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SPONSOR ED

SURVIVAL GUIDE

APRIL 2021 • FREE BEACH VOLLEYBALL 21

PARENTING IN A PANDEMIC

THE BULLFISH 83

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FESTIVAL OUTLOOK 95

kids

page 50

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Ideas for kids ... THINGS TO DO • DINING OUT • COOKING • SHOPPING • DIY STUDY SPACES + MUCH MORE! 01.indd 1

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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Issue Date: April Ad proof #4

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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[225 April 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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UPFRONT //

Fun for kids THIS ONE’S FOR the kids. The pandemic has really put a damper on life for everyone, but we know it’s been especially hard for parents and the kiddos. So, welcome to 225’s firstever kid-themed issue, dedicated to our youngest readers. Over the years, we have had so many readers suggest that 225 do more features on family-friendly activities. Our April cover story dives into just that: things for kids to do, including ideas for cooking, shopping, dining out and decorating with your little ones. Boom! To gather ideas, we went straight to the source: local youngsters and parents. To learn how to look beyond the kid’s menu, we interviewed 4-yearold food influencer Cullen Snow. He shared his favorite grown-up menu items around town, including where BY JULIO MELARA he likes to get boiled crawfish or shrimp fried rice. To learn how a child can get a headstart on their career, we picked the brain of Leroy Hayward III, who started Leroy’s Lip Smack’n Lemonade when he was 6 years old. Now, his lemonade brand is sold in 12 grocery stores around Baton Rouge—and he plans to go national next. For tips on creating a cool, functional study space, we turned to Studyville founder Amanda Vincent. Her academic workspace is one-of-akind and a great asset to our community. She shared how details like exercise bikes equipped with laptop desks and study lounges with plants make homework feel a little easier. And parenting writer Tricia Raney rounded up nearly 40 local activities to help beat pandemic boredom. From pop-up book shops to creating a DIY French fry charcuterie-style board, Raney has penned a family fun bucket list worth saving for the summer. also share advice on capturing Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof the #2We perfect family photo, decorating a • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. curating kids outfits, and • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are receivedkid’s withinroom, 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. so much more.

After a long year of social distancing and remote learning, we hope this issue offers just what kids—and moms and dads—need and want! You can find it all starting on page 30.

We spoke with event organizers about making up for a lost year—and what they’re looking forward to now. Turn to page 95 for the story.

School lesson

Quick! You have a few more days to get your votes in for the Best of 225 Awards. The polls close at 5 p.m. on Thursday, April 8. Support your favorites in nearly 70 categories, including several brandnew awards we’ve introduced for 2021. The winners will be published in our July 2021 issue. Cast your vote, and you will be automatically entered to win $1,000 from Campus Federal Credit Union. Any 225 area resident can vote one time per category. Visit 225batonrouge.com/bestof225 to fill out your ballot, read our FAQ and find updates about our annual Hot Off the Press celebration of the winners. You can even download free promotional images to campaign for your business. May the best of 225 win! And it will all be thanks to YOU and your votes!

Speaking of children, for this issue, we sat down for a chat with Sito Narcisse, the new East Baton Rouge Parish school system superintendent. Narcisse recently moved from Washington, D.C., to lead Louisiana’s second largest public school district. His appointment is the result of a national search to replace former superintendent Leslie Brown, who resigned due to health issues shortly after starting the job. We asked Narcisse about his goals— and what can be done to help kids who have fallen behind during the pandemic. He shared his vision for investing in early literacy, addressing inequality, and expanding career and magnet programs. He is dynamic, bold and ready to tackle the challenges of the local school system. Get to know Narcisse—and the future of our public schools—in our Q&A on page 26.

Festival forecast Live music began trickling back into the Capital City last month, including the 14-band, multi-day South by St. Paddy’s Fest. The Beauvoir Park event became the city’s first music festival since the pandemic’s onset. Later in March, a modified Third Street Songwriters Festival took over the grounds of Pointe-Marie’s Village Square. And while many of the spring’s bigger festivals have been canceled, there’s real hope for a brighter fall. The Baton Rouge Blues Festival, Live After 5, Baton Rouge Oyster Festival, Bandito Festival and Ebb & Flow Festival are all working hard to have their events up and running, with some returning as early as August.

Last chance for Best of 225

Be a coffee bean Damon West, co-author of the book The Coffee Bean, was a guest speaker for Business Report’s Leadership Academy alumni event last month. He gave us a dynamic presentation on his journey and “being a coffee bean.” I thought the best piece of advice he shared was: “It takes a lifetime to learn how to live. Be patient. Be consistent. Show up each day, and put in the work.” If you haven’t read The Coffee Bean, I highly recommend it. It’s a short read and a great reminder that each of us can impact and change our environment!

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

TIPS FOR BUYING OR SELLING YOUR HOME THIS SPRING: 1. CHOOSE DEL RIO AS YOUR TRUSTED AGENT. 2. LET US TAKE CARE OF THE REST. IT’S THAT EASY!

225.218.0888 • DELRIOREALESTATEBR.COM 6 

[225 April 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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CONTENTS //

Features 18 Who is creating locally made tiki mugs for your home bar 77 Whose vacation rental is the “queen” of Mid City 88 What to do with the mushroom bounty this spring 99 Where to see some of the best seats in the house

Departments 12 What’s Up 21 Our City 28 I am 225 30 Cover story 77 Style 83 Taste 95 Culture 102 Calendar

And much more …

30

ON THE COVER

School’s almost out for summer. For kiddos, it means the promise of a long stretch of free time—to hopefully fill with lots of fun. They can start with this month’s cover story, which we’ve filled with family-friendly ideas for cooking, adventuring, dining, shopping, studying and more. For some expert tips, we turned to our cover stars—Cullen Snow, Alice Daniel and twins Channing and Kingston Adams—who shared their knowledge on ordering dinner like a grown-up, dressing to the nines, and filling your bedroom with personality. Staff photographer Collin Richie captured the fun. Turn to page 30 for more.

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SEAN GASSER

The kids issue

[225 April 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

A S K T H E S TA FF

Your best school subject was … Publisher: Julio Melara

EDITORIAL

Editorial director: Penny Font Editor: Jennifer Tormo Managing editor: Benjamin Leger Features writer: Maggie Heyn Richardson Digital content editor: Mark Clements Staff photographer: Collin Richie Contributing writers: Cynthea Corfah, Julia-Claire Evans, Caroline Hebert, Adrian E. Hirsch, Tracey Koch, Tricia Raney, Stephanie Riegel Contributing photographers: Ariana Allison, Sean Gasser, Amy Shutt, Haskell Whittington

“I was a mathlete back in high school, but my best subject was always English or computer science. Hence why I got into digital journalism!” —Mark Clements

ADVERTISING

Sales director: Erin Palmintier-Pou Account executives: Manny Fajardo, André Hellickson Savoie, Jamie Hernandez, Kaitlyn Maranto, Olivia Robb Advertising coordinator: Devyn MacDonald

“Geography.” —Collin Richie

CORPOR ATE MEDIA

Editor: Lisa Tramontana Content strategist: Allyson Guay Multimedia strategy manager: Tim Coles Client experience coordinator, Studio E: Nicole Prunty

MARKETING

Chief marketing officer: Elizabeth McCollister Hebert Marketing & events assistant: Taylor Floyd Events: Abby Hamilton Community liaison: Jeanne McCollister McNeil

“English III and IV honors. I won first place overall in the State Literary Rally both years.” —Stephanie Riegel

ADMINISTR ATION

Assistant business manager: Tiffany Durocher Business associate: Kirsten Milano Office coordinator: Tara Lane Receptionist: Cathy Brown

PRODUCTION/DESIGN

“Math. Kinda odd for an artsy person, but it just always clicked for me. I even had to tutor my friends to help them out.” —Emily Witt

HERRINGSTONE’S BATON ROUGE Call Haley Herrington to schedule your own personal shopping experience 7474 Corporate Blvd Ste C | 225.239.5239 | www.herringstonesboutique.com 10 

Production director: Melanie Samaha Art director: Hoa Vu Graphic designers: Melinda Gonzalez, Emily Witt

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Audience development director and digital manager: James Hume Audience development coordinator: Ivana Oubre Audience development associate: Jordan Kozar A publication of Louisiana Business Inc. Chairman: Rolfe H. McCollister Jr. Executive assistant: Tara Broussard President and CEO: Julio Melara Executive assistant: Brooke Motto

9029 Jefferson Highway, Suite 300 Baton Rouge, LA 70809 225-214-5225  •  FAX 225-926-1329 225batonrouge.com  ©Copyright 2021 by Louisiana Business Incorporated. All rights reserved by LBI. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is strictly prohibited. Business address: 9029 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Telephone (225) 214-5225. 225 Magazine cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material—manuscripts or photographs—with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed.

