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JANUARY 2021 • FREE NEW YEAR’S TIPS 12 LSU GYMNASTICS 21 MARDI GRAS 2021 69 225BATONROUGE .COM

Arianne Bellizaire

Cameron Jackson

People Rachel Eggie-Gibbs

Roberto Ramirez

2021

Ellen Ogden

Chris Cummings

to Watch

James Davis & Vishal Vasanji

in the Capital Region How these locals are Zooming into the new year

Stephen Hightower

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Shareef O’Neal

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

LUXURY CUSTOM POOLS & OUTDOOR SPACES D E S I G N | B U I L D | M A I N TA I N

CALL US TODAY for a complimentary consultation! 225.757.6138 | pecbuilt.com |

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To be the exception, I need exceptional care. Exceptional care rises beyond one city, one hospital, one clinic. Exceptional care reaches for something groundbreaking, life-changing. Our Lake of the Lake Children’s Health believes connected healthcare across Louisiana helps build a stronger, healthier generation. Now is the time to be exceptional for Louisiana’s exceptional kids. Visit ololchildrens.org/believe for more.

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UPFRONT //

Daily dose of ‘225’ HAPPY NEW YEAR! Like many of you, I am eager for a fresh start and ready for a great 2021. 2020 was certainly challenging, and it required us all to adapt and change. Sometimes, that change was for the better. That’s why I’m proud to share that 225 is also heading for bigger, brighter things. On Jan. 4, we will launch a brand-new newsletter called 225 Daily. The free e-newsletter will bring you the latest on local people, food, events, arts and entertainment, style and more. It will hit inboxes Monday through Friday. Inside, you can expect more of the content you’ve come to know 225 for— but now on a daily basis. Subscribers will get access to first looks inside buzzworthy new restaurants, shops and venues, as well as interviews with local leaders, features on community happenings, event previews and much BY JULIO MELARA more. Don’t worry—225 Dine is not going away. Our 12-year-old food e-newsletter will now be part of 225 Daily. The food-centric Dine edition of our newsletter will drop on Tuesdays and Thursdays, full of restaurant news and recipes. And, of course, we cherish our print magazine as much as ever—it’s not going anywhere, either. You’ll still be able to find it every month on a news rack near you. But the media industry is changing globally, and the impacts of COVID-19 have only accelerated that. Our team is excited to evolve, too. We are shifting toward a digital-centric approach so we can bring you stories as they happen. So, how can you get access to 225 Daily? If you’re already a Dine subscriber, you don’t have to do anything—you’ll automatically start receiving the newsletter on Jan. 4. If not, you can subscribe at 225batonrouge.com/225Daily. And we decided to throw in a little fun for our subscribers. All 225 Issue Date: January 2021 Ad2Daily proof #2 subscribers can register to win • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. a four-day, stay at the • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24three-night hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may beMargaritaville subject to production fees.Resort, just north Lake

of Houston on Lake Conroe. Amenities include five signature Margaritaville dining concepts, an 18-hole golf course, 3-acre waterpark with a lazy river and outdoor pools, a spa and wellness center, and lots of sports and water activities. Enter now at 225batonrouge.com/ contests, and share the contest with friends on social media to get extra chances to win the trip. 225 Daily subscribers and 225 Magazine app users will also be the first to get access to our annual Best of 225 nominations and voting. Nominations open Jan. 6 at 225batonrouge.com/ bestof225. Happy scrolling!

People to Watch We have a longstanding new year’s tradition at 225: publishing our annual list of People to Watch. All year long, we search for Baton Rougeans who have been making headlines and planning big things, with projects on the horizon that will impact the Capital Region and its residents. On this year’s list, we have the founders of Relief Telemed, which launched in 2020 with hopes of becoming the “Waitr of medicine.” An early pivot to COVID-19 testing—including on LSU’s campus—helped the business generate more than $2 million in revenue during its first year in business. Now, the team is prepping for COVID vaccine distribution. We also profile City Group Hospitality’s Stephen Hightower and Millennial Park developer Cameron Jackson, who worked separately on big Stephen Hightower projects in Baton Rouge’s food scene last year—despite the challenges the pandemic dealt the industry. Both have more in the works for 2021. In the cover story, you can also read about Shareef O’Neal (who’s looking to carve his own basketball legacy), Ellen Ogden (whose artwork is making Baton Rouge a more colorful place) and Arianne Bellizaire (whose interior design projects have taken off while

we’ve all been staying home more). Meet them all and the rest of our 2021 People to Watch class in our cover story on page 26.

Gymnastics journey Now that football season is over, Tiger fans turn their attention to other sports. One of the biggest highlights: gymnastics. It’ll be the team’s first season in four decades without legendary head coach D-D Breaux at the helm. Now that Breaux has retired, new head coach Jay Clark knows he has big shoes to fill. He plans to fill them by honoring Breaux’s legacy—but not by trying to replicate her style. “If I wind up trying to be D-D Breaux, I will find myself failing in a lot of areas,” Clark tells 225. “She’s part of a group of coaches of that generation that I would call the warrior class of our profession.” In a feature starting on page 21, we explore Clark’s background and vision for the future—which includes vying for the program’s first national championship. Geaux Tigers!

A new kind of Mardi Gras Over in New Orleans, krewes have spent the winter reframing what the city’s biggest tradition will look like in the COVID-19 era. Without large parades—and with limits on galas and balls—they’ve looked to new ways to safely celebrate. And what does that mean for our parades and krewes here in Baton Rouge? Krewes that are part of events like Mid City Gras have turned to “reverse parades,” with homes decorated instead of floats. Revelers can drive through Mid City neighborhoods to check out the “costumed” houses. We asked the directors of parade krewes like Mid City Gras, as well as Spanish Town, Oshun, Southdowns and others, what their plans are for the season. Turn to page 69 for more. And however you celebrate this year, we hope you have fun and stay safe!

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING? NOBODY DOES IT BETTER

225.218.0888 delriorealestatebr.com

WE LIVE HERE. WE GIVE HERE. WE LOVE IT HERE. 6 

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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L O C AT E D O N T H E C A S I N O F L O O R Must be 21 or older to enter Casino, Red Lotus Asian Kitchen and Bon Temps Buffet. Terms subject to change. Gambling problem? Call 800.522.4700. ©2021 Penn National Gaming, Inc. All rights reserved.

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CONTENTS //

Features 16 Where to get sensory

overload among some native plants

56 Why this local photography

studio features a showerhead

64 What to cook for all the good luck and prosperity this year

69 How local krewes

are dealing with COVID-19 woes this season And much more…

Departments 12 What’s Up 21 Our City 25 I am 225 26 Cover story 53 Style 59 Taste 69 Culture 74 Calendar

ON THE COVER

People to Watch 2021

26 COLLIN RICHIE

We know—most of us want to leave 2020 in the past. But let’s face it: Zoom isn’t going anywhere. So for our January cover, we couldn’t resist lining up our 2021 People to Watch for a mock Zoom meeting. After all, the most common topic this year’s class discussed with us was the importance of adapting to all of today’s changes and challenges. Here’s to a new year—and an inspiring group of locals bringing us into the future. Turn to page 26 to read their stories.

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[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: JAN 2021 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

A S K T H E S TA FF

Sushi Burrito - Poke - Ramen

Favorite spot to celebrate your birthday?

NOW OPEN

Publisher: Julio Melara

EDITORIAL

We Provide the Fresh, You Become the Chef ! MODERN ASIAN FUSION “For me, it’s got to be Umami Japanese Bistro! It’s so cozy and cute, and all the food is to die for.” —Ariana Allison

Editorial director: Penny Font Editor: Jennifer Tormo Managing editor: Benjamin Leger Staff writer: Cynthea Corfah Digital content editor: Mark Clements Staff photographer: Collin Richie Contributing writers: April Capochino Myers, Julia-Claire Evans, Adrian E. Hirsch, Tracey Koch, Elle Marie, Maggie Heyn Richardson, Stephanie Riegel Contributing photographers: Ariana Allison, Sean Gasser, Amy Shutt, Haskell Whittington

ADVERTISING

Sales director: Erin Palmintier-Pou Account executives: Manny Fajardo, André Hellickson Savoie, Jamie Hernandez, Kaitlyn Maranto, Brooke Motto Advertising coordinator: Devyn MacDonald

CORPOR ATE MEDIA

Editor: Lisa Tramontana Content strategist: Allyson Guay Multimedia Strategy Manager: Tim Coles

MARKETING

Chief marketing officer: Elizabeth McCollister Hebert Marketing & events assistant: Taylor Floyd Events: Abby Hamilton Community liaison: Jeanne McCollister McNeil “I’m a sucker for The Global Wildlife Center in Folsom! I am instantly transported to a world beyond Baton Rouge.” —Tim Coles

“BLDG 5’s gorgeous outdoor patio.” —Cynthea Corfah

“At home with my little people! It’s in January, so we usually have a fire in the fireplace and hot chocolate.” —Jamie Hernandez

ADMINISTR ATION

Assistant business manager: Tiffany Durocher Business associate: Kirsten Milano Office coordinator: Tara Lane Receptionist: Cathy Brown

PRODUCTION/DESIGN

Production director: Melanie Samaha Art director: Hoa Vu Graphic designers: Melinda Gonzalez, Emily Witt

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Audience development director and digital manager: James Hume Audience development coordinator: Ivana Oubre Audience development associate: Jordan Kozar

“Radio Bar. Hands down. I just want to stand at that shuffle board table and challenge strangers to a game.” —Taylor Floyd

A publication of Louisiana Business Inc. Chairman: Rolfe H. McCollister Jr. President and CEO: Julio Melara Executive assistant: Kathleen Wray

LOCATED AT ARLINGTON MARKETPLACE 660 ARLINGTON CREEK CENTRE, BLVD 4F BATON ROUGE, LA 70820

225-663-2128 LIKE US ON

9029 Jefferson Highway, Suite 300 Baton Rouge, LA 70809 225-214-5225  •  FAX 225-926-1329 225batonrouge.com  © Copyright 2021 by Louisiana Business Incorporated. All rights reserved by LBI. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. Business address: 9029 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Telephone (225) 214-5225. 225 Magazine cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material—manuscripts or photographs—with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed.

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[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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F E E D B AC K / / W H AT ’ S O N L I N E / /

W H AT ’ S O N L I N E

Meet ‘225 Daily’

Only the BEST

WE’RE KICKING OFF the new year with a bang. On Jan. 4, we will launch a brand-new e-newsletter: 225 Daily. We’ve been publishing 225 e-newsletters almost as long as we’ve been publishing our 15-year-old print magazine. Our 12-year-old food-focused e-newsletter, 225 Dine, has been running the longest. But there is so much more to 225—and Baton Rouge—than food. Our team is just as passionate about writing previews of mustattend events and digging into important stories affecting our community as we are about local restaurants. That’s why we’re expanding 225 Dine and turning it into 225 Daily, a free e-newsletter with the latest stories on local people, food, events, arts and entertainment, style and more. It will hit inboxes Monday through Friday. Inside, expect exclusive first looks at the hottest new restaurants, shops and

Write in your picks for the 2021 Best of 225 Awards Best of 225 is back. Starting this month, you can help determine who is eligible to win a local award. Here are some important dates to know:

venues, plus Q&As with local leaders, event previews, community news and much more. The newsletter’s Dine edition will continue to publish on Tuesdays and Thursdays, full of restaurant news and recipes. Subscribe now at 225batonrouge. com/225Daily. And if you’re already a Dine subscriber, you don’t have to do anything— you’ll automatically begin receiving the newsletter on Jan. 4. One more special bonus: In our first edition, you can look for details on how to win a free four-day, three-night stay at the Margaritaville Lake Resort, just north of Houston on Lake Conroe. See you online!

Jan. 6 to Feb. 10

Write-in nominations will be open at 225batonrouge. com/bestof225. On a fill-in-the-blank ballot, Capital Region residents can write in their own choices for the best local businesses and people.

March 4 to April 8

Voting is live on our website. The people and businesses that received the most nominations in each category will be listed on the final ballot.

Late June

We’ll announce this year’s winners with the release of our July 2021 issue of 225 magazine. Be sure to subscribe to 225 Daily for all the details on how and when we’ll honor next year’s winners.

COURTESY MARGARITAVILLE LAKE RESORT

Find out how you can win a four-day stay at the Margaritaville Lake Resort in Texas in the first issue of 225 Daily.

Bah humbug!

FEEDBACK

Summing up the season

The Christmas season may be over, but we’re still giggling at an unnamed reader who just wasn’t feeling our 225 Dine story about local peppermint-flavored drinks.

COLLIN RICHIE

AHEAD OF LSU’S Dec. 5 football game against Alabama, we asked our Facebook followers how they felt about the matchup (Editor’s note: It was another loss in a disappointing season). While many responded with GIFs, you can likely still understand the feeling behind these:

Green thumbs In our November 2020 issue, we highlighted Andeab and Mila Berhane of Greenhand Nursery, who have been among the Red Stick Farmers Market’s longest participating and most celebrated vendors. Our readers felt the same.

“Some of the finest human beings you will ever meet!”

“Peppermint induces heartburn in a large segment of the population.”

ARIANA ALLISON

Andeab and Mila Berhane of Greenhand Nursery A peppermintflavored cocktail from MID TAP

—James Fred

CONNECT WITH US facebook.com/225magazine

twitter.com/225batonrouge

instagram.com/225batonrouge

pinterest.com/225batonrouge

youtube.com/225magazine

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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January Purposeful Lea designs 12-month and 30-day planners and downloadable finance and lifestyle resources.

planners Local maker Katherine Lea designs minimalist planners for creatives

PHOTOS BY SEAN GASSER

Katherine “scottie.” Lea is the owner of Baton Rouge planner company Alter Planning Co.

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DO YOU STRUGGLE finding a yearly planner that fits your style? Do you get overwhelmed by all the stickers, bright colors, motivational quotes and to-do lists filling the pages of today’s most popular planners? Meet: Alter Planning Co., a local planner business that makes simple, stylish and intentionally designed planners with artists in mind. Katherine “scottie.” Lea launched Alter Planning Co. in 2019. She didn’t feel represented by the planners available in stores and wanted to create one that met all of her needs. The 26-year-old pictured a holistic planner that included financial planning, goal setting, business tools, monthly overviews and space to make daily lists. So she made just that. She began conceptualizing the 12-month planner, The Annual, in 2018. She debuted it in 2019 in hopes she could sell 70 copies. Little did she know the planners would speak to so many others. In the first eight months, she sold 425 planners. By 2020, Alter Planning Co. reached global recognition when it was featured on Beyonce’s website showcasing Black businesses. “There’s so much freedom whenever you lay out structure and boundaries and set out tangible goals,” Lea says. The Alter Planning Co. planners are like a blank canvas for all of your planning needs. The pages are monochromatic, with texts and shading in different tones of grey. They are gender neutral and easy to digest for people at any stage of life. They include helpful pages to log down monthly habits, morning and evening routines, money goals and your monthly budget. “It’s so much easier to accomplish your goals when you can break them down,” Lea says. “It makes it harder to get stagnant.” Lea also sells The Dailies, 30-day booklets to help plan your monthly overview, daily to-dos, habits and finances. On her website, people can shop downloadable resources like monthly money management forms, routine building workbooks and a daily expense tracking calendar. Before launching her planner company, the Baton Rouge native was a photographer, brand coach and content strategist. She never imagined how much her graphic design skills would be brought to the forefront after 2019. While she still works with brand development clients, her focus is on expanding Alter Planning Co., launching new planners for different lifestyles and getting The Annual sold in stores. “I want to change what the planning industry looks like,” Lea says. “It’s time to shake it up.” alterplanningco.com

—CYNTHEA CORFAH

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

Sustainable swaps

Flower pot candle from Pollumination

Five eco-friendly household items to switch to in 2021

COURTESY MATADOR VODKA

WHAT WAS ON your New Year’s resolutions list? Do you want to leave a smaller carbon footprint? Use less paper? Or maybe save animals and eat more veggies? Whatever it is, we could all benefit from making more eco-conscious decisions. Local businesses are helping Baton Rougeans make sustainable choices. Here are some eco-friendly household items to consider switching to this year. Cotton gift bags from The Hope Shop Save some trees and package your gifts in these stylish cotton gift bags. Instead of getting a gift in a disposable bag, the recipient gets a two-in-one gift including the item and a reusable bag.

Flower pot candles from Pollumination Who says you have to throw away your candle holder after the wax is melted? Pollumination makes eco-friendly candles that double as candle and plant holders. After the wax melts away, clean the pot and use it as a planter. It even has a hole at the bottom to keep your plants well-drained. Loose herbal tea from Adornleaf Tea Co. Do you enjoy harmful chemicals being infused into your tea through synthetic tea bags? No, thank you. Ditch the tea bags and shop locally blended loose herbal tea from this Black woman-owned business.

