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Issue 41

AUSTRALIA’S NO.1 FORTNIGHTLY

EAT WELL! for less

HEALTHY COOKING MINI MAG

23 money-saving meals

Meryl Streep

No more neck pain!

‘My secret for a happy life’

Move freely with these easy fixes

Travel Fashion

HOW TO WEAR COLOUR

20ING

AMAZ

Find the right shade for you

cruise trips

Aussieife Real L

‘Mum never gave up on me’


Dear Reader, W

ho’s the cook in your house? At our place, hubby does a mean breakfast, but I’m happy to rustle up the rest of the meals. This means I’m always looking for inspiration, so I’m loving our cooking special this issue (p75), featuring 23 recipes that are seriously delicious, healthy and budgetfriendly – tick, tick, tick! The roast vegetable frittata and sun-dried tomato pork rolls are going straight on to the midweek meals roster. Another area where I’m always happy to get more inspiration is fashion – especially when it comes to prising me away from my beloved black. All the expert advice says wearing colour is more flattering as we get older, so I do try to inject some into my wardrobe. Our feature on p54 shows you how to work the latest trend: top-to-toe colour. It’s not as scary as it sounds, honest! And make sure you take a look at our story on the art of op-shopping (p40). I was an avid op-shopper as a student, and still can’t resist a look at what’s in store. It’s National Op Shop Week and there are some truly brilliant bargains to be had, plus it’s for a good cause – so go forth and shop! Until next time,

SEE PAGE 95 FOR STOCKIST INFORMATION

Lisa Sinclair, Executive Editor

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LINKED IN

You will find us here: Post

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Yours GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW, 2001

yours@bauer-media. com.au

facebook.com/ Yoursmagazineau

This chunky chain necklace is a statement piece for a steal! $20, Adorne @ Birdsnest

3


CONTENTS

16 Me & Mum Maternal instincts are a lovely link for the Sunshine State’s Joy and Bianca

75 Cheap eats Healthy options for every meal of the week that will save you time and money

4

Generation Wow! 6 Shooting stars Your fave celebs in the spotlight – celebrating and making news 8 Queen of the screen Acting royalty Meryl Streep talks performing, family and shares the secret to her successful marriage 12 Back from the brink Unconditional devotion helped a mum wrench her daughter back from the clutches of crystal meth 14 New direction Three women recall the light bulb moment that changed their lives 21 Star diary Dancing queen Helen Richey on her happy marriage, helping others and how she’s ageing gracefully 104 All in onesies The jumpsuit stages a triumphant encore in Tinseltown 106 Then and wow Stunner Geena Davis has always been a knockout on the red carpet On the cover

Good to know 30 Easing the pain Our expert guide to eliminating common neck ailments 34 In good shape The Healthy Eating Pyramid has been tweaked to accommodate the latest nutritional research 36 Overcoming tragedy What to do when your daughter suddenly loses her unborn baby 40 Thrifty business Discover the subtle art of scouring op shops for designer deals 42 Instinct vs. intuition Which should you listen to when making decisions? 44 The woof pack Learn to understand what your puppy is telling you Lifestyle 53 Beauty: Jerry Hall The six simple tricks the American beauty uses to get gorgeously glam – try them for yourself! 54 Fashion: Colour blocking Put together an outfit, head to toe, using tones of a single colour

38

COVER PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES, THINKSTOCK, NICK CUBBIN; ROB SHAW/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU

This issue in

App-solutely fabulous Stay in touch with loved ones using the latest technology


32 All ears Address hearing loss in its early stages

50 Show of hands Care for your hands and nails with these nourishing creams

58 Homes: On the mantle Frame your fireplace with these gorgeous additions 64 Gardening: Grand stokers Landscaper Charlie Albone turns up the heat outdoors 68 Travel: Epic adventures Discover the world aboard the very best cruises 72 Travel: Urban escapes Fun capital city breaks that won’t cost you the earth

Real-life fashion

18

We see what you’re wearing in Healesville, Vic, then share our tips to get the look

60 Go troppo The plants that can make any garden look like a tropical oasis

In every issue 24 Books: It takes two Kathryn Fox and James Patterson team up 28 Subscription offer 47 Yours Club 90 Puzzles 94 Privacy notice 95 Stockists 96 Horoscopes 97 The Middletons 98 Fast fiction 99 Kerri-Anne Kennerley No-nonsense advice 100 What’s on 103 Wendy Harmer

22 Snap chat

66 Patch things up Make this cute cushion from fabric offcuts!

Ex-model Lisa Rutledge went behind the camera 20 years ago and has never been happier


PICTURE PERFECT

ON A HIGH NOTE It’s been 25 years in the making but Mariah has finally achieved her “childhood dream” of landing a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. “This is a huge honour,” says the pop diva, who shared the moment with her 4-year-old twins Moroccan and Monroe. TEXT: JESSICA GRUBB PICTURES: AAP, AUSTRALSCOPE, GETTY IMAGES, NEWSPIX, SNAPPER MEDIA

Mariah Carey, 45

Ty Burrell, 47

FAMILY FACE TIME Modern Family star Ty is very much the doting dad as he takes a video phone call from his family while shopping in LA. “I didn’t realise you could fall in love with children, and as time goes on love them even more,” he says of his two daughters, Frances, 5, and Greta, 3.

PUP QUIZ Salma was truly in her element on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, beating host Jimmy at trivia to win a cuddle with five puppies! “I love it! I’m in puppy heaven!” says the actress. “I pick up abandoned dogs from the street. At the moment I have nine dogs.” 6

PATRON SAINTS

Salma Hayek, 48 Jimmy Fallon, 40

Golden couple and patrons of the Fight Cancer Foundation, Hugh and Deb launched the foundation’s Back On Track support program – aimed at helping kids with cancer keep up with their schooling – at Sydney Children’s Hospital. Nice!

Hugh Jackman, 46


Helen Mirren, 70

Shania Twain, 50

TRIPLE THREAT

5

Dame Helen is in high spirits at Madame Tussauds in London as she poses with three wax figures that portray her on the red carpet, and in her roles in The Queen and Prime Suspect. “It’s like having three sisters,” she jokes.

to the

e !Wl

m co e 0+ club

HURRAH! It’s going to be a big year for Canadian country crooner Shania. Not only is she hitting the road for her farewell tour, she’s turning the big five-oh on August 28! “I’m going out of my forties with a bang and celebrating throughout the summer with the tour!” she says.

Deborra-lee Furness, 59

GREEN THUMB

Debra Messing, 47

CHEER SQUAD

Actress Joanna is one stylish gardener as she launches a rooftop playground in London for the Marks & Spencer Spark Something Good initiative, which aims to inspire the nation to donate time to do good in their local neighbourhood. “It’s about giving back to the community,” Joanna says.

Joanna Lumley, 69

Will & Grace star Debra proudly cheers on her 11-yearold son Roman at baseball practice in New York. “I’m all up in sports now, and it’s because of my son,” she says. “Your life is completely changed when you make a little person.” 7


COVER STORY

NOTE PERFECT “I spent six months working on my guitar technique,” she says of her latest role

Heart to heart

‘Life’s about choices and I’m happy with mine’

TEXT: FRED ALLEN/THE INTERVIEW PEOPLE PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES, PICTURE MEDIA, SNAPPER MEDIA

Acting royalty MERYL STREEP, 66, talks work, womanhood and why there’s a long way to go in the fight for equality

T

he First Lady of Hollywood, Meryl Streep, is back on our screens in Ricki and the Flash (in theatres now). Playing a musician who neglected her family to pursue her dream of rock’n’roll stardom, she returns home to attempt a belated reconciliation with her daughter, Julie (played by Meryl’s real-life daughter Mamie Gummer, 32). And it’s a role which gives the Oscar winner another chance to show off her vocal ability, after wowing us in hit 2008 musical Mamma Mia!. “Ricki is an old-school rocker who sings in bars and belts out songs of famous bands,” Meryl tells Yours. “I spent six months working on my guitar technique and I had such a great time doing covers of Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty hits.”

8

Here Meryl reveals her thoughts on… Emerging as a musical performer: “It’s funny how things have worked out this way because my mother [Mary Streep] had ambitions of being a lounge singer and my father composed music and played the piano. I had a great singing teacher, Betsy Parrish, in graduate school and that’s where I learned a lot about how profoundly your emotions connect to your breathing and to music. She was a huge inspiration and enabled me to appreciate that singing and acting are very similar in that singing makes you reach into your deepest feelings. Singing is an extension of everything that you do when you’re acting.” Working with her daughter: “That’s such a delight for me. I’m so proud of Mamie and of Grace [Gummer, 29]

who were willing to follow in their mother’s profession despite all the pressure and attention that comes with being Meryl Streep’s daughters. They’re very strong-willed and determined young women. I only want them to be happy in life and I’m very supportive of their work because they made their decision knowing they would always have to deal with that added burden.” Playing age-appropriate roles: “It’s good to live in the place where you are… you can put old age on; it’s a lot harder to take it off.” Taking on lighter roles: “When I graduated from drama school there were a lot of very good, very serious films being made and those were the best roles that were available or were being offered to me. After doing The Deer Hunter and Sophie’s Choice I was locked into playing very serious women and I never had a chance to do any DRAMA QUEEN (L-R) The 1982 film Sophie’s Choice earned Meryl her first Oscar; 1978’s The Deer Hunter saw her make her mark in Hollywood


SISTER ACT (L-R) Daughters Louisa, Mamie and Grace are the spitting image of their famous mother

CAPTION HERE IItististis aut eatem. Nequiant, od maximodis sa sam

FLASH MOB With co-stars Rick Springfield and daughter Mamie

comedies. I didn’t have a choice. But later on when I was raising my children I became tired of only playing certain kinds of very dramatic roles and I wanted to play in lighter kinds of films. Now I’m simply amazed that I’ve been able to find so much work and play many different kinds of characters at an age when this industry tends to forget about women. I’m thrilled!” Strong female role models: “My mentor was my mother. She walked into a room and lit it up, and people were sad when she left. That, to me, is what really matters; who you touch and how. She was a mentor because she said to me, ‘Meryl, you’re capable. You’re so great.’ ” Equality for women: “We’re viewed as equals, but we’re still not there yet. For the first time we have the expectation that we can have a broad array of choices, that we could lead in almost any part of society, and yet we face resistance. We see that here [in the US] in our government; in the House and the Senate. We see that in our boardrooms. We see that in Hollywood.

Turn the page


“The challenge for our girls, I think, is dealing with that resistance. Our girls are going to have to contend with that. I contend with it right now in every realm I operate in.” Sacrificing family time for career: “I think there’s a bias against women when it comes to discussing the idea of making sacrifices. That question doesn’t arise when it comes to men – a man has always been seen as someone who works hard and has a full-time occupation. I think women should have the same opportunity and not have any stigma attached to them if they choose to pursue their careers. “Life is all about making choices and I’m very happy with mine. I’ve had a wonderful time raising four children and I’ve also been lucky to have the support of a wonderful husband [sculptor Don Gummer, 68].” Achieving work-life balance: “When my children were younger I turned down any project that involved me having to be away from our home for long periods of time. That was just out of the question for me. I wanted to enjoy my life at home so I would only do films which wouldn’t last longer than two months and where I could still fly back on weekends to be with my children. “Being with my husband and my children always brought me the greatest joy and happiness in life. I love acting, of course, but I had already achieved a lot of success by the time my children were growing up that I didn’t have the urgency to prove myself. I was also very exhausted by the grind of studio meetings and the pressure to keep finding the best films. It left me feeling miserable at times so I decided to cut back and do different kinds of films. Also, when you reach 40, at least in my day, it was considered the beginning of the end of your career playing leads. So that was another factor.” Her career renaissance: “I’m not complaining. I think that once my 10

OPPOSITES ATTRACT “We complement each other beautifully,” says Meryl of husband Don

GREAT RESPECT Mum Mary, who died in 2001, was Meryl’s “mentor”

‘My husband and my children always brought me the greatest happiness’

children were all grown up and didn’t need Mummy to look after them anymore it was the right moment to go back to work with as much passion and dedication as I ever had. Except maybe I don’t stress myself out as much now before every film!” Still getting a kick out of acting: “The best thing about it is when you’re playing a scene and you actually become your character and lose yourself in that moment. That’s when you know

you’ve succeeded at what you’ve worked very hard to accomplish in your profession. Those are the truly thrilling moments.” Her long and happy marriage: “We’re kind of the perfect odd couple. Don is a man of few words; I’m the one who keeps up a constant stream of chatter in the house. He listens very patiently and then goes back to his work. He also loves me as I am, eager and overactive, even at my age. He’s the definition of the introverted and introspective artist. I’m very expressive and more exuberant. We complement each other beautifully that way.”


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REAL LIFE

Overcoming addiction

Her mum’s unconditional love helped this young woman ensure she was one less casualty of the chilling ice epidemic, writes Kerrie Davies

‘I’m so proud of my daughter’ S

12

BREAKING THE CYCLE Sally and Noni practically “did the rehab together”, so devoted was Mum to her daughter’s recovery

Noni, Sally’s younger sister Ali and brother Tom noticed Sally losing weight, suffering alarming, erratic mood swings and withdrawing from family life. Her behaviour and her new friends were clear signs to Noni that Sally was using. “That was the beginning. She was a people pleaser and she’d find the person with the biggest broken wing,” Noni painfully recalls. A teacher for children with early learning difficulties, Noni drew on an inner strength, her family and friends. “When there were small windows to talk, she said, ‘I can’t talk about this now’,” says Noni, who in those dark days endured a constant state of distress. “I protected myself by thinking that unless I was with her, I couldn’t solve

anything. Ali and Tom needed to go to sport, see friends and have a normal life, too. But it got to the point where they didn’t want her around.” Then Noni took the phone call she’d been dreading and feared most: Sally had been arrested for possession of ice. “She said, ‘Mum, I’m here.’ It was one of the most distressing nights,” Noni says, tangibly reliving it. “She was broken. I couldn’t touch her because she was in a cell. I thought, Sal, you can’t get any lower. “At the time, you muster your adrenaline. After, you think, I’m not sure how I did that! That was huge to endure. You still have a cry and I have amazing friends who I could talk things out with, and family were great, too.

PICTURES: NICK CUBBIN/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU HAIR & MAKE-UP: ANNA LE

ally’s heart filled with hope each time she looked up at the moon from the courtyard of her drug rehabilitation facility. Her mum Noni always told her that no matter where she was, they’d always see the same symbol of her enduring love and support. Sally reckons it was this unfailing bond that helped her get through 15 months of treatment for addiction to crystal methamphetamine, or ice. “I’d leave Sal messages telling her that I loved her and I was proud of her,” Noni, 57, says. “As she didn’t have her phone, she’d write to me: Wow, did you see the moon that’s come up tonight?” Sally’s journey to rehab at NSW’s Odyssey House began when, as a bright and popular senior student, she was given ice by an older boyfriend. “I was experimenting and I wanted to fit in,” Sally, now 27, candidly admits. “It was that simple.”


Sally took just 28 items of clothing with her to rehab at Odyssey House (partially funded by Centrelink), including shoes, and no phone. Like all Odyssey House residents, Sally helped run the property as part of her bid to assume responsibility and rebuild her self-esteem. Residents come from all backgrounds, from caring homes like Sally’s to the more troubled. Addictions range from desperate alcoholism to raging ice habits. Sally moved through the four stages of the program, ultimately being able to help other residents recover. “My mind was clear but I struggled with the fact that I was young, so I should be able to party! But I’ve since been to music festivals and out with friends and I know I can enjoy myself,” she says. “You have to break your thought patterns, but not everyone is a success story. I know people who left before finishing and overdosed.” Sally credits her success to her mum’s unwavering support, always being there for her no matter what. On family visits, they shared Sally’s favourite homemade chocolate-chip M&M cookies, picnicking on Odyssey House’s property. “I think Mum did the program with me,” Sally

says with a laugh. “We joke that she was an honorary resident!” Noni admits she’s asked herself if she could’ve done more, or stepped in earlier. “That stuff can gnaw at you,” she says. “It’s a grieving process but I think it’s better to think about what to do to get someone you love in a healthy place, rather than how it happened. I think the point is it can happen to any family. There’s no single attribute to that path. It’s not how you got there, it’s how you respond.” Six years on and Sally is vibrant and healthy. She works with Odyssey House’s family units on the property. She often calls her mum for advice on parenting to help her clients. “I think Mum’s the reason I got through it,” Sally reflects. “A lot of people don’t have that support. “Now, Mum and I text each other all the time: Have you seen it? It’s a gorgeous moon.”

‘It can happen to any family [but] it’s not how you got there, it’s how you respond’

“But she needed to hit that bottom. It was a big, good shock.” In court, the magistrate warned Sally that this was her chance to get help and sent her to rehabilitation. It transpired to be the then-21-year-old’s true coming of age moment. At Sally’s request, Noni wrote on Sally’s Facebook page: Sally has made the decision to go to Odyssey House and we’re so proud of her. That honesty allowed family and her old friends to embrace her change. “I hurt a lot of people,” Sally says with disarming frankness. “But all my good friends had open arms. They said, ‘We don’t want you to be the person you have been.’ My best friend from school, who I hadn’t seen for five years, visited. “To know they were there when I finished made it so easier.”

Helping hand for those in harm’s way Australian Crime Commission CEO Chris Dawson is in no doubt ice is causing “untold harm”. Now the third most commonly used illegal drug in Australia, it can cause mental health issues and make users wildly aggressive and unpredictable, putting children and other loved ones at grave risk of harm.

Odyssey House is one of the country’s biggest, most successful drug and alcohol rehabilitation bodies. Its comprehensive services help people overcome drug and alcohol abuse, then take control of and rebuild their lives. Visit odysseyhouse.com.au

SUPPORT SYSTEM (Top, L-R) Ali, Noni, Tom and Sally; (inset) Noni, with a young Sally, has always had her welfare at heart 13


oment m e h T How unexpected moments of truth GENERATION WOW

propelled these three women into successful and fulfilling new careers ‘I FOUND MY TRUE CALLING WHILE HIKING’ It was in the midst of trekking Spain’s epic Camino de Santiago that Glenyce Johnson, 54, decided to quit her job and pursue her passion for adventure After 15 years as managing director of a travel company, I needed a break. So I decided to take my long service leave and go to Spain with my partner Dawn for six months to walk the 800km Camino de Santiago across northern Spain. I’d previously lived in Europe and felt like I had some unfinished business in that part of the world, and I also wanted to practise my Spanish. We spent a couple of months preparing, challenging ourselves with 90-minute walks through a national park to get fit for the 42-day hike. When we eventually set off we had reservations about how our bodies were going to react, but I knew I’d rather die on the Camino than not finish. We got off to a good start, and our fitness quickly improved as we clocked up to 30km a day. We had proper hiking boots that we’d worn

TEXT: KIMBERLY GILLAN

‘I COULDN’T EVEN AFFORD TO PAY MY RENT’

50s

in during training and poles that we’d lean on if our knees ever felt sore. When you’re on the trail, it’s like there’s nothing else in the world. You have a complete sense of freedom, getting up each day and putting on the same clothes and your trusty boots, meeting new people along the way and chatting about the walk or life in general. We slept in homestays each night and had our luggage driven from spot to spot. It was around the 500km mark that I had a light bulb moment and thought: I need to do more walking and less working. I didn’t focus too much on looking for

‘It was around the 500km mark that I had a light bulb moment’

14

changed Victoria Rose, 65, was living in denial about her dire financial situation until she realised her bank account was about to run dry. That proved the catalyst for a fresh start

answers while I was hiking, but as soon as I got on the plane back to go home, I started hatching a plan. I got back to Melbourne and saw out my work contract and then, with an old friend and colleague Jane Reed, we started a business together called Wandering the World (wanderingtheworld.com.au). We host walking trips for people who have an appetite for active and cultural experiences in destinations including Portugal, Sri Lanka and Nepal. The real beauty of walking holidays is that you can often walk to places that you can’t get to in a car, not to mention you have the benefit of guilt-free food and wine! I feel like I now have the best job in the world.

In February 2014, I was looking at my bank account online and saw I didn’t even have enough money to pay my rent. It felt as though a big black rock had dropped into my guts; I felt so sick and ashamed. I thought by my mid-sixties I’d have figured life out. Aren’t I smart enough yet? I realised something had to change, so I asked myself, How am I going to pay the rent? I had been working as a leadership trainer, contracted to an international seminar company who paid me a low daily rate. I was very busy, on a plane up to seven times a week flying around


that

our lives the country. So from the outside I looked very successful, but the truth was I wasn’t being paid a fair amount for my efforts, not to mention the time I was away from my home in Melbourne. I found out I could access my limited superannuation, so I terminated the contract with the international company and took some time to work out what I would do next. I knew I was a good leadership trainer and had lots of contacts, but I needed help with skills to run a business. I embarked on a 40-week business accelerator course which was brilliant. Once finished I started my business, Over 60 Still Fabulous (www.over60stillfabulous.com), and added a zero to the rate I was being paid from the seminar company. I started working with big corporations and government departments, as well as baby boomers, to help people build leadership and teamwork skills, plus live a better life. I've also written a book, How to Make The Rest of Your Life the Best of Your Life: Tough Love for Smart, Single Women over 60. I’m never going to let myself get back into that financial position again. I have ridden my horse on the ups and downs of life, and I’ve finally learned I’m quite capable of creating my own happily ever after.

60s

‘A CHANCE ENCOUNTER REIGNITED A SPARK IN ME’

Esther Lalor, 75, knew little of her paternal family until fate led her to a woman who turned out to be her second cousin Growing up, I knew not to ask questions about my father’s father, whom I’d never met. The only things I knew about him was that he was said to have come from a wealthy family and he had an alcohol problem. I respected my father for not wanting to talk about it, but I was always so curious. Without Dad knowing I began sneaking around to discover more about our family history, but I only found dead ends. Then, when I was in my early fifties and working with vision-impaired people, I did a home visit to a vision-impaired woman in her eighties. We talked about how I’d grown up in Melbourne’s Footscray and she mentioned that she had family there whom she’d never met. She then asked for my maiden name. I told her and she said, ‘That’s my mother’s maiden name!’ It turned out this woman was my father’s cousin – her mother was my grandfather’s sister. I was blown away.

70s She directed me to look at a photo on her mantel, which had my grandfather in it – it was the first time I had ever laid eyes on him. On leaving she kindly gave me a brooch of my great grandmother’s. That chance encounter reignited a spark in me and so I decided to start investigating again. It was a slow process but I enjoyed it so much that I decided to do a diploma in genealogy so I could become a professional family history researcher. For my thesis, I researched my family and discovered that my grandparents were married when my grandfather was about 40 years of age. Unbeknown to my father, and possibly my grandmother, my grandfather had actually been previously married at 20. His then-wife had died in childbirth while delivering their second child. The baby survived and

my grandfather sent the infant to Perth where he was to be raised by the sister of his now deceased wife – the child’s aunty. Sadly, the baby died six months later. Further tragedy struck when his two-year-old son, whom he was caring for, also died. He had lost his entire family within eight months. I think maybe if my father – who has since passed away – and his siblings had known of their father’s life tragedies, they may have been more understanding. Now I focus much of my time researching people’s family histories, which is incredibly rewarding. Had I not met my second cousin on that fateful day, I might have put my curiosity about our family aside and never embarked on this incredible career.