[225 April 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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F E E D B AC K / / W H AT ’ S O N L I N E / /

Must-try spots

Safety first! In our February cover story, we provided a guide to easy and photo-worthy bike rides to take around town. We should have mentioned to avoid attempting a great shot for the ’gram while still on the bike, but a reader offered this word of caution:

OUR COVERAGE OF the local food scene always gets readers talking. Here’s what some of them have to say about recent openings and spots on the way. About Southern Cofe opening a location in Main Street Market downtown:

About the new restaurant SoLou opening in the former Rum House:

“We have a new place to try!”

“Oh, this makes me so happy!”

“BR is poppin’ off and I’m so proud.”

—Hailey Clark

—Melanie Verzwyvelt

“Looking forward to it!”

“Very excited!!”

—Ryan S. Hernandez

—Dani Borel

About Nick Hufft’s plans for Gail’s Fine Ice Cream in the Perkins Road overpass area:

“Don’t take photos while the bike is in motion!”

—Meghan Pecaut

“Game changer ”

—Daniel Zielinski

—Austin William Guntz

“This looks delicious!”

One Week Left

Southern Cofe downtown

NA

IA AR

Last chance!

ON

ISTOCK

ARIANA ALLISON

—Lalie Smith Edgecombe

LIS

AL

Chicken Salad #2 at SoLou

TO VOTE

BEST of

VOTING FOR THE 2021 Best of 225 Awards closes at 5 p.m. on Thursday, April 8. Head to 225batonrouge.com/bestof225 now to get those votes in. Once you cast your vote, you will be automatically entered to win $1,000 from Campus Federal Credit Union. Each participant is able to vote for each category ONE time. Attempts at multiple entries will disqualify you from the giveaway. Go to our website for more information and reach us at editor@225batonrouge.com with questions about the ballot. Happy voting!

CONNECT WITH US Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #3

twitter.com/225batonrouge facebook.com/225magazine • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

instagram.com/225batonrouge

pinterest.com/225batonrouge

youtube.com/225magazine

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

FOR OUR MENU, VISIT ELSIESPIES.COM 3145 GOVERNMENT ST 225.636.5157

S’MORES PIE

MONDAY 11AM–9PM TUESDAY 11AM–10PM WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY 11AM–10PM FRIDAY 11AM–11PM SATURDAY 10AM–11PM SUNDAY 10AM–9PM

EQ

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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April

A hard act to follow How a local actor is playing a role in inspiring kids to consider careers in the arts and sciences

Marion Mayfield is a local actor and the education liaison at Louisiana Art & Science Museum.

12 

PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

e isiana Art & Scienc Mayfield hosts Lou ng kids at agi eng eos vid e Museum’s onlin ssroom. home or in the cla

THIS SEASON, MARION Bienvenu premiered in two new roles. The actor got married and became Marion Mayfield, and she accepted a new position as education liaison at Louisiana Art & Science Museum. Now, Mayfield works alongside LASM’s Sheldon the Sheepdog puppet and channels Ms. Frizzle, Princess Fiona, Lucy van Pelt and a host of other characters in the museum’s educational programming. Mayfield began her creative career as a teenager, when she debuted in Theatre Baton Rouge’s 2004 summer musical Children of Eden. After graduating St. Joseph’s Academy, and then Northwestern State University in 2012, she auditioned at cattle calls across the country. She was cast in lead roles ranging from Jo March in Colorado’s Thingamajig Theatre Company’s Little Women to Joanne in Hawaii’s Manoa Valley Theatre’s Rent. Between those gigs, Mayfield came back to the Capital City and landed her dream role in Theatre Baton Rouge’s 2018 production of Cabaret. “Not only did I get to play Sally Bowles, but my mother was on stage with me as Frau Schneider,” Mayfield says. “She’s my best friend, my biggest fan and [the person] who introduced me to musical theater. So, it was a very special time for us.” A year later, Mayfield’s strong family ties, new fiancé and sense of responsibility to the local arts community prompted her to settle in Louisiana’s Capital City. “The only way the arts in Baton Rouge can continue to grow,” says Mayfield, “is for artists to bring back knowledge from outside of our small community and use it to inspire others to find their true passion.” It wasn’t long before LASM recruited Mayfield to join its education staff—and she brought with her the talent she’d learned acting across the United States. Mayfield admits that finding herself at the convergence of art and science in the old train station was challenging at first. As a child, she wasn’t as interested in science as she is now. But thanks to her years at local youth theater company Playmakers of Baton Rouge and a side hustle as a nanny, Mayfield has made fast friends with the thousands of educators and kids who visit LASM on school field trips. “I love exciting kids about science and inspiring them to consider STEAM-related fields in their future,” she says now. When COVID-19 caused temporary closures and capacity restrictions at the museum, “Our staff embarked on a year of unprecedented creativity,” Mayfield says. The team quickly developed “Virtual Voyages.” Hosted by Mayfield, the series of Kids Lab science experiments, Traveling Trunk show story times and other online videos engage kids at home or in the classroom. Mayfield hopes live theater and in-person learning will return soon. In the meantime, she is determined to find a way to educate and entertain audiences. Despite any obstacles, the veteran performer knows, the show must go on. lasm.org and marionbienvenu.com —ADRIAN E. HIRSCH

[225 April 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

Use your noodle

DIGITS

6

Where to get fresh pasta and noodles in Baton Rouge LAST FALL, CANNATELLA Grocery started experimenting with making small batches of fresh pasta. Word spread, and soon the small Cajun-Italian grocery store could barely keep up with demand. Now, the Mid City shop sells thin spaghetti, radiatore, casareccia, spaghetti alla chitarra, fettuccine, linguine, fusilli and campanelli-shaped pasta—and it has hired an extra employee to help keep up with production demands.

The noodles are made of an egg-free formula using only flour and water. Flavored noodles—such as spinach, roasted red pepper, beet, and tomato and garlic—all incorporate fresh produce. Customers have even told owner Pam Cannatella they use the flavored noodles as a way to get their kids to eat vegetables. It’s motivation to keep things fun. “Making [pasta] is therapeutic,” she says.

th

Where Louisiana places out of 50 states on Smart Growth America’s pedestrian danger index. The report was released in February and ranked Baton Rouge No. 16 out of the 100 most-dangerous metropolitan cities for pedestrian fatalities.

—CAROLINE HEBERT AND HOLLY DUCHMANN

For dining out Bōru Ramen

It’s dinner and a show at this Electric Depot restaurant, where cooks make ramen noodles behind a glass window in the middle of the dining room. 1509 Government St., Suite B; Find it on Instagram

Nino’s

From the house-made rigatoni in the Baked Ziti to the spaghetti in the Bolognese, Nino’s pasta is simple, bright and scratch-made. 7512 Bluebonnet Blvd.; ninos-italian.com

“It’s not just New Orleans.”

Soji: Modern Asian

One reason those Drunken Noodles are so good? The rice noodles are homemade, as are the noodles in the ramen bowls. 5050 Government St.; eatsoji.com

—The New York Times, in a February article exploring why Louisiana has reported the highest murder rate for the last 31 years in a row. Even if the Crescent City were removed from the state’s annual murder statistics, Louisiana would still have recorded the nation’s highest or secondhighest murder rate in 12 of the last 15 years. The article notes that Baton Rouge had its worst three-year stretch from 2017 to 2019.

Fresh pasta at Cannatella Grocery

For home cooking Cannatella Grocery

Find a variety of fresh pastas in the refrigerated section. The noodles have a shelf life of five days. 3869 Government St.; cannatellagrocery.com PHOTOS BY ARIANA ALLISON

Dagostino Pasta

Dagostino’s pasta is made locally in small batches. It’s made without eggs or preservatives and air-dried in wooden cellars. Find it in local groceries. 3458 Drusilla Lane, Suite B; dagostinopasta.com

WINNERS

COURTESY PHOTOS

Ramen at Bōru Ramen

Where else do you like to get fresh pasta? Tell us at editor@225batonrouge.com.