COLLIN RICHIE

Dot Menstrual Cup from The Hope Shop Ladies, say goodbye to maxi pads and tampons. With this reusable menstrual cup, you can save money, cotton and a monthly trip to the store to restock menstrual products.

Sub-irrigated planters made from Outside Stimuli Who knew so much science could go into planters? This downtown plant shop makes sub-irrigated planters from upcycled plastic containers. Inside each planter is a recycled plastic bottle where the plant is housed that allows the adornleaftea.com grower to see the roots, handsproducinghope.org soil and water drainage to outsidestimuli.com monitor the plant’s pollumination.com progress at all stages.

ONLINE

DIGITS

16

The amount of times the new Baton Rouge vodka company Matador Vodka distills its vodka made from Louisiana sugarcane. matadorvodka.com.

A fit new year

5 out-of-the-box ways to work out in Baton Rouge

1 2 3

WORKING OUT CAN get tedious. Mix it up this year by trying a new fitness class around town. Here are some local spots to get moving.

4 5

For a mix of cardio, dance and muscle toning | Barre 3 | barre3.com For indoor rock climbing at Louisiana’s largest climbing gym UpTown Climbing | uptownclimbing.com For kickboxing and self-defense classes | Baton Rouge Krav Maga batonrougekravmaga.com For pole dancing and aerial hoop classes | TWRL | twrlbr.com

WINNERS BREEDLOVE BEAUTY CO., a Baton Rouge beauty business, was one of nine sellers in the United States featured in December on eBay’s Holiday Marketplace, a virtual platform connecting sellers with shoppers who want to find oneof-a-kind gifts and support small businesses. breedlovebeautyco. com

For group or solo strength and conditioning work Geaux CrossFit | geauxcrossfit.com

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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COLLIN RICHIE

COURTESY NICOLE CUMMINS

Barre 3

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

W H AT ’ S N E W

Buzz feed By Julia-Claire Evans // Photos by Ariana Allison

BIG MOVES

“We’re not your average Ramen Restaurant”

1509 Government St Suite B, BTR, LA at ”The Electric Depot BR” (225) 283-1148 boruramen.business.site

Crafted Cocktails Inspired Appetizers Freshest Sushi 5741 Essen Lane @ Perkins, BTR Issue Date: October 2020 Ad proof #1 (225) 767-2288 ichibanbr.com

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Front Yard Bikes

Your favorite community bike shop will soon have new stomping grounds. Not too far from its current Mid City location, the shop is moving to a larger facility: a former church that includes classroom space for its youth development program. Front Yard Bikes sell bikes, of course, but it also aims to teach customers of any age how to ride and repair their bikes, and it runs an afterschool program teaching local youth about ethics and leadership. Add its new location at 4385 Government St. to your Google Maps favorites. frontyardbikes.com

STOCK IMAGE

Welcoming the newest “Must Try!” Restaurant in Baton Rouge

Wine about it THE STORE OF your home-bar dreams is setting up shop in the Capital City. Carrying 8,000 wines and thousands of types of beer, Total Wine & More is opening its fourth location in Louisiana. Launching in Siegen Village Shopping Center, you can look forward to satisfying your wine cravings on any budget. The cheapest bottle of red goes for $4. And don’t forget about its enormous selection of both popular and rare beer and liquor brands, too. The brand has not yet announced its local launch date. Look for updates at totalwine.com.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Mimosa Handcrafted

HIGHEST QUALITY WITH COMPETITIVE PRICING!

Mimosa Handcrafted has a new home in Baton Rouge. In November, the jewelry company moved to Perkins Road, right next to Wanderlust by Abby, a longtime seller of the brand’s jewelry. mimosahandcrafted.com

At Ducote’s Restaurant & Bar Equipment, we specialize in supplying the foodservice industry with a broad selection of the top-quality equipment and supplies you need to successfully run your operations and efficiently serve your customers.

4433 Florida Blvd • 225-344-4240 ducotesrestaurantsupply.com

Dagostino

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

#38003 #AM-50-BAJ

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Baton Rouge’s Dagostino Pasta Company announced earlier this winter an expansion of its fresh pasta and food products into New Orleans stores. The company already has its own store on Drusilla Lane and sells at many supermarkets in Baton Rouge, but it will now sell its homemade, authentic pasta and sauces to Langenstein’s in Metairie and Vom Fass in New Orleans. dagostinopasta.com

Beers, barns and Istrouma Brewing

The newest brewery in the Capital Region, Istrouma Brewing, is a barn-turned brewery boasting an array of homemade brews. The “art farm” brewery opened last fall, housed on a running farm decorated with antique pieces like tables made out of old pianos. If that doesn’t make you want to visit, the farm’s many roaming animals, such as horses and goats, should entice you! sugarfarmsla.com

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad2 proof #1 W H AT ’ S U P / /

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

STEP INTO THE NEW YEAR AS

the best you

Can you say Bonjour? Bonjour Baton Rouge, the city’s newest French dessert spot that opened last fall, boasts not only delicious crepes, but waffles, milkshakes, waffle sticks, bubble waffles and ice cream. Using ingredients sourced both locally and from Europe, each treat is doused in your choice of milk chocolate, white chocolate, caramel and more. Yes, please! Find it on Instagram @bonjour. batonrouge

DIGITS

80,000

The initial estimate for the number of doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine Louisiana was expected to receive during its first two weeks of distribution. During an early December press conference, Gov. John Bel Edwards said the first shots would be given to hospital workers on the frontlines of the pandemic.

Spanish Moon

Little Graze goes big

Originally made for younger kids, Little Graze expanded to add grown-up boxes, too. The company makes stylishly packaged snack, dessert and charcuterie boxes. It was started by Port Allen native Cassie Treuil over quarantine. Now available to order in a variety of sizes, the boxes are available in different themes and are perfect for anyone, no matter their age. littlegrazela.com

Corporate Blvd at Jefferson • 225.925.2344 townecenteratcedarlodge.com • HEALTH • BEAUTY • DESIGNER SHOPPING HOME DECOR • GOURMET DINING • AND MORE 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

THINGS TO DO

Good for the senses

Inside the Baton Rouge Sensory Garden, a hidden gem that’s three decades in the making By Julia Claire-Evans // Photos by Ariana Allison

THERE’S AN OASIS of mint, basil, sunflowers and even okra right in the middle of the city. The recently completed Baton Rouge Sensory Garden inside BREC’s Botanic Gardens at Independence Park feels miles away from the cars passing through the surrounding Goodwood neighborhood. The Sensory Garden has been a work in progress for around 30 years, and its transformation has continued since the Herb Society took it over about three years ago. With the garden almost completely refurbished, the society held a dedication of its ninth and final plant bed this past fall. Today, all of your senses are immersed in the semicircle-shaped

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garden the moment you step inside. Each rounded, raised garden bed is designed to appeal to one of the five senses: sight, touch, smell, taste and sound. The beds are themed. One is all about Louisiana cooking, with sprouting onions, cilantro, celery, basil, edible flowers and a large, treesized okra plant. There’s a bed full of healing plants, growing things like peaches and garlic. There’s a mint bed showcasing—you guessed it—many different types of mint. Another is dedicated to lemon-scented herbs like lemon verbena and lemongrass. The “Scarborough Fair” bed is full of English favorites, like parsley, sage,

rosemary, thyme and even strawberries. There are beds with plants from Mediterranean, Asian and various Spanish-speaking countries, too. The last and most central bed in the garden is a work in progress, showcasing Louisiana native plants in an homage to Baton Rouge. The garden beds and the plants themselves are distinguished by small signs identifying their names. Volunteers are also working on planting more fruit trees. Currently in the works are two peach trees, multiple blueberry bushes, a satsuma tree and a fig tree. “We want it to be edible things that people can pick off and eat,” says Herb Society education chair and garden volunteer Mary Williams. They also hope the trees provide

peaceful shade for garden-goers to sit under. The goal, Williams says, is for the Sensory Garden to be a teaching place, and for people who usually wouldn’t know about plants to learn more. “We want people to know that herbs aren’t just things you can cook with,” Williams says. “Herbs are there for use and delight.” With as much planning and hard work the volunteers have put into the garden, nature has had its own say, too. The okra wasn’t even planted on purpose, Williams says. The plant just showed up one day, possibly from a seed dropped by a bird. It just so happened that it sprouted in the perfect spot for okra to grow in: the bed named “Louisiana cooking.” brec.org

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

Work-fromhome attire: Comfy or professional?

YOUR FLAVOR

Alexandra Hurtado McCall

Mother; Co-owner, Stork Maternity Consulting 33

Rick Patel

Owner, MID TAP 36

Comfy, for sure

Comfy. Basketball shorts and a T-shirt

Must-have tool for staying organized

The Trello app

Apple’s Notes and Calendar apps

What inspires you?

The women in my family

My uncle, Kevin Patel. He’s a great businessman I always looked up to.

Hawaii

Your 2021 mantra

Light House Coffee’s lavender latte with oat milk Mindfulness

Spiced-mango maple-flavored bourbon eggnog at MID TAP

Live freely.

Comfy

Calendar on my phone

Family

Gumbo

Value every moment.

A cozy set

Notion, an app for journaling and tracking goals and habits

The Skinny Confidential podcast

Mid City Beer Garden’s fireplace

Live authentically, and what’s meant for you will align with you.

Marissa Mizell

Makeup artist and social content creator 27

Japan (or anywhere in Asia!)

Remedy for Baton Rouge’s chilly days

Dubai

Ewell Netter

Founder, His Insecurities 39

Where you’d love to travel when it’s safe

Tokyo

WE CARRY EACH OTHER It’s how we do things in Louisiana during times of challenge. We’re stronger together and we know our strength lies in the helping hands of our neighbors. So let’s wear a mask and protect one another. And protect the life we love. 01MK7496 12/20

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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I N S I D E : Local news

Following a

LEGEND

First-year head coach Jay Clark is aiming high in 2021 after four decades of D-D Breaux’s dedication B Y M A R K C LE MENTS

CHRIS PARENT / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

HOW DO YOU replace a legend? What steps do you even begin to take to fill the void left by someone who is the gold standard in your line of work? It’s a question that has been on Jay Clark’s mind ever since he was tasked to take over for D-D Breaux as head coach of the LSU gymnastics team in August.

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COACH CLARK’S STATS

29

Number of years in college gymnastics

2012

Joined the LSU coaching staff

infectious around here. It’s something that we really focus on trying to bring every day when we’re in practice and training for something that we feel very passionately about. We feel like we have an obligation to our fans at this point to really continue what we’ve built in recent years and to try to take that next step.” The team isn’t shy about what that “next step” is, either. After finishing four of the past five seasons as national runner-up, the Tigers are itching to get over the hump and grab the program’s first national championship. “Obviously, that’s definitely our end goal,” says senior Christina Desiderio, a talented beam and floor performer. “But we preach just taking one step forward every day. If we do that, I think we definitely have the ability to win the national championship, for sure. I think the sky is really the limit with this team. We just have to keep focused and stay determined.” LSU is bringing back a ton of talent from last season’s strong squad, as

4

Number of years as head coach at Georgia

1990

Joined Georgia as assistant coach

“This palace of a gym that I’m sitting in is a testament to her career and everything that she accomplished and contributed.” —Coach Jay Clark on retired coach D-D Breaux’s legacy

COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

IT GOES WITHOUT saying this wasn’t just your routine coaching change. Even outside of Baton Rouge, Breaux doesn’t need much of an introduction. The longest tenured coach in SEC history amassed more than 800 wins for LSU. The Tigers finished in the top 10 nationally for 31 of Breaux’s 43 years in charge of the program. So, how does Clark hope to continue that legacy? Well, ironically, by not trying to be D-D Breaux. “If I wind up trying to be D-D Breaux, I will find myself failing in a lot of areas,” Clark says. “She’s part of a group of coaches of that generation that I would call the warrior class of our profession. This palace of a gym that I’m sitting in is a testament to her career and everything that she accomplished and contributed.” Now, that isn’t to say Clark plans to abandon Breaux’s building blocks. On the contrary, it seems he is aiming to mirror, rather than mimic, Breaux’s approach. After all, he has spent the past seven years learning under her tutelage as the unofficial “head coach in waiting.” Prior to his arrival in Baton Rouge, Clark spent 22 seasons at University of Georgia in Athens, working his way from an assistant coach/recruiting coordinator up to head coach—a title he held for four seasons. “I was in a place where I wasn’t sure whether I even wanted to coach again,” Clark says about the end of his time as the Bulldogs’ coach. “But anybody that’s been around D-D very long knows that she doesn’t take no for an answer on a lot of things. It just felt like maybe something special could be done here. It would be an opportunity to see if the things that we had seen work in [Georgia], could some of those principles be applied here and help D-D achieve some of the things that she really wanted to see come to fruition?” But it wasn’t just Breaux’s coaching successes that drew Clark in. He constantly repeats descriptors like “energy” and “passion” when referencing his predecessor, adding that the standard of excellence she set within the program hasn’t faded even if she isn’t around quite as often. It was announced during Breaux’s retirement that she would be retained by LSU Athletics as an ambassador for the school and gymnastics program. “I’ve learned that if you don’t bring the energy, you can’t expect the people around you to do it,” Clark says. “That’s one thing that D-D did every single day was bring a level of energy that was contagious and

CHRIS PARENT / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

OUR CITY //

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COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

“We were all sent home and places were closed, so we couldn’t train or workout or anything. It’s been a weird transition, but I think we’re handling it well.”

CHRIS PARENT / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

well as a loaded incoming freshman class that includes two former U.S. national team members and three Junior Olympics competitors. Clark says this year’s group is deeper and more competitive at each event, which has led to some healthy battles within the team. “Last year, the biggest issue we had was lack of depth, and that really was born out of injury to a large extent,” says Clark. “Knock on wood, at this point we’re in a good situation from a depth perspective. That creates a competitive environment. You know the old ‘iron sharpens iron’ mentality that there’s a little bit of one-upsmanship that goes on in the gym from time to time, and it’s exciting. We’re in a much better place right now—believe it or not—in November [2020] than we were this time in November last year.” Among those returning talents is sophomore Kiya Johnson, who racked up 22 event titles, three All-America honors and multiple SEC Gymnast and Freshman of the Week awards in her debut season in purple and gold. Growing up comes quick in the world of collegiate athletics. As a former standout freshman herself, Johnson has already begun taking on more of a leadership role this year to help the new crop of five freshmen get adjusted to the daily rigors of life as a college gymnast. It’s a big adjustment in itself that has only been amplified with COVID19 impacting just about every aspect of daily life. For example, workouts that would normally wrap up in two hours can now take four because of safety precautions and disinfecting protocols that must be done before a new group can begin their work. “We had to make some adjustments in the way we train and how we rotate events and who we group them with,” Clark says. “We had to consider what contact tracing would look like, based on how we train. If you’ve been training with somebody, it should be somebody you already live with rather than cross-contaminating multiple living spaces and those things. It’s been challenging, but I think our kids deserve a lot of credit with how they’ve modified their social behavior and done a relatively good job of heeding the protocols that we had to put in place.” To help ease the transition into these new arrangements and maintain some sense of normalcy, the team has transformed what is normally its “entertainment area” in the gymnastics facility into a study hall spot.

—sophomore Kiya Johnson, who racked up 22 event titles in her debut season

CHRIS PARENT / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

CHRIS PARENT / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

OUR CITY //

“I think the sky is really the limit with this team. We just have to keep focused and stay determined.” —senior Christina Desiderio, a talented beam and floor performer Desks were set up so student athletes can safely knock out their schoolwork, attend virtual classes or enjoy a meal on campus and around their teammates. This has helped maintain team camaraderie while providing a more structured routine with easier, quicker access to the gym. “It was a little challenging at the beginning when we all got back on campus to just get back into the swing of actually doing gymnastics,” Johnson says. “We were all sent home and places were closed, so we couldn’t train or workout or anything. It’s been a weird transition, but I think we’re

handling it well. It’s a pretty big [freshman] class, so if any of them need any advice on anything, or any help with anything, we try to just be there for them and help them through it, so that they can feel ready and prepared.” One of the few disappointments for the team entering the season is that they won’t have a fully packed PMAC crowd cheering them on for home meets. The new SEC-only schedule will feature eight total meets, starting Jan. 8 against Arkansas. It’s still not known how many fans will be allowed inside the PMAC, which is considered one of the best

college gymnastics environments in the country. When it’s rocking, it’s one of the most vivacious atmospheres in the sport, averaging the fifth-most fans in the country. Even still, Clark had a powerful message for the Tiger faithful. “We ain’t dead, and neither are you,” Clark says with emphasis. “We know that you’re there. We feel it. We see it in our social media interactions. Rather than dwell on what we can’t do and what we don’t have, I want to focus on everything that we’ve built, and everything that we still have. While we may be limited in terms of how many at one time can be in there, there’s going to be fans in there … and I expect them to be as loud as they can possibly be. The fan base of the LSU Tigers is the loudest and proudest in the country. And it doesn’t matter what the sport is.” Clark and company certainly don’t want to get ahead of themselves, but they also know something special could be in the making moving forward. And no matter what successes come down the line, Clark emphasized that it will all be because of one local legend. “Whenever we get over the hump and win this first national championship, it’s going to be about D-D Breaux in a lot of ways,” he says. “I think the whole sport owes her a debt of gratitude for the time and the persistence that she showed and the tenacity that’s innate in her and her personality.”