‘I enjoyed it so much that I decided to do a diploma in genealogy’

15


FAMILY VALUES

Queenslanders Bianca, 36, of the Gold Coast and her mum Joy, 61, from Bundaberg, always see the best in each other

Bianca says: I would be lost without Mum. With her, there is no judgment. I can tell her anything without her thinking the worst of me – and because she’s a counsellor she’s amazing at giving advice. Whether it is to aid good communication in my marriage or parenting advice, Mum always knows just what to say.

16

Amalia and Mum definitely have a special bond – especially because she was the first grandchild. The distance is hard and it gets harder as Amalia is growing up. While I was going through IVF and struggled with fertility issues, Mum was amazing at keeping my mind at ease and reminding me to focus on myself and relax. She was always there.

Joy says:

Bianca and I have a really close relationship, as I do with my three other kids. We both have similar personalities, and because we live in different parts of Queensland we make the most of enjoying spending quality time together when the chance arises. Since Bianca’s become a mother to my eldest grandchild, Amalia, 4, I think we’ve become even closer. I was in the birthing suite for Amalia’s birth and got to witness her coming into the world. It was incredible! I was euphoric afterwards and felt really privileged to be part of it. Since then, Bianca has had some fertility issues and has had IVF. The physical distance has been difficult and at times I’ve felt very helpless. Thankfully, she is now 14 weeks pregnant with her second child and the entire family couldn’t be more excited! I see a lot of myself in Bianca. I’m already seeing parts of Bianca coming out in Amalia. It’s really lovely to see the family traits continuing down the line.

Since I’ve become a mother I definitely think I have a better appreciation for my mum, and all she’s done for me and my three siblings. Dad went away a lot for work when we were growing up so Mum did a lot by herself. I only have Amalia, with one more on the way. Mum had four kids and I marvel at how she did it so well!

Contact us: If you’d like to tell your story in Me & Mum, email us at yours@bauer-media.com.au

TEXT: LUCY MANLY PICTURE: PHILLIP CASTLETON/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU HAIR AND MAKE-UP: TANIA TRAVERS

Me & Mum


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STREET STYLE Lorraine, 58 “My style is relaxed and modern. I try to tie in a pop of colour, too – today it’s my necklace from Ari Jewellery in Brisbane. My jeans are by AG, this cashmere jumper is by Line, the jacket is David Lawrence and my bag is from Mimco.”

What you are wearing in

Karen, 63 “I own the local clothing boutique KG on Maroondah and am passionate about supporting Australian labels. Today I’m wearing pieces from my shop. My pants are by The Ark Clothing Co., this is a Tani top, Neo shoes and my sunnies are Ksubi, which I personalise by changing the lenses.”

18

Healesville There was plenty to admire in Victoria’s stunning Yarra Valley

Genevieve, 52 “Because of the weather here it’s essential to layer. I’d consider my style as casual and I usually stick to a black-and-tan palette. My entire outfit today is from Hobnob Jewels in Yarra Glen.”


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2 No wardrobe is complete without a good-quality belt. $45, Loop Leather Co. @ The Iconic

Not just for superheroes, capes can save even the most ho-hum outfit. $238, Boden 2

Leah, 39 “I have eclectic style; I love to clash prints and I shop anywhere and everywhere – even in op shops. This dress is from Melbourne label Alpha60, the jacket is vintage and so are these Wylee boots. This is a retro ’80s Swatch watch, and Vanrycke necklace from Paris.”

Katrina, 64 “I’d describe my style as eclectic and today I’m rugged up for the chill. My pants are by The Ark Clothing Co., this mustard top is by Lauren Moshi, shoes are Neo and my black top is Dizingof.”

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Turn the page


STREET STYLE

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Kerrie, 49 “My style is quite classic. I wear a lot of black, white and grey, and I like my outfits to have clean lines. My entire outfit today is from Witchery.”

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Cosy, functional with good looks to match; a parka ticks all the boxes. $149.95, City Chic

Gloria, 65 “My boots are Diana Ferrari and are perfect for the Healesville chill. I’m keeping warm in a David Lawrence top and a Creswick wool scarf.”

Be in the running for the best shoes on the street. $119.95, Skechers

TEXT: LUCY MANLY STYLING: ORLA MOLLOY PICTURES: RODNEY MACUJA/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU SEE PAGE 95 FOR STOCKIST INFORMATION

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20

What you are wearing in

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Janine, 49 “My jacket is by a label called Messina and was a present from a girlfriend in Melbourne. My boots and jeans are ones I’ve had forever and don’t recall where I got them from, but my necklace is Morris Brown. I’d consider my style as classy – hippie with a twist of chic!”

Subtle zip details update a traditional blazer. $89.95, Jeanswest


STAR DIARY Twinkle-toed Dancing with the Stars judge HELEN RICHEY, 69, reveals all about staying in love, shaking her tailfeather and ageing naturally…

Helen’s diary Anything but routine!

I’m still really enjoying working on the show. It’s always so great to see so many new faces and every season is different. What I love most about it is working with great people. We get terribly spoiled. Having lived overseas for almost 30 years, the show has actually given my husband Robert and I a life back here in Australia.

TEXT: LUCY MANLY PICTURES: NEWSPIX, THINKSTOCK

Dancing queen

I’ve been a dancer my whole life and that’s my passion. I’ve danced, coached and judged at an elite level and at one point was third in the world. I’ve been fortunate in my career to have danced in front of royalty, at Madison Square Garden and in Japan. As a young girl, I danced contemporary, classical and jazz. I had a friend whose parents owned a dance studio and that’s where I met my dancing partner, Robert (inset), who became my husband. We fell in love at first sight and we’re still together today. We’ve been together for 49 years. I would say staying married for almost 50 years is a pretty amazing achievement these days – seriously!

Retail therapy

I couldn’t have children, but you can’t have everything you want in life. Robert and I have had a great life. My

kids are my two Maltese Shih tzus. I have a brother in Adelaide, a brother in Wangaratta and Robert has a sister in Castlemaine, so we’re based in the middle of everyone. My favourite thing is for Robert to take me out and spend lots of money [laughs]. We live out of Melbourne but I love shopping in Ballarat.

Ageing in style

Happiest at home

Give something back

In my spare time I like to sew and make clothes. I used to do it a lot more than I do these days. I also like gardening and decorating. I used to play golf but stopped doing that because of tendonitis in my arm. Dancing keeps me in shape and so does the housework and the gardening.

I don’t really worry about ageing. It’s a fact of life. If you know anyone who is growing younger, let me know! I haven’t gone down the botox track because I’m happy with how I am. For those who do, that’s fine! My mother looked just as beautiful in her eighties as when she was in her forties. I don’t want to look 30 on the outside and feel almost 70 on the inside: I’ll be expected to run up the stairs quicker!

I’m the ambassador for Cal-ability (calisthenics for kids with disabilities), fundraise for the Good Friday Appeal and the McGrath Foundation. I used to teach a girl whose sister had Down Syndrome; she loved dancing and got into calisthenics. It’s a nice thing to be involved in. Catch Helen on Dancing with the Stars, Sundays at 8pm on Channel Seven

Next issue: We catch up with veteran American TV actress Marg Helgenberger 21


INSPIRING READ

Glamour girl

‘I kidnapped Jack Nicholson!’ Former top Aussie model LISA RUTLEDGE, 55, now runs a successful photography business, but Amelia Saw also uncovers her secret past as an ambusher of movie stars!

MAIN PICTURE: PHILLIP CASTLETON/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU

A

s dusk fell over Paris, friends Lisa Rutledge and Tara Shannon chatted and laughed as they walked down famous shopping strip Avenue Montaigne. It was the early ’80s, and the modelling “It girls” were at the peak of their careers, their faces splashed across Vogue covers and campaigns for Chanel, Christian Dior and Yves Saint Laurent. As the young women strolled past the gleaming shop windows, Tara spotted screen giant Jack Nicholson. “Oh my God, Jack! It’s Tara! It’s me, Tara!” she cried, despite never meeting the star of the day’s biggest box office hits, The Shining and The Postman Always Rings Twice. “He obviously didn’t want to admit he didn’t remember her, so he said, ‘Oh… yeah, hi. What are you ladies doing?’ ” Lisa recalls. The women convinced Jack to accompany them to the party they were attending at movie director Roman Polanski’s house. Then with the courage of a few hours of champagne-drinking spurring them on, Lisa and Tara decided to take their farce further. “We lured Jack into the elevator at Roman’s, took him downstairs and pushed him into his own car, and we had the driver take us all the way to my place,” Lisa says.

22

When the giggling party arrived, Lisa realised she’d forgotten her house keys – but the girls weren’t giving in there! “I managed to open one of the windows and we pushed him through the window,” she says. “Are you sure this is where you live?!” Lisa remembers an alarmed Jack yelling as the two models heaved his legs and buttocks through the window. “ ‘Yeah, yeah, it’s fine,’ we were saying,” she remembers with a laugh. After getting Jack to open the door from the inside, Lisa and Tara spent the rest of the evening laughing and drinking champagne with the star, until they “released” him unscathed the next morning. These days, Lisa’s too busy with her thriving photography business and training for triathlons to kidnap any movie stars, but the incident goes down as one of the funniest experiences of her prolific, colourful modelling past. When Lisa’s career in front of the camera slowed down in her early thirties, she changed focus to go behind the lens, making a living initially as a food photographer. She’s since expanded to child and family portraiture, weddings, and recently began taking “tasteful” boudoir

JACK THE LAD A wild ride with two buoyant beauties one fateful night in Paris doesn’t seem to have done the star any lasting harm

photography for women over 40. “It’s about getting your ‘sexy’ back on,” says Lisa, who started the racier side to her business after numerous women approached her, asking to be photographed as a personal gift for their husbands. “It’s really nice at certain stages of your life to be depicted, and women


LIFE THROUGH A LENS Leggy Lisa was also blessed with a cover girl face that graced many a magazine in her modelling heyday. Now it’s the Sydneysider framing the photos

in their forties, fifties, sixties and older are damn sexy,” she says from the home she shares with Evan, her partner of five years in Sydney’s Inner West. In her formative years on Sydney’s North Shore, Lisa says she lacked ambition and was unsure as to what she wanted to do with her life. Her father suggested she visit a casting agent in the hope she might be able to get work as an extra while she was looking for a proper job. “I happened to have crazy long legs, was thin as a beanpole and had that kind of face that with some spit and polish scrubbed up reasonably well,” Lisa modestly explains. At 18 she was snapped up by top Sydney agent Vivien’s. A year later, she relocated to New York, then Paris, where the Aussie teen had the distinct pleasure of working with some of the world’s top fashion photographers. At 21, she gave birth to her daughter Roxanne. Splitting with Roxanne’s father after three years, Lisa had to quickly learn to juggle her high-flying modelling career with life as a single mum.

Her enduring love of children naturally deepened with motherhood, something she now channels into her baby and child portraiture. She has a tight bond with Roxanne, 33, who now lives in LA. Despite having Lisa as a mum and Linda Evangelista as a stepmother, she never pursued modelling, working instead in marketing. For Lisa, life at 55 is comparatively staid contrasted with the late nights and bright lights of her modelling years – she now rises at 4am each day to ride with her cycling group – but she enjoys the self-acceptance she’s found with age. “Every now and then I look in the mirror and think, ‘I can’t believe I’m this old!’ But then I go for a walk and look around and think, ‘You know what? I look OK and I’m doing OK’,” she says. “I feel very content.”

23


BOOK CLUB

‘Fiction has the power to engage’ KATHRYN FOX, 49, reveals the thrill of writing with James Patterson, and how she presents victims as people, not clinical statistics

Write for us 24

to gain from it, it was unconditional kindness, rare in most professions.” The gripping result is Private Sydney, in which the Australian office of Private, the series’ detective agency, is searching for a missing high-profile CEO. To Kathryn, her move from medicine to full-time writing seemed a natural

progression. “I thought I could do more good as a writer by presenting victims as people and not just stats,” she says. Indeed, feedback from forensic officers in the UK suggests they learned to be more empathetic to victims via her novels, and one remote rural doctor uses her books as a guide to help conduct medical forensic investigations. “In fiction you become emotionally engaged,” Kathryn says. “I think if you write in a non-preachy way, you can educate if you want to, but readers are also being entertained at the same time. That’s the wonderful part of writing fiction.” Sadly for her fiction fans there is no new book in the works as she’s focusing on writing for film and TV. “I’m working on a screenplay on the life of Helen Keller for [actress/producer] Marlee Matlin at the moment. I met Marlee in an airport, we stayed in touch and she asked me to write it for her,” she says. With two TV series in the works, it may not be long before we see her works on the small and big screens. Private Sydney by James Patterson & Kathryn Fox, RRP $32.99, Random House

Have you read a book you think other Yours readers would enjoy? Write a review and you could see it in print. It can be a new release or an old favourite – just give us your verdict in 100 words and email yours@ bauer-media.com.au or by post to Yours, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW, 2001

TEXT: BELINDA WANIS

K

athryn Fox was a GP with an interest in forensic medicine whose first novel was about to come out when she went to a James Patterson talk at a Sydney bookshop. Little did she know that day 11 years ago would be the start of not only a great friendship, but would lead to them writing together. “I was so happy and excited to be there,” Kathryn recalls. “However, at the end I was absolutely mortified because the bookshop owner held up an advanced copy of my first book and said to James, ‘Would you like to read some brand new Australian crime fiction? This is by Kathryn Fox – and let us know what you think.’ “The next morning, the book came back with a handwritten letter from James thanking me for the book and giving me a testimonial. I just couldn’t believe it! It is actually now framed in my office.” A decade on and on a cold Friday night last year, Kathryn was contacted via her agent about collaborating with James on his Private series. “I showed my husband, thinking, Is this a hoax? ” Being such a fan, she was thrilled. “I did not want to let him down. He had been so kind to me and he had nothing


Five books by my bedside

Is this your next page-turner?

with author Gideon Haigh

Yours reveals the opening lines of a new book on the shelves. Does it make you want to read more?

The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra by Vaseem Khan, RRP $29.99, Hachette Australia

On the day that he was due to retire, Inspector Ashwin Chopra discovered that he had inherited an elephant. “What do you mean he’s sending me an elephant?” he said, turning in astonishment from the mirror in which he had been adjusting the collar of his uniform to face his wife Archana, who was hovering anxiously in the doorway, and was known to friends and family alike as Poppy. “Here, see for yourself,” said Poppy, handing him the letter. But Chopra had no time for that now. It was his final day in the office and SubInspector Rangwalla was waiting for him downstairs in the police jeep. He knew the boys at the station had planned some sort of farewell celebration, and, not wishing to ruin their surprise, he had been feigning ignorance of the preparations going on around him all week.

A CRUEL AND SHOCKING ACT by Philip Shenon

The inside story of the Warren Commission, and its sins of omissions, in investigating JFK’s assassination.

LION & KANGAROO by Gavin Souter

For the umpteenth time I’m reading this masterpiece of Australia between Federation and World War I.

GOLDEN BOYS by Sonya Hartnett Australia’s best novelist. A marvel.

RIVER OF SHADOWS by Rebecca Solnit

The weird, wonderful story of Eadweard Muybridge, forefather of cinema, and murderer.

THE ONGOING MOMENT by Geoff Dyer

A favourite writer and subject.

Certain Admissions by Gideon Haigh, RRP $32.99, Penguin, is in bookshops now

Reviews Haunting

Thriller

Self-discovery

Gripping

Heartwarming

Yasmin and her deaf daughter Ruby arrive in Alaska but husband and father Matt is not there to meet them. The truth takes them on a journey of faith over an inhospitable landscape, with daylight still 54 days away! The Quality of Silence by Rosamund Lupton, RRP $29.99, Hachette Australia

Estranged sisters Claire and Lydia reunite after Claire’s husband dies in a robbery gone wrong. She discovers he was living an horrific double life: what did he know about their sister Julia’s disappearance two decades ago? Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter, RRP $32.99, Random House

It’s 1963 and Henry and Charlotte’s marriage is in trouble. Unable to face another English winter, he convinces her to move to Australia. But Perth’s glare shines a harsh light on their lives: where does she belong? The Other Side of the World by Stephanie Bishop, RRP $29.99, Hachette Australia

After the shock of losing her home, Clare moves her daughters Grace and Pip to a tranquil block of flats in London that border communal gardens. But when Grace is attacked in the garden square, Clare wonders how safe her family is. The Girls by Lisa Jewell, RRP $32.99, Random House

Intertwined stories of celebrations, love and loss told via customer requests at Lara’s florist in Dublin. Lara rebuilds her life after a tragedy and finds joy again helping others express their feelings in floral arrangements. The Flower Arrangement by Ella Griffin, RRP $29.99, Hachette Australia 25


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Our team of experts are ready to answer your toughest questions. Ask us anything – we’re here to help

6 1 pages of

Good advice to Know

This fortnight our experts are caring for our wellbeing from head to tail. We explore the latest treatments for neck pain and hearing loss, and take a look at the refreshed healthy eating guidelines. Keep in touch with loved ones – wherever you are in the world – with the web’s top chat apps; make better decisions by knowing when to follow your instincts; and learn how to decipher what your new puppy is trying to tell you. Enjoy!

TheYoursteam

Dr Trudy Rebbeck

Dr Elaine Saunders

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Dr Lissa Johnson

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GOOD TO KNOW Ease a pain in the neck and move freely again

W

Navigating

e’ve all woken up with a frozen neck after a bad night’s sleep, but when neck pain is severe or ongoing, it can be difficult to ignore. “This is especially true when you have neck pain with headaches, which can make it even harder to concentrate or work,” explains musculoskeletal physiotherapist Dr Trudy Rebbeck. While neck problems can be debilitating, they’re not usually medical emergencies. “Less than five per cent of neck-pain scenarios are serious,” Dr Rebbeck says. But neck issues do require appropriate treatment and lifestyle adjustments to give you the best chance of minimising their impact on your life. Here’s what you need to know.

Why is it so common?

Your head weighs about 5kg and rests on a series of seven vertebrae – separated by discs, stabilised by joints and ligaments and moved by muscles – at the top of the spine. “Neck muscles have to hold your head up all day,” says Dr Rebbeck. While postural problems and injuries are the most frequent causes of neck pain, disc degeneration and arthritis are also culprits. That’s why it’s vital to get ongoing issues seen to by a GP or physiotherapist. “Try to see a physio who specialises in treating this area,” Dr Rebbeck says. Visit the Australian Physiotherapy Association web site (physiotherapy.asn.au) to find one near you, and try these strategies for managing four common types of neck pain.

b Upper neck pain

Feels like: A dull pain at the base of your skull that becomes worse as the day goes on, possibly accompanied by a headache. Possible cause: “Joints, ligaments and muscles in that region of the neck may become compressed, irritated or inflamed,” Dr Rebbeck says. People with desk jobs are typically most at risk, but now anyone looking down at an iPad or smartphone for hours may develop upper neck pain, too. Fix it: “A combination of physiotherapy and gentle exercises will help,” she explains. When sitting for long periods, don’t forget to get up out of your seat every 45 minutes and have a brief walk and stretch.

Safe spine-tuning ✘ DON’T SIT FOR TOO LONG “Change your posture regularly – get up and move around every hour,” Dr Rebbeck advises. ✔ USE A LUMBAR CUSHION Maintaining a neutral spine is more useful than being completely slumped or over-erect with your posture, she says. ✔ STAY ACTIVE “Being fit is associated with less long-term neck pain. Try Pilates, yoga or swimming,” Dr Rebbeck suggests. 30

Dr Trudy Rebbeck Musculoskeletal physiotherapist

Easy ways to lend your neck a little support

✔ BUILD UP NECK STRENGTH Lie down on your back or tummy and gently lift your head up from the bed. Carefully hold for a count of three and repeat up to five times, a couple of times a day. ✔ KEEP UP YOUR PRESCRIBED EXERCISES “Keep up anything your physiotherapist has suggested once your neck issue has resolved so you can build muscle strength and endurance,” she says. This may help to avoid recurring pain, too.

Try this at home: Stand up straight with your feet flat on the ground. Relax your shoulderblade muscles by pulling them down and back. “Then try gently nodding your chin down to stretch your neck muscles and reduce the pressure at the back of your head,” Dr Rebbeck says.

b Lower neck pain

Feels like: Your neck feels like it gets stuck when you try to turn your head or look over one shoulder. Possible cause: “After 50, it may


Health

your neck pain simply be arthritis – you might have instant or come on a few days later.” worn joints that are not moving as Whiplash may also be caused by smoothly because the cartilage a fall “or any high-velocity movement is damaged,” Dr Rebbeck says. where your head goes forwards and “Or it could be an injured joint backwards quickly.” due to recent or past trauma.” Fix it: “Treatment is similar Either way, damage to a joint to other kinds of neck pain, with can cause ligament instability a combination of manual and make muscles sore. therapy and light Fix it: “This kind of exercise,” explains reduced range of Dr Rebbeck. motion shouldn’t Try this r 50 afte d cke cra k nec r you require more at home: ing Hav stroke a of risk or min at you than two or Whiplash can put can plies sup ich wh , ery art ral teb ver three physio be exacerbated if the d. blood to the brain, is damage treatments to by staying still l Always insist on gentle manua get you moving for too long, therapy or mobilisation. again,” she says. especially if “Low-velocity techniques It should just you’re prone to are just as effective,” be a case of slouching, so move Dr Rebbeck says. your practitioner often and be mindful treating tense muscles of your posture. to help your neck move more freely. You may require b Pins and needles ongoing treatment if it’s Feels like: Pain in your neck with arthritis-related. pins and needles or numbness, and Try this at home: To help get sometimes pain in your arm and your movement back, try slowly tingling in your fingertips, too. moving your head from side to Possible cause: “The first thing side, without forcing it. “Once a physio or GP will do is to check you have it turning that way, you for nerve compression,” she says. can try to move your head gently Fix it: If a nerve is compressed, a small backwards and forwards, too,” percentage of people go on to require Dr Rebbeck says. surgical decompression. However, most of the time, pins and needles b Whiplash indicate nerve irritation rather than Feels like: “Neck pain and compression. “It just means the nerve headache are the most is irritated, which can be successfully common symptoms after treated with physiotherapy,” she says. a rear-end car accident.” Try this at home: You can avoid nerve Other symptoms may include compression by holding your neck in dizziness, pins and needles a more neutral position. For most of and numbness. us, that means pulling the chin back Possible cause: “At least so your head sits over your shoulders, 40 per cent of people who not protruding. Ask your physio to have a motor vehicle demonstrate the right standing and accident suffer whiplash,” sitting positions. A more supportive office chair or a lumbar cushion may Dr Rebbeck says. improve the way you sit, too. “Symptoms can be

Never get your neck cracked!