In Memoriam

Books for all kids

Downtown’s big losses

BU SIN ES S

TO WN

1982-2021 Carnegie, a restaurateur who had his hand in numerous restaurants, businesses and events, died last month. “If you’ve ever had a great night at Jolie Pearl, City Bar, Happy’s, Boudreaux DO and Thibodeaux’s, Bengal SY TE UR CO Tap Room, Rio Tacos & Tequila, Oyster Fest or Bandito Fest—you have Eric to thank,” the Downtown Business Association wrote on Instagram. “If you enjoyed live music in our area—Eric was likely behind the scenes of it.”

ASSOCIATION

Eric Carnegie

LIN COL

E HI RIC

W

1956-2021 The executive director of the Downtown Development District since the agency’s inception in 1987, Rhorer died last month after a monthlong battle with COVID-19. He was one of the area’s biggest advocates and helped lead its vibrant transformation. “He was the main cheerleader. ... He kept things moving,” Capital Area Finance Authority Executive Director Mark Drennen told Daily Report.

N

Davis Rhorer

A collection of 40 children’s books curated by The Conscious Kid was delivered to 54 local public elementary schools this semester. Every title was authored by creators who are BIPOC (Black, indigenous or people of color) and features BIPOC and/or LGBTQ+ characters. The books were distributed through a partnership between Line4Line, Knock Knock Children’s Museum, East Baton Rouge Parish Library and the East Baton Rouge School System. “Today, schools must have books that represent all children,” says Lucy Perera, director of community programs at Knock Knock Children’s Museum and cofounder of Line4Line. line4linebr. org/book-program 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

W H AT ’ S N E W

Buzz feed

By Julia-Claire Evans

Baton Rouge’s “Must Try” New Restaurant

ARIANA ALLISON

1509 Government St Suite B, BTR, LA at ”The Electric Depot BR” (225) 283-1148 boruramenbr.com

Earn Rewards on every dollar spent. REWARDS 5741 Essen Lane @ Perkins, BTR (225) 767-2288 ichibanbr.com

Taco ’bout it City Slice isn’t just pizza anymore. The restaurant near LSU is now also operating City Taco. It was inspired to launch the ghost kitchen concept to make up for lost sales due to a decrease in LSU campus activity during the pandemic. The taco menu includes many of the City Pork-style meats, along with a ton of toppings. Stop by and take your pick between tacos and pizza (if you can). Find it on Facebook

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Dollar General does good

brec.org/youthfreeagent

REGISTER BY: April 30 LEAGUE BEGINS IN MAY! F OR M OR E I NF O + T o regis t er

brec.org/athletics

14 

A 2020 Best Practices Report from the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ Business Council highlighted Dollar General’s partnership with Mayor Sharon Weston Broome to bring fresh produce to Baton Rouge residents. The partnership brought residents easier access to fresh fruits and vegetables in neighborhoods without a nearby grocery store.

Rock Paper Taco

NEW

developments

The Baton Rouge taco truck from restaurateur Joshua Duke is bringing its fresh tacos to two brick-and-mortar spaces: the first on West Chime Street, and the second in the Perkins Palm development near Staring Lane. Each unique taco is named after a different Baton Rouge street. rockpapertaco.com

[225 April 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad1 proof #1 W H AT ’ S U P / /

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

So suite Look out, Topgolf fans! A new golfing venue is coming to town. GolfSuites will be developing its high-tech driving range just a couple of miles from its local competitor, Topgolf, on Siegen Lane. The new-to-Baton Rouge brand currently only has one other location in Oklahoma. GolfSuites also uses electronic tracking to monitor golf balls, and it advertises itself as catering to both recreational and serious players. golfsuites.com

BRIGHTEN UP

your wardrobe

DIGIT

53,000

The number of Baton Rouge households that Entergy said were without power by midmorning during the Monday, Feb. 15, ice storm. We’re not likely to forget anytime soon how chilly it got that week in south Louisiana. In addition to the cold invading locals’ homes and closing our restaurants and businesses for a few days, Louisiana State Police responded to 75 weather-related crashes in a 24-hour period. Frigid temperatures also made the price of oil soar higher than it had been since the beginning of the pandemic.

STOCK PHOTO

ARIANA ALLISON

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Farewell, Sears The Mall of Louisiana’s Sears, the last of its kind in Louisiana, is closing. Sears is shuttering dozens of stores across the country because of the company’s 2018 bankruptcy filing and the continued decline of sales thanks to COVID-19. The exact date of the Mall of Louisiana location’s closure had not been announced at press time.

Arcade bar

Blue Store Chicken

Gather your gaming friends. A new arcade bar is coming to Baton Rouge on Government Street. The bar will open in the former Pop Shop Records space near Ogden Park Shopping Center.

Get your napkins ready! Blue Store Chicken, the crispy, juicy favorite, may be opening closer to you. The new location launches this year on North Boulevard. Get your fried chicken wings and fried rice even easier now. Find it on Facebook

Corporate Blvd at Jefferson • 225.925.2344 townecenteratcedarlodge.com • HEALTH • BEAUTY • DESIGNER SHOPPING HOME DECOR • GOURMET DINING • AND MORE 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

YOUR FLAVOR Truth or dare?

What you wanted to be when you grew up

Fave spring sport or outdoor exercise

Advice you’d give your 10-year-old self

Classic Hits 103.3

Dream big; the possibilities are endless.

Max 94.1

Dream big, and never quit. You have a bright future ahead of you.

Hot 107.9, especially the Breakfast Jam on Friday mornings

Keep smiling, and keep your head up.

Live music at The Basin Music Hall

92.7 K-Love

Don’t study political science.

My social sorority’s sweetheart ball in August

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School teacher

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Playing with my kids, Kameron and Karsyn

Jogging

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Radio station you listen to the most

Baseball

The Blues Festival and Ebb & Flow—all the festivals and entertainment!

Going to a Saints game

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

Omar Girona is the owner of Oakwash, a local brand that makes tiki mugs sold all over the country.

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W H AT ’ S U P / /

Tiki room

B Y JU LI A - C LAI R E EVANS // P HOTO S B Y CO LLIN RICHIE

How a local artist’s tiki mug creations ended up on display at Disneyland PICTURE THIS: You’re in your favorite bar, sipping a cocktail out of a beautiful tiki mug. That mug might just be one of Omar Girona’s creations. The Baton Rouge native’s mugs are displayed in tiki bars across the country, including Trader Sam’s Enchanted Tiki Bar on the Disneyland property in California. Girona started his business, Oakwash, in 2015. It was originally a production design company before he shifted focus to tiki mugs around early 2019. His interest was sparked after visiting tiki bars like Beachbum Berry’s Latitude 29 in New Orleans and Lei Low Rum & Tiki Bar in Houston. “I was overcome with inspiration to join the community,” he says. Girona started learning more about the craft of the tiki mug by watching artists online. He began playing with clay and making mugs from scratch. It is a tedious process, taking him anywhere from a couple hours to a couple days to create one mug. He hand-etches designs in the clay. To make identical copies of the mugs, he slip casts them in plaster molds before firing and glazing them.

Omar Girona’s home tiki mug studio

The process requires multiple quality checks and hours of labor, all done by hand by Girona. The finished mugs have a hyperrealistic, carved look, with fine lines and cracks reminiscent of aged wood. Colors range from light tan to bright blue, and designs center around different themes and characters. Tiny, specific details are added with care, which means each piece is unique in its own way. “That shows in the final product,” he says, “and I think that’s my biggest selling point.” In July 2019, the Disney team reached out to Girona asking if he could send his work to be displayed. He wasn’t sure what the mugs would be used for—until friends sent him pictures of his work on display at Trader Sam’s at the

Disneyland Hotel in California that September. “It’s a big honor to be on display in that bar,” Girona says. Now, he creates mugs for bars like Lei Low and Latitude 29, the very places that inspired him in the beginning. Before the pandemic, Girona had produced 50 mugs for a tiki party held at Soji: Modern Asian. But his mugs are just as likely to appear in people’s home bars. The bulk of Oakwash’s creations are sold directly to individual customers, Girona says. He sells them on his website to those quick enough to “add to cart” before they sell out. “I’m not an experienced maker, like most ceramics artists who go to school and have degrees,” Girona says. “That lack of knowledge is a plus for me, because I can push the boundary of what a mug can be—and what is considered art.” oakwash.com

“I can push the boundary of what a mug can be—and what is considered art.” —Oakwasher owner Omar Girona 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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I N S I D E : Q&A with new school system superintendent / More local news

The beach is back

B Y M A R K C L EM ENTS

After its promising 2020 season was cut short, LSU’s beach volleyball team is looking to reach new heights this year as one of the top teams in the country

STOCK IMAGE

LAST YEAR WAS going to be the year. Players and coaches alike could just feel it. The LSU beach volleyball program had already seen a rapid rise through the ranks in its young, seven-year history, though the Tigers hadn’t yet gotten over the hump to snag some postseason silverware. But 2020 was going to be different.