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OUR CITY //

By Benjamin Leger DIGITS

$2.7 million

Number of donations to local nonprofits through the 225 Gives campaign in December. The citywide campaign aimed to help nonprofits that had struggled in 2020 because of the pandemic.

18

Percentage income growth rate of the average Black household in Baton Rouge since 2015. Still, Black households earn only about 55% of white households on average, according to the Baton Rouge Area Chamber’s “2021 Economic Outlook.”

On to a second term THE DECEMBER RUNOFF election solidified something many political experts were predicting: Mayor Sharon Weston Broome would win a second term. In a battle with former State Rep. Steve Carter, Broome emerged with 57% of the vote to his 43%. Broome spent the campaign season touting her work over the last four years, including the MovEBR road improvement program and steering the parish through the aftermath of the 2016 floods, the country’s reckoning with racial inequality and the economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic. She drew harsh criticism from Carter and her six other challengers for the parish’s high crime rate, the pace of traffic-alleviation projects and the St. George split. Interestingly, nearly 87% of voters within the prospective city of St. George voted for Carter. But in the end, the majority of voters rallied around her and showed pollsters that the Capital City continues to lean left politically. “Baton Rouge is kind of like a lot of urban areas around the country,” says Southern University political scientist Albert Samuels. “It’s a blue dot in the middle of a red sea.” Broome acknowledged at her election night party that she has her work cut out for her during the next four years to bring the city-parish together. “We have so much left to do,” she said on election night.

—COMPILED FROM LOCAL NEWS REPORTS

COLLIN RICHIE

News briefs

Mayor Sharon Weston Broome won a second term in the December 2020 runoff election.

76

LSU is facing a national reckoning over its alleged handling of sexual assault complaints— many against student athletes.

660

Acreage of Greenwood Community Park and Baton Rouge Zoo. BREC broke ground in December on the first phase of its planned improvements to the park. That includes relocating the zoo’s entrance to the center of the park with a new entry plaza and several new exhibits, including an underwater observation area of pygmy hippos.

DATE S

Fall 2021 When the first phase of the lakes project is expected to begin. That will include dredging and deepening City Park and LSU lakes as well as other small lakes in the vicinity. The project will also include pedestrian and bicycle path improvements and other amenities around the lakes. In November, project organizers received five responses to its request for proposals to lead the design, though a final selection hadn’t been announced.

Late 2022 When Baton Rouge commuters can expect to see work begin on an I-10 expansion through the city. In late November, DOTD selected Kiewit/Boh, a joint venture of two firms based in Georgia and New Orleans, to serve as contractors for the project. Construction will stretch from La. 415 in West Baton Rouge Parish to the I-10/12 split, adding an additional lane in each direction and modifying several onand offramps along the interstate.

24 

JORDAN HEFLER

Percentage of voters statewide who rejected an amendment to let out-of-state residents sit on higher education boards. The proposal had already moved swiftly through the state legislature with not a single “no” vote. Political leaders argued it helped higher education boards, such as LSU’s Board of Supervisors, gain national expertise rather than requiring members to be state residents. But voters resoundingly disagreed.

LSU’s national controversy A TERRIBLE 2020 football season was no match for what came to light in mid-November, when USA Today published a bombshell report alleging LSU’s athletic department and other administrators had for years ignored sexual assault complaints against some of its star athletes. The massive investigative piece detailed several cases where LSU officials reportedly looked the other way, including multiple complaints from female student athletes against former running back Derrius Guice, whose football career continued to flourish at the university despite rape allegations reported to the athletic department. In other cases, USA Today says even parents of alleged victims were ignored when voicing complaints directly to athletics officials. The piece also detailed other instances of inaction toward sexual assault complaints among the general student population, including one student who claims she was not allowed to transfer out of a class she was taking with her alleged attacker—despite the university being aware of multiple assault allegations against him.

In the wake of the USA Today article, LSU hired law firm Husch Blackwell to complete its own investigation. During a speaking engagement with the Baton Rouge Press Club in December, LSU interim president Tom Galligan acknowledged the university had yet to place anyone on administrative leave, despite multiple coaches and athletic department leaders being directly named in the article. Galligan told the Press Club the university is waiting on Husch Blackwell to complete its investigation before taking any action. “Unless they make a recommendation in the meantime, or discover other facts, we will wait until the report is released,” Galligan says. “We will take swift and appropriate action, if it calls for it.” Husch Blackwell started interviewing students and staff in December and plans to present a list of recommendations to LSU once complete in February. Galligan says the recommendations will be made public. —COMPILED FROM LOCAL NEWS REPORTS

S AY W HAT

“If we designed a place, like a town center, the sidewalk dining was lagniappe to the dining space allocated inside the building envelope. Now, the sidewalk is involved in these conversations. That real estate can be allocated for rentable space. Same with roof decks and balconies. Those things don’t come cheap, but right now they’re very valuable.” —Mike Sullivan, a local architect and principal at LRK Architects, discussing how the pandemic has made outdoor space and flexible space more important in future design projects

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I AM 225 //

Beth Welch BETH WELCH’S “LIVING Memory” exhibit at the Arts Council’s Firehouse Gallery is turning into as much a technological feat as an artistic expression. Realizing the pandemic’s potential to keep local patrons away, Welch plans to engage an international audience. A Facebook livestream, Instagram takeover and drone footage will offer a behind-the-scenes look at the opening, a tour of the show and a conversation with the artist. The concept for the series began as a tribute to Welch’s mother, who had a severe stroke when Welch was in high school and who now suffers from dementia. As the collection developed, Welch increasingly explored the universal theme of identity and motherhood: Who is the woman behind the mom? What are her passions, dreams and history? Many children never know. The distance between a child’s perception of their mother and the woman’s true self takes the form of a detailed pen-and-ink rendering of a child on cloud-like, translucent vellum paper that overlays a charcoal sketch of a mother figure on a separate sheet. The intuitive choice of media echoes the nuance and haziness of childhood memories. “Once you have a child, everything is focused on that child, and you lose so much of your identity,” says Welch, the mother of a 2-year-old son. “By placing the mothers in the background, I hope ‘Living Memory’ brings them to the foreground of the conversation.” At age 28, Welch is a collage of modern mom and Old World master. She has studied classical technique in Italy, mastered media ranging from photography and oils to charcoal and pen-and-ink, won the bestin-show and juried an exhibit at the Dallas Metro Arts Contemporary Gallery, recorded mother/artist podcasts, and mentored women artists. The Monroe native jumpstarted her career by declaring herself an artist at age 5. She drew on any surface that wouldn’t land her in time-out. She has yet to stop. By high school, art already meant more than finishing a masterpiece. “It has been the way I process all things in life,” she explains. “There’s a definite quiet that your mind gets to whenever you’re making something from nothing on the paper.” Despite the high-tech methods used to create one of the gallery’s most virtually accessible exhibits, that sense of calm pervades the show. “[The pieces] don’t scream from across the room. They’re not big and red and naked,” she explains. “They are layered and subtle—almost like whispers.” But Welch hopes those whispers get families talking. That’s why she titles each piece with a question. An interactive board at the exhibition also encourages the community to contribute questions they’d like to be answered by the women in their lives—and serve as a reminder to ask those questions while we still can. —ADRIAN E. HIRSCH

“There are a lot of things that I wish I could ask my mom. But she can’t reply anymore. I hope people will look at my work and ask those important questions, while their moms are still able to answer.”

COLLIN RICHIE

See Beth Welch’s work

“Living Memory” will be on display at the Arts Council’s Firehouse Gallery Feb. 1-26. The opening is scheduled for Feb. 6 at 6 p.m. For more information, visit bethwelchart.com. And turn to page 78 of this magazine to find a print from Welch.

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C OV E R S T ORY

W

HEN WE CHOOSE our People to Watch each year, we usually look for individuals with big projects on the horizon or who might be shaping policy or impacting part of our community in a significant way. When considering this year’s list, we looked for another trait, too: People who know how to pivot. After all, it’s what everyone had to learn to do in 2020. This year’s class includes a tech founder who is helping museums digitize their exhibits, and the owners of a telehealth company that has contributed to COVID-19 testing availability during the pandemic. From a restaurateur who’s found ways to thrive in the toughest of times to a developer who brought Baton Rouge its first shipping container park, each person in these pages found ways to adapt to today’s challenges. But they all seem to have one thing in common: They are taking 2020’s lessons and moving onward and upward into the future. Here’s what they have planned for a hopefully brighter 2021.

26 

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C OV E R S T ORY

SEAN GASSER

Rachel EggieGibbs is hoping to reshape the local hair industry, starting wtih her new salon.

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ARTS

Y

OU MAY NOT know her name yet, but you probably know her work. Ellen Ogden is a Baton Rouge artist behind many of the vibrant murals and whimsical sign art around town. Her lively creations have been painted on the windows and walls of businesses like Wanderlust by Abby, The Royal Standard, Hey Penelope, MJ’s Cafe, Pure Barre Baton Rouge and Olive or Twist. The 32-year-old has been passionate about art for as long as she can remember. She studied painting and art history at LSU. She thought she wanted to work at museums but learned she hated sitting still. In 2016, she got her start in painting murals at Trader Joe’s in Metairie. From that year on, she painted dozens of murals around Louisiana. Ogden paints everything from chalkboard menus to large-scale murals. Most of her work includes bright colors, mixed fonts and elements from nature like flowers, trees, leaves and grass. She works primarily with businesses and nonprofits to execute each client’s vision. One of the pieces that has meant the most to her was an intricate mural of Lady Justice made for The Walls Project’s mural series, One Rouge, focused on the nine drivers of poverty in the United States.

Ellen Ogden

C OV E R S T ORY

2020’S BIGGEST LESSON

“Mindfulness: trying to be mindful and conscious of everyone, wherever we are. Also, to be a vessel of positivity.“

—CYNTHEA CORFAH

28 

MA

NTR A F

20 21

“Pursue love in the existence you have today.”

Thomas Wimberly’s illustrations honoring health care workers were featured all over billboards from New York to London at the start of the pandemic. Later in the year, he created voting-themed graphics for MoveOn and worked on imagery for Amplifier’s Cannabis Justice campaign. Leea Russell and Xero Skidmore will help lead the charge for programming of the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge’s new downtown headquarters. When it opens later this year, the space aims to be a resource for regional artists and creatives.

SEAN GASSER

MORE TO WATCH

OR

The mural represents the wage gap in Louisiana, especially affecting single heads of households. It depicts Lady Justice as a strong woman pulling her blindfold off and shaking the scales of equality. The man’s scale is blue and weighed down, and the woman’s scale is pink, going up in smoke and dropping lotus seeds to grow flowers beneath it, which represent feminine power. Since COVID-19 began, things have looked a bit different for the Baton Rouge artist. She took voluntary leave from sign art at Trader Joe’s and focused her efforts on community work. In 2020, she started her window art project Reflect Love. She wanted a way to continue painting but also bring life to businesses in an economically challenging time. She began reaching out to local shops, asking to paint on their windows. Before she knew it, she had an influx of inquiries about the window art. She made an online form for people to request window paintings at their businesses. Ogden worked with fellow Baton Rouge chalkboard and sign artist Jennifer Hester of Blooming Chalk to paint positive messages like “reflect love,” “let kindness spread,” and “sprinkle joy,” on local stores’ windows. In the future, Ogden plans to expand her online platform. She wants to begin selling prints and develop her website for people to view her work. “My favorite part of my job is meeting a new client and figuring out what they’re excited about,” Ogden says. “When the puzzle pieces fit and they approve the design and see how it transforms the space, it’s the best.”

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C OV E R S T ORY

MORE TO WATCH

COLLIN RICHIE

All eyes are on Mayor Sharon Weston Broome. She starts her second term in the midst of an ongoing health and economic crisis. She must also manage divisions over St. George and a growing murder rate, and she’ll continue work on the MovEBR road improvement program. Kim Ginn, vice president and general manager of L’Auberge Casino & Hotel since 2018, is one of the few female gaming executives in not only the state but in the country. Hotels and casinos were dealt a tough hand in 2020, and Ginn will help lead her property’s recovery.

BUSINESS & COMMUNITY

“Nothing is guaranteed. You have to be ready for anything.”

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The shipping container park is still in its early stages. As of HERE’S NOTHING CAMERON Jackson can’t accomplish December 2020, Millennial Park featured three eateries: turkey when he sets his mind to it. leg spot Jive Turkey; barbecue joint Memphis Mac BBQ; and The 25-year-old is the president and CEO of Millennial Royal Taste of Jamaica for authentic Jamaican fare. As the park Park, Baton Rouge’s first shipping container park. After continues to expand, more shipping containers will be added. opening in the summer of 2020, the open-air eatery has quickly Jackson plans to rent one of his spots to a soup-and-salad eatery become a hub for the community. called Green Acres and open his own bar, daiquiri shop and a Besides providing tasty food from different cultures on the Florsnoball stand. ida Boulevard corridor and even a space for drive-in movie nights, Jackson has big plans for the future. He plans Millennial Park also strives to help its neighbors. to raise his own turkeys for Jive Turkey and colJackson has hosted free drive-thru turkey 2020’S laborate with Sweet Jones Farms for local fruits, drives, flu shot and voter registration events BIGGEST LESSON vegetables and livestock for the park and for and school supply giveaways. It is the home of the upcoming fresh produce market, Millennial Louisiana’s largest Little Free Library, where the Park Produce Stand. The market will be at the public can donate and borrow books for free. intersection of North Street and North Acadian “I have such a high ceiling for myself,” Jackson Thruway. He also plans to buy abandoned lots says. “I want to impact the city like no one has to build affordable housing out of shipping conever seen before.” tainers and open an HIV/AIDS treatment clinic. Before he conceptualized the shipping “It’s too easy to use your space to help the container project, the Baton Rouge native was on community,” Jackson says. “I want to show the football team at Coastal Carolina University people and other businesses that if you’re going in South Carolina. He attributes part of his to take from the community, you need to give discipline and drive to spending years waking up back.” early for practice and maintaining good grades in college. —CYNTHEA CORFAH

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Cameron Jackson

“Carpe diem. Seize the day.”

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NOWING HOW TO attract diners—and keep them coming back—is the restaurant industry’s million dollar question. It’s something Stephen Hightower has mulled extensively over the course of his 25-year career. The secret, he says, is knowing your audience. “Honestly, I’d put the Baton Rouge palate up against any other in America,” says Hightower, 47, managing partner of City Group Hospitality. “People here understand what they like. They’re great home cooks. They know flavor, and they travel.” Hightower has spent the last six years shaping and expanding City Group Hospitality’s impressive lineup of restaurants, which includes City Pork Bar and Brasserie, City Slice, Rouj Creole and the recently acquired Beausoleil Restaurant and Bar, now rebranded as Beausoleil Coastal Cuisine. The group also holds City Pork at LSU, and thriving catering and food services divisions capable of delivering everything from weddings to school lunches. Hightower’s seasoned perspective in the business is informed by a mashup of diverse experiences that began in the kitchen of the former Murphy’s Bar and Grill, where he learned to make homemade stock and not take culinary

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MORE TO WATCH

“In business, you have to remain loyal to persevere.”