When it hurts, try…

TEXT: ALICIA PYKE PICTURES: ALAMY

Paracetamol When neck pain strikes, instead of reaching for a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as aspirin or ibuprofen, which can interfere with other medications, try taking a couple of paracetamol. “After the age of 50, anti-inflammatory medication can be harmful, so speak to a health professional before taking it,” Dr Rebbeck advises. Resting up Just don’t do it for too long. “Just like spraining an ankle, you might need to rest for a couple of days,” she says. If that’s out of the question, take regular breaks. Either way, don’t stay still for hours at a time. “Try turning your head from side to side – if you can’t do it while standing or sitting, try it while lying down,” she adds. Applying heat “Particularly if the muscle is in spasm, heat will help it to relax,” Dr Rebbeck says. Icing it A recent injury may benefit from applying ice or alternating ice with a heat pack. Professional treatment See your GP or physio for a confirmed diagnosis and treatment plan. 31


GOOD TO KNOW

Listen up!

F

rom the giggles of But if you’re under 60, a child playing to chances are environmental the opening bars of noise damage is to blame a special song, sound for any hearing loss. If you has the power to make your spent your teens and twenties heart soar. And then there’s going to rock concerts every the pleasure of a long chat weekend or grew up helping with a close friend. out around tractors on a farm, Dr Elaine Contemplating a world your hearing probably won’t Saunders Audiologist without hearing your be as good as someone who favourite people and sounds can didn’t – and it has a lot to do with that be downright frightening, but there’s noise exposure happening early in life. nothing to be gained from putting off “Most farmers over 45 have quite a hearing test if sounds aren’t as sharp marked hearing loss because they drove as they used to be. tractors or went shooting without ear “Hearing is a use-it-or-lose-it sense,” protection when they were younger,” audiologist Dr Elaine Saunders explains. Dr Saunders explains. That’s why experts now advise it’s best to have your hearing concerns b Heeding the signs investigated as soon as they arise. Because hearing loss is usually so “The longer you leave it, the harder gradual, it helps to recognise the it can be to adjust to a hearing aid common early indications. “You might if it turns out to be necessary.” Here’s find it a bit hard to hear when you’re what you need to know: somewhere noisy or you’ll miss occasional words and drift off from the b What causes hearing loss? conversation easily,” Dr Saunders says. While your hearing ability peaks at Other signs include needing to turn up just 10 years old and naturally declines the volume on the TV or comments slowly afterwards, most people have from friends and family. no issues until after the age of 60. “People are often accused of selective listening or told they’re not “Gradual hearing loss is very concentrating but we lose the common with age and noise ability to hear higher damage,” Dr Saunders says. frequencies first and “Two out of three people speech tends to between 60 and 70 be in the higher will have hearing pitch range,” issues but that means one third she says. This To boost your hearing, sit rs doo out et qui ly fair e are still doing explains why somewher all nds sou the to lly OK,” she says. it can seem and listen carefu can you ny “The cells in our like everyone ma around you. See how Try . are y is mumbling ears are just like notice and how far away the or you’re the cells in our ng the same exercise while listeni missing the best skin – some people to classical music and seeing bits of a group are blessed with how many instruments you conversation. “If gorgeous skin that can recognise. you feel your hearing never looks its age.”

Try mindful listening

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One in six Australians is affected by some level of hearing loss – here’s what to do

isn’t as good as it used to be, get a GP to examine your ears to make sure they’re not full of wax and they’re generally healthy,” Dr Saunders says. An all-clear from the doctor means the next step is a hearing test. If you prefer, you can start out by testing yourself in the privacy of your own home. “There are various hearing tests online, including one I helped develop called the Speech Perception Test (blameysaunders.com.au); otherwise you can go to an audiologist and they’ll do the beep test.” These tests are used to measure which sounds you can and can’t hear. “A hearing test is not a pass or fail thing,” she adds. Instead, hearing loss is described as mild (hard in some situations), moderate, severe and profound (impossible without a hearing aid).

b Taking positive steps

Depending on the results of your test, you may be advised to try active listening strategies – “that’s a method of really paying attention to listening to people while looking at them” – or it might be recommended that you be fitted with a hearing aid. Before you recoil, hearing aids are no longer ugly and obvious. The latest versions provide a comfortable listening experience based on your exact requirements of strength, range and size. While the prospect of life with a hearing aid can be daunting, there are advantages to acting quickly. “If you do find you can’t hear very well, it’s important to get a hearing aid as soon as possible because the longer you leave it, the harder it is to adjust,” Dr Saunders says. “If there isn’t a message from the ear going up the pathways to the brain, the brain forgets what to do with that information.” It might come as a rude shock but waiting too long may mean a hearing


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Health aid doesn’t help as much as you hoped. “If someone leaves it until they’re quite elderly, they might be disappointed [with the results],” she says. If you’re worried that wearing a hearing aid will be instantly ageing, it’s worth asking your audiologist about the different types, including the very discreet ones, about 2cm long, that are almost entirely hidden behind the ear. “Hearing aids are not all the same, so just because a friend has told you they have a terrible hearing aid that doesn’t mean they’re all terrible,” Dr Saunders says. While wearing one can take some getting used to, she says it can have surprising anti-ageing benefits as you’re no longer missing out on conversations. “Some people put off getting one because they think it’s ageing but a hearing aid can actually have the reverse effect; it keeps your ears fit so you can age well and enjoy life,” she says.

How to broach the subject Worried a friend or partner is losing their hearing? It can be difficult to discuss, even with your nearest and dearest. Here are Dr Saunders’ tips for handling the conversation with sensitivity: ✔ DO Use humour. “Try to encourage people to appreciate the benefits of being able to hear better by using humour to lighten the situation.” ✔ DO Offer to go the GP together. “The doctor will know how to engage them in a discussion about their

hearing and advise what to do next.” ✔ DO Be realistic. “If someone has a lot of other medical conditions, especially age-related ones, they may not be ready to be told they have hearing loss because they don’t want to confront another problem.”

Useful read Sound of Silence by Dr Elaine Saunders (RRP $27.99, New Holland Publishers)

Never ignore this symptom!

Sudden hearing loss in one or both ears can indicate a serious viral infection or major medical condition. Seek emergency treatment immediately

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GOOD TO KNOW Healthy eating rules have changed! Use our easy guide to get up to speed

Food for th

B

etween celebrity diets and the surge in reported food intolerances, deciding on the right approach to healthy eating can be a real challenge. Now, for the first time in eight years, Nutrition Australia has released a new take on the Healthy Eating Pyramid launched in 1982. Back then it was designed as a more-to-less concept of what to eat based on nutritional thinking at the time. It’s had various changes but remains a common sight Aloysa Hourigan Nutritionist, at medical centres, school tuckshops and dietary Nutrition Australia clinics. Chances are, even if you didn’t follow the pyramid to the letter, you could still picture it. So why has it changed? This year’s reboot reflects the latest official advice on what to eat, and how much. “The updated pyramid reflects the five core food groups, plus healthy fats, and how much they contribute to a balanced diet,” says Nutrition Australia’s senior nutritionist Aloysa Hourigan. “It’s based on the 2013 Australian Dietary Guidelines as some advice around the proportions of some food groups had changed over the years.”

b What’s new?

For the first time, the healthy eating pyramid puts only vegetables and fruit in the “eat-most” category at the base. Grains, cereals and breads were previously in this layer, too, but we’re now being encouraged to think of them separately. This simple change makes it easy to see exactly which foods should take up the most space on your plate and in your trolley. “When you’re thinking about your food budget, you need to allocate a reasonable amount

34

Layer by layer Vegetables and fruit

There’s a huge variety in a rainbow of colours chosen to encourage people to expand their tastes for green (zucchini, pear), red (tomato, eggplant, strawberry), orange (carrot, orange, pumpkin) and yellow (corn, capsicum, banana) plant foods. For the first time the layer shows frozen and tinned LIMIT SALT AND goods. “We ADDED SUGAR want people to MILK, YOGHURT, eat five serves CHEESE AND of veg, two of ALTERNATIVES fruit every day,” Aloysa says. GRAINS

to the bottom layers where the plant foods are – they’re cheaper than meats and dairy foods in the upper section, anyway,” Aloysa says. “And the more expensive foods at the top, like oils, are items that we don’t need to buy a lot of.” Perhaps the biggest development is in the way the new food pyramid focuses on precisely which foods are useful to keep your diet (and hopefully weight!) in balance. “We want people to concentrate on the most nutritious foods to eat,” Aloysa says. Other changes reflect the rich variety of foods on offer. “We have one of the broadest cuisines in the world due to our multicultural diversity and food supply,” she says.

Grains

VEGETABLES

AND While plant LEGUMES foods have bumped wholegrains up to layer two, they’re not out of favour. “The importance of ENJOY HERBS AND SPICES grains in your diet is actually a bit underrated but your body prefers carbohydrate for fuel,” she says. The pyramid now has a broader mix of grains (quinoa, cous cous) alongside wholemeal bread rolls and breakfast cereal. “Wholegrains provide fibre, which is good for our digestive health, and lots of B vitamins such as thiamine, which is important for our central nervous system,” Aloysa says.


Use the pyramid to plan meals Each meal should start with a base of plant foods, a type of grain, a source of lean protein and a very small amount of healthy fats

Working from the bottom up, the updated pyramid is divided into four distinct layers

BREAKFAST Grated apple mixed through oat porridge topped with yoghurt and walnuts OR Scrambled egg on brown toast with sliced avocado, tomato and fetta

Dairy, meat, eggs

“We need significant amounts of dairy foods and non-animal alternatives such as soy milk to get enough calcium for bone health,” Aloysa says. The recommended protein intake is up from one to three serves a day. You can boost your levels by eating eggs. “Eggs are a very economical and versatile food that HEALTHY FATS make it easy to get enough protein into LEAN MEAT, a meal,” Aloysa says. POULTRY, FISH, EGGS, NUTS, “Even if you have high SEEDS, cholesterol, you can LEGUMES still have up to six eggs a week.”

LUNCH Roast beef and salad sandwich on brown bread with butter OR Salad of quinoa, spinach, cucumber, capsicum and pine nuts with tinned tuna in olive oil

DINNER

Healthy fats

Atop the pyramid you’ll now find healthy fats. The recommended daily intake is 14g to 20g for women under 70, and 28g to 40g for men CHOOSE WATER under 70. “It’s important to get enough polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats in your diet,” Aloysa says. Polyunsaturated fats are split into those containing omega-3s (canola oil, salmon, sardines) and those with omega-6s (nuts and seeds). For monounsaturated fats, try avocado, sesame oil and peanut butter. A mix of both can help protect you against arthritis, asthma and heart disease. FRUIT

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hought

Nutrition

Wholemeal pasta bake with tomato, eggplant, mushroom, basil and mozzarella with chicken breast coated in almond meal OR Curried beef mince, pumpkin, cauliflower, lentils and coriander with brown rice and a dollop of yoghurt

SNACKS Sliced pineapple with mint and coconut yoghurt OR Cottage cheese with celery and carrot sticks OR

Small piece of cheddar and a few red grapes OR Hard-boiled egg on a rye cracker

35


GOOD TO KNOW

How can I ease her pain?

Helping your daughter through miscarriage

T

he announcement that a new grandchild is on the way can be one of life’s most exciting moments, but the sad reality is that every year in Australia, one in four of these pregnancies (103,000) will end in miscarriage, leaving parents and grandparents devastated. “The bereaved often need to lean on the support of their loved ones, but this can be difficult to give readily if you don’t know how to act or what to say,” says Lyndy Bowden, chairperson of Sands Australia, a support service for those dealing with pregnancy loss. But you can navigate this painful process and provide needed support.

Lyndy Bowden Chairperson, Sands Australia

Dr Lissa Johnson Psychologist

b Address their grief

The most important thing you can do is to let your daughter know you’re there for her and acknowledge that the loss and grief she’s feeling is real, says

psychologist Dr Lissa Johnson. “It’s natural for us to want our children’s pain to ‘go away’, but rather than finding solutions or trying to alleviate their grief, be ready to give your child the time and space to grieve in their own way. When they want to talk, talk. If they want to sit in silence or cry or get on with things as normal, take their lead.” Lyndy recommends reading up on miscarriage and grief, listening without expressing judgement or offering advice. “You need to remember that the baby is a life, one your daughter had already

Dos and don’ts Knowing what to say after the loss of a baby is difficult. Lyndy offers her tips DON’T SAY… ✘ “Something was wrong with the baby.” This may cause added stress in future pregnancies. ✘ “You’re still young, you can have another.” Babies are not replaceable, this baby was a loved and wanted. ✘ “Thank goodness you weren’t further along.” Why? Grief is grief. 36

✘ “You shouldn’t have worked, you overdid things.” Your daughter will already be blaming herself and it’s generally unknown why miscarriages occur. ✘ “You’ll get over it.” No, your daughter will not get over it, she’ll get through it. ✘ “I know how you feel.” Even if you have also had a baby who died, your daughter’s grief is unique.

DO SAY… ✔ “I know there’s nothing I can do to fix this, but if you just want someone to talk to, I’m here whenever you need.” ✔ “It’s not your fault.” ✔ “I can’t imagine what you’re going through right now.” ✔ “I know how much you wanted this baby.”

TEXT: DILVIN YASA PICTURE: GETTY IMAGES/POSED BY MODELS VISIT LISSAJOHNSON.COM.AU *NAME HAS BEEN CHANGED

What to do when your child’s pregnancy ends tragically


Relationships

b Acknowledge your feelings

Witnessing your own child suffering as you both mourn the loss of the baby can be a double sorrow, especially if it brings back memories of similar personal loss decades earlier, Lyndy says. “Your pain is as real as theirs and it’s important to acknowledge this with family, friends or support services such as Sands.” Dr Johnson agrees taking time out to grieve is crucial. “Without detracting from or overshadowing your child’s grief, you need to find support for yourself and notice what you find healing – whether it’s rest, time Sands is a not-for-profit with your family, organisation that promotes or solitude – and well awareness and education, as allow yourself those as offering ongoing support to things.” To help you nds frie and s ilie fam s, come to terms with started to ent par can You y. bab a of s los your loss, consider make plans following the the via es vic creating something for, and now access these ser line t por tangible to help you those future 24-hour national sup honour your grandchild, hopes and on 1300 072 637 or via such as a piece of jewellery dreams are sands.org.au or art, or planting a tree. shattered,” she says. Consider buying a small b Remain patient memento to honour the child, or a baby book to create memories from the Grief has no blueprint or use-by date pregnancy that you can work on together. so pressuring your daughter to move on can be detrimental, says Dr Johnson, adding that this can make people more b Offer practical support likely to become stuck. “Instead, listen Grief can bring with it all kinds of out for your child’s attempts to come emotions which make the day to day to terms with their loss as time goes difficult. Rather than asking if there’s on, and support their search for ways anything you can do – this pressures to honour the baby they have lost.” your daughter to come up with ideas Using the baby’s name in conversation – pitch in on a domestic level. Lyndy and marking anniversaries such as the suggests cooking and freezing meals, due date can help. doing the laundry, grocery shopping, While your daughter may eventually caring for their other children, or going move on she may never be the same to appointments with your daughter, again. If you’re concerned her grief has as being the most helpful. “You can slipped into depression, seek help from also let others know of the devastating a healthcare professional or call Lifeline news but only after checking with your Australia on 131 114. daughter and her partner first.”

Further support

Case study

‘I just let her grieve’ Pauline, 67, from Victoria, knew only too well the pain her daughter suffered after the loss of her unborn baby

When Bianca* announced she was pregnant with her third baby, I was thrilled for her. That said, because I’d lost my fourth child, Ben, a day after he was born (it was discovered he had a condition called microcephaly), pregnancy announcements – no matter how delightful – always brought up strong emotions in me, so I was cautious. Bianca didn’t indicate that there was anything wrong with the pregnancy, but when she was four months along she chose to go to the hospital for an ultrasound, only to be advised she had experienced a “missed abortion” and that her baby had died. I was devastated by the news and concerned for my daughter and her family, but having experienced a newborn death myself I was aware of the deep emotions she would experience and I knew there was nothing anyone could do to take away her pain. I also knew I would experience grief again, so I had to work hard to rise above it and be there for my daughter. I made endless cups of tea and let Bianca shed her tears and talk as much as she wanted to. That was what she needed, and looking back I believe our shared experience only served to strengthen our relationship.

If you’re in a position to assist financially, doing so can also alleviate the pressure meeting medical costs, possible funeral costs, or perhaps even allow your daughter to stay home from work a while longer while she recovers.

37


GOOD TO KNOW

Stay in touch fo FACEBOOK

SKYPE

Nic Healey Senior editor, CNET Australia

P

erhaps you’re enjoying life on the road with a caravan What it does: The undisputed in tow, trundling from state leader of connectivity, Facebook to state, camping ground to lets you tell people what you’ve been camping ground. Or maybe your doing via photos or text, and see kids have moved interstate or gone what your friends are up to. off on adventures of their own. Or How it works: Set up a profile then it could be that life just gets too start adding “friends”; people you busy and conflicting schedules mean know. You’ll start seeing what they you don’t catch up with family and post in your feed and vice versa. friends as much as you’d like. Best for: Keeping in touch with a At the last census count in 2011, big group of people and an excellent the Australian Bureau of Statistics way to see what younger family found that only eight per cent members have been doing. of older people (those aged over 65) live with a family member other WHATSAPP than a spouse. And it’s not This built-in app is available just a case of on all recent Apple devices being spread (iPhones, iPads and desktops) around this and allows users to make wide brown free video calls over wi-fi land. When but only to other it comes to Apple users. heading overseas, What it does: Sends texts, retirees are the new videos and photos to people in your kings. In fact, nearly phone contact list who also have the a quarter of all Aussies heading app. You can also create groups to abroad for a year or less are aged message multiple people at once 55 or over. So how do you conquer and even make phone calls. that tyranny of distance? Well, How it works: Just download and like so many things these days start chatting! It automatically lists a smartphone or tablet app can help. your phone contacts who also use Here are eight suggestions which the app – unlike Skype, you don’t cost you nothing and will allow you need to request or accept anyone. to chat with loved ones, no matter Best for: Texting people overseas; how great the distance. you won’t rack up roaming costs.

What about FaceTime?

38

What it does: This video calling app lets you chat face-to-face with people in real time. How it works: Sign up for an account and you can contact anyone else using Skype for free, either via text chats or, better still, video calls. For an often minimal charge you can also use it to call landlines and mobiles. Best for: Video phone calls! It’s a great way to not only hear but see how the whole family is doing.

VIBER

What it does: Similar to WhatsApp, Viber also has a desktop version for your PC which, like Skype, lets you make video calls. How it works: Viber uses your own contact list to find people you can chat to straight away. You can share text messages, images and, on the desktop version, make video calls to other Viber users. Best for: If you like the sound of Skype and WhatsApp but don’t want both, Viber is a good middle ground.


or free

Technology

These eight apps will keep you connected to friends and family, wherever you are in the world

INSTAGRAM

What it does: Lets you take, edit and share photos. How it works: When people follow your account on Instagram, they’ll see the photos you post in their feed. However, you can also tag an image using hashtags. For example, if you add the text “#travel” to the caption of a holiday snap you post, anyone who searches for that tag can see your photo as well. Best for: Photography buffs who love seeing other people’s snaps.

TEXT: NIC HEALEY PICTURE: GETTY IMAGES

INBOX

What it does: This is Google’s new Gmail app. It’s a cleaner, simpler way of organising your emails. How it works: A watered-down version of your desktop Gmail, it categorises your emails – making your inbox easier to manage – and shows the highlights of a message without having to open it. Best for: People who want to get the gist of an email at a glance. If you enjoy penning and receiving longer emails, give this one a miss.

SNAPCHAT

What it does: Share images and short videos with either a single person, or multiple recipients. How it works: Make an account and start adding friends. You can then take photos or videos to send to people or even short videos. The recipients can only see what you send for a limited time. Best for: Anyone who loves to document the little things in their day, but not have it lurking around the internet for years to come.

FACEBOOK MESSENGER

What it does: An instant messaging service that allows you to privately send text, images or videos to your Facebook friends. It used to be part of the Facebook app, but now it’s a separate application. How it works: Find the person you want to communicate with and start chatting. It can also be used like email to send longer messages. Best for: If you have Facebook, then you really want the option of having private messaging as well. 39


GOOD TO KNOW

The art to being fashionably thrifty

How to op-shop like a pro Top tips for finding that hidden treasure at your local second-hand store

S

ure, it may have gone out of fashion for a while but op-shopping is back. Securing a unique, well-made designer bargain is satisfying Faye De Lanty enough, but knowing Fashion you’re also helping commentator out a charity while improving your wardrobe – well, that’s worth bragging about! It’s been revealed that 97 per cent of Australian women have donated to charity stores, and 88 per cent have bought from them, so there’s no longer any stigma attached. National Op Shop Week (August 23-30) may be high time to rediscover your local thrift store to find something unique and affordable. But what’s the best way to unearth a cracking find at a charity shop? “In most stores we have areas where we promote better quality and ‘brand’ clothing,” says Neville Barrett, general manager of The Salvation Army Salvos Stores. “The Salvos Street Boutique is

40

being rolled out in Op Shop Week to make these items more available and obvious to our customers. Also, our new campaign, ‘The Style Army’, means all stores will have an allocated area for better-quality merchandise,“ he says. Here’s how to score a bargain:

b Know where to look

Most stores keep their designer finds in glass cabinets or on shelves behind or

above the counter. Stock is generally locally sourced so there’s the chance to pick up a bargain at any store. “Wealthy areas can be good for getting some key labels, but sometimes there may not be as much awareness about certain brands in more suburban or country areas so it can be a really great place to grab a unique find,” says fashion commentator Faye De Lanty, who curates the Salvos Street Boutique Store in Sydney.


Finance b Allow plenty of time

Charity shops aren’t as visually appealing as chain and designer stores, they don’t have colour-blocked areas and a lot of stock will be on the racks and shelves. It means you need to take time going through what’s there to really assess it and find those hidden gems.

b Check the labels

You should be looking for more than just a designer name; a lot of information can be gleaned from the tags inside the clothing. Go for natural materials such as 100 per cent wool, cotton, silk or leather, or blends with cashmere, linen, new wool or mohair. Also look to see where the garment was produced – “Made in Italy”, “Made in Australia” or “Made in France” tags may represent lesser-known, low-key labels that are well made.

b Picture it in your wardrobe ROUGH DIAMONDS Opportunity knocks for sunnies, bags, clothes and homewares

TEXT: BELINDA WANIS PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES

b Be label aware

Knowing the names of good labels and designers makes it easier pick them out. Not everyone working in an op shop has an interest or knowledge about fashion so many good labels could be overlooked and put in a corner or hidden in the middle of the racks. You won’t necessarily find a good label in your size every time you shop, but when you do it’s like hitting the jackpot!

b Know what you’re after

The sheer volume of clothes available in these stores can be overwhelming so go in with an idea of what you want. Search for a trend but be aware it may be a little easier to pick up last season’s. Good-quality classics never go out of fashion, so always be on the lookout for black pants, a camel coat, a white shirt or little black dress.