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LSU OPENED THE season by winning the Duke Kahanamoku Beach Classic in Hawaii—a tournament that saw the Tigers take down No. 19 Stanford, No. 5 Hawaii and No. 1 UCLA, marking the program’s first-ever win over the two-time national champion Bruins. “It really did feel like a fairy tale season, the way it was going,” says senior Toni Rodriguez, “like things were going to go in our favor. We were going to put in the work and the effort and the time to win the national championship. And I think we were on a good path to do that.” The tournament title set the tone for the season, and LSU would rattle off wins in its next nine matches, including another victory against topranked UCLA. The Tigers were rolling. The team had worked its way to the top spot in the national polls. Then, like most of 2020, the wrath of COVID-19 ended the promising season just 14 matches into the year. “It was heartbreaking,” says senior Kristen Nuss. “We felt it. We knew it. We were going to win the national championship. There was nothing that was going to get in our way. But then, turns out COVID was going to get in our way.” It was a jarring halt to a season many within the program anticipated being a historic one. Since its inception in 2014, the LSU beach volleyball program had continually built upon its prior successes, increasing its win total and national ranking every year. The Tigers finished the 2019 campaign with a 31-8 record and ranked No. 3 in the country. Last year was supposed to be its next step. And while that opportunity may have been taken away from the team, the Tigers have transformed the heartache into an even more focused and ambitious 2021 season. “That is something that we’ve definitely taken from last year,” Nuss says. “Now, we go into everything (thinking) this could be our last practice, or this could be our last (weight) lift. We don’t know when the end is going to come. We’re all definitely taking it like we’ve got to go give 100% in everything. Because, again, we never know when that last practice or (match) could be.” The good news for LSU—and in particular for seniors like Rodriguez and Nuss—is that all collegiate athletes were given an extra year of eligibility due to the pandemic. So the Tigers were able to bring back all the pieces from that hopeful

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“It really did feel like a fairy tale season the way it was going … We were going to put in the work and the effort and the time to win the national championship. And I think we were on a good path to do that.”

MG MILLER / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

OUR CITY //

“We were out training at Mango’s (volleyball complex) in January when it was freezing cold, and trying to teach —Senior Toni Rodriguez, about how them to play the game COVID-19 put a halt to their championship of beach volleyball,” aspirations Brock says. “They really had no experience, no This is going to be good. But right now, training and obviously it was a very how do we shorten this process to get tiny group. We would sit and (ask) us in a position where we can play the how can we start to teach these players game a little bit?” some of the skills that will give them Brock has since steadily solidified an opportunity to maybe have some the team, putting together a full roster success in a month and a half, playing of top-tier talents that currently hail against teams that had full rosters and from 10 different states. had been training and playing for two A handful of them are the typical or three years? That was probably the beachy places you’d imagine would biggest epiphany that we walked into. produce high-level sand volleyball players, like Florida or California, but an even bigger chunk come from landlocked states. South Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, Ohio, Arizona, Texas, and, of course, The state-of-the-art Beach Volleyball Complex Louisiana are all represented on opened on campus in 2019, and features a customized locker room, a team lounge and a the Tigers’ roster—speaking to the training area—not to mention six outdoor courts recruiting power the Tigers have built holding 24-inch-deep sand with an underground up already. irrigation and wetting system. “There’s no doubt “Our job is to find the best kids in that one of the reasons why we’ve been able to get to where we are right now is because of that the country who can play. They’re facility,” says head coach Russel Brock. super athletic and can get after it, and we don’t really care where they’re

season, giving head coach Russell Brock even more reason for optimism as he enters his fifth season in charge of the program. Brock first arrived in Baton Rouge in 2014 for the launch of the program, after spending eight seasons coaching with Rice’s indoor team. He worked as an assistant coach for the first three years under Fran Flory, who was pulling double duty as LSU’s indoor and beach volleyball coach, splitting her time between the sand and the court. She wasn’t the only one, either. When the program first launched, the majority of the roster was filled out with mostly indoor players, as well as a few students who came to an open tryout for the team.

Hi-tech sand

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OUR CITY //

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

CHRIS PARENT / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #1

from,” Brock says. “We just want to try and get them down here to Louisiana and help them become great beach volleyball players. We’ve always had to go and find either a diamond in the rough or a player from a nontraditional place who had great ability, but would be open to going somewhere other than California “Now we go into everything or Florida. That’s thinking this could be our last always been a part of practice … We’re all definitely our recruiting process. We’re looking for the taking it like we’ve got to best available, and the go give 100% in everything. best available may not Because, again, we never be in those (traditional) places; it could be know when that last practice coming from anywhere or match could be.” around the country. So —Senior Kristen Nuss it makes it fun.” Along with the slew of successes on the sand, one of LSU’s biggest recruiting tools has been the new state-of-the-art Beach Volleyball Complex that opened on campus in 2019. The university revitalized the old tennis stadium near the PMAC and West Campus Apartments to build one of the country’s premier volleyball venues.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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OUR CITY //

—Head coach Russell Brock

Issue Date: Feb 2021 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

CHRIS PARENT / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

The facility has a customized locker room, a team lounge and a training area, as well as six outdoor courts holding 24-inch-deep sand with an underground irrigation and wetting system. “There’s no doubt that one of the reasons why we’ve been able to get to where we are right now is because of that facility,” Brock says. “Mango’s was great for us to be able to have a place but, in the big picture, to have that facility, to have a place to call home, to (have a place) for our fans to come and support us and for the campus to even really know, honestly, that we exist, it was great. And then to have something that’s better than anything else in the country is more humbling than anything. Our mentality every day is: We’ve got to prove that it was worth it to spend the money and to spend the time and the energy to build this facility.” Looking at where the program sits now—ranked No. 3 in the nation and touting an 11-2 record as of press time—is a testament to the work Brock, his staff and the players have put in throughout the past seven seasons. And if their success so far is any indication, the future sure does look bright on the beaches of Baton Rouge.

“Our job is to find the best kids in the country who can play. We just want to try and get them down here to Louisiana and help them become great beach volleyball players. We’ve always had to go and find either a diamond in the rough or a player from a non-traditional place who had great ability, but would be open to going somewhere other than California or Florida.”

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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OUR CITY //

N E WS B RIEFS

DI GI TS

‘Nothing has been done’ The ramifications of a scathing report on how LSU ignored sexual assault allegations the Title IX office. Coincidentally, the Husch Blackwell investigation was also spurred on by USA Today, through a November 2020 report exposing how LSU administrators and athletics leaders had ignored allegations against student athletes for years. That wasn’t lost on former student and sexual assault survivor Caroline Schroeder, who provided the only public comment before LSU’s Board of Supervisors meeting in March discussing the findings of the report. “I’d like to express how little faith I have in this board to do the right thing today or in the months to come,” she told the board via Zoom. “This meeting was not called out of the goodness of your heart. We’re here because a national newspaper published a story in November of last year, which created a bit of a public relations problem for you. That is the only reason you are here now intending to resolve this issue.” FILE PHOTO

IT WAS A highly anticipated report, yet it was still a shock just how damning the revelations were. That was how many felt in March, when law firm Husch Blackwell released its 150-page investigation into LSU’s handling of sexual abuse and violence complaints on campus. Among the findings: The university was slow to develop policies to handle such issues. The policies that did exist weren’t clear or properly followed. Its Title IX office was understaffed, and university leadership ignored repeated requests to provide more funding and personnel. “We are not the first people to note this and flag this to the leadership,” Husch Blackwell attorney Scott Schneider said. “It has been repeatedly addressed to the leadership of the university, and nothing has been done to remedy it up to this point.” Adding fuel to the fire: The Husch Blackwell investigation came out a day after LSU made public a 2013 report into allegations of sexual harassment

against former football coach Les Miles. LSU leadership had kept those allegations quiet for eight years—until USA Today filed suit for access. In response to those revelations, the University of Kansas quickly parted ways with Miles, who had been head football coach there since 2018. For its part, LSU so far has only temporarily suspended executive deputy athletic director Verge Ausberry and senior associate athletic director Miriam Segar without pay. The university released an action plan, including providing more staffing for

50th

Louisiana’s standing in the U.S. News and World Report’s latest Best States Rankings. The report puts Louisiana 46th in health care, 48th in education, 47th on both the economy and infrastructure, and 50th in crime and corrections, among other categories. We’ve held the bottom spot for the second year running.