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shortcuts, even in a watering hole. That was followed by several years on the road with Ruth’s Chris Steak House, and later, in a stint at Bocage Racquet Club, where he revamped the food and beverage program. Hightower opened Frankie’s Dawg House and the now-closed LeRoy’s, and in 2014, he bought a majority share in City Pork and became managing partner of its restaurant group. From artisan barbecue to pizza to Creole fare that honors south Louisiana’s diverse foodways, City Group Hospitality’s restaurants continue to influence Baton Rouge’s dining landscape, and show no sign of slowing down. Last year, when restaurants were asked to pivot beyond their wildest expectations, Hightower led the purchase of the popular eatery Beausoleil, refreshing its hip-Southern ethos, and creating a coastal theme girded by a modern raw bar. There’s more to come from the restaurant group in the coming months, promises Hightower. Our mouths are already watering. citygrouphospitality.com

“In honor of Ruffino’s owner Ruffin Rodrigue, who died unexpectedly before Thanksgiving, celebrate life.”

Red Stick Spice Co.’s Anne Milneck quickly figured out how to not only survive the pandemic but thrive during it. She just opened her brand-new teaching kitchen, equipped with technology to continue her virtual cooking classes. Misti and Brumby Broussard’s BLDG 5 was voted 2020’s Best New Restaurant in the Best of 225 Awards. They are adding a rooftop bar called High 5 to the restaurant this winter. Mitch Rotolo Sr. is growing his pizza empire, planning The Hive Pizza, a build-your-own pie restaurant on Siegen Lane. He’s also investing in Speedy Bancroft’s automated pizza system in a 25foot container in Tigerland.

SEAN GASSER

FOOD & DRINK

Stephen Hightower

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“I’m kind of using this as a restart … It’s my second year of basketball, so it’s going to be a lot to learn. That’s what it is: a learning experience.”

Shareef O’Neal

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E KNOWS THE comparisons are coming. It’s inevitable with the illustrious name written across his back. But ever since the start of his basketball career, Shareef O’Neal has been working to create a legacy of his own beyond simply being “Shaq’s son.” He heard it countless times on the recruiting trail: ”We want you to be better than your dad.” Not only is that a nearly impossible task, but it’s not the path O’Neal envisions for himself. As a four-star power forward prospect, O’Neal committed to UCLA out of high school. He played in 13 of 31 games as a redshirt freshman, averaging just 10.2 minutes, 2.2 points and 2.9 rebounds per game before deciding to transfer out of the program. He felt it wasn’t quite the right fit for him in Los Angeles and ultimately decided to make the move to LSU. He knows the challenges that come with being an O’Neal in Baton Rouge, but he also felt that—ironic as it may sound—being a Tiger gave him a chance to get a fresh start. “I feel like when I went [to LSU] to visit, the people there didn’t really talk about my dad one time,” O’Neal said this summer. “Even though there’s a statue outside the stadium. That’s kind of what stood out to me. [They said] ‘We want you to be Shareef. People here love you.’ The LSU family is just really supportive, so I felt like that was the best option for me.” It’s still early in his Tiger career, but the 20-year-old has already featured in all of LSU’s games this season. O’Neal was averaging 3 points and 5.3 rebounds per game as of early December.

2020’S BIGGEST LESSON

GUS STARK / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

“I just want to learn the college basketball game and just have fun playing basketball. Even though I couldn’t really score [at UCLA], when I was in the game for those couple minutes, I was just happy to be able to put on the jersey and play again. Even if I shot a shot and I missed it, I was just happy to be able to shoot a shot.”

MORE TO WATCH LSU baseball is No. 2 in the preseason rankings, and Jaden Hill is one of the big reasons why. Signs are pointing to Hill being the leader of a stacked pitching staff as he recovers from an arm injury he suffered last year. He looked dominant throughout the 2020 season and fall scrimmages. LSU football’s Elias Ricks has already begun making a name for himself, with standout performances throughout his freshman season. He was a five-star recruit out of high school and has already worked his way into a starting role. He led the team in interceptions as of early December.

He’s listed as a 6-foot-10 power forward and has already garnered high praise from head coach Will Wade, despite having to adjust to what O’Neal called a “scrappy” style of basketball in the SEC. “Shareef has been very, very good,” Wade said at a press conference earlier this season. “He’s making shots. He’s a very good offensive rebounder. He’s got good stuff when we give him space in the long post. He’s the best guy we got [defending] the ball right now in the press. He gets deflections. He’s long; he’s athletic. That really sets the tone for your press when you’ve got those guys up there that can make it hard to get the ball inbounds.” Wade has put together an exciting roster with high expectations for the 2020-21 season, and O’Neal looks to be a big part of that success. And even though his dad’s name will forever hang in the rafters of the PMAC, O’Neal is hoping to make some history of his own.

—MARK CLEMENTS

Editor’s note: LSU Athletics did not respond to interview requests in time for 225’s deadline. All of O’Neal’s quotes were sourced from a previous interview with Bleacher Report. 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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“Be flexible, and listen to what your customers want.”

SEAN GASSER

“Take the next step.” MEDICAL

Vishal Vasanji & James Davis

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all in.” He and Davis worked tirelessly, sometimes 20-hour days, expanding the fledgling venture to accommodate a surge in demand for telehealth platforms among doctors, and, as the weeks went by, in widespread COVID testing among employers eager to keep their teams healthy. “We very quickly put together a dashboard for employers to track their employees, and that established the next growth phase for the company,” Vasanji says. “By August we were working with 30 to 40 companies, bringing COVID testing to their sites.” The company also landed contracts in the education space, conducting widespread COVID testing at LSU, LSU-Alexandria and LSU-Shreveport, and the Santa Ana Unified School District in Orange County, California. The business grew from generating no revenue in early 2020, to an anticipated $2 million to $3 million by the end of the year, Vasanji says. Up next: The company is well-positioned to take on vaccine distribution, once the shots become widely available. relieftelemed.com SEAN GASSER

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FEW YEARS ago, the notion of chatting with your doctor via videoconference was beginning to take off nationwide. But platforms weren’t perfect, and start-up entrepreneur Vishal Vasanji saw an opportunity to make the typical telehealth experience more robust. The founder of Patient Plus urgent care clinics teamed with software developer and LSU professor James Davis to form a company called Relief Telemed. Offering just a video to video interface wasn’t enough, they believed. They wanted to create a model that made the interaction seamless and straightforward for both patients and health care providers. “At some point, a lightbulb went off,” recalls Vasanji. “We said, ‘Let’s put nursing on the road. Like Waitr puts drivers on the road to take food from restaurants, we can build a similar concept that brings health care to your door.’” The venture, tested throughout 2019, was preparing to officially launch by mid-2020. But by March, COVID-19 had turned daily life on its head. “At a certain point, it was clear [the pandemic] wasn’t going away anytime soon,” Vasanji says. “So we went

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

MORE TO WATCH Russell Ledet has shared his inspiring story everywhere from Good Morning America to The Washington Post. A former Baton Rouge General security guard, Ledet is now a medical student at Tulane and a resident at Baton Rouge General. He is using his platform and organization 15 White Coats to inspire young Black students to pursue their dreams. Kyle and Orlando Palmer are the owners of Parker’s Pharmacy. The brothers opened their flagship neighborhood pharmacy on Florida Boulevard in 2018. This past fall, they bought a former Regions Bank building next door to the pharmacy, which they plan to use as the new corporate headquarters for the pharmacy as well as their industrial hemp and CBD businesses.

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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STYLE

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ACHEL EGGIE-GIBBS WANTS to change the hair industry. Her plan: mentoring the next generation of stylists. She’ll do so from her new salon Eggie Salon Studio, which opened on Goodwood Boulevard in November. Inside, she’s assembled a team she hopes to shape into industry leaders. With employees as young as 19, Gibbs hires for personality and passion rather than experience. Her coaching goes beyond coloring techniques. It’s about marketing, running a business and facing conflict in the workplace. It’s about what to say to a coworker when they forget to clean a mixing bowl. It’s about taking pictures of your work for social media. Most importantly, Gibbs is teaching her employees to break down the barriers many stylists worry about when considering hair as a long-term career. “I’m teaching them how to hit goals and raise their prices. Why can’t this be like any other industry, where you have the potential for growth, promotions and moving up?” she asks. “You can only do so much with your hands, and once stylists hit a certain level, they can feel stagnant.” The 29-year-old has been working toward hitting her own goal of opening a salon for more than half her life. She grew up watching her grandmother, who was a leader in the hair industry and worked closely with names like Sam Brocato and Rigsby Frederick. By age 14, becoming a hairstylist was Gibbs’ dream. As a student at St. Joseph’s Academy, she would style classmates’ hair for prom. In college, she cut her friends’ hair. After graduating from LSU with a marketing degree, she moved to Texas to train at the Aveda Institute of Houston. Her first job at Therapy Hair Studio, a high-end salon in uptown Houston, left her forever enamored with salons. She loved the salon’s energy and how the room vibrated with chatter. It

Rachel Eggie-Gibbs

C OV E R S T ORY

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“There are always going to be bumps in the road. If you make the most of a situation, you’ll always come out stronger on the other side.”

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was the best kind of chaos. It planted a picture she couldn’t get out of her head: running her own salon in her hometown. So she moved back to Baton Rouge, and in 2016 launched her hair styling business, House of Eggie. She started small, renting out chairs from salon owners. Her goal was to open her own salon within five years. In 2019, she began designing Eggie Salon Studio. She worked with interior design firm Tiek + Co., architecture design firm By Day and B & G Construction to build a space that feels like nothing else in town. With Italian black and white marble floors, a brass accent wall and arched entryways, the completed interior looks plucked from Architectural Digest. Gibbs wanted the salon to be a social environment. The color bar is front and center to create a flurry of activity and excitement that energizes the rest of the space. Large-screen TVs and iPads throughout are loaded with tutorial videos, so customers can learn how to properly use a curling iron or apply styling products. Because it turns out that she doesn’t just want to teach her staff—she wants to educate and inspire her clients to take pride in their hair, too. “When I ask my team ‘What’s your why,’ they always say the same thing: We have a gift to make someone feel their absolute best,” she says. “When clients leave the salon, we want them to feel they can conquer the world because they look awesome.” eggiesalonstudio.com

MORE TO WATCH

“We don’t know what 2021 is going to bring. But we have to put 2020 in the past and move forward.”

Fashion designer Christopher John Rogers continues to make waves in New York City and beyond, consistently landing features in publications like Vogue and dressing celebrities like Lady Gaga, Zendaya, Tracee Ellis Ross and many more. Matt Bahnick’s Positive Vibe Movement T-shirt and hat line aims to end the stigma and expand conversations around mental health. Five percent of sales proceeds go to The You Aren’t Alone Project, and the clothing has already been seen on the likes of pro athletes like Javier Báez and actors like Anthony Anderson.

—JENNIFER TORMO

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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BUSINESS + COMMUNITY

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HRIS CUMMINGS IS making storytelling easier than ever before. Cummings is the founder of Pass It Down, a service that allows museums, galleries and businesses to create websites and virtual experiences for visitors anywhere in the world. But the idea first came to him for a completely different reason. When he was around 17, his mother developed early-onset dementia. “The doctor told me, ‘Spend as much time with your mom as you can. She won’t be around much longer,’” Cummings recalls. He tried to hire a biographer to record his mother’s personal history, but it was much too expensive, especially for a college freshman. “I wanted to be able to capture my mom’s stories, but I didn’t know how,” says the LSU alum. “Everyone has one person in their life they wish they had more of.” In 2015, Cummings translated this wish into his company: Pass It Down. The business began as a digital biography service. Today, the company has changed, but its mission is the same: to use the power of storytelling to capture and pass down history. Now, the company focuses on making city attractions more attainable to visitors and tourists. It translates museum exhibits to a virtual

Chris Cummings

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format and places city library records online. The company gives museums, galleries and businesses a template to create their own online exhibits. It allows them to build simple and navigable websites to showcase anything they would like the public to access. In addition to mobile experiences, the company provides tools to create touch-screen displays and capture user-generated content at inperson exhibits. And perhaps most importantly, much like Cummings wanted to save his mom’s memories, his service preserves businesses’ items digitally, saving them even if they deteriorate over time. The company has been named one of the 100 most innovative startups in the world by Startup of the Year, and was invited to Tech Starters Austin, one of the top three accelerators in the world, in spring 2019. Over the past year, COVID-19 has made Pass It Down a more relevant and important tool than ever. It now counts brands, universities and three Fortune 500 companies among its clients. “We realized last spring that we’re really building something for visitors,” Cummings says. “We’re trying to get them to look [away from social media], pay attention and create a more engaging experience.” Up until 2020, Cummings and his team had their headquarters in Austin, Texas. But after Pass It Down won a BREW Pitch Contest in November 2019, Cummings decided to open an office in Baton Rouge, hoping to expand in the area. The past year has provided Cummings some important lessons. “It has taught business owners how to prepare for the worst,” Cummings says. “We just focused on building a good company that’s slow but also steady.” passitdown.com

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“The best companies assume that the worst will happen.”

—JULIA CLAIRE-EVANS

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MORE TO WATCH Bridget and Cindy Tiek, the motherdaughter interior design duo behind Tiek + Co., are not only beautifying homes and businesses with their modern style, they also have a creative studio and retail business in the works with partner architecture design firm By Day. The Mid City space is in the early planning stages.

Arianne Bellizaire

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RIANNE BELLIZAIRE’S FIRST big design project was painting her childhood bedroom pink. “Pepto Bismol pink,” she says,

laughing. When she was a kid, Bellizaire was always rearranging the bedroom she shared with her sister. Despite her early love of interiors, she didn’t imagine she’d grow up to become a designer. She never predicted that by 2020, her work would have graced magazine covers or that she’d speak on a panel alongside design maven Emily Henderson. Back in her childhood bedroom, where she stacked and unstacked the bunk beds, she didn’t know she was prepping for future “big reveal” moments with clients. Or that campaigning to her mom about paint colors was building the groundwork for public speaking appearances. “I didn’t realize what I did so naturally was something people struggled with,” says Bellizaire, 41. After graduating from LSU with a degree in communications, the New Orleans native instead began a career in public relations. Her jobs took her to Texas and eventually back to Baton Rouge, working for companies ranging from Cox Communications to the Louisiana Lottery. By the time she was pregnant with her second child, though, she found herself helping friends pick paint colors and leaning into her love of decor. “Maybe this is a thing,” she thought. She started working toward design certifications and attending every conference and training she could. She sought mentors. And she launched a blog to document everything she was learning.

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HAYLEI SMITH / COURTESY ARIANNE BELLIZAIRE

“I’m someone who loves to have a good plan, but 2020 shattered that. Be nimble. You have to be ready to adjust on the fly.”

“Identify the big-picture goals and position myself to get there. Focus on the intention behind what I’m trying to accomplish.”

It’s the blog she credits with setting her apart as a designer. Although interiors was her second career, she leveraged her communications skills to bring her business to the next level. In 2013—after more than a decade working in communications—she launched Arianne Bellizaire Interiors. It turned out to be a pivot that would later equip her for success in the Year of the Pivots. She’s proud to say 2020 was her business’ best yet. In the spring, as we were all spending more time at home, interest in design skyrocketed. Bellizaire hosted virtual consultations with clients. In the summer, national shelter publication MyDomaine featured her on its list of “Inspiring Black interior designers we should all be following.” And in the fall, she spoke alongside Henderson—who has long been one of her design idols—for a Black Interior Designers Network panel. Her recent projects have been all about what works for clients’ lifestyles during a pandemic, when parents are hosting less and homeschooling more. “People think design is a luxury or that it is superficial. Or they want something that looks like a magazine without realizing that is unlivable,” she says. “Give yourself permission to make a space that is perfect for you. Home should be a place you want to spend every waking moment.” Because as much as last year taught us, Bellizaire says one of the most enduring lessons will be this: “The way you design your home matters.” ariannebellizaire.com

—JENNIFER TORMO

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E D U C AT I O N

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HEN ROBERTO RAMIREZ was a kid growing up in Mexico, he wanted to be a pilot. But he wore glasses and his parents didn’t think that was the best career for their son. So, his thoughts shifted to creating and discovering. That passion led to a business and economics degree from Universidad del Sol in Asunción and an eventual career in education. “That innovation and creation that I had as a kid works for me today,” says Ramirez, 43, the head of BASIS Baton Rouge Materra, a tuitionfree charter school near Woman’s Hospital. “BASIS follows that model, and we also empower and trust teachers who are innovative and passionate about teaching.” Ramirez has been working for BASIS for more than a decade. His education career started shortly after he and his wife, Jennifer, met while she was studying Spanish in Mexico. They moved to Arizona, and her love of education rubbed off on him. “I was teaching at another charter school, and I read in the news that a school in Tucson got ranked No. 1. I noticed that they had an opening in their Spanish program,” he says. “I was so impressed with what they did that I wanted to be part of it.” In 2008, he began teaching Spanish at BASIS Tucson and worked his way up, as a counselor and an upper school director before eventually moving to Baton Rouge in 2018 to start BASIS Materra.

