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Camille Baumann-Jaeger 2010 2014


Camille Baumann-Jaeger Barnard College-Columbia University Bachelor’s of Arts in Architecture with a Concentration in Latin American Civilizations


Design PS101: Edible Schoolyard in Harlem

“I know I’m falling and will soon slam into the bottom.”( p472)

Communal Transformations and Subnature Examinations 4th Year Undergraduate Studio Project Fall 2013

To Filter, To Fold, Consuming, Watching “Catch me I’m falling, I’m flying.” (p475)

Spatial Strategies and Actions 4th Year Undergraduate Group Studio Project

Spring 2014

“I’m floating or falling or I don’t know what.” (p468)

Disorientation as a Positive Force in Architecture Film and Repetition to Create New Spaces 3rd Year Special Topics Project Spring 2013

E-Waste Pavilion in Rockefeller Center Sustainability and Community Introduction Studio: Abstraction Spring 2012

Form Representation Eames as in “Dreams” Finding Tradition in the Digital 3rd Year Special Topics Project

Spring 2013

Mapping Ice Paths Explorations in Representing Temporal and Spatial Transformations 4th Year Undergraduate Studio Project Fall 2013

Consumerism Form Analysis A Historical Analysis of Form Introduction Studio: Abstraction

Spring 2012


PS101: Edible Schoolyard in Harlem Communal Transformations and Subnature Examinations

Nestled in Harlem, NYC, PS101 plans to become the next Edible Schoolyard of NYC. A project begun by Alice Waters in Berkeley CA, this project incorporates the original goals of the Edible Schoolyard within a new setting. This project seeks to create a space for learning about food production, preparation, and distribution, while at the same time becoming a public symbol for a community. My project begins with David Gissen’s work “Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments” in which he explores how forgotten variables, or subnatures, can affect architecture. He categorizes these forms of nature under three categories: ATMOSPHERE, defined as the potential confrontations to the existence of modern urban society, MATTER, which are markers of social transformation, history, and time, and LIFE, which he depicts as elements which question the dominant role of architecture. Drawing from his work, I was inspired to analyze the site in order to determine the subnatures of PS101.

“Subnature are those forms of nature deemed primitive (mud and dankness), filthy (smoke, dust, and exhaust), fearsome (gas or debris), or uncontrollable (weeds, insects, and pigeons).” -David Gissen, Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments


111th and Park Ave

site

106th and Park Ave

scale: 1/128”=1’ 0”


1:16

1:16


Discrepencies Exterior sites experience a wider range of subnature components while the PS101 subnature experiences a very limited range of variables

Goal

To balance the discrepencies between the exterior and interior subnatures of the set while also formulating a new subnature which amplifies the subnature’s positive components.

ivy weeds moss graffiti fence train wall exhaust


Ground Floor Plan In Relation To Site

PS. 101

9

10

8 3 7

5

1. Mini-Market 2. Bakery 3. Cafe 4. Deli and prepared kitchen area 5. Ripening Room

2

6

4

1

6. Warehouse Storage 7. Cold Storage 8. Loading Dock and Staging Area 9. Dining Area 10. Restroom

site liberated to the public

original site confined by fence link barrier

scale: 1/32”=1’ 0”


Green Roof

25 22 26

21

24 23

21. Seasonal Exterior Garden 22. Vegetable Garden 23. Outdoor Eating Area 24. Greenhouse 25. Compost Receptacle and Hothouse 26. Rainwater Harvesting

Third Floor 16

17 20

19

16. Open Air Recreation Area 17. Restroom 18. Vertical Hydroponic Garden 19.Greenhouse 20. Office

18

Second Floor 11

15

14

13

16

12

scale: 1/32”=1’ 0”

11. Restrooms 12. Seasonal Exterior Garden 13. Raised Potted beds 14.Community Area- flexible lecture/demonstrations and meeting room


Sections

3/4”=1’-0”


scale: 3/4”=1’ 0”


Perspectives

PS101 edible schoolyard main entrance perspective PS101 edible schoolyard main entrance perspective


Second Floor Community Hall Rendering North View Perspective Rendering

Rendered Perspective of Entrace and West Side View

Interior Cafe Perspective Rendering and Collage


Design Model


To Filter, To Fold

Consuming, Watching

a study of relationships between spatial strategies and actions This project focuses on investigating the relationship between space, program, and material in order to create new systems for spatial organization. Working in a group, my peers and I questioned definition of containment at a human scale. Taking the terms “To Fold’ and “To Filter” as our spatial strategies, we combined them with the actions of “consuming” and “watching”. This combination then directed our design process as we transformed static programmatic elements into dynamic spatial engagements.


section 1


section 2

scale: 1/2”-1’0”


Film and Repetition to Create New Spaces

“I’m floating or falling or I don’t know what.” (p468)

“I know I’m falling and will soon sla

“Catch me I’m falling, I’m flying.” (p475)

Disorientation as a Positive Force in Architecture


My interest in the relationship between disorientation and architecture was first inspired by Mark Z. Danielewski’s novel “House of Leaves”. In his work, Danielewski’s protagonist, Will Navidson, experiences a loss of self as he falls for days through complete darkness. In that instance, he becomes disassociated with his body, his senses blur together as he loses the notion of time and direction. He becomes lost in an interminable void.