64.3%

Hotel occupancy rates in Baton Rouge for the week of March 1-6, which is on par with the 64.8% they averaged for the first week of March 2020—the last big week of activity before the pandemic shuttered the economy. Local officials were positive about the slowly rebounding hospitality industry following declining COVID-19 infection rates and the state’s loosening restrictions on event capacity. “I think things are coming back,” says Visit Baton Rouge President and CEO Paul Arrigo. “We feel better about the direction we’re headed in.”

—FROM NEWS REPORTS

WE CARRY EACH OTHER It’s how we do things in Louisiana during times of challenge. We’re stronger together and we know our strength lies in the helping hands of our neighbors. So let’s wear a mask and protect one another. And protect the life we love. 01MK7496 R3/21

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OUR CITY //

“If you don’t invest early, kids fall behind, and you’re only focused on an intervention approach.” —New EBRPSS Superintendent Sito Narcisse

Q&A

Up for the challenge

By Maggie Heyn Richardson // Photos by Collin Richie

New school system superintendent Sito Narcisse on making sure kids don’t fall behind during such an unusual time THERE’S A LOT you might not know about recently appointed East Baton Rouge Parish School System Superintendent Sito Narcisse. Born in New York City to Haitian parents, Narcisse grew up speaking Haitian Creole at home and learned English as a second language in school. His dad was a cab driver, and his mother worked at a diner. His parents preached that opportunity would come through education, a lesson Narcisse took to heart when he earned a master’s degree from Vanderbilt University and a doctorate in educational administration from the University of Pittsburgh. Friendly and approachable, Narcisse loves football and dining out, things that make him feel right at home in the Capital City. Narcisse comes to Baton Rouge by way of District of Columbia Public

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Schools, where he was chief of secondary schools. Here, he replaces former Superintendent Leslie Brown, who resigned last fall for health reasons after a few months on the job. The school board conducted a national search to replace Brown—its second in a year. Narcisse narrowly edged out Interim Superintendent Adam Smith. Now at the helm of the state’s second largest public school district, he’s determined to close the gap on educational inequities, expand successful magnet and career programs, and invest in early literacy, which he calls the biggest game changer of them all. What was it about this job that attracted you? I wanted to be part of improving an urban school district—that’s been the focus of my career. Big city and urban

school districts have a lot of similar challenges across the country, and those challenges don’t scare me. I also wanted to be part of a community that was behind the work, and that’s the case in Baton Rouge. And I liked the idea of being in the South. How did you feel when it was announced that K-12 teachers in Louisiana would be able to get the COVID-19 vaccine starting in late February? I was thrilled. It’s great for our faculty and staff, because it’s been a time of high anxiety for them. Hopefully, this will help put their minds at ease and also give our families more assurance and consistency. One hundred percent of schools have reopened in East Baton Rouge Parish, and this is good news for families because a big

concern is around learning loss from not being in the classroom. Most kids are back, but we still have a lot of families learning virtually—about 25% of the student population. But every school now has access to technology and the ability to simulcast classroom learning, and students have access to computers and hot spots. Having worked both as a teacher and an administrator, what’s the most important factor when you’re trying to bring about change in public education? Being inclusive in everything you do. Community engagement works. It really does. You can’t do things to people, you have to include them in the decision-making process. There’s no such thing as too much community involvement.

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OUR CITY //

You’ve said early literacy is a top priority. How do you plan to accomplish this? My approach is to see early literacy as fundamental to a college and career pipeline. I’d love to see us have universal pre-K. If you can build that foundation of reading and writing by the time a child gets to third grade, then they won’t have to play catch up. If you don’t invest early, kids fall behind, and you’re only focused on an intervention approach. The East Baton Rouge Parish School Board’s decision to hire you was split 5-4. How do you build support among board members who didn’t vote for you? Transparency equals trust. Once you start focusing on a common goal, you have the best chance of building cohesive relationships. We’re all in it to give children the best possible educational opportunities. What do you like to read in your spare time? I’m a big sports fan, so I love keeping up with my favorite teams. I also love to read about innovation in business. I really like the Harvard Business Review.

Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #1

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions.

• AD WILLisRUN AShere IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. Narcisse seen working with students at Scotlandville Middle School. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Even though you’ve said you don’t have roots in Louisiana, how many people have asked you if you’re related to a Narcisse they know? (Laughs) It’s definitely come up. I love Louisiana culture. I’m trying to learn as much as I can about the community.

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I AM 225 //

JOSH WILLIAMS WASN’T a household name in Baton Rouge when he committed to LSU in 2019. He was a two-star recruit from The Kincaid School in Houston, with only a handful of offers from smaller programs like Dayton, Drake and Stetson. So he decided to bet on himself and sign as a walk-on for the Tigers. The 5-foot-9, 190-pound running back stepped on campus the same year LSU signed five-star tailback John Emery Jr. and four-star runner Tyrion Davis-Price, and one year after it landed four-star bruiser Chris Curry. Needless to say, not many people expected to see No. 27 carrying the ball much for the Tigers— except maybe Williams himself. “I always wanted to come [to LSU],” says Williams, who grew up watching the Tigers from his Houston home. “I love LSU football, and my family loves it. This is where I saw myself playing, and I

wanted to come earn a scholarship here.” It only took about a year, and that’s exactly what Williams did. After the final scrimmage on the last day of the 2020 fall camp, head coach Ed Orgeron called Williams to the middle of the locker room in front of the team and told him he would be one of three new players put on scholarship. Williams’ teammates doused him with water in celebration, and his family immediately drove into town from Houston to savor the moment. But Williams didn’t want his story to end there. He continued to work in the background before getting his first game action in LSU’s 41-7 win against Vanderbilt. He got a pair of carries in the Tigers’ thrilling upset against Florida, but it was Williams’ showing in the season finale against Ole Miss that finally turned some heads. He finished the day as LSU’s leading rusher,

carrying the ball 12 times for 55 yards (a solid 4.6 yard average), highlighted by an impressive 30yard scamper that nearly ended in the endzone. “It meant a lot,” Williams says, reflecting on his journey. “It means that hard work does pay off, and if you want something, you have to put your all into it. If I want to keep going forward in football, I have to keep working hard. So that’s what I’m doing.” It’s hard to bet against Williams at this point. He’s worked his way from an unknown walk-on to the team’s leading rusher against an SEC rival. He’s done it all while maintaining “around a 3.4 or 3.5” GPA as a business major, which landed him on the SEC Academic Honor Roll. As disappointing as LSU’s 2020 season was overall, Williams was one of the bright spots. And his story points toward a promising future for the Tigers.

“It feels great to show that I’m not just a walk-on and that I can produce yards just like a four- or five-star. It feels good to prove yourself.” 28 

—MARK CLEMENTS

PHOTO BY BEAU BRUNE / COURTESY LSU ATHLETICS

Josh Williams

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C OV E R S T ORY

SEAN GASSER

The Splatter Room at Pinspiration Baton Rouge

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ds KI ki

C OV E R S T ORY

er rn Co 225’s guide to dining, cooking, studying, styling and adventuring with kids. Because even in a pandemic, there are so many places to play in Baton Rouge. PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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C OV E R S T ORY

Gavin Metoyer, Noah Metoyer, Mayci Baker and Autumn Metoyer in the Splatter Room at their family's business, Pinspiration.

! t Spla

The new Pinspiration studio offers kids immersive, art-driven experiences

INSIDE A STUDIO off South Sherwood Forest Boulevard, the paint is flying. It sticks to the walls, ceilings, floors and doors, every inch saturated in bursts of reds, yellows, blues and greens. This is Pinspiration’s Splatter Room, where visitors can fling paint at blank 9-by-12-inch canvases and not have to worry about making a mess. In fact, the mess is the point. “It is an absolute paint explosion,” says co-owner Shana Baker. “Organized chaos is the best way I can describe it.”