Roberto Ramirez

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“Kids are incredible, resilient and adaptable. Their love of learning doesn’t stop during a pandemic.”

—APRIL CAPOCHINO MYERS

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The East Baton Rouge Parish School Board will begin interviewing candidates for its new superintendent this month. The search continues after Leslie Brown resigned from the superintendent position in October after mere weeks on the job because of her failing health. Justin Giglio opened Studyville, a state-of-the-art tutoring facility/academic workspace at Perkins Rowe, last year—just in time to accommodate students facing educational challenges after COVID-19 school closures.

SEAN GASSER

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When the school began, there were 400 students enrolled. Now, there are 693 students, with an additional 700 on a waiting list. The overwhelming response has motivated BASIS to build another school in Mid City, slated to open in August 2021. Officials recently broke ground at 7921 Florida Blvd., between Wooddale and Lobdell boulevards. Ramirez’s children Mia, 10, and Emilio, 8, are also students at BASIS, and when Ramirez isn’t working, he is spending time with his family. They’ll play tennis at Southern Oaks and swim or garden. One of his favorite traditions is cooking buffalo wings and snuggling with his family on the couch watching movies. But what they love to do most is science experiments, and that creation and innovation he has passed onto his children has helped fuel the success of BASIS Baton Rouge. “Baton Rouge is a wonderful community with incredible potential. I think families and students were looking for an option that is both high quality and accessible without an entrance exam or tuition, and we are that,” Ramirez says. “We have a great curriculum, and we recruit teachers who are experts in their fields and have the passion to teach students. Families here have responded really well to what BASIS has to offer.” basised.com/baton-rouge

“Basis Baton Rouge strong. Together we can do what we do every day.”

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

WELLNESS A GUIDE TO HEALTHY LIVING

Good health starts with taking care of yourself physically and mentally. In this special advertising section, local doctors and health and fitness specialists answer questions from their patients and clients on numerous topics. In these pages, you’ll find motivation and encouragement to achieve your wellness goals and start living your best life!

S P O N S O R E D BY

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S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

Get care from anywhere! Medical and behavioral health visits available! MEDICAL With BlueCare, you can have 24/7 online doctor visits • Effective for non-emergency health issues like sinus infections, cold, cough, bladder infections, pink eye and more • Less expensive than ER or urgent care • Available on any device with internet and a camera BEHAVIORAL HEALTH You can also schedule BlueCare online appointments with psychology or psychiatry providers.

SIGN UP AND TRY BLUECARE TODAY!

www.BlueCareLA.com 01MK7324 04/20

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Powered by American Well. American Well is a vendor that provides the BlueCare telehealth platform for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana and its subsidiaries. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ASK THE ORTHOPAEDIC EXPERT WHAT ARE SOME COMMON CONDITIONS YOU TREAT? I specialize in shoulder, knee, ankle, and foot conditions.

WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM OTHER SPECIALISTS IN YOUR FIELD? As an orthopedic physician who frequently treats sports-related injuries, my experience as a collegiate athlete has given me incredible insight. I’ve experienced many of these scenarios firsthand. I understand the toll that high-level physical activity can take on the body and how those problems commonly begin to manifest.

WHAT BENEFITS DOES YOUR PRACTICE BRING PATIENTS? Being part of a larger orthopedic practice at the Bone and Joint Clinic means that our patients have ready access to an incredible range of specialists and services. A patient coming to me can receive imaging, diagnosis, treatment, and physical therapy all under one roof. And should a different condition arise that is not my area of specialty, I can refer them to another colleague just down the hall.

ARE YOU WORKING ON ANYTHING NEW? The latest treatment I’m excited to offer is platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to help speed healing of some common orthopedic conditions. This treatment delivers a high concentration of the patient’s own platelets, plasma and growth factor proteins directly to the site of injury. Professional level athletes have been using PRP for sometime, but it’s just as useful for everyone ranging from youth athletes to weekend warriors to arthritis patients.

DON’T LIVE IN PAIN. CALL TO SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY! No referral needed. #movemorehurtless

Dr. Julie Neumann Orthopaedic Surgeon

7301 HENNESSY BLVD #200, BATON ROUGE, LA 70808 | (225) 766-0050 BJCBR.COM |

JULIE NEUMANN, M.D. |

@DRJULIENEUMANN

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. for:ICORRECT ADDRESS SCarefully P EC I Acheck L Athis DVad E RT S I N G S EC T I O N• CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ASK THE EXPERT: DR. TODD HOWELL I have heard of the new Non-surgical “Butt-Lift” offered. How does this work and what is involved? This simple in-office procedure can provide an alternative to individuals considering a Brazilian Butt Lift. This procedure uses cosmetic fillers to enhance and contour the buttock region without the surgery or downtime. Radiessse, a calcium gel is diluted and injected in areas of concern giving immediate and lasting results. It’s truly amazing the stunning results that can be achieved using this technique!

With the New Year right around the corner what options do you offer to help us conquer our new years resolution for better health inside and out? Every year, one of the most common resolutions that people make is the resolution to a healthier lifestyle. Now, with everything going on in the world, is it more necessary than ever to make sure that your body is at its peak. Getting older lends itself to all manner of changes that can potentially affect longevity. We are the regions leader in diagnosing and treating age related hormone deficiencies in men and women. Very often, simple adjustments to an individuals naturally declining hormone levels can lead to dramatic improvements in mood, energy, and overall health. This year, our clinic, in association with the Cleveland Heart Clinic, began offering in depth testing to evaluate cardiovascular disease as well as diabetes. Using a complex panel of lab tests, predictions can be made as to the presence or probability of developing cardiovascular disease, including formation of plaque in arteries. Additionally, using these tests, we can see if an individual is truly “pre-diabetic” and then make changes through diet and exercise to alter the course of the disease before it starts. We also offer IV vitamin therapy as well as Metagenics Nutritional Supplements. Optimizing ones metabolic and nutritional state can help improve immunity, boost energy, and reduce risk of cancer, heart attack and stroke.

As I get older I’m noticing my aging more and more but I’m nervous to get started. What do you recommend and what makes you stand out? We all have that moment when we look in the mirror and realize that time has finally caught up with us. It is also normal to be overwhelmed and somewhat nervous when considering taking the first step in getting a cosmetic procedure. Our office welcomes newbies, whether it is the first time doing anything at all, or just trying something new. Our educated professional staff offers Free Consultations with out any pressure or sales game. We will evaluate your concerns and make the appropriate recommendations to get you the result you are looking for. Once you and your practitioner have decided upon a treatment plan, you can be assured that your services will take place by industry leaders using the latest state of the art equipment, to bring out the very best in you.

BOTOX | BODY CONTOURING | FILLERS | LIPOSUCTION HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY & MUCH MORE BATON ROUGE 8485 Bluebonnet Blvd. (225) 753-1234

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Todd Howell MD & Brittany Lipoma MPAS, PA-C

TheAntiAgingClinics.com

LAFAYETTE 5000 Ambassador Caffery Building 1, Suite 101 | (337) 484-1234

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

WHAT MAKES NEIGHBORHOOD BARRE DIFFERENT? At NEIGHBORHOOD barre we specialize in providing a workout that is dynamic, inventive, yet approachable for all levels - beginner to advanced. Our incorporation of both full-range and isometric exercises creates results that are hard to find in a traditional barre studio. We will truly push you to your limits or encourage you to take it at your own pace, in a calm and inviting environment that is free of judgment and comparison.

WHAT TYPE OF CLASSES ARE ON YOUR SCHEDULE? We have four classes that we currently offer. barre50 is our signature classic barre workout and is designed to maximize muscle fatigue in specific sections of the body to deliver optimal results for sculpting and shaping. barre30 is our classic method condensed into 30 minutes and it is the perfect class to squeeze into your busy day at lunch or right before one of our yoga classes. We also offer a barreHIIT class and Yoga!

“ Issue Date:Hwy.January proof #2 8210 Jefferson STE. B • (225)2021 427-0077 •Ad batonrouge@neighborhoodbarre.com • neighborhoodbarre.com/batonrouge.php •

Took my first Barre class (ever) with Jessie and all I can say is WOW! It was an amazing burn of a workout! Exactly, what my body needs to get toned! I loved how cute the studio was, and I enjoyed the smaller class size (which makes it very personal). I can’t wait to come back! Thanks :)”

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

WHEN SHOULD YOU GET A MASSAGE, AND WHAT IS THE BEST MASSAGE FOR A FIRST TIMER? Always consult your doctor if you have an injury. Patients are referred to us after they are healed from an injury or surgery. Whether it is stress or pain, our Licensed Massage Therapists are educated and trained to ease your problem spots through a thorough consultation to determine the necessary treatment and desired pressure, while maintaining a relaxing atmosphere. We recommend Our Swedish massage for first timers, as the pressure is not too light or too deep. Consult our FAQ section on our website for more information on all massages.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO GET A MASSAGE AND WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF MASSAGE THERAPY? We stress the importance of massage therapy for all ages to help with aches and pains as well as improve overall health and well-being. Benefits include increased circulation/range of motion, tension relief, full body relaxation, migraine/headache relief, reduced depression and more. We promote living a healthy lifestyle and adding massage therapy to your routine as frequently as you can.

6473 LA-44 STE. 108, GONZALES, LA 70737 | 225-725-4239 |

Photo by Julie Lee

BOOK ONLINE AT THERELAXATIONCOMPANY.ORG 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

YO U R F ITNESS IS ESSENTIAL THE CALIFORNIA FITNESS ALLIANCE RECOMMENDS 4 STEPS TO KEEP YOUR WORKOUT SAFE • Wash your hands • Work out six feet apart • Wear a mask • Wipe your equipment

ONLY 23% OF PEOPLE GET THE EXERCISE THEY SHOULD Planet Fitness makes it easy to stay active with tons of variety in-club, plus hundreds of workouts and exercises you can do anytime, anywhere in the PF App.

1 IN 5 AMERICANS STRUGGLE WITH MENTAL HEALTH Staying active helps reduce stress, depression and other diseases. Whether you’re in our clubs or at home with the PF App, we have so many ways to help you get started and keep going!

STRESS CAN INCREASE YOUR RISK FOR HEART DISEASE AND DIABETES BY 40% Working out isn’t just good for your physical health. According to California Fitness Alliance, 43% of Americans say that exercise reduces mental stress too. Talk about a win-win!

Learn more at www.planetfitness.com/fit-facts

Information obtained from the CDC, and the California Fitness Alliance

JOIN FOR JUST $

0 ENROLLMENT | $10 A MONTH NO COMMITMENT EXPIRES JANUARY 31ST, 2021 Offer valid at any Baton Rouge area locations.

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #4

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ASK THE EXPERT What advice would you give someone who is considering a knee or hip replacement? At our practice, surgery is a last resort. We do a thorough examination of our patient, ensure that we have an accurate and specific diagnosis, and give our recommendation for a treatment plan moving forward. I advise anyone who is considering surgery to be prepared to fully discuss any of their questions and concerns. We feel having this discussion is a very important part of patient care. Do your due diligence to ensure that you are making the best decision about who will be the physician for your treatment. I also would say that if surgery is needed, that we have helped numerous patients achieve a pain free, active, healthy life after surgery. Patients tend to be very happy that they made the decision to receive care from our practice.

What can patients expect from a visit at your office?

Niels J. Linschoten, M.D. Hip & Knee Specialist Dr. Linschoten (pronounced Lynn-Show-Ten) was born in The Netherlands, raised in the Caribbean, and settled in Baton Rouge in l992. He married a nice Cajun girl from Gonzales in 2013. He attended medical school in the city of Utrecht and completed a residency in Orthopaedic Surgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, after which he further subspecialized in total joint replacements at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. He has successfully practiced orthopedic medicine for nearly 30 years.

Patients can expect to feel like we care about them, and not just in a medical sense. I see my occupation as my calling to help people. There is a valet that will park your car, a short walk to the elevator and off of it, X-ray techs in office, and caring professionals on staff, all of whom seek to ensure your highest level of comfort for your visit. You can also expect that we won’t make you feel rushed on your visit. We will take our time with your diagnosis, explanation of your diagnosis, explanation of treatment plan options, and discussion of your concerns. We pride ourselves on the highest quality patient care.

What sets you apart from other doctors? Some of the things that set me apart in orthopedic treatment and surgery include 3 decades of exemplary service in orthopedic medicine. I stay at the forefront in education and technology in my field. I specialize in hip and knee revisions and replacements and love to do cases that other doctors turn down or refer to me. I love the look in the eyes of the patients who were told that their surgery could not be done when I say, “I can do it.” And I love it even more when that surgery is successful in bringing my patients newfound freedom from pain and a higher quality of life. Being excellent at complex cases makes me even more excellent at the standard procedures. I pride myself on being skillfully among the best while still showing kindness and compassion in my care to the people I treat.

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You have a choice in patient care. Choose Dr. Niels Linschoten.

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Baton Rouge General Medical Center

Learn more about Dr. Linschoten and set an appointment at linschotenortho.com 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. for:ICORRECT ADDRESS SCarefully P EC I Acheck L Athis DVad E RT S I N G S EC T I O N• CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

The Wax-Powered Fast Facial Reveal your best skin in 30 minutes or less with our innovative wax-powered, heat-amplified, skin-revitalizing facial treatment. The Wax-Powered Fast Facial from European Wax Center is a patent-pending, revitalizing treatment that combines the power of heat, our exclusive Thermaceutical Wax™, and high-performance serums to reveal your best skin yet. This innovative treatment and at-home skincare therapy has been clinically tested to deliver visible results immediately and over time.

What can I expect during the service? The service begins with a customized consultation determining which of the three distinct treatments (Youth, Brightening or Clarifying) will be used to target the guests’ skincare needs. Next, the skin is cleansed, toned, and prepped prior to applying a high-performance serum-elixir booster which targets the specific skincare needs. Then, to lock in the active ingredients, a booster cream is applied to prepare the skin for the imminent wax application. The Thermaceutical Wax is then applied and left on for five minutes, allowing the active ingredients to soak into the deepest layers of the skin. Once the wax is removed, the skin is toned again, and a targeted serum-elixir is reapplied. Guests have the option to add-on an undereye treatment. Expect to be relaxed and to leave with refreshed, supple, and radiant skin.

What results can I expect from the Wax-Powered Fast Facial service?

portfolio, generally ranging from 65% to 100% for clinicals and 74% to 100% for consumer perception and were based on a combination of three and six-week independent studies of participants who received the treatment once (or twice during the six-week study) and used the at-home products on a daily basis.

How do I maintain the results? The beauty of this service is that it is gentle and infuses amazingly goodfor-you ingredients into the skin so there is no down time, and it can be received as often as desired. To help extend and enhance results beyond in-center treatments, the products used to deliver the service are available for at-home use between visits. The Cirefusion Thérapie 135° product lineup includes five at-home skincare therapy extenders including a Purifying Gel-Lotion Cleanser, Mineral Micro-Mist Toner, a Youth Serum-Elixir, Brightening Serum-Elixir, and Clarifying Serum-Elixir. Every EWC skincare product is dermatologist-tested, clinically tested, paraben free and cruelty free.

Overall benefits from the service are improvements in skin hydration, texture, radiance, tone and evenness. In clinical trials, participants realized the following results although many more benefits were also achieved: the Clarifying treatment saw 100% decreased pore size; the Brightening treatment saw 97% improved skin moisture, and the Youth treatment saw 94% improvement in fine lines and wrinkles. The clinical testing results were strong across the

Highland Park ‒ 225-228-1383 | Towne Center ‒ 225-228-1373 | Perkins Rowe ‒ 225-800-3636

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

The REGYMEN Difference REGYMEN Fitness offer 90 different workouts among four unique platforms. These workouts are designed with excitement and variety to prevent burnout from the same old cardio routine. Using advanced technology that fosters engagement and friendly competition, you’ll work at your own pace since REGYMEN members come from all levels of fitness. The program’s current workout options are BURN, BOX, BUILD, and RUMBLE ... all designed to work together to challenge your body in different areas for muscle gain, calorie burn, flexibility, agility, and to make you better at everyday movements. The program provides the mental encouragement and inspiration proven to help individuals reach their health & fitness goals faster than going at it alone.

VOTED WORLD’S BEST WORKOUT!