Finding items to complement what you already own is one way to search. A busy patterned jacket may not look special in the shop, but it could look great teamed with your classic black pants, a singlet and your best jewellery. And those quirky home accessories could become quite the talking point.

b Take a risk

Think outside the box to repurpose an item to great effect. “There is so much you can do with upcycling. Look at the trends in magazines and then consider doing it yourself,” Faye says. A champagne bucket could be used as a planter for an orchid, a scarf can make a fabulous belt, and furniture can be painted with an ombre look so mismatched pieces look like they go together. Pinterest is a great place to get upcycling ideas.

b Go often!

There are always new things coming into op shops so visit regularly. Be friendly to the staff, often volunteers, who can let you know when bargains arrive. People often throw out clothes in the New Year or the start of a season.

Op shopping Dos and Don’ts Eco fashion blogger and Salvos Store brand ambassador Faye De Lanty’s tips for finding a gem: ✔ DO go in with an open mind. Treat op-shopping as you would any other shopping experience. Look for the same indicators – beautiful fabric, great quality, an interesting cut, unusual design or a colour that really draws you in. ✘ DON’T buy things that are too damaged, broken or stained. Check everything thoroughly first and consider whether you’ll get around to fixing it and a rough cost. ✔ DO buy electricals. We have people specifically assigned to check that electrical goods are working. We don’t put anything out that doesn’t work and we very rarely get anything that isn’t up to scratch. ✘ DON’T dismiss shoes. A lot of boots are worn with socks but I also get antibacterial wipes and give the inside a thorough wipe and spray them with some air freshener, and they’re fine. If they look pretty new and feel good then I think they’re fine, but it’s a personal thing. ✘ DON’T buy something just because it’s a designer brand. If an item is falling apart and can’t be fixed or doesn’t fit properly, it’s still not worth it, regardless of the make. ✘ DON’T focus on vintage. There’s a misconception that op shops only stock vintage clothing. They also have a whole heap of almost-new current-season clothes. ✔ DO think before you haggle. If there’s nothing wrong with the item, accept the price; it’s for charity! But if the zipper is broken or the hem’s down, you can ask for a discount. 41


GOOD TO KNOW Learn to distinguish when you should trust a rational decision and when it’s better to just go with your emotions

D Dr Cindy Nour Psychologist

Head Vs

ecisions, decisions. You make thousands every day. Coffee or tea? Fish or chicken? Read a book or watch TV? Throw in the big stuff – career, relationships, finances and health – and decision fatigue gets ramped up a notch. Going with your head, not your heart, is often touted as the smart strategy, but research stakes a claim that tuning into gut instincts can be beneficial. One study found participants who relied on instinct made the right call up to 90 per cent of the time. But when it comes to decisions, there isn’t

a one-size-fits-all approach, so instinct is a helpful addition to your emotional toolkit. Life strategist and author Domonique Bertolucci urges people to make decisions instinctively, then back them up with head-based thinking. “First, tap into your instinct, then reconcile that feeling with your head to see if it’s the right fit,” she says. Some situations call for more head-based logic, others may rely on intuition and feelings – or a mix. Our experts look at common life decisions and explain whether to go with your head or trust your gut.

b Quitting your job

b Ending a relationship

At some point, you’ve probably fantasised about telling your boss what you really think and storming out of the office! Or maybe a career opportunity popped up and you agonised about taking it. While shouting, “I quit!” after a rough workday seems appealing, clinical psychologist Dr Cindy Nour says weighing things up, rather than making rash decisions based on gut instinct, is essential. “This sort of decision requires a logical approach and planning, because the reality is that you need money to survive,” she says. But that doesn’t mean you should ignore your gut entirely. If those feelings keep bubbling away, listen to them and find less impulsive ways to act on them. “Take note of your frustrations so you don’t stay in unideal situations,” Dr Nour says. “Gut instinct can be the reminder you need to do something about what’s making you unhappy – but then follow through with a more rational approach.” VERDICT: Use your head, but don’t completely ignore your gut instinct.

Love isn’t black-and-white – there’s a lot of grey, and we’re not talking about the Fifty Shades variety. The decision to leave or stay with someone can be tough and influenced by many factors, including guilt, self-confidence, finances and fear. But with one in three marriages ending in divorce, it’s a reality many face. “Love is blind and relationships are complicated, so try to tune into your gut feelings,” Dr Nour says. “People are good at rationalising and explaining away thoughts and emotions, but this means we sometimes ignore the warning signs that we’re in an unhealthy or an unhappy relationship.” Your mission? Be honest with yourself and your partner about what you want, and reach out to a trusted friend or psychologist if you need extra support. VERDICT: Trust your gut about what will really make you happy.

42

Did you know? Scientists often refer to the gut as the body’s “second brain”. An ETH Zurich university study even found gut instinct plays a major role in giving the brain a heads-up about looming threats.


Heart

TEXT: GABRIELLE TOZER PICTURE: GETTYIMAGES

b Making an expensive purchase Houses, holidays, cars – if you’re in the market for something big, don’t whip out your credit card just yet. Your gut might be saying, This is it! I can feel it, this is our dream home. Let’s get it even though it’s $95,000 over budget, but your head then needs to work overtime so you don’t end up drowning in debt. “Making an expensive purchase needs to be a rational, considered decision,” Dr Nour explains. “It can be easy to mix impulse decisions with a gut feeling. The last thing you want to do is make an expensive purchase based on an impulse.” Her advice? Stay measured – and Domonique agrees. “Before buying anything big, ask yourself if this is the right thing to do,” Domonique adds. “Otherwise your gut might get you caught up in the excitement and adrenaline of it all.” VERDICT: Use your head.

Psychology b Disputing a diagnosis

It’s not uncommon: you feel a niggle so you go to the doctor, but their verdict is not what you expected. You don’t feel “right” about the diagnosis, so what’s your next move? Sorry, gut, but this is now head’s territory. “Stay as logical as possible with this scenario, as many people mix up gut instinct and anxiety,” Dr Nour says. “Tests can give you all the evidence you need, and a doctor can help you to find the answers. Leave this one to the experts.” If a nagging doubt just won’t go away, seek a second opinion from a doctor – but not Dr Google. “Googling your symptoms will only make you more anxious to do with your health,” Dr Nour says. VERDICT: Trust your head – and also the experts!

b Telling a friend an uncomfortable truth Facing this type of moral decision is complicated with a capital “C”. Maybe you’ve been told a close friend’s partner is having an affair or heard a rumour that may really concern her. Should you speak up? It’s tricky, the experts says, so respect boundaries. Be there for your friend without interfering. “Use your head to ask yourself how you’d feel if you were in this situation,” Domonique says. “What would you need? What would you want?” Then, if you can’t shake the feeling that your friend’s in strife, or you fear she’s going to make a detrimental decision, step in. Otherwise, the experts recommend playing it safe rather than dropping uninvited emotional truth bombs. VERDICT: Steer clear of emotional decisions. Think of the impact and trust your head.

b Trusting someone again Whether you’ve been cheated on, lied to or betrayed, rebuilding trust is hard – and sometimes impossible. A University of California study found we’re better at identifying liars when we rely on our initial responses – yes, instinct – rather than thinking about it too much. In such an emotional situation, Domonique insists it’s essential to approach the issue rationally. After all, our emotions can confuse things even further, especially if the betrayal or lies are fresh. Distance yourself from the situation and give yourself time to process it. “The best indicator of future behaviour is past behaviour,” Domonique says. “If this person hasn’t demonstrated they can be trusted again, then it’s wise for you to be wary.” VERDICT: Approach with caution and use a combination of heart and head.

Get in tune with your gut feelings Believe or not, your gut instinct can be faulty or even “off”. While it may feel like your body is trying to talk to you, sometimes a tight, churning stomach is just that (or you might’ve had a bad oyster!). Remember, fine-tuning your intuition is like working out a muscle

– the more you use it, the stronger it gets. “Journals can help you to process feelings and tap into your intuition,” Dr Nour says. “Not rushing your decisions or seeing how they play out also helps.” For more advice, talk to a counsellor or psychologist. 43


GOOD TO KNOW

Learn to sp teenager.” Here’s how to decode eight typical messages your pup might be trying to convey.

b I’m happy

When your puppy’s feeling happy and outgoing, its tail will be up, but relaxed (not stiff ), its mouth will be loose, without any tension in its muzzle, and its eyes will be naturally open, neither narrowed nor wide and rounded. It may go into the classic “play bow”, with its front end down low, forepaws extended, and its tail and bottom in the air.

Dr Julie Summerfield Veterinary surgeon

Here’s how to read the eight key messages your little dog might be trying to send you

G

etting a new dog is exciting for the whole family, but being the best owner you can be is tricky – unless you know how to read your puppy’s body language and understand its cries and barks. “You can learn an incredible amount about a puppy’s personality by watching how it behaves,” says Andrew Banks, animal behaviourist and author of

44

The Secret Language of Puppies: The Body Language of Young Dogs. “Every dog is an individual and the more you know about your pup’s personality, the stronger your relationship will be. “If you get used to training your puppy and paying attention to how it behaves every day, right from the beginning, you won’t get a nasty shock when it becomes a large, enthusiastic

“A hungry puppy might show you it wants food by trying to chew things, nipping or ‘mouthing’ and other attention-seeking behaviours, such as jumping and whining, especially around food and their bowl,” says veterinary surgeon Dr Julie Summerfield. “These behaviours can also be associated with other non-food motivators but young dogs have a faster metabolism and need feeding more often while they are growing than mature dogs. The best way to ensure that they aren’t hungry is to set up a feeding schedule of about three to four meals a day, dropping down to two by about 10 months.”

b I’m cautious

Some puppies will confidently climb all over an adult dog (and may receive a canine slap down in response), others approach with caution. They may use a range of “calming signals” to slow down a direct encounter. These might include looking away from the older dog, sitting down and scratching, yawning and sniffing the ground. They’re all intended to convey that the puppy’s intentions are friendly and not

TEXT: BELINDA WANIS PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES

b I’m hungry


peak puppy! confrontational. Your pup may use the same body language when meeting new people, too. A yawn, a quick flick of the tongue over its nose, or a glance away from the new person are all signs of caution. Let the puppy approach in its own time, when it’s ready.

b I’m confused

Few well-socialised puppies have problems understanding what other dogs are telling them. Human body language, however, isn’t nearly as clear to them. Watch for signs your puppy is telling you it’s confused or worried about what you expect. Sitting at an angle to you (non-confrontational), suddenly scratching or keenly sniffing around when it doesn’t need to go out are all classic signals. Yawning and quick flicks of the tongue over the nose can be signs, too.

b I’m scared

A fearful puppy may be reluctant to come to you, may grovel submissively or pee when you pay it attention. Its eyes will be wide and rounded, possibly with a little bit of the whites showing; its back will be rounded and its posture stiff and still. Its tail will be lowered and perhaps tucked between its back legs, and its ears may be flattened to its head. An extremely timid puppy may even run or hide. Don’t move towards the pup or make eye contact until it’s happy to approach, and never force it into direct contact. Play with a toy or offer small treats to tempt it to engage.

b I feel threatened

This pup’s tail, ears and the hair on the back of its neck and along its shoulders may rise – all to make it appear bigger

and taller. The pup’s eyes may narrow, and its lips may pull back to show teeth. It may even lean forward, ready to lunge if it feels it’s necessary. Show the pup you’re not a threat by staying still, avoiding direct eye contact, and don’t reach out towards it. You don’t want to force it into a reaction.

b I want attention

A puppy often jumps up for attention. Don’t acknowledge the jumping at all or you’ll be “rewarding” it with your attention. Instead, turn your whole upper body away and cross your arms. Most puppies will be surprised by this and many respond by sitting down. Even if it doesn’t, the pup is unlikely to try to jump again. The moment its feet are on the floor, turn back, praise and treat it.

b I’m sick

“Dogs have many ways of telling you they’re sick: from unusual behaviour, lethargy or irritability, tummy problems, breathing problems, changes in bathroom habits, physical signs of pain and lumps, and neurological signs, such as seizures or twitches,” Dr Summerfield says. “You know your pup best so if you see any changes and are worried, take it to the vet.”

Practical read For more insights, read The Secret Language of Puppies by Andrew Banks (RRP $19.99, Allen & Unwin)

Pets Which puppy is best for you? Want an adorable little puppy? Vet Dr Holly Goldring matches the best breeds to your home life… Sharing with a cat Try: “Boxers. They’re super-friendly and are good with company. Steer clear of working dog breeds that like to chase and round up other animals and hunting breeds, for obvious reasons.” If you’re less active Try: “Smaller dogs such as Cavalier King Charles spaniels, Maltese terriers and bigger breeds like mastiffs and bulldogs. They tend not to do quite as much.” Apartment living Try: “Designer poodle cross-breeds like cavoodles and groodles; they’re good for smaller apartments as they don’t shed. Beagliers (beagle-cavaliers) and pugaliers (pug-cavaliers) also do well in smaller spaces.” Rural or semi-rural living Try: “Border collies, kelpies, German shorthaired pointers, Weimaraners and Dalmatians. They all like a lot of space.” Living alone Try: “Poodles or cavaliers. They’ll happily sit on your lap all day, every day, so make good companions.” Living with allergies Try: “Poodles and poodle crosses – because they don’t shed. However, top of the list for hypoallergenic dogs are schnauzers and Bichon Frise as they have the least amount of dander [shedding skin].” Living in busy households Try: “Labradors, as they love change and parties and are incredibly social. Other social breeds are Maltese terriers, Shih Tzus, Cavalier King Charles and cavoodles; they’re all happy to interact with children. Avoid guard dogs as they want to look after a family and take their jobs pretty seriously, so they’re not very happy with lots of comings and goings!” 45


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moment, or have a favourite recipe or cheeky pet to tell us about? Have you taken a life-changing journey? This is your place to share the wonderful in your life, so join the conversation and keep those letters and emails coming.

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Your say Dear Yours,

I loved Judi Dench in The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. The film had so many great actors in it and the scenery in India was vibrant. It was a fun and lighthearted movie, and showed older people can still have fun and enjoy their life. I’m 66, and Judi gives me great inspiration for the years to come in my later life. I’m so pleased she has found a new love in her life with David Mills, after the death of her beloved Michael Williams many years ago. Keep making those films Judi, and I shall be there watching them! Karen, 66, Brisbane, Qld

Whilst I agree in principle with Kerri-Anne Kennerley’s reply regarding friendships and retirees (Yours, Issue 38, p91), I felt it a little harsh. Not all of us are WINNING as confident or as brave (or as LETTER beautiful) as Kerri-Anne. Retirement can be a challenge. It takes adjusting to. It’s a huge change and, as with all changes, brings with it a sense of loss and sadness. Without the rituals, structure and purpose of our professional lives, many of us ask: “Who are we now?” And with all that free time we can feel lost, and thus may have higher expectations of family and friends with differing availability. of the organisations and groups in As a social worker, I worked with your area you can take part in. Consider many people who found that when volunteering, trying an exercise class, they retired, instead of the joy they or joining a book club. U3A is another expected, they actually became organisation offering discussion rather lonely and depressed. groups, outings, lectures and short “Get a life” is good advice, but courses on a wide range of subjects. where to start? Making new friends All of these will offer possibilities for can be difficult as we age. But new friendships and interests. starting a new episode can be So get out there, alone, but not lonely! exciting – there are so many options Life is exciting and is to be enjoyed. and possibilities out there! Carpe diem – seize the day! I suggest contacting your local Ann, 74, Mount Martha, Vic council, which will have a directory

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MEETING PLACE IT’S NEVER TOO LATE…

‘I met my sponsor child in Kenya’ Gay, 63, a nurse from Yanchep, Western Australia, was thrilled to connect with her African sponsor child She lives with her grandmother in a basic mud hut that doesn’t have running water or electricity. The whole community was very welcoming and since the children learn English at school, and with the help of an interpreter, we were able to interact and relax over a cup of their sweet, milky Kenyan tea. Despite having sponsored children in Africa for 30 years, I never felt a close connection to their lives. Visiting Naomi in remote Kenya was a high point in my life. It was revealing to see the basic conditions they live in and the meagre

Our gorgeous pet 48

Name: Tilly (aka Tilly Boo Boo Child) Age: 1.5 years Breed: German shorthaired pointer Loves: Getting under the covers and snuggling, swimming, using her paws like hands to help herself to food on the bench, sleeping, and being anywhere we are! Dislikes: Walking on wet grass, having a bath. We love her because: She has no idea how big she is, she always climbs into our laps for cuddles or climbs into bed with us and pushes us out. Lauren, 41, Sydney, NSW

SURREAL EXPERIENCE (Left) Gay with Naomi and her gran; (above) on a tour of the village

crops they are trying to grow to make a living. I was surprised at the level of emotion I felt when visiting Naomi – it was an unforgettable experience, both a pleasure and a privilege. To find out how you can sponsor a child like Naomi, visit worldvision.com.au

MY HAPPY BIRTHDAY…

I recently celebrated my 70th birthday surrounded by loved ones. It was a big deal because none of my immediate family has reached 70. Now I’m aiming for the big 8-0! Rosemary, 70, Toowoomba, Qld

TEXT: LUCY MANLY PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES, SNAPPER MEDIA

A

fter a long career in nursing I was able to fulfil a dream of volunteering as a nurse in Kenya. It gave me a break from regular nursing and the opportunity to travel. While there, with the help of World Vision, I was able to organise a visit to our 12-year-old sponsor child, Naomi, who my family has sponsored for eight years. Initially shy and hesitant, Naomi later became quite talkative and proud to show me her village.


ONE OF THE GALS…

Homemade vanilla ice-cream

Ingredients 600g sweetened condensed milk 600ml thickened cream (full cream) 1 tsp vanilla extract

WINNING PHOTO

Dear Yours, I’m part of a dancing group on the New South Wales Central Coast called The Gals. The group has been going strong for over two decades – people have come and gone but the name has stayed on. We range in age from 55 to 76 and are all female, although we occasionally require the assistance of a male. We’re all fairly fit with a few of us suffering some aches and pains, but we do what we can!

FLASHDANCE Julie (left) kicks up her heels with a dance troupe

I love dancing, dressing up and performing and The Gals is a great social outlet, full of fantastic ladies. We rehearse once a week for a good two-and-a-half hours and perform two shows per week. Our performances are often in retirement villages and elderly homes, and we performed for a local Rotary club. Because our audiences aren’t able to get out much we bring the entertainment to them! Julie, 67, Avoca Beach, NSW

You could win! Every issue there are two $50 WIN $50!

prizes to be won for original contributions which haven’t been published in any other magazine. We do try to publish as many letters as we can. Those not printed help us to keep in touch with your feelings and concerns and we enjoy reading

Method 1 Put all ingredients into mixing bowl and combine until thick. 2 Place the mixture into a plastic container, cover with an airtight lid and freeze for 8 hours or overnight. 3 Serve with fresh berries, or your favourite topping. Anna, 61, Oakhurst, Qld

them, but we can’t always reply to each one. We like to include photographs, so please send them with your letters and, if you want them returned, write your name and address on the back. Please don’t send in your only copies of precious photos as these can go astray in the post. Digital images need to be high resolution (minimum 500KB). 49


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TEXT: MARKEETA WADDINGTON PICTURES: ALAMY SEE PAGE 95 FOR STOCKIST INFORMATION

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BEAUTY

Glam up just like Jerry

Copy the Texan knockout’s red-carpet look: bold lips, big hair and dramatic eyes!

1

GIVE SOME SERIOUS LIP

TEXT: KRISTY BRADLEY PICTURE: GETTY IMAGES SEE PAGE 95 FOR STOCKIST INFORMATION

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STUN WITH KILLER CHEEKBONES Jerry Hall, 59

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BRIGHTEN YOUR BASE Before applying any make-up you should always prep your face: cleanse, tone and moisturise. Apply cream blush (see above), then follow with a moisturising blur foundation for an even-toned complexion. TRY: Max Factor Miracle Match Foundation,

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MAKE HAIR COLOUR RADIATE

To prevent colour fading, give your hair regular treatments and use tailored shampoos and conditioners. Blonde or grey? Use a silver or purple-based shampoo to banish brassiness and lock in shine. Brunette? Apply a weekly gloss treatment. Red? Choose an enhancing shampoo and conditioner. TRY: John Frieda Colour Refreshing Gloss, $16.99; Joico Color Infuse Red Shampoo, $29.95

53


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Not only is blue universally flattering, different shades of this cool colour rarely clash so you can mix–and–match. If subtle is more your style, start with a navy base (like denim jeans) and style it as black.

Top, $24.99, W. Lane Cardigan, $22.95, Forever New Skirt, $118, Boden Shoes, $190, Sambag Bag, $22.95, Colette by Colette Hayman Necklace, $44.95, Majique


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Set the tone of your spring wardrobe by styling an entire outfit – right down to the details – based on a single hue

GREEN There are two ways to colour–block this hue: vibrant and fresh, or nature-inspired, but never combine the two. Not sure what will suit? Mint works best with paler skin tones, while muted khaki complements olive skin.

Shirt, $69.99, Jeanswest Pants, $59.95, Sara @ Ezibuy Shoes, $219.95, Ecco Bag, $60, Jendi Sunglasses, $149, DKNY @

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PINK

While undoubtedly sweet, all–over pink can look sophisticated. Play up the femininity with a fun print and bright accessories, or make it edgy with masculine pieces in a muted pastel or salmon shade.

Jumper, $39.90, Uniqlo Pants, $88, Boden Shoes, $149.95, Florsheim Bag, $129.95, Ecco Snood, $29.99, Forever New Necklace with pendant, $307, Nikki Lisson

STYLING: REBECCA O’HEARN PICTURES: ROB SHAW/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU SEE PAGE 95 FOR STOCKIST INFORMATION

FASHION


PURPLE Shirt, $79, Boden Pants, $149.95, Sportscraft Shoes, $190, Sambag Bag, $22.95, Colette by Colette Hayman Necklace, $16.95, Colette by Colette Hayman

Plum is the ideal trans-seasonal shade

Use rich jewel tones to frame your face in the cooler months as lilac can make your complexion look washed out, then switch to a softer palette in summer when your skin has more of a sun-kissed glow.