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Painters trade their shoes for protective booties, wearing goggles and shower caps so they can really let loose and use the paintbrushes freely. At the end of the 60-minute private paint sessions, they get to take their masterpieces home. Baker and her sister, Erin Metoyer, opened the Baton Rouge location of the Arizona franchise last November. In addition to the Splatter Room, the facility offers a selection of DIY crafts and projects. Visitors can make everything from string art and decorative signs to acrylic pours and candles.

“It’s like Pinterest on steroids,” Baker says. “If Pinterest was a building, we’d be it.” To keep customers safe during the pandemic, Pinspiration requires face masks and temperature checks upon entry, and it follows social distancing and sanitation protocols. Just be sure to come dressed in an outfit you don’t mind getting messy—it might become part of the art project, too. pinspiration.com/locations/ batonrouge

—JENNIFER TORMO

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busters

Local parenting writer Tricia Raney shares some of her family’s favorite pandemic-safe activities to try around town

1. Explore the themed playgrounds at LSU

AgCenter Botanic Gardens. March your little ones to the nature-inspired Oak Grove Playground (think climbing stumps, balance logs and a wooden swing) or the brandnew, bug-themed Pollinator Playground. Plus, we think it has the best-stocked Little Free Library and most beautiful fields of flowers. (Its sunflowers are the backdrop of 90% of my friends’ profile pictures.) lsu.edu/ botanic-gardens

2. Turn a visit to BREC’s Baton Rouge Zoo

into your own DIY scavenger hunt. Print a zoo-themed scavenger hunt from a site like Pinterest, and see what animals you can find! Afterward, bring the zoo home with you by watching its virtual educational programming on its YouTube channel. brzoo.org

6. Shoot for the stars at Highland Road Ob-

servatory. I am raising a Mars-bound, space loving, astronaut-in-training. We first visited the observatory for Mercury’s transit in 2019, and I was blown away that this place existed in our backyard and we’d missed it all these years. It’s amazing and informative, and it’s a great place to view meteor showers, moon phases and so much more. bro.lsu.edu

7. Book a private cooking

class. Our kids are more prone to branch out and even—gasp—eat without complaining if they help prepare the meal. Family cooking classes are such a fun way to bond, help a small business and get a delicious dinner out of it. Our family likes chef Jeremy Coco’s classes, but you can book the chef of your choice. chefjeremycoco.com

8. Walk the Mississippi

SEAN GASSER

3.

Read on a library rooftop terrace. Our family just recently discovered the rooftop terrace at the Main Library at Goodwood, and the view is absolutely stunning. Or, you can head to the other side of town and check out the brand-new River Center Branch Library’s outdoor terrace, complete with a greenery wall and Mississippi River views. ebrpl.com

4. Grab a Chicly Brewed tea sampler

River levee. From measuring how high the water is to seeing how many steps we can get in, my kids absolutely love everything about the levee. There are plenty of restaurants within walking distance to pick up from and have a picnic. downtownbatonrouge.org

9. Check out the aquariums at Cabela’s and

Bass Pro Shops. My kids LOVE to go look at the fish and turtles. We’ve gotten lucky a few times to be present when workers donning scuba gear are cleaning the tank. It has given my son a new career path! basspro.com and cabelas.com

for an at-home tea party. We love to visit the Prairieville tea shop to pick up a three-tea sampler. Toss some cookies (or biscuits) on the table, and pretend you’ve traveled to Europe. It might inspire you to start collecting teas, kettles and milk frothers! chiclybrewed.com

10. Catch some air at a skate park. Did you

know BREC has multiple skate parks around town? For a little adventure, head to Perkins Road Community Park, Old Hammond Highway Park or Zachary Community Park. Just don’t forget your helmet. brec.org 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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PHOTOS BY COLLIN RICHIE, RAEGAN LABAT, AND STOCK

5.

Picnic at Manchac Park Trail. Just off Old Jefferson Highway near Hoo Shoo Too Road is a hidden gem of a park. Grab a to-go meal from your favorite restaurant and head to this green space, where you’ll find a little playground, baseball field and basketball court. Head to the very back to uncover a beautiful shaded trail. It’s about 1 mile of easy walking, and is a go-to of ours. brec.org

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19. Day trip to Prehistoric

12.

ST

OC

K

PH

OT

O

Gather art supplies from your backyard for a craft day. Do a little exploring of all nature has to offer us in Louisiana. Pick items like sticks, leaves, pine needles, flowers and acorns. Create your own mixed media piece, nature mandala, or even a selfie backdrop.

20. Teach your kids about shopping local

ingredients at the weekend edition of the Red Stick Farmers Market. It’s outdoors, full of fresh food, and supports small, local businesses—is there anything better on a Saturday morning? breada.org

31. Wander the grounds Museum. The Historic Naval Ships Association recognized it as one of the most authentically restored vessels in the world. Browse artifacts from veteran and naval military history. usskidd.com

of the State Capitol. Between Capitol Gardens and Louisiana Veterans Memorial Park, there’s so much to see. Soak in the views of oak trees, large hills and lakes.

22.

32. Enjoy some patio

21. Spend a day learning at USS Kidd Veterans

15.

Say hi to Mike the Tiger. Have you even lived in Baton Rouge if you haven’t visited Mike the Tiger? LSU is one of the few colleges with a live mascot, and Mike is a handsome, 4-year-old tiger, often found taking dips in his wading pool or curled in the shade of his expansive habitat. lsu.edu

fry charcuterie-style board. This was my 3-year-old’s idea! For her birthday, she’s allowed to pick what we eat all day, and she just wanted French fries. So I hopped in the car and made a 1-mile loop hitting up all the fries in our area, ensuring we had a good mix of plain fries, cheese fries, chilli fries, tater tots and onion rings. Once home, we tossed them on our largest cutting board to make a French fry tasting board.

17. Shop local game shops and plan a game night. Our

family loves game nights. We find our unique games at The Rouge Games local shop of board, collectible card and role playing games. Or, you can check out all the gaming options at Little Wars. Find them on Facebook

18. Have an adventure at Bluebonnet Swamp Nature

Center. Just past Perkins Rowe off Bluebonnet, you’ll find a bit of wild in the middle of the city. An easy-to-navigate trail walks you through the swamps, and on a good day you’ll see turtles, snakes, all kinds of birds, grasshoppers, dragonflies and so much more! There are even some covered seating areas for resting and cooling off. brec.org

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29. Take a family bike ride. I think everyone took up 30.

14. Play some disc golf. My husband

16. Make a French

Hospital. There’s a great little pea gravel 1-mile walking path around the ponds. My kids love to go look for turtles on sunny spring days and have foot races along the walking path. womans.org

Try a private chef experience. Book your favorite chef for a private dinner. The owner of Odom’s Kitchen is another rock-star chef we love, with delicious offerings like seafood over stuffed potatoes, amazing wings and lamb that will make you cry! eatwithodoms.com

limited the movie-theater-going days of many families. But now, AMC’s private movies have become quite popular for “quarantine birthday parties” for many of our friends. For an even more intimate experience that supports local, rent out the Manship Theatre. amctheatres.com and manshiptheatre.org

Check out a pop-up book shop with Red Stick Reads. Red Stick Reads is a new addition to town that began by popping up at local boutiques and coffee shops with a curated book selection. In December, the company opened a small boutique bookshop with story time sessions and plenty of children’s books to encourage kids to explore the world through reading. redstickreads.com

28. Wind down the Harris Walking Trail at Woman’s

biking as a hobby thanks to quarantine. There are plenty of places around town to ride bikes, but our favorite route is to pedal around LSU’s campus to River Road.

13. Rent a private movie showing. The pandemic

loves disc golf, so of course our kids have come to love it, too! There are several places to play around town: Highland Road Community Park, Greenwood Community Park, Flanacher Park Disc Golf Course in Zachary and Louisiana Healthcare Connections Disc Golf Park in Scotlandville. brec.org

27.

Do a car wash tour. Hear me out on this one. During the long weeks of social distancing, my kids begged to ride through car washes around town. So we made it a thing! We made a list of car washes close to us and broke them into categories of price, length, colors, coolness and vacuum strength. After each new car wash, we’d rate them on our scorecards.

23. Plan a dessert

night with local treats. Y’all, stop what you’re doing now and plan a trip to one of the new treat shops that’s opened in the past year. Bonjour will make all your dessert dreams come true with its bubble waffles, crepes and milkshakes. Sweet Society is a haven for Asian-style desserts like Sweet taiyaki fish-shaped waffle Society cones stuffed with ice cream, and Boom Box Pops is a popsicle and ice cream shop with a delightful ’80s theme.

24.