REGYMEN FITNESS LOCATIONS: 7556 Bluebonnet Blvd. | 7580 Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 14663 Airline Hwy. Suite 100 COMING SOON: 27800 Juban Rd. #3, Denham Springs

regymenfitness.com | 225.300.8095

THE COVERY LOCATIONS: 14463 Airline Hwy. Suite 101 | 7580 Corporate Blvd. Suite 101 COMING SOON: 27800 Juban Rd #3, Denham Springs

thecovery.com | 225.300.8095

REJUVENATE RENEW • RELAX WHY THE COVERY? In a time of uncontrollable chaos, The Covery empowers you to take control of you mind and body, through an immersive wellness experience; resulting in an immediate impact towards your best self.

SERVICES: Cryotherapy • Cryotherapy Facial • Hydrafacial Dry Float • Hyperbaric Treatment • Iv Vitamin Infusion Salt Infused Sauna • Red Light Therapy • Botox Hormone Replacement

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #1

respond by e-mail withS EC your Tapproval S•PPlease EC I A L A DV E RT I or S Ifax NG I O N or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Happy New Year FROM

FF+ $2S1ERVO ICE $50 ANY

Issue Date: January 2021 Ad2 proof #2

11745 BRICKSOME AVE. STE. A2 | BATON ROUGE, LA 70816

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

225-364-8809 | BEAUTYTHERAPYSTUDIO.COM

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

We Take Your Health Personally Take the first step in a healthier direction by scheduling your initial consultation. Call (225) 928-0486.

FI TNES S

T HER APY

PERSONAL TRAINING

PHYSICAL THERAPY

GROUP TRAINING

MASSAGE THERAPY

SPIN || YOGA || PILATES

NO MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED A goal and some serious commitment will do.

FU TUREFI T N ESSBR.COM | 1650 LOBDELL AVENUE | BATON ROUGE, LA 70806

N U TRI T I O N

EST HET I C S

NUTRITION COUNSELING

ST UDI O PA R K • AC R O S S F R O M TOWN E C E N T E R

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S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

CHARLES AYCOCK, M.D.

FRANK BREAUX, M.D.

JILL BADER, M.D.

THERESA BRIGNAC, M.D.

DEBRA BAEHR, M.D.

RANDALL BROWN, M.D.

BRITANI BONADONA, M.D.

NICOLE CHAUVIN, M.D.

ALLYSON BOUDREAUX, M.D.

LIN DANG, M.D.

REBECCA BOUDREAUX, M.D.

SARAH DAVIS, M.D.

RYAN DICKERSON, M.D.

CARING FOR OUR COMMUNITY, one woman at a time.

SHAWN KLEINPETER, M.D.

JULIE MARTIN, M.D.

STEVEN FEIGLEY, M.D.

LISA GAUTREAU, M.D.

SHARON LEE, M.D.

PAMELA LEWIS, M.D.

CHARLES LAWLER, M.D.

WENDY HOLDEN-PARKER, M.D.

NICOLLE HOLLIER, M.D.

Obstetrics & Gynecology

CRYSTAL NHIEU, M.D.

O’NEIL PARENTON, III , M.D.

AMANDA PEARSON, M.D.

MICHAEL PERNICIARO, M.D.

SAMANTHA PRATS, M.D.

LAUREN SANDERS, M.D.

MICHAEL SCHEXNAYDER, M.D.

CURTIS SOLAR, M.D.

LAURIE WHITAKER, M.D.

SUNSHINE WILLETT, M.D.

lwha.com •

KIRK ROUSSET, M.D.

/LWHAwomenshealth • 225-201-2000

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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Issue Date: JAN 2021 Ad proof #4

respond by e-mail withS EC your Tapproval S•PPlease EC I A L A DV E RT I or S Ifax NG I O N or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

LET’S DETOX from 2020…

Start 2021 off right with healthy options from

Try the Detox Island Green Smoothie or any other delicious smoothies for 15% off when you mention 225 @tscbatonrouge

Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #3 • tropicalsmoothiecafe.com • 324 Lee Drive, Suite A • Catering Available • Please225.256.3385 respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

LEAVE THE COVID WEIGHT IN 2020 WITH HELP FROM YOUR PERSONALIZED WEIGHT LOSS COACH!

How it works:

PHASE 1: WEIGHT LOSS Take your body from a carbohydrate burning state to a fat burning state while sparing muscle! Your body has three sources of energy: Carbohydrates (always burn first), Proteins & Fats. Ideal Protein Products deplete the carbohydrate reserve, protects the protein in muscle and teaches your body to draw energy from the fat reserve. The intake of high biological value protein will help maintain lean muscle mass and force the body to burn fat for energy. Dieters will stay in Phase 1 until 100% of weight loss goal is achieved!

PHASE 2: STABILIZATION

PHASE 3: MAINTENANCE

Learn how to reintroduce all food choices into your daily life while using fewer Ideal Protein products. Food intake is recorded for seven days to create the nutritional foundation for Stabilization. Healthy fats and complex carbs are reintroduced in a measured and deliberate fashion, assessing the tolerance each week to effectively manage hunger and maintain weight loss.

For the first 12 months following Stabilization, you will continue to receive ongoing education, support and strategies from your coach while making your own healthy food choices.

9270 SIEGEN LN. STE. 204 | BATON ROUGE | 225.405.1857 | IDEALPROTEIN.COM 48 

Independent Authorized Weight Loss Clinic

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ASK THE EXPERT: LOWER BACK PAIN AND WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR Lower back pain is extremely prevalent and affects nearly every person at some point in their lifetime. Back pain could be the result of a simple strain from activities; however, this could also represent a more significant underlying problem. It’s important to recognize some symptoms and signs that could point to a more serious medical condition and when to see a physician.

WHEN SHOULD I SEE MY PHYSICIAN ABOUT LOW BACK PAIN? If your back pain is in conjunction with certain signs or symptoms, this could signify a more concerning underlying condition. There are warning signs your physician will look for to prompt further evaluation. If you are experiencing any of these concurrent symptoms, then you should seek an evaluation by a spine doctor. WHAT ARE THE SIGNS THAT SHOULD PROMPT MEDICAL EVALUATION? Concurrent signs or symptoms that should lead to further medical evaluation include any fever, numbness or tingling in the lower extremities or private area, any loss of bowel or bladder control, or weakness in the lower extremities such as foot drop. Other concerning symptoms could include nighttime pain waking you up, or pain lasting longer than 6 weeks. It is also important to seek medical evaluation if you have lower back pain and a recent history of trauma, cancer, a suppressed immune system, osteoporosis, unexplained weight loss or prolonged use of steroids. WHAT WILL THE EVALUATION BY A SPINE PHYSICIAN INVOLVE? Your physician will take an initial history of your symptoms including questions on your current complaints as well as your past medical and surgical history. The doctor will take your vital signs and perform a physical exam of DR. KEVIN your lower back and lower extremities. It is likely MCCARTHY x-rays will be obtained to further investigate Specializes in the source of pain. Depending on the results, spinal disorder treatment your doctor will decide if advanced testing such as a CT or MRI scan is necessary. Ultimately your spine physician will identify the probable source of your pain and determine a treatment plan to alleviate these symptoms. At The Spine Center of Baton Rouge, we know how frustrating it can be to suffer with chronic lower back pain. Our team works with you to identify the true source of your pain and comes up with a treatment plan that is targeted to getting you painfree and fully mobile once again. BATON ROUGE • PRAIRIEVILLE • WALKER

SPINECENTERBR.COM | PH. 833-SPINEBR

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Issue Date: JAN 2021 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. SCarefully P EC I Acheck L Athis DVad E RT S I N G S EC T I O N• CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS for:ICORRECT ADDRESS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Kelley Ainsworth Powell, MCD, CCC-A, with over 20 years of experience, is now in private practice. Her goal is to help you hear better, understand more, stay engaged and connect with your loved ones and the world around you! Ainsworth Audiology provides comprehensive diagnostic audiology and hearing healthcare tailored to each individual! Hearing aids from top brands are selected and customized to meet each patient’s daily communication needs.

Most insurances are accepted and filed for hearing aid benefits.

225.769.9530

11903 Coursey Blvd., Suite B | Baton Rouge, LA

ainsworthaudiology.com

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Issue Date: JAN 2021 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

I NEED TO LOSE 10 POUNDS IN A MONTH, IS THAT POSSIBLE? Yes! Most of our patients lose between eight and 15 pounds in

believe in helping our patients look great and feel great by providing you

the first month of being on medication. For the past 33 years,

with the best one-on-one care to make losing weight as easy as possible.

we have been helping Louisianans lose weight and keep it off. While we all have the best of intentions when it comes to fitness, a lot of factors can come into play, including age, metabolism, starting weight and activity level. Things often get in the way of our weight loss goals—stress, cravings, lack of time and energy, and a busy schedule. Everyone wants to lose weight fast and keep it off, which is

Our physician, pharmacist and nutrition consultants can help you manage your food intake with your lifestyle and goals in a way that is safe and easy. Whether it is a short-term goal of losing 10 pounds or a longterm goal of losing more than 100 pounds, we have done it all and have the experience to help you … because a better you is what we do! B EF O R E

A FT ER

possible when you are equipped with the right tools. Since we are a small family owned business, we are devoted to making you feel like you are a part of our weight loss family. We

748 Chevelle Dr. | 225.929.9898 | batonrougeweightcontrol.com

MEAGAN COOPER

Weight Control Consultant

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR... : S L A O G

an Eat cle e more v o m , s Sit les time” e m “ e or Take m doctor y m t i Vis

Enter to win over $1,000 worth of health & wellness services and products. Blue Cross Blue Shield | Bone & Joint Clinic | Aesthetic Medicine & Anti-Aging Clinics Neighborhood Barre | The Relaxation Company at Pelican Point | Planet Fitness Baton Rouge Orthopaedic Clinic | European Wax Center | Regymen Fitness Baton Rouge Weight Control | Future Fitness Wellness Center Louisiana Women’s Healthcare | Ideal Weight Loss Solutions, LLC | The Spine Center Ainsworth Audiologist | Beauty Therapy Studio | Tropical Smoothie Café

Scan to enter. Deadline March 1, 2021

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Find your way home.

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I N S I D E : Eye Wander Photo’s new creative space

Meaningful

mugs

Local clay artist Ghada Henagan creates meaningful and functional pottery B Y CY N T H EA COR FAH // P HOTO S B Y S EAN G ASS ER

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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rowsing through Baton Rouge clay artist Ghada Henagan’s pottery collection, you will see plate sets with teal and mustard leaf prints, white and sandy brown planters with the outline of a pelican, baby blue hand-pinched bowls for pet food, and white mugs with a plump chicken eating feed off a green leaf. The animals and nature etched into the pottery aren’t random, though. Each design has its own story. Henagan grew up in a small village in Lebanon. Since moving to the United States in 2006, she carries vivid memories of her hometown. She was inspired to paint chickens on her pottery after remembering a time when she was younger and her family was displaced due to a war. They had to leave in a hurry, and when her brother went back to their home a week later he grabbed the family chickens. Hoping to save them, he put them in a bag. But by the time he returned to the family, all except one of the chickens were dead. For the 47-year-old, the chicken design represents her bittersweet memories of her family’s chickens that perished during the plight. Though her design inspiration is personal, Henagan says her pieces are not only about her. “I hope that people will connect to my work with their own stories or memories,” she says.

“I hope that people will connect to my work with their own stories or memories.” —Clay artist Ghada Henagan

Ghada Henagan became a full-time clay artist after moving to the U.S. from Lebanon.

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[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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STYLE //

Issue Date: January2021 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

The local clay artist handmakes mugs, vases, jars, plate sets, water dishes, fruit bowls, serving dishes and ornaments. Instead of using a pottery wheel, she sculpts her pottery by hand at her dining room table. She likes the slower pace of hand building and the freedom to add texture and designs on the slab of clay before forming it. Each piece is complete with a delicate hand-etched or stamped design, watercolorlike transparent glaze colors and a homey flair. “I’m in love with what I do, and I can’t imagine doing anything else,” Henagan says. Before she became a full-time clay artist, Henagan worked in the accounting department of a hospital in Lebanon. Her sister, a nun, knew she was passionate about art. She told Henagan to leave her job and create religious ceramics. She started by creating clay crosses, candle holders and decorative tiles. It wasn’t until she moved to the United States that she learned about the large world of functional pottery. Now, she sells her work at Mid City Makers Market, Baton Rouge Arts Market and on her website. “I hope that people find something in my shop to give them joy,” Henagan says. “If it adds a little bit of joy to their life, that’s enough for me.” ghadahenaganceramics. com

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Light up

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By Jennifer Tormo // Photos by Collin Richie

Eye Wander’s new Goodwood studio is Baton Rouge’s latest creative space—but it’s also a full-time home for Aaron and Jency Hogan

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[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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ARON HOGAN couldn’t stop thinking about light. It drove the entire design process of his new studio on Goodwood Boulevard. Every time he’d visit the property, he’d study the light’s direction and intensity. He wanted to be sure his photography studio would never get harsh direct light at any point throughout the year. “He’s always talking about light,” says Aaron’s wife Jency Hogan, an actor and filmmaker. “A lot of people call him a ‘light master.’ It’s like his nickname.” Aaron is known around town for his wedding and portrait work, but he says he really wanted a space to hone his studio lighting. And so for the better part of a year, he and Jency spent hours every day poring over the construction details of their live-work space. They tore down an old building on the property and built the studio from the ground up. Inside the finished product, the lighting in Aaron’s studio is tailored, of course, for photography. But there’s plenty of natural light throughout the building, too. Sunshine pours into big windows in the Eye Wander Photo office and creative spaces, as well as Jency’s acting studio and the Hogans’ upstairs apartment. Outside the windows, neighbors walk their dogs or head to the library across the street. “It’s a dream come true to have a

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

space where we can live and work,” Jency says. Before, she and Aaron used to spend a lot of time going back and forth between their home and office. “Now, it reminds me of the olden days, when the clock maker would live above their shop.” To make the $1.2 million project a reality, Aaron says they had to think on a grander, commercial scale. The building, which opened in November, is home to Bokéh Beauty Suites as well as other creative workspaces and offices available for lease. The photo studio can also be rented for weddings and events. The interior was inspired by California midcentury modern design. The Hogans took cues from their travels, pulling the vibrant blue and green hues from memories of trips to Puerto Rico and the modern, hightech details from visits to similar photo studios in New York’s Tribeca neighborhood. The Hogans’ biggest hope, though, is that its creative spaces will inspire other artists. “When I would picture the new building in my mind,” Jency says, “I would imagine paint colors pouring out of the window onto the street and down Goodwood Boulevard. This is a place where people can take classes in acting or do photography. … We want it to be just a huge creative hub for Baton Rouge.” eyewanderphoto.com

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Jency and Aaron Hogan live above the Eye Wander Photo workspace. The open-concept living-dining-kitchen space looks out onto a balcony terrace.

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In the Hogans’ otherwise minimalist bedroom, Aaron turned one of his photos into a 17-by-10-foot mural behind the bed. At first glance, the photo seems reminiscent of a lively tropical rainforest, but it’s actually a macro shot of greenery inside an aquarium.

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Rich green Moroccan tiles line the floor and wall of the combined soaking tub and double-shower. It’s Jency’s favorite space in the apartment.

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Green leather barstools and a gold leaf backsplash warm up the kitchen’s sleek black cabinetry and black natural granite island. Floating shelves were constructed from red oak trees salvaged from the property during construction.

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The A-frame building was modeled after a “modern barn.” It was designed by architect Dwayne Carruth of The Front Door and Monochrome, and built by Brandon Ivey of Ivey Construction.

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The photo studio was conceptualized with Aaron’s underwater photography in mind. A showerhead can simulate rain during photo sessions, and a drain is built into the white epoxy mirror-finish floors. Versatile moveable walls and backdrops on casters offer endless possibilities for set creation.

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In the lobby, Aaron’s underwater photography portraits greet visitors. Wood accent walls, hand-carved by Robert Broussard of Broussard Wood Working, are the backdrop for aerial shots of Aaron and Jency inside the empty building during construction. All the photos were printed by Vivid Ink, including several custom wallpapers.

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Your Adventure

This Month [ J A N U A R Y ]

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Jan. 9 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

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I N S I D E : New wines to try / New Year’s recipes / Local food news

Southern classics

SEAN GASSER

COLLIN RICHIE

Satisfying takes on familiar favorites at Southern Pearl Oyster House

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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The Shrimp Trio appetizer offers a sampling of shrimp served up in an Orleans sauce, Voodoo-style or classic fried.