Jacket, $49, Target Dress, $99.95, City Chic Shoes, $219.95, Ecco Bag, $329.95, Ecco Necklace, $64.94, Majique

57


HOMES

s r e m r a w h t r a He

Makeover your mantel

A fireplace is the perfect perch to display everything from flowers to books and your favourite pieces of art

Framed print, from $180, Urban Road

Geranium bush, $24.95, Rogue @ Albi

Segovia vase, $44.95, Amalfi

Lantern, $54.95, Madras Link

Billie vase, $79.95, Amalfi Lotus Flower candle, $49.95, Talulah

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Get the look A fireplace is usually the focal point of a room, and your mantel Scott should be Mardi National marketing equipped manager, Laura Ashley to take centre stage. Follow these easy decorative ideas for an eye-catching mantel


Glansig tealight holder, $1.99, IKEA

Lewis velvet cushion, $29.95, Designers Choice @ Zanui

Celeste vase, $39.95, Amalfi

Berkley cushion, $79.95, Laura Ashley

Copper planter, $49.95, Laura Ashley

Eden throw, $69.95, Laura Ashley

COMPILED BY KELSEY FERENCAK PICTURE: COURTESY OF LAURA ASHLEY SEE PAGE 95 FOR STOCKIST INFORMATION

Canberra chair and footstool set, $439, SkyBlue @ Zanui Choose an anchor piece How you style your mantel depends on your decorating preferences, but the easiest place to start is with an anchor point such as a mirror, a piece of art or floral display placed directly above the fireplace to enhance the focal point. Add some personality Group treasured items, ornaments or decorative pieces together on each side of the mantel, preferably in odd numbers. Pick up on colours and materials found elsewhere in the room, and choose objects of varying heights. You can even place a stack of coffee table books on one corner.

Play with scale Incorporate smaller and larger objects, and create asymmetrical displays which will make your mantel decor appear relaxed and natural. A round mirror will add flow to a room dominated by straight lines. Take care to not overcrowd the mantel, and be aware of any fire hazards. Change for the seasons During the warmer months when you’re no longer sitting by the fire, swap in candles for ambience and a introduce a mix of bright fresh flowers for a summery feel. Keep ornaments and decor in the same vein as soft furnishings.

Dali lanterns, $135.95 (set of two), Wayfair

Pinwheel rug, $79.95, Amalfi 59


GARDENING

Bring a touch of the tropics to your garden, no matter the local climate

Tropical illusion 60


N

aturally the easiest place to get a lush, tropical garden is the tropics, but if you live further south where the climate is cooler it doesn’t mean you have to forgo your dreams of exotic surrounds. While you can’t expect tropical natives such as heliconias and crotons to survive in less-than-ideal conditions, you can still create a backyard oasis that looks lush all year-round. You just need to combine the right selection of exotic-looking plants: flamboyant foliage, glossy greenery and dramatic blooms, and set them against a suitable backdrop such as a fish pond or swimming pool. Our plant “cheat sheet” on p62-63 will help you choose wisely. So take your pick then get planting – your tropical escape awaits!

Gold for Australia ENCORE, ENCORE! The flamboyant blooms of cymbidium orchids can be enjoyed for weeks on end

TROPICAL PUNCH It’s hard to go past a wattle in full bloom For a really effective and not be impressed. And with about 700 look, create good density different types (pictured is thea Mount Morgan of plantings from the wattle) native to Australia, there’ll be one ofground up. Make sure to bring these showy shrubs or small trees that’s right in plants plenty of for you. August to September is with peak wattle colourful foliage, such season, but there’s a wattle in bloom as cordylines and New somewhere every month of the year. They’re Zealand flaxes, as these fast and easy to grow, demanding only full sun will add visual interest and good drainage, but not maintenance-free. year-round. Also use longShear a wattle straight after its flowers flowering plants such as finish, to keep it dense, compact and looking strelitzias and cymbidium good. And you can forget the myth that orchids introduce wattles cause hay fever – their to pollen’s simply colour for several weeks too heavy for the wind to carry. at a time. Native ferns such as the maidenhairs (Adiantum spp.) and bird’s nests (Asplenium spp.) thrive in cool zones. Even the castiron plant (Aspidistra elatior) can look the jungly part in a shady spot, as can the renga renga lily (Arthropodium cirratum), a native of New Zealand.

Spot treatment

Many of the plants featured on the cheat sheet are good performers in cool-climate, coastal zones such as around Melbourne and Adelaide. However, if you’re in a more marginal area, such as the mountains or Tasmania, you might have to fine-tune the placement of some varieties to help them get through the chilliest winter days. Look for the warm microclimates in your backyard. Top spots include north-facing brick or stone walls as these absorb heat by day and gently radiate it back at night. Another option is to put the more delicate plants in pots so you can move them inside or at least onto your verandah, if a particularly frosty night is forecast.

Theme party

Aside from an excellent planting scheme, to mimic a resort-style oasis you’ll need to add design elements that help tie the theme together. A plain paling fence isn’t exactly tropical, but cover it with bamboo or brushwood cladding and you instantly gain an untamed vibe. Also consider introducing art and finishing touches from warmer parts of the world that complement the theme. It could be Balinese statues, a Buddha, native masks, carved stone lanterns, bamboo torches or wind chimes, thatched roofing for a shed or pergola, carved seats or benches, and colourful scatter cushions for seating.

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THE RAINFOREST CANOPY 4M+ MIDDLE LEVELS 1.5-4M GROUND LEVEL TO 1.5M 62

CHINESE WINDMILL PALM (Trachycarpus fortunei): Probably the best palm for cool-climate zones, it can reach 4-10m in a garden bed, less in a pot. Plant in full-sun or partial shade in fertile, well-drained soil, but protect it from strong winds when young.

NIKAU PALM (Rhopalostylis sapida): A native of NZ, this slow-growing palm eventually reaches 6m and has an attractive, slender trunk and a distinctive crown of very straight leaves. For best results, plant in a humid, sheltered, semi-shaded spot.

TREE FERN (Dicksonia antarctica): A native of Australia’s mountain gullies, this slow-growing fern can eventually reach heights of 6m when planted in its ideal conditions – a cool, moist, shady spot – but 1-1.5m tall is common in gardens. It’s very frost-hardy.

EUROPEAN FAN PALM (Chamaerops humilis): With its attractive, fan-like leaves, this sun-loving palm can tolerate temperatures down to -15°C and will grow to 2-3m. You’ll also see this sold as the Mediterranean fan palm in some nurseries.

NZ CABBAGE TREE (Cordyline australis): One of the best choices for cool zones, this NZ native reaches between 2-4m in most gardens. Available with bronze, red or cream-edged leaves, it’s a tough plant that loves sun and isn’t bothered by cold snaps or dry spells.

NZ FLAX (Phormium tenax and hybrids): There are oodles of NZ flax varieties and their strappy, colourful leaves can add valuable year-round richness to your scheme. Sizes vary depending on the variety, but between 60cm-2m is typical.

SAGO PALM (Cycas revoluta): Japanese sago palm is a cycad, not a palm, but it has that palm-like look and copes well with cold temperatures in cool, coastal zones (but not mountains) in a sunny spot with good drainage. It’s also a good choice for pots.

BIRD OF PARADISE (Strelitzia reginae): With its orange-and-purple flowers emerging from its clump of broad leaves, this is a hardy plant for cool, frost-free spots. Clumps can grow to 1-1.2m high. If flowering slows down after a few years, dig up, divide and replant.


PICTURES: BRENT WILSON/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU, GETTY IMAGES, LEIGH CLAPP, LORNA ROSE

BAMBOO (Bambusa spp. and cvs.): You need to be careful to choose a non-invasive clumping bamboo, not a running bamboo, but plants such as Bambusa oldhamii make a great foliage background for other plantings, or can be used to screen an unattractive fence.

BANGALOW PALM (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana): Although these 20m tall palms are happier up north, they are still worth a try in warm, sheltered spots in coolclimate coastal zones as they most certainly can survive if given enough attention.

RHAPIS PALM (Rhapis excelsa): Forming dense clumps with leaves to the ground, this palm is often grown as a potted indoor palm but give it a spot outdoors with filtered light and it will do well – though growth will be slow. In full sun its leaves may burn.

OTHER SMALL PALMS Linospadix monostachya (pictured): Good in shady spots in humid coastal areas, growing to about 3m tall. Arenga engleri: The dwarf sugar palm grows to 3m and is best in a semi-shaded position; it can tolerate light frosts.

JAPANESE AUCUBA (Aucuba japonica): Varieties such as “Gold Dust” and “Variegata” have gold-spotted leaves. They like partial shade as too much sun will scorch the leaves, but they will perform in cold zones, growing to 1.2-1.8m tall.

FATSIA (Fatsia japonica): This frost-hardy, evergreen shrub or small tree reaches between 2-4m in beds, offering large, hand-like green leaves up to 30cm-wide and sprays of white flowers in autumn. It performs best in a shaded or semi-shaded spot.

DWARF PHILODENDRON (Philodendron “Xanadu”): Forming small clumps up to 1m high, this hardy plant with glossy green foliage likes a sunny or semi-shaded, frost-free spot and doesn’t mind being splashed with water from a swimming pool.

BROMELIADS Though these plants are from the tropical jungles of Central and South America, many do surprisingly well in cool-climate coastal gardens. They’re easiest to grow in pots in a 50:50 mixture of ordinary potting mix and orchid potting mix. 63


What to do in your garden this fortnight

GARDENING

Fanning the f lames

Yours’ gardening guru CHARLIE ALBONE just loves the warmth of a fire

W

ith every bone in my body I’m willing spring on. I just can’t wait until the warm evenings are back and I can enjoy alfresco dinners once again. For now, to keep warm, I’m installing the fire pit that was the centrepiece of my Chelsea Flower Show display in my garden here. It holds a special place in my heart as in my design it represented my wife, the centre of the design, the fire in my life. Fire pits are a great addition to any garden as they bring warmth, an evening’s entertainment and make the outdoors more usable all year round. My fire pit is huge, almost two metres across, and made of sandstone so it will become a focal point in the garden.

BURN FOR YOU A fire pit lets you enjoy the outdoors – all year round

It also weighs nearly two tonnes, so understandably it may not be suitable for every garden! Other options for fire pits include simple metal braziers, chimineas and metal fire bowls, all of which can be used for warmth – and to convince people to enjoy the great outdoors! These three options all have the added benefit of being somewhat portable (not while in use, obviously!), so they

Charlie’s tips for…

Getting decked out T he Aussie deck is synonymous with outdoor entertaining. A deck should be built by a licensed and experienced professional, with the decking board chosen carefully for the right mood. Selecting the correct size and material is vital for the best look. A 90mm-wide board is standard and creates a streamlined look. A board 130-140mm can create impact in a small space, but can also help put large decks into scale with the size of the deck. As for material, soft wood or treated pine is the most cost-effective and easy to install as it’s lightweight and there is rarely the need for pre-drilling screws, which also 64

saves time when installing. The standard 90mm-wide decking boards cost about $5 per lineal metre; 140mm-wide boards are around $9 per lineal metre. The finished look of treated pine can have a “cheap” appearance and while painting can help, it leads to ongoing maintenance issues. I like to use a stain, something out of the ordinary such as a light stain of charcoal or black, as they can give treated pine somewhat more of an authentic hardwood look. However, these dark stains won’t suit every style of garden. Hardwood decking boards have a high-end finish and add a beautiful texture

ALL ON BOARD A deck can be quite a value-adding feature


Ask Charlie

Do you have a gardening question? Charlie can’t wait to answer it! a We love our tree dahlia, which

and warmth to the garden but they do come at quite a premium: $6-$9 for 90mm, $12-16 for 130-140mm boards. Hardwood decking also costs a bit more to install as you need to pre-drill all holes before screwing or it can split. However, it does suit most garden styles and I think it looks best with a simple natural oil finish. Composite decking boards are relatively new on the market and range from $10-$40/lm, with the cheaper options looking quite fake and unattractive. The expensive boards look fantastic but are pricey. My pick of the composite boards are those that look nothing like timber and only really suit a modern garden. Their biggest drawcard is the low ongoing maintenance.

PICTURES: ANDREW FINLAYSON/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU, GETTY IMAGES

don’t occupy your valuable garden real estate all year round. When choosing a spot for a fire pit, make sure it’s not a flammable surface, such as a deck, and it’s somewhere you can sit to enjoy the warmth. It’s also a good idea to protect your plants from the radiating heat from or they’ll burn. This is also true for your grass; the heat can quickly burn a large spot in your previously green lawn!

is almost in full flower. How can we prevent it from reaching four to five metres tall? It would be much easier to admire if it was nearer the ground! Alan, Surf Beach, Vic The clue to this is in the name of the plant – tree dahlia! This variety of dahlia grows very large and makes an eye-catching spectacle in the garden. You could try to stunt it by not feeding it during the foliage-growth part of its life cycle, and then as soon as you see flower buds feed it with a fruit-and-flower fertiliser to aid blooms – but I’ve never tried this. Instead, why don’t you grow another variety of dahlia that grows closer to eye level? There are a few varieties that have a similar flower to the tree dahlia, including “Pinkie O” and “Collarette”.

a I have two varieties of hibiscus growing in pots. The one with frilly cream flowers looks reasonably healthy, however the other, an orange hibiscus with a burgundy centre, has curled-up leaves. They’re still a healthy green, but

Contact us:

the curling worries me. Please advise what fertiliser or treatment would be suitable. Amanda, Narembeen, WA This could be two different things. It could be viral – and let’s hope not as there’s no cure! The other cause could be a sap-sucking insect. Insects such as aphids, mites and thrips all suck the sap of the plants, which in turn will distort the leaves and make them curl. Have a close look on the plant for tiny white or green insects and spray them with horticultural Watch Charlie as oil such as he whips gardens Eco-Oil.

Do you have a gardening issue or question for Charlie? Email us at yours@bauer-media.com.au

Tune in

into shape on Selling Houses Australia on The LifeStyle Channel 65


GET CRAFTY

Make your own

COUCH cushion Brighten up your lounge with this DIY dazzler in a quirky quilt pattern! YOU WILL NEED ● Fabric for front (We used

Top tip Don’t worry if the stitches aren’t straight: that’s a part of making your cushion beautiful and unique!

66

two main panels for the front and lots of scraps for the patches) ● Fabric for back ● Iron ● Pins ● Needle ● Thread (We used pale pink, pale blue, pink and gold) ● Sewing machine and thread ● Cushion stuffing


DIFFICULTY RATING ★★★

Instructions

1

Arrange the background fabric panels and fabric patches on a flat surface.

STEP 7

7 STEP 4

STEP 2

2

4

Pin together the two main fabric panels for the front of the cushion. Sew the two pieces together using a tiny running stitch.

Push the needle in and out of the fabric several times before pulling the thread through. This speeds up the stitching process a little and also produces a nice texture.

8

Cut the back panel to size. Pin the right sides together and sew a seam 1.5cm from the edge on a sewing machine. Leave an opening of 10cm on one side for the stuffing.

Move the fabric pieces around until you’re happy with the composition.

TOP TIP Take a photo of the arrangement with your phone to use as a visual reference STEP 9

9 STEP 5

5

Pin the patches in place on top of the front panels. Sew the patches in place with running stitch.

6 STEP 3

3

Iron down the hems of each of the fabric patches.

Once all the patches are sewn in position, start sewing rows of running stitch over the whole panel. Stitch a few rows using one colour of thread, then change the thread colour and sew a few more rows. Continue in this manner, alternating the thread colour.

Remove the pins and turn the cushion cover right sides out, then add the stuffing.

10

Pin the open hole together, turning the edges of the fabric under, then close the hole with hand stitching.

Top read This is an edited extract from Make & Do by Beci Orpin (RRP $39.95, Hardie Grant) 67


TRAVEL

G N I G N A H C E F I L 20 S E C N E I R E P X E E CRUIS Before you book your next voyage, check out these must-do getaways on water

A

sk any fan of high seas holidays and they’ll tell you there’s a dream cruise they hope to take. For some it might be taking a step back in history to cross the Atlantic and for others it might be seeing abundant wildlife, but whatever floats your boat, here’s 20 ideas to get you dreaming.

THE GREEK ISLANDS This corner of the world is ideally suited to cruising; myriad islands, whitewashed villages, olive groves and sandy beaches. Exploring the Mediterranean on one of the masted Windstar yachts allows you to visit places you may otherwise miss, and immerse yourself in a unique history and culture where brilliant blue water meets sun-bleached ruins. How much? From $4492 for seven nights, multiple departure dates from October. Call 1300 857 437 or visit traveltheworld.com.au 68

THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER The glamorous American Queen paddlewheeler crosses the fabled waters of the mighty Mississippi year-round, visiting southern US destinations such as New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Alton. How much? From $3695 per person, twin share, for nine days from New Orleans to Memphis, departing November 14. Visit americanqueensteamboatcompany.com GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND This 34-day tour combines 23 days on land in England, Scotland and Ireland, with 11 nights on MS Hebridean Sky. How much? From $22,190 per person, twin share (fly free, paying only taxes, if you book before October 31). Call 1300 196 420 or visit aptouring.com.au


ANTARCTICA It’s a wilderness with an “other world” quality accessible only by ship, and during the southern hemisphere summer you can explore it all on National Geographic Explorer on a 12-day cruise from Ushuaia, Argentina. Be prepared for the spectacular calving glaciers and icebergs, and enjoy encounters with adorable gentoo penguins. How much? From $14,410 per person, twin share, departing November 28. Call 1300 361 012 or visit au.expeditions.com

THE PANAMA CANAL Cruise for 19 days from Miami to San Francisco, passing through the canal’s winding waterways aboard Crystal Serenity. How much? From $10,996 per person, twin share, departing January 5, 2016. Call 1800 251 174 or visit wiltrans.com.au

NORWAY Viewing the Northern Lights in Norway is a truly magical experience. Cruising with Hurtigruten gives you a choice of ships, departures between October and March 2016, and itineraries from six to 14 days. How much? From $2490 per person, twin share, for six days from Kirkenes to Bergen, departing October 30. Call 1800 623 267 or visit discovertheworldcruising.com.au THE KIMBERLEY Known for its deep gorges and sky-high waterfalls, the only way to explore this ancient wilderness is from the water. Kimberley Quest II cruises this remote part of Western Australia between March and September, visiting a line-up of natural wonders including King George Falls and Montgomery Reef, with activities including crocodile spotting, fishing and hiking. How much? From $9639 per person, twin share, for eight days from Broome to the Hunter River, multiple departures in 2016. Call 1300 156 035 or visit kimberleyquest.com.au

SOUTH AMERICA Experience all the colour of this exotic continent aboard Sea Princess, visiting 27 ports in 18 countries. How much? From $17,999 per person, twin share, for 84 days, departing January 11, 2017. Call 132 488 or visit princess.com

PERUVIAN AMAZON It’s one of the hottest destinations right now and from next year you can explore this part of South America on Avalon’s new Amazon Discovery (pictured). The journey combines land stays at Cusco, the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu, and a three-night cruise exploring remote tributaries with the chance to spot rare pink dolphins. How much? From $6659 per person, twin share, for 11 days, multiple 2016 departures. Call 1300 230 234 or visit avalonwaterways.com.au

Turn the page


TRAVEL FRENCH POLYNESIA French charm, idyllic islands, colourful coral reefs, marine life, pristine beaches and warm hospitality are just some of the highlights making Tahiti and its surrounding islands a dream destination. There’s no better way to explore this part of the Pacific than on the luxury MS Paul Gauguin on a round trip from Papeete, Tahiti. How much? From $8132 per person, twin share, for 14 nights, departing April 16, 2016. Call 1800 251 174 or visit wiltrans.com.au

RHINE-MAIN-DANUBE CANAL This popular river cruise route follows three of the world’s great waterways from Amsterdam to Budapest. Over 15 days you’ll sail on the Scenic Jasper through Hungary, Austria, Germany (pictured) and The Netherlands, enjoying historic castles, vineyards, charming towns and villages, and the must-see city of Vienna. How much? From $8095 per person, twin share (including flights to Europe, taxes not included), departing May 9, 2016. Call 138 128 or visit scenic.com.au

CANADA AND NEW ENGLAND Cruising is the best way to enjoy this region’s natural beauty, and it’s an ethereal experience as Liberty of the Seas sets off from New Jersey and glides down the Saint Lawrence River. How much? From $1543 per person for nine days, twin share, multiple departures. Call 1800 754 500 or visit royalcaribbean.com.au THE DOURO RIVER All-inclusive luxury and the sun-washed jewels of Spain and Portugal await you on a 13-day cruise of the Douro Valley aboard Queen Isabel. Highlights include the picturesque coastal city of Lisbon, Porto (pictured), Spain’s Golden City of Salamanca, Madrid, and activities including wine tasting, fine dining and flamenco shows. How much? From $6499 per person, twin share, numerous departure dates. Call 1300 780 231 or visit uniworldcruises.com.au

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TRANSATLANTIC CROSSING In a bygone era this voyage between Southampton and New York was the only way to sail from the old world to the new. Today it’s a chance to relive the adventure on a week-long cruise on one of the world’s best-loved ships, the Queen Mary 2. How much? From $1839 per person, twin share, departing July 17, 2016. Call 132 441 or visit cunard.com


TEXT: JOANNA HALL PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY IMAGES, SHUTTERSTOCK PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY AND CORRECT AT TIME OF PUBLICATION

SECTION MARKER ALASKA Shaped by glaciers, this is a dramatic landscape of sky-high peaks, deep fjords, and abundant wildlife. On a Princess Cruises’ tour you get to explore the best of Alaska on land and at sea, visiting Denali National Park and calling in at ports including Ketchikan, Skagway and the capital city of Juneau. How much? From $1569 per person, twin share, for 10 nights on Island Princess from Vancouver to Whittier, departing May 21, 2016. Call 132 488 or visit princess.com

THE NORWEGIAN FJORDS Get the best views of the fjords from Azamara Quest on a 15-night round trip from Amsterdam. How much? From $7029 per person, twin share, departing August 11, 2016. Call 1800 754 500 or visit azamaraclubcruises.com

THE MURRAY RIVER Australia’s best-known waterway is the third longest navigable river in the world after the Amazon and the Nile, and is dotted with quaint townships and blessed with a stunning landscape. Exploring the river on the inland paddlewheeler PS Murray Princess is the way to go. Choose from three, four and seven-night itineraries. How much? From $926 per person, twin share, for three nights. Call 1300 729 938 or visit murrayprincess.com.au

THE GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS This isolated group of volcanic islands is a tropical paradise also home to creatures you won’t find anywhere else in the world. From 2016, you can see it all on a four-night cruise on the newly refurbished MV Santa Cruz II, part of a 27-night tour of South America also taking in hot destinations Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires. How much? From $15,995 per person, twin share, multiple departure dates. Call 1300 196 420 or visit travelmarvel.com.au

AROUND AUSTRALIA Circle Australia from Sydney on MS Volendam, a 33-day cruise with highlights including the Great Barrier Reef (pictured) and the Top End. How much? From $7098 per person, twin share, departing October 19, 2016. Call 1300 987 322 or visit www. hollandamerica.com.au

RUSSIA AND THE BALTICS Think of Russia and two cities spring to mind: St. Petersburg and Moscow (pictured), and on the 13-day Viking River Cruise you’ll get to explore both. But there’s another side of Russia; towns such as Uglich and Yaroslavl are blessed with opulent palaces and cathedrals, and cruising is the easiest way to see them. How much? From $7395 per person, twin share, multiple departure dates. Call 1800 131 744 or visit vikingrivercruises.com.au 71


TRAVEL 1

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2

Mercure Hotel, Sydney From $151 per night Offering well-appointed rooms in a handy central location, this makes the perfect base for exploring the city, harbour and Chinatown.