Learn about trees, shrubs and wildflowers at Hilltop Arboretum. Take in the scenery of the walking trails and the unique architecture of the covered pavilion, walkways and auditorium. There’s a new Children’s Bookshelf open in the gift shop. Personally, my kids are all about rolling down the hill! lsu.edu/hilltop

25. Browse the Mid City Makers Market. This craft fair is full of goods by some of the most talented Baton Rougeans. It is a great way for kids to meet creators who have turned their passions into incomes. midcitymakersmarket. com

26.

Walk the Blackwater Conservation Area. The trails at this ecosystem restoration area are easy on tiny legs and partially shaded—and if you follow the right path, you’ll be led to the Comite River. brec.org

dining. While we love supporting local businesses and have done lots of take-out, my family hasn’t fully jumped into dining at restaurants yet. I know Head to the State Capitol many people feel much during Memorial Day better about outdoor Weekend to see the Garden dining, and I personally of the Flags display. love the patios at spots like Willie’s Restaurant, Gov’t Taco and Fat Cow. Our kids love to eat Velvet Cactus’ dessert nachos—cinnamon sugar chips covered in ice cream, chocolate sauce and whipped cream—on the patio.

33. Feed the birds at the LSU and City Park lakes. These popular green spaces are home to plenty of runners and bikers and families of ducks and geese. We like to bring some bird seed and chat with the birds.

34.

Head to a drive-in movie. Millennial Park, Mongo’s Movies and Outside Movie have held pop-up movie nights. Or, DIY your own drive-in. Use Amazon boxes to make cars for the kids to decorate, rent a movie online, pop some popcorn and turn your living room into a theater! Our kids have made rockets, race cars and even a dump truck.

35. Explore a new part of town by staging a

progressive dinner. Our family loves to pick a neighborhood, set a radius, then hit up all the curbside pickup deliciousness for a take-home feast. Here’s our sample menu from Mid City: Truffle Parm Fries from Curbside, Wild Chow Wings from Chow Yum Phat, and Crawfish Queso and a Chocolate Cream Pie from Elsie’s Plate & Pie.

36. Make new plant friends at Cohn Nature Preserve.

This gorgeous 16-acre spot is one of our go-to outdoor destinations, with both wooded and landscaped areas full of native and foreign plants. brec.org Tricia Raney is a mom of five and a contributing writer and event assistant for local parenting website, Red Stick Mom. She loves exploring Baton Rouge and all it has to offer in terms of family fun for her 9-year-old, 5-year-old, 3-year-old and two angel babies—and the occasional date night, too!

PHOTOS BY RAEGAN LABAT, ARIANA ALLISON, COLLIN RICHIE, KRISTIN SELLE AND STOCK

11.

Fly a kite or splash around at Highland Road Park. This park’s wide-open green spaces are perfect for flying kites! There’s also a shaded playground, splash pad and boat launch—just the thing for summer sunshine. brec.org

Park in Henderson. If you have a dinosaur lover on your hands, this park is so worth the quick drive. On 12 acres of paved walkways, life-size dino depictions tower overhead. prehistoric-park.com

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Knocking at your door

Small groups of children are currently permitted in the museum lobby for day camps, such as this stop-motion animation program, or a peek at the model train set.

The Knock Knock Children’s Museum has been closed since last March. But it hasn’t been a lost year, thanks to continuing programs and preparations for brighter days ahead

PHOTOS BY RAEGAN LABAT, ARIANA ALLISON, COLLIN RICHIE, KRISTIN SELLE AND STOCK

T

HE KNOCK KNOCK Children’s Museum has been eerily quiet for the past 54 weeks (and counting). There are no tiny hands ringing up groceries at the Pelican Pantry learning zone. No little feet pattering up and down the towering Storybook Climber exhibit. But it’s the voices ringing through the halls that the museum’s team has missed the most. The sounds of children shouting with delight at new discoveries, or dragging Dad to a must-see exhibit. “We love working with kids every day. Seeing smiles on their faces, getting to have those ‘aha’ moments—that’s our fuel,” says executive director Peter Claffey. “You start to miss that during COVID.” The museum hasn’t been entirely silent, though. The staff has found fuel in plenty of other projects. Smaller in-person camps staged in the museum’s lobby have provided safe learning experiences for kids. The museum has partnered with organizations like Front Yard Bikes, Fathers on a Mission, Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital, Big Buddy and the Gardere Initiative to provide STEAM kits and remote learning experiences. And last spring, it launched its “Knock Knock At Your Door” series, a free digital library of more than 150 original videos. Staff members share art lessons, science experiments, fitness activities, story time sessions and more. Each of the videos correlates to one of the museum’s 18 learning zones—recreating a slice of Knock Knock in a family’s home.

“People liked seeing staff in the videos. If you’re a member that used to come visit us all the time, it’s almost like you’ve been missing your friends,” Claffey says, adding, “I’ve been in this business for over 20 years now, and this is the busiest I’ve ever been in my life.” The most unsung task, according to Claffey, is the one the team has been working on nonstop since closing last March: getting the museum ready for reopening day, whenever that may be. When Knock Knock unlocks its doors again, it will still be the same magical space children first fell in love with—but with a lot more done behind the scenes to keep it that way. The staff has installed hand sanitizing stations at every exhibit, touchless fixtures in the bathrooms,

and UV filters in air conditioning vents. Pathways are marked with social distancing reminders. The work has required imagining what it might take to make families feel comfortable in the future— and going above and beyond to make it happen. The museum purchased extra sets of the exhibits’ interactive pieces, so while one child is playing with a set of Legos, a museum staff member can disinfect and swap the next set for the next group of playmates. In case families would rather wash their hands with soap and water rather than hand sanitizers, the staff built outdoor sinks. The museum will carry today’s lessons long into the future. It is already working on plans for a Knock Knock At Your Door mobile unit, bringing interactive experiences and STEAM activities to children across the Capital Region and beyond. The pandemic has proven that a great learning experience doesn’t have to be inside the walls of the museum—or even in-person. “Just seeing kids’ smiles and bringing them engaging, playful learning experiences—whether that’s digitally or physically— has become our fuel now,” Claffey says. The feeling is mutual. Because even when visitors stop by the lobby, they always say the same thing: “We’re just so happy to be back.” knockknockmuseum.org

—JENNIFER TORMO

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Wha

? iez

g L n i i l t F a o e o s ’t d

A lot. But here are the pint-sized food Instagrammers’ top picks.

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Off the (kids) menu Order like a little foodie with Cullen Snow’s six fave local meals

Boiled crawfish Crawfish on the Geaux Spicy tails don’t scare Cullen, just the thought of his mom and dad failing to keep pace with his appetite. Peel faster, he tells them. And bring on the corn and potatoes.

Pepperoni pizza The Hive While willing to sample all sorts of different toppings, Cullen is a pepperoni loyalist who attacks his slice with manly gusto. “I like to eat pizza with my hands, not a fork,” Cullen says. We agree.

Fried pickles Pluckers The varied texture of a deep-fried pickle, crisp on the outside and squishy in the center, is just the sort of warm-up Cullen expects before a plate of fingerlicking honey barbecue wings. He believes both of these items are best when dunked in ranch dressing.

C

ULLEN SNOW HAS strong opinions about what to order at Curbside. “Tater tots!” he says through an open-mouthed grin and saucer eyes. It’s the same surprised look he deploys for what he calls his “foodie pix.” Lowering his voice to a conspiratorial whisper, he adds, “And a chocolate milkshake. With a lot of whipped cream.” Cullen, 4, and his little brother, Brooks, 1, are the faces behind @lilfoodiezla, the Instagram restaurant adventures of two Baton Rouge boys and their silent partners, parents John and Reagan Snow. The project started when Cullen was not quite 2, John says. It was inspired by @foodbabyny, a New York City dad documenting his kids with mouthwatering dishes from neighborhood eateries. The Snows, longtime fans of dining out, thought it would be nice to similarly record their family’s local restaurant outings. “It was fun for us to catalog his adventures,” says John, a partner at the management consulting firm, Emergent Method. “He really enjoys it, and it’s become something we do together on weekends. Now, when we go to our favorite places, someone will yell, ‘LilFoodiez in the house!’”

Shrimp fried rice Blue Store Thanks to his parents, Cullen recently discovered shrimp weren’t all that different from crawfish. It opened up a world of new food possibilities. This includes the savory shrimp fried rice from Blue Store, a family favorite known for its deep-fried wings.