R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W

Southern Pearl Oyster House B Y D.J. B E AU T ICIA // P H OTOS B Y S E A N GAS S E R

Our food critic’s name may be false, but the credentials are not. This gastronome has studied the history, cultivation, preparation, science and technology of food for more than 30 years. halfshelloysterhouse.com 9460 Perkins Road Sunday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

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TIRED OF DINING in and desperately needing to get outta the house, I braved the indoor restaurant scene with a dinner at Southern Pearl Oyster House. Part of the Half Shell Oyster House restaurant family based in Mississippi, the Baton Rouge iteration on Perkins Road has maintained popularity since opening in September 2019, in spite of the pandemic. Inside the restaurant, Cajun, zydeco and blues music drifted from the speakers and put us in a festive mood. The decor was reminiscent of the French Quarter with a hint of JacquesImo’s Cafe flair mixed in.

Once seated at a socially distant table, our eyes narrowed in immediately on the menu’s two sampler appetizers: Oyster Sampler and Shrimp Trio. Our server congratulated us on such smart choices that allowed us to get a wide flavor swath of the full menu. For the Oyster Sampler, 12 oysters were presented in trios of charbroiled, Bienville, Rockefeller and a new one to us: Orleans. This last one had abundant garlic and parsley with plenty of Parmesan and a cayenne kick. Rockefeller were rich and creamy with a perfect whisper of Pernod absinthe liqueur. It was the favorite of

THE BASICS: The Half Shell Oyster House family of restaurants opened a Baton Rouge outpost in September 2019. While the name is different, the restaurant brings much of the same Southern and New Orleans cuisine that made the restaurant group so popular. WHAT’S A MUST: Test out the range of flavors with the Oyster Sampler appetizer, featuring a dozen bivalves prepared in four different ways. For a satisfyingly large entree, try the Herb Encrusted Mahi and make sure to order the loaded seafood Bisque on the side.

my table. Bienville was topped with a shrimp, cheese and breadcrumb mixture that was superbly flavored, though the breading could have used a bit more broiling for crunch. Charbroiled seemed so simple with wine, butter and a garlic herb sauce,

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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TA ST E / /

were seasoned perfectly with a salty, but for me they were the juiciest and earthy Parmesan and herb crust. So most delicately flavored of the bunch. large was the fish portion that we The Shrimp Trio consisted of shrimp almost missed the simple sautéed in the same Orleans sauce as the spinach hiding underneath. Topped off oysters, plus fried and Voodoo shrimp. by a tart lemon cream that tied it all The Voodoo was at first very sweet, but together, this was a deeply satisfying then a mild heat rewarded you with a entree that was plenty large enough soft bang of flavor. A squeeze of lemon for us to share. further tamed the sugar. The fried Too full to indulge in desserts, we shrimp were plump, juicy and crisp, took the Bananas Foster Cheesecake as all good fried shrimp should be. The and Chocolate Obsession home included cocktail sauce was perfect to enjoy later. Both servings for dipping as well as clearing sinuses. were diminutive slices, but the Swimming in butter, the Orleans was luxuriousness made sense as smaller rich and peppery. But something in portions. The velvety cheesecake had the flavor was off—perhaps a dried ample flavor, reminiscent of banana herb or spice in the seasoning had pudding, with a swirl of caramel been overcooked. throughout. Chocolate Obsession After such large and satisfying offered decadent layers of chocolate appetizers, we split the Herb cookie crust, chocolate “decadence,” Encrusted Mahi, choosing the and dark and white chocolate mousses recommended Bisque and Jalapeño all crowned by chocolate sauce. Hushpuppies as our two sides. Though it sounded too cloying to enjoy The hushpuppies were crunchy more than one bite, it was surprisingly and loaded with onions, but there subtle and worthy of its name—and a was no jalapeño to be found. The great ending to the meal. seafood bisque was packed with so If you are even hinting at a diet this much seafood and corn in a thick month, Southern Pearl likely isn’t your cream broth that we could practically jam. But if you need a true seafood stand the spoon straight up in the cup. experience, swim on over. You won’t Overall, it was a rich, silky treat. Issue Date: January2021 Ad proof #1 be revisions. disappointed. For the entree, fat, or juicy mahi • Please respond by e-mail fax with yourfilets approval or minor

The Herb Encrusted Mahi doesn’t skimp on size or flavor with the earthy, salty Parmesanflecked crust.

Don’t miss dessert—in this case, a velvety Bananas Foster Cheesecake with caramel sauce.

• AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #1

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TA ST E / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

GRAPE CRUSH

New year, new sips Three wines that push your palate JANUARY IS FOR fresh starts. Clean slates. New beginnings. It’s an opportunity to embrace a new routine—and a time to try some new wines. Never have there been so many interesting wine frontiers to explore, from varietals and regions to producers and production methods. We checked in with Baton Rouge-based Level 2 Certified Sommelier Scott Higgins for a few suggestions on what to drink this month, as cooler temperatures and social distancing call for more cozy eating and drinking at home. Look for these at Calandro’s Supermarket on Perkins Road.

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

Gen del Alma

JiJiJi Chenin blanc Uco Valley, Mendoza, Argentina $17 You may recognize the varietal chenin blanc, but you might not have tried one from Argentina’s Uco Valley, where 3,300-foot elevation creates the right conditions for this Old World grape. Produced by respected winemakers Andrea Mufatto and Gerardo Michelini, Gen del Alma’s whimsically named JiJiJi (he-he-he) series gives you an affordable white wine from a high quality producer. “It maintains bright citrus fruits, orange blossom aromas, a touch of cardamom and a finish that’s salty and bright,” Higgins says. “And at $17, it’s an absolute steal.” Pair it with: Goat cheese; fish with light cream sauce; and risotto with mushrooms and saffron.

GAI’A (YAY-ya) Monograph Agiorgitiko Nemea, Greece $17 “The Monograph lineup from winemaker GAI’A is an affordable, younger series of wines from an amazing winery that has won every major award for Greek wine,” Higgins says. “These guys make absolutely stunning wines.” About the tricky-to-pronounce grape, Agiorgitiko (ah-your-YEE-tee-koh), think merlot, but with more herbaceousness. Higgins says it’s full-bodied with currants, Asian plum sauce, smooth tannins and subtle herbs. “A great one to keep on hand as we move into winter.” Pair it with: Aged or triple cream cheeses; roast duck with berries or orange glaze; and grilled steak.

Rachel Eggie Gibbs, Salon Owner

Envinate (in-VEEN-a-tay)

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‘Benje’ tinto Listán Prieto Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain $30 What’s the new hot place for wines? The Canary Islands, according to Higgins. “Some of the most exciting wines coming out of Spain are produced here,” he says. “This is old-fashioned wine making, everything by hand, no chemicals in the land or the wine.” The grape, Listán Prieto, has been grown in Spain for centuries and was brought to the New World by Spanish explorers and grown on the grounds of Spanish missions. It’s sometimes referred to as the mission grape. “My best description for Benje would be alive,” Higgins says. “It dances and transforms over time in your glass. A beautiful wine from a region you will definitely be hearing a lot about over the next two years.” Pair it with: An older manchego, or another big nutty Spanish cheese; lamb stew with herbs and crusty bread.

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Food briefs

IN MEMORIAM

FILE PHOTO

“I’m still in shock over this. But through this fog, I can see his smiling face and I can remember two of the things I always admired: his special gift of making others feel good about themselves, and how he chose to see the good in people.”

FILE PHOTO

—Raising Cane’s founder Todd Graves, about Ruffin Rodrigue, the owner of Ruffino’s Ruffin Rodrigue was photographed on campus for an restaurant and former LSU football player who August 2014 story. died of a heart attack in November.

KEY TER M

The historic grocery on Spanish Town Road often attracts large crowds to its curbside during the Spanish Town Mardi Gras parade. STOCK IMAGE

ghost kitchen

WH AT’S IN A N A ME ?

Capitol Grocery YOU MAY HAVE known it in recent years as Spanish Town Market, but the historic neighborhood grocery just blocks from the State Capitol went back to its old ways—and old name—in October. Established in 1914 on Spanish Town Road and North Seventh Street, Capitol Grocery has a long history of serving politicians working downtown as well as the artsy folks who call the Spanish Town neighborhood home. “We wanted to change back to the original name because that’s what it was called since 1914,” says Annie Hains, partner and manager. “We also wanted to make the business more of a grocery and less of a restaurant like previous owners have tried the last few years.” Hains says the business will still serve a small breakfast and lunch menu, while also adding more shelving for produce and other grocery items. capitol-grocery.com

S AY W HAT

“We’re getting creative. We’re having to think on how to have a safe event. It’s constantly going back and reviewing guidelines, and adjusting plans to match. There’s worry in your head; you don’t want to be a superspreader event.” —Heather Sewell-Day of Red Cake Events, talking about the obstacles facing event planners and caterers during the pandemic

This isn’t exactly a place you visit, but in major cities, ghost kitchens are becoming the E starting point of your food order. AG IM CK Restaurants and budding restaurant STO concepts are looking toward onlineonly options to get their dishes to a bigger market. Ghost kitchens allow them to set up shop quickly in prime locations, churn out a well-tested small menu of items, and get them to the masses via delivery apps. This could be a $1 trillion business by 2030, according to market research firm Euromonitor.

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Issue Date: JANUARY 2021 Ad proof #2 TA ST E / /

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

DINING IN

A time for tradition

Time-honored favorite recipes to start the new year

BY TRACE Y KO CH A N D ST E PH A N IE R IE G E L PHOTOS B Y A M Y S H UT T

THE TRADITION OF eating blackeyed peas and cabbage to start off the new year is one that many of us— especially in the South—have upheld for as long as we can remember. We were told to eat cabbage for wealth and prosperity, and black-eyed peas for good luck, which we can all use after 2020. Some historians believe the tradition dates back to the Civil War era. Poor families incorporated black-eyed peas into meager diets. Many considered themselves lucky to at least have something to eat. The green leaves on cabbages are thought to represent money and ensure prosperity. It’s more likely the vegetable was consumed in January because—back before the era of supermarkets and refrigeration— cabbage was one of the few sources of

fresh produce available during the cold winter months. Whatever the reasons, though, we always start our new year off with a mess of black-eyed peas and cabbage. As with so many of our favorite, traditional dishes, we have updated these recipes to make them a little fresher, healthier and more contemporary. So, cheers to good luck and good fortune to you all in a new year that couldn’t get here fast enough!

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BEFORE

AFTER

On the menu • Oven-roasted Cabbage • Spicy Black Eyed Peas • Grilled Thick-cut Bone-in Pork Chop Recipes by Tracey Koch

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BEFORE Oven-roasted Cabbage Traditional though it may be, we were never fans of cabbage when we were growing up. This is primarily because many home chefs of that generation boiled their cabbage. Let’s face it: No matter what else you do with cabbage to make it really yummy, it can take years to recover from a first experience with boiled cabbage. But done right, it can be a delicious, healthful and versatile vegetable. One of our latest favorite methods is to roast it, giving the cabbage a nutty flavor in the parts of the leaves that get nice and toasted. It is a great side dish that complements just about any kind of meat, and it takes just a few minutes to prepare. It is also a great source of fiber and vitamins for a healthy, well-balanced meal.

Servings: 4 1 large head of cabbage 1 ⁄3 cup olive oil ½ teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper ½ cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese

AFTER

1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees and line a baking sheet with foil.

2. Wash and dry the cabbage. Remove any of the outer leaves that may look wilted and trim off the bottom stem.

3. Vertically slice the cabbage into 2-inch slices and place each onto the lined baking sheet. 4. Brush each slice with half the olive

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oil, and sprinkle each with a little salt and pepper. Carefully turn each slice over and brush the other side with the remaining oil, salt and pepper.

5. Place the prepared cabbage in the oven and roast for 15 to 17 minutes, or until it is tender but still firm and the edges are turning toasted and golden. 6. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and serve.

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Spicy Black-Eyed Peas Black-eyed peas are a quintessentially Southern vegetable. They are a down-home side dish that we love serving year round. We like to spice the peas up with smoky tasso and chopped pickled jalapeño peppers. The pickled jalapeño gives the peas, which can be a bit bland, a great kick and tang, while the tasso adds a slight smoky flavor. We also like to simmer the peas in chicken broth in place of water to give them a bit more heartiness.

Servings: 4 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ cup chopped onions 3 cloves minced garlic ¼ cup chopped pickled jalapeño 6 ounces chopped tasso 2 (12-ounce) bags frozen black-eyed peas 2½ to 3 cups chicken broth ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper

1. In a 2- to 3-quart pot, heat the olive oil and add

the onions, garlic, jalapeño and tasso. Saute 3 to 4 minutes.

2. Add the black-eyed peas and stir to combine. 3. Pour in the chicken broth, add the salt and

pepper, and bring it all up to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and cover the pot. Allow the black-eyed peas to simmer for an hour or until the peas are very tender.

4. Serve the black-eyed peas over steamed rice.

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Grilled Thick-cut Bone-in Pork Chop We love our gas grills and tend to use them several times a week all year. Grilling is an easy and healthy way to cook meat, and the ease of a gas grill makes it time efficient, as well. The marinade Tracey whisked up for these thick-cut bone-in pork chops is one of our family’s favorites. It is easy to throw together and works equally well on chicken.

Servings: 4 4 (8-ounce) thick-cut bone-in pork chops 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 2 cloves minced garlic ¼ cup balsamic vinegar ¼ teaspoon dried Herbes de Provence 1 ⁄3 cup olive oil 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper

1. Rinse the pork chops and pat them dry with a paper towel. Place the chops in a shallow baking dish.

2. In a small bowl, whisk the mustard, garlic, vinegar, herbs, oil, salt and pepper together. Pour it over the chops.

3. Turn the chops over to make sure the marinade covers both sides,

and place them in the fridge until you are ready to grill them. Remove the chops from the fridge for 20 minutes to allow them to come up to room temperature before grilling them.

4. Heat the grill to 400 degrees. Grill the chops 8 to 10 minutes on one side. Flip the chops and continue grilling for another 4 to 5 minutes, or until the juices run clear and the internal temperature has reached 155 to 160 degrees. 5. Remove the chops from the grill, and place them on a platter. Cover the chops with foil and let them rest for 5 minutes before serving.

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CULTURE I N S I D E : Local arts and music events

Carnival vs.

COVID

How the city is trying to still celebrate during the pandemic

STAFF PHOTO

BY BENJAM I N L EGER AND CY NTH EA COR FAH

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JANUARY 19-21, 2021

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FILE PHOTO

C U LT U R E / /

The Krewe of Artemis would have celebrated its 20th anniversary this year.

M

UCH LIKE THE community events of 2020 that had to be canceled because of COVID-19, it was almost inevitable the 2021 Mardi Gras season would face uncertainty, as well. Could krewes continue to host balls and show off newly appointed royal courts? Could families gather to watch parades throughout the Capitol Region? New Orleans set the tone for a more subdued approach when its mayor announced in November that no parades would roll through the city streets in 2021. Still, the city promoted a “Not canceled, just different” slogan as it asked residents to submit ideas on how to modify festivities. While Baton Rouge’s events are on a smaller scale, the impact of a canceled Mardi Gras would be felt from hotels and event venues to restaurants and bars. Many krewes also use their events to fundraise for local causes. “Obviously, the impact will be large,” says Visit Baton Rouge CEO Paul Arrigo. “We have worked very hard to make Mardi Gras in Baton Rouge a destination for visitors ... With all the uncertainty, we don’t know what will happen.” Mayor Sharon Weston Broome met with Baton Rouge krewes in late November to talk strategy. City officials suggested “parked parades” where

attendees drive by decorated floats. But, many krewe organizers left the meeting discouraged about the prospects for 2021. For Joanne Harvey, captain of the allfemale parading Krewe of Artemis, the upcoming season was set to celebrate the krewe’s 20th anniversary. “We were planning for all of the past kings and queens to come back for the soiree,” she told 225 in November. “We just don’t want to compromise on the product we put out to the community. If that’s not something we can offer this year due to COVID, we’d rather push back to provide that experience the way we’ve always done.” In the weeks after meeting with city officials, the krewes of Artemis, Orion, Southdowns and others all canceled their parades. Spanish Town Mardi Gras organizers chose to cancel their massive ball but take a “wait and see” attitude for the parade. The still-somewhat new Mid City Gras canceled its ball but is going forward with a modified parade where attendees could drive by decorated homes and businesses (read more on page 72). We spoke to some krewe leaders to get their take on the upcoming Mardi Gras season. Editor’s note: Reporting was as of our mid-December publication deadline.