2

Best city breaks

on a budget Want an affordable capital city getaway? Try these top picks from accommodation expert Trivago for less than $200 a night!

5

7

Hotel Ibis, Adelaide From $107 per night Offering serious bang for buck, standard rooms here lay on a Samsung Smarthub TV, which you can watch from the comfort of your luxurious Ibis “Sweet Bed”.

3

Quest Savoy, Hobart From $109 per night Just a hop, skip and a jump from the Salamanca markets and the ferry to the incredible Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), the Quest’s serviced apartments also enjoy a prime position overlooking Hobart’s historic waterfront.

4

Pensione Hotel, Melbourne From $94 per night Short on space (the standard room is just 11sqm!) but very generous on style, the Pensione

8

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is smartly decorated and offers free wi-fi, reverse-cycle airconditioning and tea and coffee-making facilities, all set out in a gorgeous turn-of-the century building.

5

The Sebel, Brisbane From $159 per night Large suites and apartments with a contemporary fit-out make this a comfortable and convenient choice, especially if you’re travelling with family or friends.

6

H Hotel, Darwin From $155 per night Close to shopping, attractions and the nightlife, the funky interiors and garden-wrapped pool are a peaceful oasis in the buzzy city centre.

7

Rendezvous Hotel, Perth From $156 per night It’s only 20 minutes to town but you’ll feel a world away as you gaze over the sparkling Indian Ocean from the comfort of a sleek, modern room, with all the shopping and dining Scarborough’s Esplanade has to offer right on your doorstep!

8

Aria Hotel, Canberra From $165 per night Parliament House and the National Gallery can wait! You'll be tempted to stay in your room all weekend, enjoying the rainfall shower, iPod dock and Foxtel on offer.

TEXT: EMMA VIDGEN, BELINDA WANIS ALL PRICES ARE APPROXIMATE AND SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY

1


SOUTH AMERICA

Captivating and full of life, South America will defy imagination and demand your attention as you discover a kaleidoscope of thriving cities, ancient icons, unspoilt landscapes and unique wildlife on a premium Travelmarvel holiday.

Highlights of South America LIMA 2 MACHU PICCHU 1

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23

money-saving meals

EAT WELL

! s s e l r fo

Low FAT

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Meat FREE

Low CARB

Gluten FREE Healthy options

Less than $3.50 per serve


COOKING

W

elcome to this bumper cooking special, with 23 money-saving recipes to help you eat well on a budget. You’ll find easy-to-follow, healthy recipes that will be on the table in 30 minutes or less. What’s more, all feature nutrition counts and cost less than S3.50 a serve. Enjoy! Amanda Lennon, Editor, recipes+

Fennel, fish & broccoli bake SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 20 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1408KJ • 8G FAT (2G SATURATED) • 40G PROTEIN • 21G CARBOHYDRATE • 9G FIBRE • $3.45 A SERVE

• 2 fennel bulbs, cut into wedges,

fronds reserved • 2 carrots, thickly sliced diagonally • 1 red onion, cut into wedges • 500g broccoli, cut into florets • 3 teaspoons lemon pepper seasoning

1 2

Preheat oven to 220°C. Grease a 2-litre (8-cup) rectangular ovenproof dish. Combine fennel, carrot, onion, broccoli and 2 teaspoons of the lemon pepper in a large bowl. Spray with oil. Place in prepared dish.

• cooking oil spray • 4 x 150g firm white fish fillets • 1 tablespoon capers, rinsed • 2 teaspoons shredded lemon zest,

plus wedges, to serve • 4 slices sourdough bread

Bake for 10 minutes, or until almost tender. Top vegetables with fish. Sprinkle with remaining lemon pepper and capers. Bake for 10 minutes, or until just cooked. Sprinkle with zest. Serve with lemon wedges and bread.

3

Low fat 76

Low carb


Lemongrass beef & broccoli stir-fry

Soy pork with tofu a

a

SERVES 4 • PREP 15 MINUTES • COOK 10 MINUTES • NUTRITION 1049KJ • 8G FAT (2G SATURATED) • 28.5G PROTEIN • 12G CARBOHYDRATE • 7.5G FIBRE • $3.45 A SERVE

• 400g budget beef rump steak,

fat trimmed, sliced • 2 tablespoons lemongrass paste • 2 cloves garlic, crushed • cooking oil spray • 500g broccoli, cut into florets • 1 red capsicum, sliced • 1/3 cup fat-free French dressing • 300g Chinese cabbage (wombok), shredded • 3 green onions, chopped • 1/3 cup coriander leaves

1

Combine beef, lemongrass paste and garlic in a glass bowl. Spray with oil. Heat a wok or large frying pan over moderate heat. Stir-fry beef, in batches, for 2 minutes, or until cooked. Transfer to a heatproof bowl. Spray broccoli with oil. Add to wok. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add capsicum and half the dressing. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add the beef and remaining dressing. Stir-fry for 1 minute, or until heated. Remove from heat. Add the cabbage, onion and coriander. Toss to combine. Serve.

SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 5 MINUTES • NUTRITION 1787KJ • 14G FAT (3.5G SATURATED) • 29G PROTEIN • 43G CARBOHYDRATE • 1G FIBRE • $3.40 A SERVE • 2 teaspoons gluten-free cornflour • 1 tablespoon water • ½ cup salt-reduced gluten-free

chicken stock • 1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine • ½ teaspoon sugar • 1 tablespoon gluten-free light soy sauce • 1 tablespoon chilli paste

1

Combine cornflour with the water in a large bowl to form a paste. Stir in stock, rice wine and sugar. Whisk soy sauce, chilli paste, garlic and ginger in a separate bowl. Heat a wok or large frying pan over high heat. Spray mince

2

• 1 clove garlic, crushed • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger • 300g lean pork mince • cooking oil spray • 600g silken firm tofu, drained, cut into

16 cubes • 3 green onions, sliced diagonally • 3 cups cooked long-grain white rice

with oil. Stir-fry mince for 2 minutes, or until browned. Add soy sauce mixture; bring to the boil. Add tofu, then gently stir in stock mixture. Simmer for 1 minute, or until heated. Top with green onion. Serve with rice.

2

Gluten free Vegetable cottage pie

Meat free

SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 20 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1765KJ • 7G FAT (3G SATURATED) • 26G PROTEIN • 59G CARBOHYDRATE • 22G FIBRE • $3.45 A SERVE • 2 teaspoons vegetable or olive oil • 1 leek, pale section only, thinly sliced • 2 cloves garlic, crushed • 375g cauliflower, cut into florets • 1 large carrot, finely chopped

• 2 x 400g cans diced tomatoes • 2 x 400g cans brown lentils, rinsed • 1 cup frozen peas • 2 large floury potatoes • ½ cup freshly grated parmesan

Preheat the oven to 220°C. Heat oil in a large saucepan over moderate heat. Add leek and garlic. Cook and stir for 3 minutes, or until soft. Add cauliflower, carrot, tomatoes and lentils to pan. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low. Simmer, covered, for 5 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Stir in

peas. Season. Spoon vegetable mixture into a 2-litre (8-cup) ovenproof dish. Coarsely grate potato. Using hands, squeeze excess liquid from potato. Combine the potato and parmesan in a bowl. Season. Scatter the potato mixture over vegetables. Bake for 12 minutes, or until golden and bubbling. Serve.

1

2

Turn the page


COOKING Roast vegetable frittata SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 20 MINUTES • NUTRITION 1115KJ • 12G FAT a (5G SATURATED) • 19.5G PROTEIN • 17G CARBOHYDRATE • 5.5G FIBRE • $3.40 A SERVE • 500g pumpkin, coarsely chopped • 2 zucchini, coarsely chopped • 1 large red capsicum, coarsely chopped • 1 red onion, cut into wedges • cooking oil spray

• 100g reduced-fat feta • 6 eggs, lightly whisked • 60g baby spinach leaves, shredded • 125g cherry tomatoes, halved • 1 tablespoon gluten-free balsamic vinegar

1

mixture evenly over pan; pour egg over. Cook over moderate heat for 5 minutes, or until golden underneath. Place pan (but not handle) under grill for 5 minutes, or until top is just set. Cut into wedges. Combine the spinach and tomato in a bowl. Add balsamic vinegar. Toss to combine. Serve the frittata with salad.

Preheat the oven to 220°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Arrange the vegetables in a single layer on prepared tray. Spray with oil. Bake for 10 minutes, or until tender. Transfer the vegetables to a large bowl. Add feta. Toss to combine. Preheat oven grill to high. Spray a 24cm non-stick frying pan with oil. Spread vegie

2

78

Gluten free


Roast kumara, bean & rice salad SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 20 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1682KJ • 10.5G FAT (1.5G SATURATED)

Low fat

• 14G PROTEIN • 57G CARBOHYDRATE • 5G FIBRE • $3.35 A SERVE • 400g kumara (orange sweet

potato), halved, thickly sliced • cooking oil spray • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds • 300g green beans, trimmed • 450g packet microwave long-grain brown rice • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

1

Preheat oven to 220°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Place kumara on prepared tray. Spray with oil. Sprinkle with cumin seeds. Bake for 10 minutes, or until almost tender. Add beans; bake for 10 minutes, or until tender. Meanwhile, heat rice as packet directs. Cool in

2 Grilled fish with Asian pesto SERVES 4 • PREP 20 MINUTES • COOK 10 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1395KJ • 17G FAT (3G SATURATED)

• 28G PROTEIN • 13G CARBOHYDRATE • 1.5G FIBRE • $3.50 A SERVE • 4 x 120g (about 2cm thick) dressing, plus 1/3 cup extra • 2 tablespoons warm water firm white fish fillets • cooking oil spray • 120g baby leaf salad mix • 2 tablespoons unsalted • ½ x 425g can baby beets, peanuts drained • 1/3 cup coriander leaves • 1 red onion, halved, thinly • 1/3 cup mint leaves sliced • 2 cloves garlic, crushed • Lemon cheeks, to serve • ½ cup bought French

1

Spray fish with oil. Season. Preheat a char-grill pan over moderate heat. Cook fish for 4 minutes each side, or until browned and cooked. Transfer to a heatproof plate. Cover with foil and rest for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, to make pesto, process peanuts, coriander, mint and garlic in a blender until combined.

2

With motor running, gradually add dressing in a thin, steady stream until combined and almost smooth. Add the warm water. Blend until smooth. Combine salad mix, beets and onion in a bowl. Drizzle with extra dressing. Toss to combine. Place on plates. Top with fish and pesto. Serve with lemon cheeks.

3

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Low carb

• 2 teaspoons wholegrain

mustard • 2 tablespoons seed mix • 100g baby spinach leaves • 250g cherry tomatoes,

halved • 2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled,

quartered lengthwise

a large bowl for 5 minutes. Combine lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl. Season. Add half to rice; toss to combine. Add kumara mixture, seed mix, baby spinach and tomato to rice mixture. Toss to combine. Serve salad topped with egg. Drizzle with remaining mustard.

3


COOKING

Pumpkin, spinach & chickpea curry

Tuna & bean salad SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 5 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1197KJ • 8G FAT (2G SATURATED) • 20.5G PROTEIN • 32G CARBOHYDRATE • 6G FIBRE • $3.45 A SERVE

• 3 slices gluten-free bread, torn • 1 clove garlic, crushed • 1 tablespoon ground sumac • cooking oil spray • 400g can four bean mix, rinsed • 400g can chickpeas, rinsed • 250g cherry tomatoes, halved • 185g can tuna in springwater, drained • 125g baby rocket leaves • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar • 2 teaspoons gluten-free wholegrain mustard

Gluten free

1

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Combine bread, garlic and half the sumac in a bowl. Spray with oil. Toss to coat. Arrange bread, in a single layer, on prepared tray. Bake for 5 minutes, or until golden. Meanwhile, combine bean mix, chickpeas, tomato, tuna and rocket in a large bowl. Whisk vinegar and mustard in a bowl. Add to salad, along with the bread; toss to combine. Serve sprinkled with remaining sumac.

2 3

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

80

SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES a • COOK 20 MINUTES • NUTRITION 1887KJ

• 8.5G FAT (1G SATURATED) • 14G PROTEIN • 71G CARBOHYDRATE • 12G FIBRE • $3.35 A SERVE • 1 onion, thinly sliced • cooking oil spray • ¼ cup mild curry paste • 1kg pumpkin, peeled, cut into 3cm pieces • 2 large vegetable stock cubes, crumbled • 2 cups water • 400g can chickpeas, rinsed • 200g baby spinach leaves • ¼ cup chopped coriander • 3 cups cooked long-grain white rice

1

Heat a large saucepan over moderate heat. Spray onion with oil. Cook and stir onion for 2 minutes, or until soft. Add curry paste. Cook and stir for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add pumpkin, stock cubes and water. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 8 minutes, or until pumpkin is tender. Stir chickpeas into pumpkin mixture; cook and stir for 5 minutes, or until heated. Add the spinach. Cook, stirring, until heated. Stir in coriander. Serve with rice.

2 3

Low carb


Mexican chicken SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 15 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1702KJ • 4G FAT (1G SATURATED) • 34G PROTEIN

Meat free

• 55G CARBOHYDRATE • 5G FIBRE • $3.45 A SERVE

• 2 x 250g chicken breast fillets,

halved horizontally • cooking oil spray • 2 cloves garlic, sliced • 1 red onion, finely chopped • 2 x 400g cans Italian tomatoes with basil and oregano • ¼ cup water • 1 Lebanese cucumber, finely chopped • 2 x 125g cans corn kernels, rinsed • ¼ cup coriander leaves • 1 tablespoon lime juice • 3 cups cooked long-grain white rice

1

Heat a large, deep frying pan over moderately high heat.

Spray chicken with oil. Cook chicken for 2 minutes each side, or until golden. Transfer to a plate. Add garlic and half of the onion to pan. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes, or until soft. Add tomatoes and water; bring to a simmer. Season. Return chicken to pan; cook, covered, for 7 minutes, or until chicken is cooked. Meanwhile, combine the remaining onion, cucumber, corn, coriander and juice in a bowl. Season. Top the chicken with salsa. Serve with rice.

2

3

Low fat Mustard chicken & olive salad SERVES 4 • PREP 15 MINUTES a • COOK 10 MINUTES • NUTRITION 839KJ • 5G FAT (1G SATURATED) • 30.5G PROTEIN • 6.5G CARBOHYDRATE • 2G FIBRE • $3.45 A SERVE

• 500g single chicken breast fillets,

fat trimmed • cooking oil spray • 2 tablespoons wholegrain mustard • 1 teaspoon dried tarragon leaves • 2 tomatoes, cut into wedges • 1 cup sliced black olives • 80g baby rocket leaves • 1 red onion, halved, thinly sliced • 2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus

lemon halves, to serve

a large frying pan over moderate 1withHeat heat. Spray chicken with oil. Brush mustard and sprinkle with tarragon. Cook chicken for 5 minutes each side, or until cooked. Remove from heat. Cover with foil. Rest for 5 minutes. Slice. Combine the tomato, olives, rocket, onion and chicken in a serving dish. Season. Add juice. Toss to combine. Serve with lemon halves.

2

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COOKING Sun-dried tomato pork rolls SERVES 4 • PREP 20 MINUTES • COOK 10 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1184KJ • 7G FAT (3G SATURATED) • 41.5G PROTEIN • 8G CARBOHYDRATE • 7G FIBRE • $3.50 A SERVE

Low carb

• 200g fresh low-fat ricotta • ¼ cup finely chopped, drained

sun-dried tomatoes • ¼ cup finely chopped flat-leaf

• 1 cup frozen peas • 1 red onion, finely chopped • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

1

Transfer to a heatproof plate. Cover with foil. Rest rolls for 5 minutes. Slice. Meanwhile, cook beans in a large saucepan of boiling, salted water for 5 minutes, or until tender, adding peas in last 3 minutes of cooking. Drain. Transfer greens to a large bowl. Add extra parsley, remaining garlic, the onion and juice; toss to combine. Serve pork rolls with the greens mixture.

Creamy chicken & mushroom pasta SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 20 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 2096KJ • 8G FAT (3G SATURATED) • 41G PROTEIN • 63G CARBOHYDRATE • 2G FIBRE • $3.40 A SERVE

• 1 large gluten-free chicken

trimmed, thinly sliced • cooking oil spray • 1 onion, finely chopped • 250g button mushrooms, quartered • 2 cloves garlic, crushed

• 1/3 cup water • 400ml can 99% fat-free

1

stirring, for 3 minutes, or until mushroom is tender. Add stock cube, water and milk. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes, or until reduced slightly. Return chicken to pan, along with spinach. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until spinach wilts. Add half the parmesan. Season. Add sauce to pasta. Mix well. Serve with remaining parmesan.

Cook pasta in a saucepan of boiling, salted water for 8 minutes or until tender. Drain. Return to pan. Meanwhile, spray chicken with oil. Heat a large frying pan over moderate heat. Cook chicken, stirring, for 5 minutes, or until browned. Transfer to a heatproof plate. Add onion to pan. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until soft. Add mushroom and garlic. Cook,

2

82

stock cube, crumbled evaporated milk • 100g baby spinach leaves • 1/3 cup shaved parmesan

3

diagonally into 3cm lengths

parsley, plus ¼ cup leaves extra • 2 cloves garlic, crushed • 4 uncrumbed pork schnitzels

Combine ricotta, tomato, parsley and half the garlic in a glass bowl. For each pork roll, place 1 pork schnitzel on a clean work surface. Top with a quarter of the ricotta mixture, leaving a 1cm border. Roll up to enclose filling. Secure with a toothpick. Spray with oil. Heat a large frying pan over moderate heat. Cook and turn rolls, in batches, for 5 minutes, or until browned and cooked.

• 250g gluten-free spaghetti • 400g chicken breast fillets,

• cooking oil spray • 1 cup frozen broad beans • 100g green beans, cut

Gluten free

2

3


Chickpea, beetroot & pumpkin salad SERVES 4 • PREP 5 MINUTES • COOK 25 MINUTES • NUTRITION 1370KJ • 10G FAT a (4G SATURATED) • 19.5G PROTEIN • 33G CARBOHYDRATE • 12G FIBRE • $3.35 A SERVE • 600g beetroot, peeled,

cut into wedges • 2 teaspoons vegetable or olive oil

1

Preheat the oven to 220°C. Combine beetroot, oil and garlic in a large roasting pan. Season. Bake for 10 minutes.

• 2 cloves garlic, crushed • 500g pumpkin, cut into wedges • 400g can chickpeas, rinsed

• 1 tablespoon white balsamic dressing • 150g baby spinach leaves • 150g reduced-fat feta, crumbled

Add pumpkin to pan and bake for 15 minutes, or until tender. Combine the chickpeas and dressing in a jug. Combine

the vegetable mixture, chickpea mixture and spinach in a large serving bowl. Serve salad topped with feta.

2

Meat free

Turn the page


COOKING Farfalle with eggplant & tomatoes SERVES 4 • PREP 15 MINUTES • COOK 10 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 2401KJ • 19.5G FAT (5G SATURATED) • 18.5G PROTEIN • 75G CARBOHYDRATE • 5.5G FIBRE • $3.35 A SERVE • 375g farfalle pasta (bow ties) • ¼ cup vegetable or olive oil • 1 large eggplant, peeled, finely

• 4 large tomatoes, seeded, finely

chopped • 2 tablespoons chopped basil,

plus extra leaves, to serve

chopped • 1 clove garlic, crushed

• ½ cup freshly grated parmesan

1

Transfer to a heatproof plate. Reduce heat to moderate. Add the remaining oil to pan; cook the garlic and tomato, stirring, for 3 minutes, or until tomato is tender. Add pasta, eggplant and basil. Toss for 1 minute, or until heated and combined. Season. Serve topped with parmesan and extra basil.

Cook the pasta in a large saucepan of boiling, salted water for 10 minutes or until tender. Drain. Meanwhile, heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large frying pan over moderately high heat. Add eggplant. Cook and stir for 6 minutes, or until tender.

2

3

Meat free

Pork, red lentil & leek salad SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES a • COOK 15 MINUTES • NUTRITION

1196KJ • 11G FAT (3.5G SATURATED) • 25G PROTEIN • 19G CARBOHYDRATE • 6G FIBRE • $3.50 A SERVE

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

• 1¼ cups dried red lentils • 400g lean pork mince • cooking oil spray • 2 leeks, pale section only, sliced • 1 cup frozen peas • ¼ cup sultanas • ¼ cup sliced dried apricots • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar • 1 cup chopped coriander, plus extra

leaves, to serve • 100g mixed salad leaves

84


Prawn omelettes with cucumber salad SERVES 4 • PREP 15 MINUTES • COOK 15 MINUTES • NUTRITION a 1054KJ • 14G FAT (5G SATURATED) • 25G PROTEIN • 5G CARBOHYDRATE • 1.5G FIBRE • $3.40 A SERVE • 2 Lebanese cucumbers, cut into

Low fat

ribbons • 8 small red radishes, thinly sliced • 1 cup bean sprouts • 1/3 cup mint leaves • 3cm piece ginger, cut into matchsticks

1

Combine the cucumber, radish, bean sprouts, mint and ginger in a large glass bowl. Whisk sauces together in a small bowl. Set both aside.

Low carb

• 1 tablespoon soy sauce • 2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce • 12 eggs, lightly whisked • 100g small cooked prawns • 2 green onions, thinly sliced

2

For each omelette, heat a large non-stick frying pan over moderate heat. Add a quarter of the egg and tilt to cover base. Cook for 2 minutes, or until set underneath. Top half the omelette with a quarter of the prawns and a quarter of the onion. Fold omelette to enclose, forming a semi-circle. Cook for 1 minute, or until cooked. Transfer to a serving plate. Serve omelettes with cucumber salad and combined sauces.

3

1

Cook lentils in a small saucepan of boiling, salted water for 5 minutes, or until just tender. Drain. Cool in a large bowl for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, spray mince with oil. Heat a large frying pan over high heat. Add mince. Cook, stirring, to break up lumps, for 5 minutes, or until browned. Add leek and cook for 5 minutes, or until soft. Add peas, sultanas and apricot. Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until peas are tender. Add mince mixture, vinegar, coriander and salad leaves to lentils in bowl; toss to combine. Season. Serve sprinkled with extra coriander leaves.