“I’m floating or falling or I don’t know what.” (p468)

“Catch me I’m falling, I’m flying.” (p475)

“I know I’m falling and will soon slam into the bottom.”( p472)

Can disorientation in architecture be used as a positive force?


Wall Dan Graham’s statement “living within the grid system caries the implication of being enmeshed in an impersonal, automatic schema.”(p47) comes to life in Jacques Tati’s film “Playtime”. In his film, Tati depicts a story of an older man, Monsieur Hulot, who comes to an office building on a business matter. As he walks in, he is immediately placed in a waiting room, a cage-like space where he is left to pace. The room, just like the rest of the building, is governed by a strict grid design. The supporting structure that peeks into the visual realm, the tiled floor, the evenly paced chairs, and the portrait heads staring intently at the visitor all come together to give the scene the sentiment of a cult ritual.

The ulterior motive behind the building’s design is reflected in Monsieur Hulot’s interaction with the waiting room chair. As he explores the room, he pushes down one of the black chairs and watches it inflate back to its original form. The message is clear. The building, just like the chair, is designed to resist all attempts towards change and its aesthetic remain neutral.


Monsieur Hulot’s reaction is clear as he is forced to navigate the grid alone. Running throughout the office in pursuit of the manager, Hulot becomes more and more distraught. Unfamiliar with his surroundings, his path becomes a nightmare.

Images from Jacques Tati’s film Playtime


Ultimately, he is led to a room full of cubicles—the culmination of his hellish quest. Completely disoriented, the one thing that remains clear is the hierarchy of power within the office space. While the workers are chained to their desks, the manager fleets back and forth between the different cubicles. His power is represented in his freedom of movement. Given free reign over the space, the manager takes on the role of prison warden, stalking the workers as he pops in and out of their cubicles at his leisure. As the viewer looks on at poor Monsieur Hulot, one understands that it is the stringent division of power that renders the grid into a terrifying force for it emphasizes the division instead of attenuating it.


Two part system for creating a positive disorientation:

1.

Alter spatial representations of power hierarchies: As the manager is given freedom of movement within the space, the correction for this discrepancy in power would be to ground him. Preferably in a position that does not suggest power (as used in my design, the lower left hand corner of the room). Furthermore, the cubicle walls must be diminished and the configuration of the space must encourage physical motion by the workers. 2. Disintegration: The grid must be broken from its use as a functional method of organization and alienation.


Section

scale: 1/2”-1’0”


Elevation


E-Waste Pavilion in Rockefeller Center Sustainability and Community

A temporary pavilion, the E-Waste Pavilion at Rockefeller Center was designed not only to create a place of collection for e-waste materials but also an area for community involvement and education. Part time collection facility, part time gallery, the pavilion is at once purposeful while at the same time representational of its environment as the form is inspired by and developed through the light patterns surrounding the area.


light analysis

21/04

22/04

23/04

In the spirit of recycling, the pavilion will only be open for three days of the year. These days are focused around Earth Day as the day before, of, and after are used as a focal point for the program of the pavilion.


21/06

21/12

Combined Light Analysis

In order to offer a more complete analysis of the sun pattern at Rockefeller Center, a diagram of the sun’s movement on both the winter and summer solstice is illustrated.


E-Waste Pavilion Program

public participation

education space


experience

collection and removal


6’

13’

30’ 25’ 19’ 13’

19‘

6’

25’

30’


7’

5’

3’

1’ from base

15’

13’

11’

9’


Eames as in “Dreams� Finding Tradition in the Digital

Engrossed in the digital, contemporary design has theoretically become liberated from former constraints and adopted a new mantra for a perfect, fully geometric and precise world. But what happens when you use a creative tool to convey a message? In these two works, the focus was not to redefine but to reevaluate. Both of these representations examine different qualities inherent in the Serpentine Pavilion by Toyo Ito and the Case Study House by Charles and Ray Eames.

Serpentine Pavilion by Toyo Ito


Eames House by Charles and Ray Eames


Mapping Ice Paths Explorations in Representing Temporal and Spatial Transformations For this project, the goal was to set up a system in order to document and map the melting of an ice cube. My analysis explores the nature of destruction as both a temporal and spatial phenomenon involving two opposing forces, fluid and solid, stable and the dynamic. The stable, represented in this case as children’s beads, acts as a marking system that tracks the movement of the ice’s transformation.

ice melt phases

ice melt analysis diagram


0 time (minutes)

89


Consumerism Form Analysis A Historical Analysis of Form

This project took the evolution in form of the portable music player and traced commonalities in its design through several decades. An introductory exercise in form analysis. This project was my first introduction into representating form and change from a historical perspective.


cassette player analysis

plans

elevations

section


portable music players form analysis 1954-2007

orange: interior curved forms green: exterior curved forms blue: control curved forms

Regency TR-1 1954

KLH Model 11Portable 1962

Sony Discman 1984

Saehan/Lieb Labs MPMan F10 1998

Apple First Generation Ipod Sony TPS-L2 1979

Sony WM-2 1981

Sony TPS-L2 1979

Toshiba KT-R2

WM-30 1984

AIJA HS-JX303

Apple First Generation iPod 2001

Sony CD-Walkman D-EO1 1999

Walkman Coby founded in 1990

Archos Jukebox Multimedia

Apple iPod Nano 2005

Apple iPhone 2007

Camille Baumann-Jaeger's Portfolio  
Camille Baumann-Jaeger's Portfolio  
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