Krewe of Oshun

COURTESY KREWE OF OSHUN

Known for: Launching its inaugural parade in north Baton Rouge in 2020 As told by organizer Byron Washington

On the decision-making process: “We wanted to see how the COVID-19 numbers were going. And then we also knew there was a financial component. We rely heavily on donations. We knew we wouldn’t get the same type of donations and participation.” About virtual possibilities: “We thought about a virtual party, and we may do it. It’s still weird because people have a certain expectation for Mardi Gras. It’s almost like if you’re not going to do Mardi Gras the right way, just don’t do it.” About planning during a pandemic: “Once New Orleans canceled their parades, we knew we couldn’t control the crowd. That’s an influx of people who wouldn’t have a parade in New Orleans who would come to Baton Rouge. You can’t regulate who pulls up to your parade. We want everyone to be safe.” On the future: “We’re focusing on 2022 for a bigger and better parade … I think we’re going to have to be real strategic with planning as far as safety. For us, this time will allow us to catapult the experience. We have artists who want to perform and people who want to be grand marshal.” 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] January 2021 

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C U LT U R E / / MARDI GRAS IN REVERSE

Spanish Town

IT’S NOT ALL doom and gloom for Mardi Gras season. Mid City Gras plans to host a reverse parade on Feb. 7. Mid City krewes can register to decorate their homes or businesses in a “maskparade” theme, and locals can drive by and view the decorations from their cars. “We thought this would [be] a safe and responsible way to celebrate,” Twanda Lewis, president of Mid City Gras, says in a press release. “We want to inspire creativity and uplift the community during a difficult time.” A map listing the participating krewes will be available at midcitygras.org.

Known for: Being the largest and most irreverent downtown parade As told by president Robert King On the prospects of 2021 events: “We can still have a parade this year, as far as I know. We’re brainstorming socially distant ideas.” On the decision-making process: “We have been planning all year. Krewes are interested in the parade if we have it. We’re basing it off of government regulations and COVID numbers. If we can do a parade, we donate to charities. If we don’t do a parade, we aren’t able to give charities a check every year.”

On the future: “2022 ought to be back to normal, unless the country goes to hell in a handbasket. Once I get the board to agree, we will put our decision out there.”

Krewe of Artemis Known for: Being the city’s only allwomen parading krewe, celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2021 As told by captain Joanne Harvey

FILE PHOTO

About planning during a pandemic: “I hate being in limbo. I get people asking me daily about the parade. Up until [late November], we were considering doing the ball. But there were so many regulations.”

WHAT’S CANCELED: Krewe Mystique de la Capitale ball and parade Krewe of Orion ball and parade Krewe of Artemis ball and parade Krewe of Southdowns ball and parade Krewe of Oshun parade Spanish Town Mardi Gras ball

STILL UNDETERMINED AS OF PRESS TIME:

Spanish Town Mardi Gras parade

WHAT’S MODIFIED:

Mid City Gras parade (A reverse parade is set for Feb. 7. Its ball is canceled.) Capital Area Animal Welfare Society’s Krewe of Mutts parade (It’s going virtual Feb. 13.)

Revelers gather in front of a historic Spanish Town home for the annual Spanish Town Mardi Gras parade.

On the decision-making process: “We literally plan for an entire year for our events. For the ball, we have our dates planned out for the next three years. Everything was ordered; everything was already done. We knew that if we could parade, we would. If we couldn’t, we are going to push back to 2022. I’m not willing to change the integrity of the product that we give our members and

our public. It’s not in the true essence of what Mardi Gras is.”

doing everything we can and paying close attention to CDC guidelines.”

On the future: About planning during a pandemic: “I don’t think things will have to change “The biggest, hardest part for me is: I’m a as long as everything we are being told planner. COVID has made being a planner by the CDC in terms of vaccinations hapvery difficult. I’ve been captain since pens. I am hopeful it will not have an imArtemis’ inception 20 years ago. Sadly, Issue January pact#1 for future years, and we’ll be able to this is outDate: of my hands, and I 2021 can’t giveAd proof • Please respondan byanswer e-mail orother fax withthan your we approval revisions. have that same quality product.” my members are or minor • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

LETITIA HUCKABY

THIS SAME DUSTY ROAD

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COMMUNICATION IS KEY #WHATWILLYOUDO

ON VIEW THROUGH MARCH 14

Featuring quilted photographic works based on Huckaby’s faith, family, and cultural heritage in Louisiana lsumoa.org |

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Support for this exhibition is provided by the generous donors to the Annual Exhibition Fund. IMAGE: Letitia Huckaby, East Feliciana Altarpiece, 2010, pigment print on silk, Courtesy of Artist, installation view at LSU MOA

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C U LT U R E / /

MUSIC BEST BETS

PHOTOS COURTESY BLUE CORN MUSIC, ISTOCK, COURTESY BATON ROUGE GALLERY, KEVIN MICHAEL MURPHY / COURTESY BRSO

JAN. 8 Texas native and songwriter Cody Johnson is making his way to Baton Rouge to belt out country hits like “On My Way to You” and “Nothin’ on You” for his 2021 North American tour at the Raising Cane’s River Center. raisingcanesrivercenter.com JAN. 8 Blues-folk singersongwriter Ruthie Foster was such a hit at the Ruthie Foster takes the Red Dragon stage at Red Dragon Listening Listening Room once again. Room a year ago, the venue is bringing her back! If you’re lucky, she’ll perform favorites like “It Might Not Be Right” and “Truth.” Find the event on Facebook

Divina Italian Cafe. Find the event on Facebook

JAN. 30 Ben Bell is bringing his indie rock and folk sound to La Divina Italian Cafe as you and your friends enjoy a relaxing evening filled with wines, cuisine and more. benbellmusic.com

about the New South,” featuring the works of 56 photographers and their visions of the South in the early 21st century. The show continues until Feb. 14. lsumoa.org

is catering to more opera fanatics virtually! Lunch can be delivered to viewers in the Baton Rouge area. At the in-person event, there will be a 30-minute cocktail meet and greet with an artist before the performance. operalouisiane.com

ARTS BEST BETS ALL MONTH Opéra Louisiane offers two versions of its “Sofa Series” catered to adults and kids. The coronavirus has challenged kids to explore how to be creative virtually, and Opéra Louisiane offers up three operas—The Magic Flute, Cinderella and Hansel and Gretel—with a series of engaging videos, activity books and an educational packet to get your family intrigued by the world of opera. For the grownups, pour a glass of wine and watch some of its show-stopping performances—including Carmen, Falstaff, The Pirates of Penzance and The Elixir of Love—from the comfort of your own sofa. operalouisiane.com

JAN. 9 Listening to live music while drinking your favorite wines sounds like a dream, ALL MONTH but La Divina Italian Cafe is making it LSU Museum of Art continues its show, a reality. Baton Rouge native J.M. Fritz Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof“Southbound: #3 Photographs of and will be singing his original songs at La • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

While locals won’t be dressing up in their craziest costumes this year, you can still see the eclectic works of the Surreal Salon on view at Baton Rouge Gallery.

JAN. 5-28 Baton Rouge Gallery’s Surreal Salon returns. The 13th annual exhibition showcases the pop-surrealist/lowbrow movement, featuring artists from all over the world. While the corresponding Surreal Salon Soiree event has been canceled this year due to COVID-19, you can still view the mixed-media exhibition in person during gallery hours. batonrougegallery.org JAN. 11 Although its luncheon concert series, Lunch with Leanne, now has limited in-person attendance, Opéra Louisiane

Melissa White brings her violin talents to Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra’s latest performance.

JAN. 21 Join the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra for its “String Celebration” at the Istrouma Baptist Church, with Jeri Lynne Johnson as conductor and Melissa White on the violin. brso.org

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Happy New Year from the Cypress Roofing family SERVICING THESE AREAS ALL ACROSS SOUTH LOUISIANA: Baton Rouge • Denham Springs • French Settlement • Sorrento Walker • Saint Amant • Geismar • Gonzales • Donaldsonville Livingston • Darrow • Prairieville • + many more

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CALENDAR //

      

Superpower Superpower    

january

Where play aro to Baton R und o this monuge th C ompiled b Brittney Fo y rbes

all month

LET IT GROW While The Walls Project’s annual MLK Fest has been postponed until later this spring due to COVID-19, it does have another exciting event in the pipeline. Every Saturday, the nonprofit’s Baton Roots community farm is partnering with Mayor Sharon Weston Broome for “Sow Good Saturdays.� Bring your family to the farm for some volunteering. You’ll harvest garden-fresh veggies while exchanging different recipes to go along with them. thewallsproject.org

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RAEGAN LABAT

STOCK PHOTO

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ON THE ROAD NEW ORLEANS

EVERY FRIDAY: Virtual Concert: Quarantunes at New Orleans Jazz Museum, Find the event on Facebook

STOCK PHOTO

   

HO-HO-HOLIDAYS Christmas may be over, but there’s still time left to visit Santa Claus. Thanks to the Mall of Louisiana, you can have your kids meet Santa virtually, as they talk to him live from the North Pole. You and your family can also gather around and listen to holiday stories from the Clauses, or you can listen to a pre-recorded personalized video from the man himself. Find the event on Facebook

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JAN. 2: Psycho Asylum, Home for the Holidays at The Mortuary Haunted Mansion, Find the event on Facebook

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: Jan 2021 Ad proof #3 CALENDAR //

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ALSO THIS MONTH EVERY WEDNESDAY Like to crack jokes, but need an audience to practice on? The Station Sports Bar and Grill is hosting its Delete Comedy Open Mic Night every week. Hosted by Vaughan Veillon, the Station is also offering comedy night specials. Find the event on Facebook

1-5

ICE ICE BABY The Raising Cane’s River Center’s winter wonderland is snow happy to host you and the kids for a few more days this season. The Annual Ice Skating on the River can serve parties with up to 10 participants. Don’t worry—ticket prices include ice skates. raisingcanesrivercenter.com

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RUNNIN’ RUNNIN’ AND RUNNIN’ RUNNIN’ Featuring local craft beer, musicians and your favorite Louisiana dishes, the annual Louisiana Marathon is back for 2021. Bring out your fam and friends for a socially distant run through downtown Baton Rouge, around LSU’s campus and the lakes, and so many more must-see places in the Capital City. Not sure if you want to run around people just yet? You can participate as a virtual runner. louisianamarathon.com

EVERY WEDNESDAY Head over to Register Bar weekly for a night of Funbox Karaoke with your crew. They’ll have happy hour specials to go along with your favorite songs. Find the event on Facebook EVERY WEDNESDAY The past year has definitely shaken some chakras, and the free weekly yoga class at Tin Roof Brewing Company wants to help you get them in place. Yoga on Tap comes courtesy of Leela Yoga Lifestyle Studio and is sure to help you relax before you enjoy a beer. tinroofbeer.com

The Oasis is the premier restaurant patio bar, catering and recreation facility H AWFIS RY R C G A N SERVI MID-JANU IN G START

JAN. 2 + 9 The Baton Rouge sky holds more than we know, so join the Highland Road Park Observatory on Jan. 2 for its “Learn Your Sky” event to learn about the unaided-eye Red Stick sky. If you’re curious how to properly use binoculars to see the night sky, the observatory will also host a “Learn Your Binocular” event Jan. 9. Find the event on Facebook

C hec k o u p co m i n ut o u r g league s!

JAN. 14 Do you love sushi and want to learn how to make it? Get on a roll at the Louisiana Culinary Institute with Chef Colt Patin to learn how to make some awesome rolls. lci.edu JAN. 20 Gather on a Zoom call for a MultiDimensional Spirit Circle with Baton Rouge’s own Rachel Chamness, an ascension and lightworker guide. Chamness and mediums offer galactic guides and help you tap into messages from your past life. Find the event on Facebook

CH TIGERS COME WAT LL & BASKETBA ON OUR BIG BASEBALL ’S! SCREEN T V

JAN. 24 Are you hearing wedding bells? Head to the semi-annual bridal show at L’Auberge Casino & Hotel, where you can meet local DJs, makeup artists and other vendors for your special day. Find the event on Facebook

KRISTIN SELLE

JAN. 28 Is your social media feed covered in delicious pasta meals? Learn how to make fresh pasta by hand to pair with seafood fettuccine, lasagna and more of your favorite starchy dishes during this Louisiana Culinary Institute class. lci.edu

LAFAYETTE

EVERY TUESDAY AND SATURDAY: Fightingville Fresh Market Days, Find the event on Facebook

337 JAN. 9: Artwalk at The Wurst Biergarten, Find the event on Facebook

Open Daily: 5:00pm-11:00pm theoasisbr.com • 7477 Burbank Drive Restaurant: (225) 223-6223 Volleyball: (225) 223-6598

Follow Us:

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Presents

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad proof #2 WRITE ON //

Zoom zoom zoom crack up laughing. Were they laughing IT WAS THE stuff of Zoom at me? Was I about to have a panic nightmares. attack in front of my colleagues? I was leading a weekly staff meeting Another editor spoke up. I watched this past fall. At 225 and our sister carefully, so I wouldn’t talk over him. publications inRegister and Business “OK,” I said when he was done. “I’m Report, we take turns hosting comsure that was very insightful. Does pany meetings, updating our coworkanyone else have anything to share?” ers on upcoming projects. We’ve been Once the reports were done, I tried gathering virtually since last March. to finish the meeting as planned. I I’ve long said that leading the shared an anecdote I had meeting on video is written down the night more intimidating than before. It was supposed in person. Hoping to to be an inspiring energize 45 people on a story about how my Monday morning, as they coworkers Benjamin silently stare back at your Leger and Cynthea pixelated face? Yikes. Corfah and I had cooked To ease my anxiety, I some dishes from 225’s had gotten up extra early monthly Dining In that morning to make recipe column for a sure I had all my notes photo shoot, and what prepared. As the clock that experience taught struck 8:30, I felt ready. By Jennifer Tormo us about 2020. But I All I could hope for was wasn’t sure if my jokes that my video wouldn’t were hitting properly, because I was freeze at an awkward moment. too busy trying not to show how much As the meeting began, I introduced I was shaking. myself and shared some responses I finally concluded the meeting, we’d gotten to our “225 Things to do preparing to go into virtual hiding in a Pandemic” feature. OK, I thought, for however long it would take me to this is off to a good start. Since we recover from how embarrassingly bad were on the topic of safe activities, I my Zoom meeting had gone. asked if anyone would like to share That’s when my phone started some socially distant adventuring blowing up. More coworkers than they’d done recently. I had spoken with over the past six It can be tough to engage people on months started messaging me at once. Zoom, so I crossed my fingers someSome Slacked me advice on fixing my one would respond. To my excitement, audio. Others texted to say they could one of my coworkers spoke. Except— relate and had similar experiences. “Oh,” I said, “You forgot to turn on Some emailed me to say that I had your mic.” apparently done “GREAT,” all caps. She kept talking, so I repeated One text read, “You killed it. Grace myself and told her to turn her mic on. under fire. I’m really proud of you. … That’s when 45 people started looking You handled it beautifully.” at me with alarmed expressions. It hit We went on to talk about social me that her mic was on, but my Zoom anxiety, and she told me the story I’d audio wasn’t. I frantically pressed shared at the end of the meeting truly the mute and unmute button on my inspired her. I felt tears of relief in my computer. Nothing changed. eyes. I was stuck. My computer audio was In a flash, one of the most cringeworking fine, but a technical glitch worthy moments I thought I’d want meant people could hear me—I just to erase from my mind forever turned couldn’t hear them. There was no way into a memory I’ll never forget. In my I could fix whatever was happening most socially isolated, lonely year ever, until after the meeting was over. It was I was reminded of the greatness of the the exact kind of moment I’d feared. people I work with. That it was OK to I started to sweat. I took a deep mess up and be vulnerable. That I still breath. I informed everyone the had people on my side, even if I wasn’t meeting would have to go on, but I’d seeing them in person anymore. be unable to respond to anyone. And that in our socially distant I asked if there were any department times, real connection remains reports. A coworker started talking, possible—even over a faulty Zoom call. and I saw she made the entire team

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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FRAMED //

In every issue of 225, you’ll find a free print on this page. FRAMED celebrates life and art in Baton Rouge, each one featuring a local photographer, place or graphic designer. Cut it out to hang in your cubicle, or frame it for your home gallery wall. Show us where you hang them by tagging them on social media with #225prints.

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PAINTING BY BETH WELCH / bethwelchart.com GET FEATURED We love spotlighting local photographers, artists and designers on this page! Shoot us an email at editor@225batonrouge.com to chat about being featured.

[225] January 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: January 2021 Ad2 proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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GET UP & GO. This year, take back your life.

The Spine Center of Baton Rouge is here to help. From minimally invasive spine surgery to proven pain management therapies, our experts offer the latest advances in spinal health, so you can get back to pain-free living. BATON ROUGE • PRAIRIEVILLE • WALKER spinecenterbr.com | ph. 833-SPINEBR

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[225] Magazine - January 2021  

[225] Magazine - January 2021