2

3

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COOKING Beef, pumpkin & filo parcels SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 20 MINUTES • NUTRITION 2057KJ • 15G FAT a (4G SATURATED) • 36G PROTEIN • 48.5G CARBOHYDRATE • 6G FIBRE • $3.50 A SERVE • 1 onion, sliced • cooking oil spray • 400g lean beef mince • 2 teaspoons mixed spice

• 500g pumpkin, peeled,

coarsely grated • 16 sheets filo pastry • ½ cup no-fat Greek-style

• 1 teaspoon sesame seeds • Mixed salad, to serve

1

Add mixed spice and pumpkin. Cook, stirring for 1 minute. Season. For each parcel, stack 4 filo pastry sheets, spraying with oil between each sheet. Top with a quarter of mince mixture. Top with a quarter of the yoghurt.

Fold in shorter sides; roll up to enclose. Place parcels, seam-side down, on prepared tray. Spray with oil. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake for 12 minutes, or until golden. Serve with salad.

Preheat the oven to 220°C. Line a large baking tray with baking paper. Spray onion with oil. Heat a large frying pan over high heat. Add onion and mince. Cook, stirring to break up lumps, for 5 minutes, or until browned.

2

natural yoghurt

3

Low fat

86


Meat free

Stir-fried noodles with tempeh a

SERVES 4 • PREP 10 MINUTES • COOK 15 MINUTES • NUTRITION 1426KJ • 6.5G FAT (1G SATURATED) • 18G PROTEIN • 48G CARBOHYDRATE • 6G FIBRE • $3.50 A SERVE • 225g dried egg noodles • 2 teaspoons vegetable

or peanut oil • 375g tempeh, sliced • 2 bunches asparagus, ends

trimmed, cut into 7cm lengths • 2 cloves garlic, crushed • 1 tablespoon freshly grated

1

Soak noodles in boiling water in a heatproof bowl for 1 minute. Stir to separate strands. Drain. Heat a wok or large frying pan over high heat. Add half the oil, and swirl to coat surface. Stir-fry tempeh for 2 minutes, or until golden. Transfer to a heatproof plate. Add remaining oil to wok. Stir-fry asparagus, garlic, ginger and green

2 Sweet chilli beef stir-fry SERVES 4 • PREP 15 MINUTES a • COOK 10 MINUTES • NUTRITION

1561KJ • 7G FAT (2G SATURATED) • 26G PROTEIN • 48.5G CARBOHYDRATE • 4G FIBRE • $3.50 A SERVE

ginger • 3 green onions, sliced • 1 cup bean sprouts • ¼ cup oyster sauce • 1 teaspoon sesame oil • ¼ cup water • ½ cup coriander sprigs

onion for 2 minutes, or until asparagus is just tender. Transfer to a heatproof plate. Add the noodles to wok and stir-fry for 4 minutes, or until heated, adding bean sprouts for last 1 minute of cooking. In a jug, whisk oyster sauce, sesame oil and water. Add sauce mixture, tempeh and asparagus mixture to noodles; toss to combine. Top with coriander.

3

Gluten free

• 400g budget rump beef steak, fat trimmed,

thinly sliced • ¼ cup gluten-free sweet chilli sauce • cooking oil spray • 500g stir-fry frozen mixed vegetables • 2 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce • 3 cups cooked long-grain white rice • 2 green onions, thinly sliced

1

Combine beef and sweet chilli sauce in a bowl. Spray with oil. Heat a wok or large frying pan over high heat. Stir-fry beef, in batches, for 2 minutes or until browned. Transfer to a heatproof plate. Wipe wok clean. Spray vegetables with oil; stir-fry for 3 minutes, or until just tender. Return beef to wok with soy sauce. Stir-fry for 3 minutes or until heated. Spoon rice into serving bowls. Top with stir-fry. Serve sprinkled with onion.

2

Turn the page


COOKING Chocolate & fig brownies

Low fat

MAKES 16 PIECES • PREP 15 MINUTES • COOK 30 MINUTES a • NUTRITION/PIECE 660KJ • 7G FAT (2.5G SATURATED) • 2.5G PROTEIN • 20G CARBOHYDRATE • 1.5G FIBRE • 80¢ A PIECE • 130g light margarine • 100g dark chocolate, chopped • ½ cup firmly packed brown

sugar

• 1 cup plain flour • ½ teaspoon baking powder • 1/3 cup cocoa powder,

plus extra, to dust

• 2 eggs, lightly whisked

• ½ cup chopped dried figs

1

then flour, baking powder and cocoa. Stir in threequarters of the figs. Spread mixture into prepared pan. Level surface. Sprinkle with remaining figs. Bake for 25 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the centre comes out with crumbs clinging to it. Cool completely in pan (brownie will firm). Cut into 16 squares. Serve dusted with extra cocoa powder.

Preheat oven to 170°C. Grease and line base and sides of a 20cm square cake pan, extending paper 5cm above rim of pan. Place margarine and chocolate in a medium saucepan over moderately low heat. Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes, or until smooth. Remove from heat. Cool slightly. Add sugar and egg to chocolate mixture,

2

3 Ricotta & chive pancakes with roasted tomato salsa SERVES 4 • PREP 15 MINUTES • COOK 30 MINUTES a • NUTRITION 1722KJ • 13G FAT (5G SATURATED) • 31G PROTEIN

Meat free

• 38G CARBOHYDRATE • 8G FIBRE/SERVE • $3.25 A SERVE • 4 tomatoes, quartered

• 265g low-fat fresh ricotta,

lengthwise • 2 cloves garlic, sliced • cooking oil spray • 1 1/3 cups chickpea (besan) flour • 1 teaspoon baking powder

• 2 tablespoons chopped chives • 2/3 cup skim milk • 3 egg whites • ¼ cup torn basil leaves

Preheat oven to 230°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Place tomato and garlic on prepared tray. Spray with oil. Season. Bake for 15 minutes, or until tomato softens. Meanwhile, combine flour and baking powder in a large bowl. Stir in ricotta, chives and milk. Using an electric mixer, beat egg whites in a clean, dry bowl until soft peaks form. Fold into ricotta

2

88

mixture. Spray a large frying pan with oil. Heat over moderate heat. Cook ¼-cup measures of ricotta mixture, in batches, for 1 minute each side, or until golden and cooked through, wiping pan between batches. Transfer tomato mixture, along with any juices, to a bowl. Add basil. Toss to combine. Season. Serve pancakes with extra ricotta and tomato salsa.

3

PICTURES: BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU

1

plus 200g extra


Weekend treats!

Almond apple pie a

SERVES 8 • PREP 30 MINUTES (PLUS 15 MINUTES TO CHILL) • COOK 35 MINUTES • NUTRITION 2531KJ • 39.5G FAT (12.5G SATURATED) • 11G PROTEIN • 50.5G CARBOHYDRATE • 6.5G FIBRE • $2.05 A SERVE

Gluten free

• 3 cups almond meal (ground almonds) • 1 cup gluten-free icing sugar • 150g butter, chilled, chopped

• 1-2 tablespoons iced water • 2 tablespoons caster sugar • 6 large green-skinned apples,

peeled, cored, sliced • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon • 2 cups gluten-free custard

1

2

until required. Melt remaining butter and caster sugar in a frying pan over low heat. Add apple and cinnamon. Cook, stirring, for 8 minutes or until apple is just tender. Cool. Spoon apple into pastry case. Cut remaining pastry into 1.5cm strips. Arrange over pie in a crisscross pattern at 1cm intervals. Trim edges. Bake for 15 minutes or until golden. Serve with custard.

Process almond meal and icing sugar in a food processor until just combined. Add 100g of the butter. Pulse until fine crumbs form. With the motor running, gradually add the iced water. Process until pastry just comes together. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface; knead until smooth. Shape into a disc. Wrap in plastic food wrap. Chill pastry for 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease a 23cm fluted pie plate. Roll out two-thirds of the pastry between two sheets of baking paper to a 3mm-thick circle. Ease into pie plate. Trim edges. Prick pastry all over with a fork. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden. Cool. Meanwhile, roll remaining pastry out between two sheets of baking paper to a 3mm-thick rectangle. Chill

3

4

SPECIAL PRICE Want even more meal ideas? The September issue of recipes+ is packed with more than 60 low-fat recipes – all for just $1.99! On sale August 24

89


TAKE A BREAK

Brain games Give your mind a workout Quick Quiz 1. Karise Eden won the first series of The Voice – who were the four judges: Delta Goodrem, Seal, Joel Madden and…? 2. Who or what is an epistaxis? 3. Angelo’s and the Pier Diner feature in which TV series? 4. He’s best known as 007 but for which movie did Sean Connery (below) pick up his Best Supporting Actor Oscar?

Sean Connery, 84 5. What are the names of the gangs in West Side Story? 6. Gardening Australia’s hirsute guru Costa Georgiadis also appears as a garden gnome in which children’s TV show? 7. Who wrote the Discworld series of novels? 8. Who created the delightful gumnut babies Snugglepot and Cuddlepie? 9. The Potomac river runs through which powerful, influential capital city? 10. Who lives at 4 Privet Drive, Little Whinging, Surrey?

Cryptic Crossword ACROSS 8. I’m with coat, exploding, as nuclear (6) 9. Charge to sling out emotions (8) 11. Suggests they’re close friends (9) 12. Gratuity returned with thanks for bread (5) 13. Uninterrupted success occurred in reversal of game (7) 15. After a month, journalist advanced steadily (7) 17. Morning Heather! Where’s Virginia? (7) 18. Ruffian wrecked sideshows and rides (7) 20. Walk in cocky 1 manner, beginning 8 to swing dog’s tail? (7) 23. Set up trendy 11 venue (2,5) 25. Dark thing, awful thing! (5) 13 27. Domineering woman wielding weapon (6-3) 17 29. Soccer players who are not at work? (8) 20 30. Ways to find foundations, we hear (6) 25

DOWN 1. Argument about removing cap on car tax (6) 2. Pope’s not

prepared to defer (8) 3. Man is 51 by morning (4) 4. What’s thrown from plane by man (6) 5. Applaud at start of closing circuit (4) 6. Informer isn’t disturbing church (6) 7. One has to defame someone from Fiji (8) 10. Greek character conceals origin of terrible scar (6) 14. I yodel loudly for cake topping (5) 16. Approach chicken 2

3

enclosure and lift (3-2) 17. Fire-raiser roasts in disaster (8) 18. Bluffs, we hear, then blacks out (6) 19. A real cat recipe on the menu (1,2,5) 21. Given old cars with no starter, makes one furious (6) 22. Garment right for a man! (6) 24. Still considered likely to win, leader in Oaks (4,2) 26. Accept bet, though not at first (4) 28. Return implement to get the money (4) 4

5

6

7

9 10 12

14

15

16

18

21

22

26

29

90

YOURS 1815 CRYPTIC

19

23

24

27

28

30


Megafind!

Turn the page


TAKE A BREAK Easy Crossword

Number Star Fill in each of the empty hexagons with numbers between 1 and 7 following these three rules: 1. No numbers in a horizontal line can be repeated. 2. No numbers in a diagonal line can be repeated. 3. No numbers in the seven coloured hexagons can be repeated. NOTE: Each of the white hexagons is part of a line

6

2

1 3 7 1 4 2

6

5

7

ACROSS 1. Dangerous, risky 4. US biscuit, choc-chip …, eg 9. Looked briefly, … at 10. Sound of elastic breaking 11. Report of current events, … bulletin 12. Scrupulously exact 14. Fall into a doze (3,3) 16. Finished or shut 19. Prohibited by law 21. Military takeover, … d’etat 23. Bar of gold, eg 24. Breathed sharply through the nose 25. Australian vocal band, Human … 26. Scarcely, … moving

DOWN 1. Strong impulse, get the … 2. Kelp plants 3. Centre of attention 5. Porridge ingredient 6. Olive-green 1

2

Army uniform hue 7. Nickname for boffins 8. Adjust, alter to suit 13. Surgical cut 15. Combat aircraft, … plane 17. Packed with 3

4

5

seasoning, … the turkey 18. Melting snow 20. Room illumination 21. Porcelain, bone … 22. Highly strung, twitchy 6

7

8 9

10

11

12

13 14

15

16

17

18 19

20

21 22

23

24

25

26

YOURS 1815 CROSSWORD

Guess the Year

Study the photo and five clues below and the guess the year Russian nuclear submarine Kursk sunk with all 118 hands, and the final Mini rolled off the Longbridge, England, production line.

2 6 5 6 5 1 3 4 7 2 2 3 7 5 1 6 7 1 6 4 3 5 4 2 3 7 6 4 2 3 6 5 1 7 5 4 1

1

A quarter of a million people walk across the Sydney Harbour Bridge in a mass show of support for reconciliation with the Aboriginal nations.

arsonist sets the Palace Backpackers 2 AnHostel in Childers, Queensland, ablaze and 15 tourists perish. The last original Peanuts comic strip is 3 published, in the wake of creator Charles M. Schulz’s death. welcomes its billionth living person. Its current rate of population growth will 4 India see it outstrip China’s 1.5 billion people

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN Patty, Linus, Marcie and Charlie

92

summit in Kuala Lumpur is 5 Al-Qaeda’s a planning exercise which spawns, among other atrocities, the deadly bombing of the destroyer USS Cole in Aden and the September 11 attacks.

PICTURES: ALAMY

within 50 years.


Each number in the grid represents a different letter of the alphabet. Work out which number stands for each letter, write them in the grid below and cross off the list – we’ve given you three to start you off. Fill in the letters in the box 18 mystery 10 6 word. 23 2 13 1 12 19 20 2 beneath to spell the

Code Cracker

25 21 25

14

14 21

6 16

19 12 25 25 1319 12 21

18 18

21 21

14 14

14 14 2

16816 2424 12 912 13 13

13 2113 22

10

14

21

22

10

14 14 20

21 21

21 921

2121 22 22 99 25 10 2525

3 3 3 16 16

8 17 8 12

13 11

9 13 9 11

11

9

9 21 9 8

1717 1212 1313 11 11 21 21 8

21

20 20 18

14 14

12 12

77

21 21

18 18

16 16 2424 2121 8 8 25 25 10 1025 25

12 12 2

14

13 13 10

5

2

14

10

5

20 20

8 2

12

2 21

14

10

21 25

1

10

25

1

22

33

21

10

25

16

13

10 2

1

5

10

13 21

22

21

21

7

8

8 2

18

14

2

88

99

18

44

55

66

77

4 17 17

5 18 18

6 19 19

7 20 20

14

17

18

19

20

15 15

12 12

17 17

19 19

15

12

17

19

16

14

21 8

10

10

25

10

20 20

25 21

22 21

21 7 7 18

8

22

13

1 2 3 1414 1515 16 16 15

21

13

2

2

24

21 21

8 20

21

8

11

8 24 8 12

10 10 7

20

2

14

6

25

12

16 8

2

21

D 8R 10I 13 8 8 10 13 11 DDRR I I

25

14

R 8R

2

4 4

4

20 20 8

12

12

12

18

20 8 8 18 18

12 12

12

21 13 1

2

2

21 13 13 1 1

2

B

O

C P C DP Q Q D EDQ R E R E FR S F GFS TS

GT UT G H H H IU VU I

V V JI W J JW W K X K KX X L Y L

Y

M AL C ZY M A C Z

M A C Z

1010 11 11 12 12 13 13

I10I 11 12 13 9 21 2222 2323 2424 25 25 26 26 21 R I 21

22

23

16 16 1818 2121

16

18

24

D25D

D

YOURS CODEBREAKER All the words and terms listed1815 can be prefixed by “water”. All except one of them can be found in the grid and may read forwards, backwards, diagonally, down or up. The word or term that’s not found in the grid is the mystery answer.

E D

I

S R R N O G A W C B P W

R A

T U E

C U R T D N U A O S

J

U M P

E

E M P A

E

B

L

S P

T

L

T H D O R O F E

M O O Y H T

L O L Z

T D S H

F W A E

E

S

E

A O E

L

V M C Q R L

E

S A D B

U Y A H H N O H S

E

F

E U G

S

I

B

L

V O W V

I

P R W M T R E W O P V C P W

C

I

A

T

I

U C S

O A P A S

I

L O U A C A R T

B A R R E

L N C S P

W K O L

X

T

L

A S H B I

R

Y O B O A S

L U K A N L R K

E

F

A

I

R L

T

T G F

T

I

L G G L

E

J

Y O G O Q K L

A

F

I

O S A

G H T O B W D K

YOURS 1815 WORD FINDER GRID REPLACE

2 7

6

6 2 8 7 5 3 2 9 3 5 7 1 3 8 6 5 4 3 6 6 4 9 3 Three Scrabble players each put down a high-scoring word. Can YOURS 1815 GRID you work out each one’sSUDOKU high-scoring word, the premium square used for that word and his or her final placing? Then answer the question at the top-left of the grid.

21

BARREL BIRTH BISCUIT BOATMAN BOY BREAK BUFFALO CART CHESTNUT COLOUR COOLER COURSE DROP FALL FLOW GATE GLASS HEATER HOLE HORSE JET JUMP LEVEL LILY

4

Small Logic

26

YOURS 1815 CODEBREAKER Water YOURS 1815words CODEBREAKER

Wordfind

Easy

LOG MARK MEADOW MUSIC POLO POWER PROOF RAT SHED SIDE SKI SPLASH SPORTS SUPPLY TABLE TAP TIGHT TOWER VAPOUR WAGON WAY WINGS WORKS

WHICH BONUS SQUARE DID MAUREEN USE?

WHICH

MAUREEN BONUS

SQUARE DID BERT MAUREEN USE?

IVY MAUREEN 3RD BERT 1ST IVY 2ND 3RD

DOUBLE WORD

1ST

TRIPPLE LETTER

2ND

TRIPPLE WORD DOUBLE WORD

TRIPPLE LETTER Clues 1. The player who TRIPPLE WORD PLAYER

used the word “Xenon” WORD won the game, but didn’tBONUS place it on

2ND

18

18

186

1ST

25

12

21

21

2ND

7 197

2

2

12 10 12 13

3RD

221

20

1ST

8 25 8

19

25 12812

Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 to 9 so that each row, column and smaller 3 x 3 block contains all numbers from 1 to 9.

TRIPLE WORD

21

12

12 21 1218

A N BA ON A N CB PO

3RD

21

26

1

2 12

TRIPLE LETTER

26

13

20

TRIPLE WORD

72020 26 26

2

19 12

DOUBLE WORD

212 12

23

12

TRIPLE LETTER

16 816

12

XENON

21

6

1

DOUBLE WORD

7 26 7

10

13 12

AQUEOUS

15 26 20 15

18

2

XENON

23 16

ZEBRA

6

AQUEOUS

710

ZEBRA

18

15

Sudoku

a Double-Word bonus square. 2. Maureen didn’t spell out “Zebra”, which was the word used by the runner-up. 3. Ivy’s effort was the word “Aqueous”. 4. Bert bagged a Triple Word bonus.

PLACING PLAYER WORD BONUS PLACING

Turn over for solutions


TAKE A BREAK Solutions

How did you do? Quick Quiz, p90

T T E L K E P L A T H M Y

6

2

Cryptic Crossword, p90 1 3 T P L A T O M I R S A I N T I M F P F L OW I N C A M E R I R N S W A G G O N N I G H T I E A S T R I K T S E

1

2

7

C

S A T I N G M C A

5E R

O B E E R T

J C S F E E L I N G T A I E S P I T T A C M A R C H E U F U N F A I A U L I N P L A C N C A T T L E A X S O R S R O U T E T E

4

6

Number 1815 CRYPTIC YOURS Star, p92

Code Cracker, p93

Megafind!, p91

1. Keith Urban 2. It’s a nosebleed 3. Home and Away 4. The Untouchables 5. The Sharks and the Jets 6. Get Grubby 7. Sir Terry Pratchett 8. May Gibbs 9. Washington D.C. 10. The Dursley family in the Harry Potter books

2 6 5 6 5 1 3 4 7 2 2 3 7 5 1 6 7 1 6 4 3 5 4 2 3 7 6 4 2 3 6 5 1 7 5 4 1

7

I S L A N D E R

C O U S T O U F P C L A S C E

G A R A N N A D P T O O U R R B S M A I R S O F E A D I M

A U P P E L E O P I S E H O O N T O G C O H A I R A H D O E D

A N E T H Y E M S S T A E A U M B R E A R N T K L I E D L

O U M A U R S E M J A E T A T Y O W E T S

C B E L T L R O O O N P E E W D C Y O W L L

P E F O U L A T O D R O P E N E

Easy Crossword, p92

R S I E D V E I L Y E A N K A B E A D I S D A S H F U I N T S

N I G H J M O U P P E R M D B A D N E L E E X C I S D I U A M E N F A L O U T S I R E T T I D Y

T L A T E S S T E S O L Z E M I N

Y

A B U T A A A E N D R I L G R K O V A L R C C W A L K E R E U V E R D I D X E E Q U A L R R Y S T A N T

Y T F Q Z G M R C I K A L S J OWN B U E X H V D P

AWB O N E Answer: JJawbone YOURS 1815 CODEBREAKER SOL

Wordfind, p93 Answer: Horse

U N S A F E C O O K I E Sudoku, p93 R E O A A H G YOURS 1815 ARROWWORD Easy SOLUTION G L A N C E D T W A N G E W U A M K H 7 4 9 3 8 5 6 2 1 N E W S P R E C I S E 1 3 5 7 2 6 8 9 4 6 2 8 1 4 9 7 5 3 I E T A A 4 8 2 9 1 3 5 6 7 N O D O F F C L O S E D 5 7 1 4 6 2 3 8 9 C I S T S SOLUTION 9 6 3 8 5 7 1 4 2 I L L E G A L C O U P 3 1 4 5 9 8 2 7 6 S I H U H F E 2 5 7 6 3 4 9 1 8 I N G O T S N I F F E D 8 9 6 2 7 1 4 3 5 O H E H N E G N A T U R E H A R D L Y E V E N S O

Small Logic, p93

Guess the Year, p92

Maureen/Xenon/Triple Letter/1st; SOL YOURS 1815 SUDOKU Bert/Zebra/Triple Word/2nd; Ivy/Aqueous/Double Word/3rd. Mystery answer: Triple Letter

YOURS 1815 CROSSWORD SOLUTION

2000

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95


HOROSCOPE

Hedy Damari’s astrological predictions for Aug 20-Sept 2

Libra SEP 24-OCT 23

Friends who’ve been fickle in recent weeks show their true colours in a pleasantly surprising way. Meanwhile, a full moon in your health sector prompts you to focus on your wellbeing. It’s a great time to book any tests and check-ups.

The sun shifts into practical Tip: Don’t let your friends take you for granted Virgo as the 30th’s full moon moves into polar opposite Scorpio OCT 24-NOV 22 Pisces, the sign of spirituality. If you’ve been trying in vain to generate publicity for a business or cause, the tide is set to turn. You can now easily Streamline your routine, create cultivate the sort of representation that attracts high esteem. elegant simplicity, declutter, Meanwhile, a full moon sets your romance sector sizzling! and redefine personal priorities. Tip: Virgo friends will be valuable sounding boards

Aries MAR 21-APR 20

A full moon in your karma zone brings past actions and situations into focus. Revisiting dark places is actually helpful as it lets you release any negative patterns. Meanwhile, the sun enters your health sector, the ideal time to fine-tune wellbeing.

