRICTED APARTMENT WITH MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM INCOME LIMITS. PLEASE READ BELOW TO SEE IF YOU MAY QUALIFY.

YOUR CLASSIFIEDS WITH

THE BAY STATE BANNER

(617) 261-4600 x 7799

ads@bannerpub.com

FIND RATE INFORMATION AT www.baystatebanner.com /advertise

Glass Shower Doors Laundry in Building Storage Unit

n n n

2 Income Restricted Units # of Units

Type

Sq Footage

Rent

Income Limit

1

1BR

683

$1068

70%*

1

1BR

790

$1246

70%*

*To qualify, you must make a maximum income of $48,100 for a household size of one person OR $54,950 for a household size of 2 persons. HUD 2016 limits provided by the BRA. Applications can be picked up from Isalia Property Group, 305 Dudley Street, Roxbury, MA 02119 or by email at jenn@isaliaproperty.com Monday, December 12, 2016 Tuesday-Friday December 13-16, 2016 Saturday, December 17

Hours: 9am -7pm Hours: 9am - 5pm Hours: 9am - 1pm

Deadline for completed applications at the above address: In person by 4pm, Wednesday, December 28, 2016 or mailed and postmarked by that day Selection by lottery Asset, Use, & Occupancy Restrictions Apply. Preference for Boston Residents. Preference for Households with at least one person per bedroom. For more information or for reasonable accommodations, for persons with disabilities, call Jenn at 617-299-1075. Equal Housing Opportunity

The successful candidate will be a motivated team player with a minimum of 5 years of experience in managing at least 150 units with Project Based Section 8 and Low Income Housing Tax Credit; must have the ability to interpret and analyze financial projection; strong organizational and written communication skills are a must. Proficiency in Spanish is a plus. Certification as a Property Manager and Tax Credit Specialist are required. Transportation is a must.

Maintenance Technician:

The ideal candidate will have 3 years of experience in two or more phases of building maintenance repairs including boilers, HVAC, electrical, plumbing, carpentry, plastering, locks; must be dependable and self-motivated with excellent customer service skills. Will be required to provide scheduled nights and weekends coverage. Bilingual is a plus - transportation is a must. United Housing Management LLC is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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Bay State Banner 12-1-2016  

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