Tip: Make the effort to be physically active

Taurus APR 21-MAY 21

Pay it forward! A random act of kindness has the power to trigger a wonderful ricochet and make the world a better place. Targeting those who least expect it has the most impact, especially when the full moon hits your sector of good causes.

Tip: Nurture your creativity on a daily basis

Gemini MAY 22-JUN 21

Sagittarius NOV 23-DEC 21

The full moon in your domestic sector highlights issues for urgent action, whether mediating a family conflict or chores. Even when you aren’t feeling too optimistic you’re able to boost morale, so dig deep and put on a brave face for everyone else.

Tip: Eliminate distractions to keep up momentum

Capricorn DEC 22-JAN 20

Striking a balance between mundane tasks and new adventures is a challenge, but not unattainable. Learning to delegate lightens your load and hastens you towards escapades! The full moon may herald an important document or news.

Tip: Look again and you’ll find what you seek!

Aquarius JAN 21-FEB 19

If you need to make a good impression, speak in public or Over the past weeks uncertainty has been mounting step into the spotlight, you’re in luck! The full moon in your image about your feelings towards someone close. Whether romantic sector casts you in a flattering light, and while it may leave you or platonic don’t be too hasty or burn bridges and you’ll soon open to criticism, the support and exposure are so worth it! reach the right conclusions. A full moon boosts financial plans.

Cancer JUN 22-JUL 23

Details count over the next few weeks but try not to become bogged down by them or you may lose sight of the big picture. Luckily, as the full moon nears on the 30th, you’ll gain perspective and be able to step back and see everything.

Tip: Put funds aside for some unexpected expenses

Leo JUL 24-AUG 23

Your personal image changes dramatically as Venus, planet of style and values, inspires you to put more thought into your presentation. With the sun sparkling in your finance sector, a stylist will help you cull, recycle and invest in timeless pieces.

Tip: A positive outlook is a priceless treasure

Virgo AUG 24-SEP 23

The sun delivers joyous birthday blessings. You’ll feel more vivacious than usual and in the mood to take risks, but committing to something now may limit future choices. The full moon, meanwhile, sparks passion in your relationship sector.

Tip: Don’t buy into any dramas with friends 96

Tip: Accept a generous offer – you deserve it!

Pisces FEB 20-MAR 20

A full moon in your sign makes you more sensitive than usual; you’ll easily absorb others’ moods. With the sun in your relationship sector you’ll be able to get some boundaries in place and examine how best to meet your emotional needs.

Tip: Save your energy for your dearest friends

Happy birthday!

Salma Hayek

turns 49 on September 2 She’s inching towards the big five-oh and the Mexican-born beauty just gets better with age! The Virgo star’s a big believer in recognition for older women, and despite having married a billionaire, displays the strong work ethic typical of her sign.

PICTURE: GETTY IMAGES

Tip: Don’t make any commitments you can’t keep


Last time…

PICTURE: KRISTINA SOLJO/BAUERSYNDICATION.COM.AU ALL CHARACTERS IN THE MIDDLETONS ARE FICTITIOUS

Janet was reeling from Charlie’s sudden passing, her world rocked to its core. Bryan was torn between giving her space and lending a shoulder to lean on. That was until he’d made her an offer…

Danger Island

A

as the plane turned for the final approach I looked out the cabin window, seeing yachts heeling in a turquoise sea dotted with atolls, reefs and palm-fringed islands. I smiled at Bryan Hardie. “Tropical paradise comes to mind. I’m so glad you persuaded me to come. “Not that it took much,” I added. “Even I knew I should take a break. I just didn’t have the energy to organise it. I’m happy to be your partner in crime... solving, if it involves trips like this.” After registering at the island’s luxury resort we were directed to our pavilion. The private investigator led the way in. “I hope you don’t find it too isolated,” he said. “We chose it because it will be easy to come and go without attracting unwanted attention.” “Mind?” I sat down on the sofa looking over the infinity pool and the Coral Sea beyond. “It’s wonderful. I don’t think I’ve ever stayed in such a luxurious place.” “Even with your millionaire friend?” “Rodney Willesmore? I can see my boys have been talking. They’re such gossips. Maybe one time when we went

to Venice, a city I love. However, here we’ve got the sea and the sun.” I noticed the French Champagne on the coffee table, next to a wonderful pot of orchids, as Bryan picked up the large envelope propped against the ice bucket. He tipped documents and photos onto the table, and spread out the pictures. “I have these on my phone but you get more out of the larger pictures.” One showed a tall, fit-looking man with wavy dark hair, greying at the temples, wearing aviator glasses with a discreet designer logo. Some were with over-made-up women on his arm and one seemed to have been taken in the Royal Enclosure at Ascot. “Well, he seems to be rather well-connected,” I noted. “In all meanings of the word,” Bryan replied. “This one’s a Russian arms dealer and this,” he added as he fanned out the photos, “is one of the Italian Mafia that works out of Griffith.” “If you’ve got all this evidence against him, why hasn’t he been stopped?” “Because, unfortunately, it’s all circumstantial. Arthur Peterson, to

THE MIDDLETONS Australia’s longest running serial give him his real name, is a very canny operator, more a facilitator than a doer. His skill is setting up companies, all registered, all legal, used, we believe, to launder money from drug and arms deals.” I wandered over to the bar fridge and took out a jug of fresh orange juice. “If he’s so well-known, why is your client willing to outlay so much money to try to catch him?” “John, John Campbell, thought he was buying a private jet for a reasonable price – they cost about $40 million new – with Peterson, or Sir John Huntley-Smythe, as he’s calling himself now, acting as broker. “Trouble was, Peterson couldn’t resist doing a little side deal, smuggling arms on the delivery run, so the jet and its cargo have been impounded in Thailand. His other big mistake was not giving John’s money back, round about $25 million, balance on delivery.” “I can see how that’d be upsetting.” Bryan mixed himself a buck’s fizz. “More upsetting, for John, is being taken in by this con man. He wants his money – and revenge.” A sentiment, judging by Bryan’s wolfish grin, he understood only too well. Gathering up the envelope’s contents, he said, “We don’t have to do any work today. Let’s go for a swim.” Bryan took my bag into the master bedroom, then took his own suitcase into the second bedroom. I changed, suddenly uncertain of how things stood, and stepped out through the sliding doors. Bryan was already doing lazy laps with effortless ease. Was there anything he didn’t do with style? He looked up. “Hey, you OK?” “Sure. Just, you know, the bedrooms?” “Lord, you think I don’t...? Of course I still fancy you. I just feel I’ve been rushing you and maybe I should give you a chance to say, ‘No’.” Next time: Our intrepid duo have a close brush with their quarry!

‘Of course I still fancy you. I just feel I’ve been rushing you’

97


Fast f iction

Pact with riches

BY GLYNIS SCRIVENS

C

arol kept quiet as she and Tony watched the program about hoarders. It was her favourite TV show but they always had a blazing row afterwards. “Just look at that woman’s ridiculous collection of china angels,” her husband muttered at the TV. The angels were beautiful. Carol would love to buy some, if the woman decided to reform her ways. They’d look lovely with her shelves of figurines… The camera took them on a tour of the woman’s house. She lived alone in a two-storey country cottage. Alone, but with thousands of china friends. “Maybe it’s time you decluttered?” Tony said, as the credits came up. Just as he’d said last week; that woman had decided to part with an entire roomful of garden gnomes. Something to look out for on eBay. “I’ll sell figurines the day you clear out all the spare motorbike parts in the shed.” She knew he’d never do that. Not in a million years. But she was mistaken. “It’s a deal.” She didn’t believe him, but he spent the entire afternoon taking photos and cursing at the laptop. After dinner, she checked, just to make sure, and there they were. Fifty ads for spare parts, giving Tony’s phone number. Carol felt ambushed. A deal was a deal, she knew that. “Who can I let go of ?” she whispered. “I love all of you.” She looked from her porcelain bride to the shelf of swans, and the colourful circus characters. But she couldn’t choose. Closing her eyes, she let her hands select a dozen china figurines. Tony stood beside her, ensuring she kept her side of the pact. “This’ll do for a start,” he said. “Heartless man,” Carol said under her breath, pretending he couldn’t hear.

98

Carol and Tony toiled at telling trash from treasure

“I’ll show you how to put up an ad if you like,” Tony offered. But Carol took the laptop into the garden, and sat under the mulberry tree. The basket of china lay on the grass beside her. Using the wooden outdoor table as background, she photographed each piece. Finally, she typed out the ads. Rather than sell them as a collection, as Tony suggested, she made separate ads. The next day they kept checking the laptop. Tony’s motorbike spare parts had attracted a lot of interest overnight. Some bids exceeded his expectations.

Tony couldn’t help boasting. “If you’re so good at selling things, why don’t you auction off the rest of the clutter in the shed,” she said. They were sitting in the kitchen, having tea. Tony had the newspaper spread out in front of him. “Only if you auction off more things.” Before she could answer, Tony gasped. “That woman who hoarded her garden gnomes is in the news!” He pointed to the article and the photo of the gnomes being loaded onto a truck. “Some of them are worth a minor fortune.” He looked at Carol. “I wonder if any of your china is valuable?”

“Don’t hold your breath,” she said. “I’ve already checked. There aren’t any bids yet.” Undeterred, Tony placed more ads. The shed was a treasure trove of bits and bobs someone might find useful. He hadn’t had much use for any of it in recent years, not since he’d retired. “Your turn,” he said over dinner. They repeated the performance, photographing a dozen figurines and composing ads. Still no results. “Don’t feel discouraged,” Tony said the following week, as spikes of money appeared in their joint bank account. A garage had bought most of the bike parts and someone was coming in the morning with a trailer for the ceramic pots that had been collecting dust. Ignoring the smug expression on his face, Carol went online to check her own goods. As she anticipated, no-one had placed any bids, so she decided to place a few herself. She didn’t hear him come up behind her. And she didn’t notice him looking over her shoulder. She was way too absorbed in the screen. “Isn’t that one of your figurines?” Tony thundered at her. Carol tried to scroll down the page, but more of her ads appeared. Tony was almost shaking with rage. “I did this in good faith!” “Don’t be angry,” she said sweetly. “I kept my part of the bargain.” “That’s debatable.” He rested his finger against one of her ads. “As if anybody would make an offer when the starting bid is $500!” Carol decided to wait until tomorrow before mentioning the troop of garden gnomes she’d just won. They were going to look perfectly lovely on all those empty shelves in the shed.

ILLUSTRATION: CHANTEL DE SOUSA/THE ILLUSTRATION ROOM

SHORT STORY


Here to help!

Ask me anything

COLUMN

Got a burning question or just seeking a second opinion? Our favourite straight-shooting star KERRI-ANNE KENNERLEY offers up her advice

Q

I’ve been wearing very similar make-up looks for the past 10 years. I want to switch up the look but I’m worried about what other people will think, and I’m not sure what make-up styles will suit me. What’s the best way to get an honest opinion about what will work for me? How progressive you are to be rethinking the make-up style you’ve been wearing for a decade! Often women are so comfortable with applying make-up only one way, or staying with what suited their face at 30 or 40, that they can’t bring themselves to move with the times. Make-up is like fashion and it changes, much the way paisley and bell-bottoms went out a long time ago. First, I’m curious as to why you worry about what other people might think. You’re on the right track and doing some forward thinking, so that gives you the right to feel confident. An honest opinion can only come from someone with no vested interest in whose opinion you value. You could try a professional make-up artist but sourcing them isn’t always easy, and how do you choose unless you have friends who can recommend them? Take yourself into a big department store and chat to the make-up counter staff, male and female. You can get your make-up done for free and get valuable professional advice,

with absolutely no obligation to buy. Do this a few times over a couple of weeks and explain what you’re after. I’ve relied on a couple of wonderful make-up artists to drag me into a new decade when the time comes. Products such as primers, glosses, cheek highlighters and under-eye concealers, foundations with light and exfoliant have been developed that you may need to learn about. They keep you up-to-date and make you feel fresh. Look at Joan Collins, for example – I so wish she’d stop with the heavy eyeliner, pancake make-up and ruby lips. She wore that in the ’70s! It’s time to soften up and change her make-up for 2015. I hate to admit it, but less is more... and better.

‘Look at Joan Collins – I wish she’d stop with the heavy eyeliner, pancake make-up and ruby lips’

Q

My husband and I want to go on an overseas holiday but are having trouble agreeing on where! Should we head off somewhere completely different to our original dream destinations? What’s the best way to agree on a happy medium? OK, you want me to play Solomon! And by the way, what a first-world problem, you lucky person. I’m glad you’ve at least decided you want to go together. To be fair to each other, you have to consider what your second or even third choices are. There is no use being somewhere when one of you is trying to fake a good time and,

even worse, whingeing the whole way. Yes, we all have our individual ideas about where would be great to go, but there are so many magnificent places around the world that would hardly be called second-prize destinations. Sit down together, get comfy, and talk about what type of experience you want and, more importantly, why. Leave both first choices off the table for now and think outside your own square. You may surprise yourselves by learning more about who you’re married to and what makes them tick. Write down what you expect to get from a holiday and why you want to go there. But wherever you go, enjoy being able to travel and being together without any home-life pressure!

Contact us:

Got a question for Kerri-Anne? Email us at yours@bauer-media. com.au or write to Yours Ask Me Anything, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW, 2001 99


WHAT’S ON Exhibition

Ginger Meggs: Australia’s Favourite Boy!

Mark your diary!

We first met Ginger Meggs 94 years ago, and an exhibition featuring original drawings celebrates the beloved cartoon hero. “His everyday escapades echo the experiences of millions of Australian children,” curator Anna Cossu says. Until November 8, Museum of Sydney. Visit sydneylivingmuseums.com.au

Event

Botanical Bazaar

Musicals

The Gold Coast beckons green thumbs to a gardening expo sure to whet the appetite for spring. Taste exotic tropical fruits, pick up plants or botanic-themed homewares, or take a workshop and let experts show you how your garden grows. August 30, Currumbin RSL, Qld. Visit botanicalbazaar.com.au

My Fair Lady

Audrey Hepburn starred in the film but Dame Julie Andrews, who played Eliza in the original stage production, will direct this must-see musical event. Sydney Opera House, August 2016. Visit sydneyoperahouse.com

Cats

One of the best, most popular and longest-running shows in West End and Broadway history is staging a triumphant revival. However, the blockbuster musical’s run in each capital will be very limited! Nationally from October 30. Visit catsthemusical.com/Australia


Celebrity chitchat

Documentary

Iris

DVD

Welcome to Me

Kristen Wiig stars as Alice, a young woman with borderline personality disorder who wins the lottery and decides to become the next Oprah Winfrey – as you do! She buys her own talk show and the results are... interesting and quite hilarious. Out now, RRP $34.95

MICHAEL FLATLEY After more than 20 years of delighting audiences all around the world, MICHAEL FLATLEY, 57, is preparing to hang up his dancing shoes It’s your final tour! What can your fans expect to see in Lord of the Dance: Dangerous Games? It’s a re-imagining of the original classic Lord of the Dance – it’s bigger, better and more colourful. We have 40 of the greatest dancers we’ve ever had, plus holograms, new technology and costumes. You won’t be disappointed. What will you miss the most about performing? Coming down the stairs at the end of the show with the audience standing up, city after city, language after language, culture after culture. Meeting people and feeling how the show fits and how they accept it in different places – that’s wonderful, a blessing.

What do you like about Australia? The people seem lovely, friendly and calm. I’m a big fan of Greg Norman and boxers Kostya Tszyu and Jeff Fenech. I’d like to spend more time on the Great Barrier Reef and also go into the outback. What’s next for you? I want to do more painting. I’ve painted all my life really. I love abstract expressionism, I love action painting and I paint some with my feet and some with my hands using an old windscreen wiper from a ’66 Jaguar or a nice old piece of rare wood from [Ireland’s] Castle Hyde! I [paint with] old rags from old costumes – things that carry energy. Has ageing been taxing for you? Life’s got better with age! I love being where I am now, facing the next challenge and going to something new, whatever that is. Let the gods decide! Touring nationally from September. Visit lordofthe dance.com 101

TEXT: BELINDA WANIS PICTURES: ALAMY, THINKSTOCK

Few fashion icons find fame later in life but walking wardrobe Iris Apfel, 93, is one. The American designer and “clothes horse” adores ritzy couture pieces but also has an eye for quirky jewellery. In this amazing doco, see her barter for beads in an African shop, lecture students and film a shopping network segment. “If you’re lucky enough to do something you love, everything else follows,” Iris says. The free spirit’s exuberance is encouraged by chief cheerleader, husband Carl (below with Iris), who turns 100 in the film! Warm and touching, this life-affirming doco will have you piling on the bling with renewed joy. In selected cinemas now


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Wendy’s world

COLUMN

Crafternoon delights! Needles and pins! WENDY HARMER seams sew happy to be passing on her womanly arts skills

PICTURE: NICK CUBBIN

H

ow many of us spent a good slice of our teens standing on the dining table being stuck with pins? Or wearily holding our poor little arms out as they were wound around with wool? My stepmother was an accomplished seamstress, knitter, crocheter, quilter, lacemaker and embroiderer. There was nothing in the crafty department she couldn’t do. Self-taught and industrious to the point of obsession, her skills were beyond legendary. She could take one look at you and draft a pattern for a pair of daks you’d never wear in a fit; whip up a starched cotton doily (with your initials in the centre) that would never match any decor; or knit a Christmas jumper, with bells on, which would only ever be worn by a blind reindeer-herder. As a teen, I marvelled at her expertise. It was her awful taste that I rebelled against – and when it’s an orange A-line dress complete with attached black-andorange out-sized gingham tie (plus a matching one for my younger sister), fair enough, I reckon. My family lived in country Australia for a good few years and there were only two TV channels, no internet and shopping malls had barely been invented, so learning crafty stuff from my stepmother was one way to fill in the time while I waited for my destiny to appear, somewhere over the rainbow, above the endless vista of cow paddocks. I loved those times, head bent over my own

projects, even if many of them were abandoned, half-finished, in the bottom of the wardrobe. The quiet time spent with busy hands was meditative, as any artist will tell you, and far outweighed the value of the end product. I remain a fair hand with needles, but not an expert. (Fair Isle! The words still make me grit my teeth with frustration.) I mention all of this because my teen daughter (Miss 15), has asked me to teach her how to sew. At last! Since my girl was a baby I’ve tried everything to get her interested in the womanly arts – given her a Knitting Nancy, plied her with felt, needles and embroidery cottons to make her own soft toys, and bought her all manner of sewing kits – all cheerfully ignored. But last weekend I dragged out the Husqvarna Viking to take her to a land unexplored of pinking shears, basting, French seams and self-covered buttons. Finally, I saw a spark ignited that I’d hoped was just there beneath the surface of her Instagram account. By Sunday afternoon she finished her first garment – a cotton halter top in a lemon print, trimmed with pale blue bobbles. I’m so proud… I may frame it. It feels good to pass on my knowledge, finally a reward for those hours of being admonished, “Do not move! I’m trying to get this hem level” and being stuck with nasty pins. However, I’ll never be able to forgive the Fair Isle! Follow Wendy Harmer on Twitter @wendy_harmer

Next issue in

on sale Thursday

September 3

Travel Take a picturesque train trip through Canada with Yours on the Rocky Mountaineer.

Gardens Spring is in the air, which means it’s a time for celebration in our gardens after the chills of winter. And nothing says good times are coming like a beautfiul display of blossoms.

Fashion Get some ideas for your new-season wardrobe with four fab looks inspired by our favourite stylish celebrities.

Craft Making a mosaic box is oh-so-easy! Use it to store your precious keepsakes, or turn it into a lovely personalised gift. 103


RED CARPET

Generation Wow!

Jump to it From loose-fitting shapes to denim, the iconic ’70s jumpsuit has been re-imagined for the modern day leaving stars swapping gowns in favour of the one-piece wonder

Angie Harmon, 43

Maria Bello, 48

Julia Roberts, 47

Gwen Stefani, 45

The jungle book

Sporting her own label L.A.M.B. at a showcase of the collection in New York, the singer scores top marks for her wild onesie, signature platinum blonde hair and bold red lips. 104

Back to fuchsia

Hollywood favourite and pretty woman Julia can’t put a foot wrong, and her choice of a hot pink Valentino jumpsuit for an awards night in LA is just further proof of this. Tick!

Denim days

The Rizzoli & Isles actress keeps it casual at a film premiere in LA, sporting a long-sleeved denim jumpsuit cinched at the waist, teamed with a bright red tote.

Hot pants

Maria’s designs on spicing up the night are certainly a success, stepping out at a charity event in LA in this hot orange Trina Turk jumpsuit and gorgeous gold accessories.


Ellen Pompeo, 45

On repeat

This isn’t the first time Ellen’s been spotted in a jumpsuit. Clearly a fave style, this time the Grey’s Anatomy star opts for a monochrome look at an event in West Hollywood.

TEXT: KIETLEY ISRIN PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES

Jane Fonda, 77

Disco diva

Bringing back the ’70s in a body-hugging Balmain one-piece for the Grammy Awards, the actress turns up the bling factor with a gold fringed necklace, glittering clutch and metallic pointed heels.

Robin Roberts, 54

Sporting choice

In LA for a sporting awards ceremony, the Good Morning America co-anchor shows off her fit physique to perfection in this strapless Emilio Pucci jumpsuit.

Cate Blanchett, 46

Leading lady

Arriving at an Oscars dinner in LA, Aussie beauty Cate gives a lesson in how to make the trend ultra feminine: accent a one-shoulder Stella McCartney creation with minimal jewels and strappy heels.

105


STAR STYLE

WOW

Screen siren GEENA DAVIS, 59, proves she’s always been in a league of her own, knocking it out of the park with her bold choices and infectious smile

1989 SILVER BELLE Gorgeous Geena is the belle of the Oscars as she walks the red carpet looking like royalty. Her statuette for Best Supporting Actress makes a winning accessory. 106

NOW

2005 LIKE A SUNRISE The Thelma & Louise star shines bright at a Hollywood press party. A burnt orange cocktail dress and gold details work to complement her signature red locks.

KABLOOM! Showing off her enviable figure in a fitted floral dress at a charity event in LA, the one-time Victoria’s Secret model admits it’s taken her a while to get comfortable in her own skin. “When I started to believe that people weren’t judging me every second of my life, I began to really like myself.”

TEXT: JESSICA GRUBB PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES

Then &

Bettenr tha ever!


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Yours is Australia’s fortnightly magazine for women. Packed full with inspiring real-life reads, heartfelt celebrity interviews, the latest...

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Yours is Australia’s fortnightly magazine for women. Packed full with inspiring real-life reads, heartfelt celebrity interviews, the latest...

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