The pandemic put a damper on the Snows’ ability to dine out as frequently as they’d like, but the occasion has provided a platform to explain a global pandemic to a preschooler. “He loves restaurants, so when the pandemic hit, it was like here was this whole different rhythm,” John says. “The changes he saw allowed us to explain what was going on in the world.” John says one of the benefits of eating out with Cullen is that when he’s in a restaurant, he is willing to try just about anything. “He might not like it,” says his dad. “But he’s willing to taste it.”

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

Cheese grits JED’s Local Louisiana Po’boys While Cullen will enjoy a shrimp off his dad’s po-boy here, it’s the creamy, tangy side dish of JED’s cheese grits he looks forward to most.

Chocolate glazed donut holes with sprinkles Mary Lee Cullen has a very specific donut preference: glazed chocolate donut holes with sprinkles, which he enjoys from Mary Lee. “I made the mistake once of bringing home regular donuts,” John says. “I won’t do that again.”

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Locally owned children’s shops From toys to clothes, here are the shops readers nominated for this year’s Best of 225 Awards. What other local spots do you like to shop for kids’ clothes? Tell us at editor@225 batonrouge.com.

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Blaand Children’s Boutique shopblaand.com Carpenter & Co Find it on Facebook Giggles Toys & Candy shopgigglesbr.com

Lulu & Bean luluandbeanbr.com

Oh Baby! ohbabystyle.com

The Hope Shop Find it on Facebook

Mini Macarons - A Children’s Boutique shopminimacarons. com

Olly-Olly Find it on Facebook

Victoria’s Toy Station victoriastoystation.com

The Bee’s Knees Find it on Facebook

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Get the look

Style advice from

the twins

How Two Little Boys’ styles are inspiring their classmates— and kids all over the country

“Socks make your outfits pop.”

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HE NAME OF the clothing line is Two Little Boys, and it’s run by two little CEOs. With Mom’s help, of course. Regina Adams launched the business in 2017 alongside her fraternal twins, Channing and Kingston. Together, they make screen-printed, pint-size T-shirts and accessories. The kids clothing designs they come up with are artful and edgy. A ’90s-themed backpack is covered with boom boxes and graffiti. Checkered socks feature a bear they dubbed “Laweezeyana.” Shirts are just as likely to have squiggle patterns or camo prints as they are to feature photos of French fries or clouds. These designs are coming from the imaginations of 8-year-olds, after all. Asked where the twins get their inspiration, Kingston tilts his head thoughtfully. “The different days make different styles for us,” he says. He’s right: It all started with animal-print T-shirts they made to wear on a field trip to the zoo. They handpainted a golden lion, finished with googly eyes. Soon, everyone on the school bus wanted their own painted shirts. So Adams and the twins made more. They began doing pop-ups at a friend’s shop, WINK Your Eyes, which was then in the Mall of Louisiana. It was just the exposure the brand needed. Adams started screenprinting the shirts. The process enabled her to sell in larger quantities. Through the brand’s Instagram and e-commerce shop, it now reaches customers all over the country. But the whole creative process starts and ends with the twins. They help conceptualize, edit and greenlight the designs. “They’ll say, ‘Mama, I had an idea,’ or ‘Mama, I don’t really like that,’” Adams says. “Kingston’s style is more R&B, and Channing’s is hip-hop.” And they wear the clothes with pride. Channing and Kingston have been modeling for Mom’s iPhone shots since before they could walk. In photos for the brand’s Instagram, they show off jackets, hats and duffel bags. At the end of each business day, Adams shares the latest sales with her sons. They talk about which items the customers purchased, and they evaluate money and savings. The boys get paid for their work (and for regular household chores). Adams has even helped them invest in stocks. Despite the pandemic, 2020 was the brand’s strongest year yet. Adams is excited about what’s on the horizon, with spring launches planned for shoes, swim trunks and girls clothes. But running the business together is about even more than that. It has made their mother-son bond stronger than ever. “Talking about the designs has helped our communication,” Adams says. “They are not scared to tell me anything.” twolittleboys.shop

—KINGSTON

“I go by mood. It depends on the day.” —KINGSTON

at the “I usually look om and colors of the ro ir t on. put that color sh rs are My favorite colo w.” green and yello

—CHANNING

“When dressing twins, coordinate their outfit s, but don’t make it too matchy-matchy.” —MOM

“Match your shoes to your clothes.” —CHANNING

—JENNIFER TORMO

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A kid’s place is in the

kitchen Tips for cooking at home

Baton Rouge’s Young Chefs Academy

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IDS GATHER ROUND stainless steel prep tables at Baton Rouge’s Young Chefs Academy and listen intently. Owner Gay Nan Moree, a former middle school home economics teacher, is about to show them how to make tomato soup and heart-shaped grilled cheese sandwiches. They work together, sautéing onions and garlic for the soup, and carefully combine these softened vegetables into a blender, along with canned tomatoes. Once the mixture is smooth, they pour it back into a saucepan and add a little cream. “It tastes just like La Madeleine,” one student says. With the soup finished, they turn to the sandwiches, which they cook on low heat in order to melt the cheese to a gooey texture without burning the bread. Since Moree bought the Baton Rouge franchise of Young Chefs Academy in 2009, she’s been on a mission to show children and teens—and their parents—that cooking together isn’t a lost art. The Bocage area business offers cooking sessions, summer camps and birthday parties, all of which give children a chance to try their hand at cooking. Moree draws from plenty of easy, kid-friendly recipes, like glazed sugar cookies, mini pizzas, and empanadas made simply from canned biscuit dough. She’s been a crusader for letting kids learn to cook at home—even if it feels inconvenient. “Parents are so busy that they don’t take time to cook or show their kids how,” Moree says. “I hear it all the time. A lot of families are eating on paper plates in front of the TV.” Don’t be daunted, Moree says. Start with easy recipes and basic tasks, and youngsters will pick up skills quickly. batonrougela.youngchefsacademy.com

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

Tips for cooking with kids Let go. One of the most common mistakes parents make is taking over for their children. “I watched a dad once totally decorate a gingerbread house his son was working on because he wanted it to look a certain way,” Moree says. “Kids aren’t supposed to know how to do things perfectly, and they won’t improve unless we let them try.”

LOOKING FOR A GREAT SPACE FOR YOUR NEXT EVENT? Bluebonnet Swamp is available for birthday parties, business meetings, weddings and group tours! CONTACT US FOR MORE INFO

Issue Date: February 2021 Ad proof #2

N. Oak Hills Parkway brec.org/swamp •10503 Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval225-757-8905 or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Use basic instinct. Moree marvels at the number of kids and teens who have never measured an ingredient, or who are unfamiliar with kitchen staples. Start with basics, like measuring, stirring and whisking. Discuss the function of common kitchen utensils. Go through your pantry, pointing out your favorite ingredients and how you like to use them.

Short list it. Don’t feel like you have to tackle long, complicated recipes. Start with simple projects, like pizza kits, threeingredient spaghetti or blender milkshakes. Most kitchen lessons can be gleaned from the simplest tasks.

“The service was professional and the technician was courteous. Job well done. I will recommend them to my family and friends.” — CUSTOMER REVIEW

Take the shortcut Moree shows her students lots of recipe shortcuts, including how to make apple turnovers from crescent roll dough, sliced apples and cinnamon sugar. Even if you’re a kitchen purist, embracing convenience foods can make the experience less stressful and more fun.

Make a moment of the mess Kids are going to make a mess in the kitchen, but don’t let that be a dealbreaker. Embrace the mess as a teachable moment. Show children how to clean up as they go.

PLUMBING & DRAINS

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e ut ‘C M

EGHAN DANIEL’S INSTAGRAM is a color lover’s dream. Warm reds, cozy pinks and bright greens dot each square, as her maximalist-inspired rooms come to life on the screen. Recently, a new room has been featured on her page. It belongs to her 5-year-old daughter, Alice. Meghan and her family moved into their new house in early 2020, and they took their time on the many repairs the house needed, including repainting all the walls. “My mom’s really creative,” Alice says. “She’s an artist, and I’m an artist. I’m really just like her.” Stepping into Alice’s room, she gives me a tour of her many stuffed animals, tucked neatly at the head of her bed. “This is my most favorite bunny,” Alice says. “I like to call her Strawberry. But her name is actually Good Dream Bunny, because she helps me to have good dreams.” When decorating Alice’s room, most of the decor plays off the color of the walls, a bright and happy yellow. “They painted my room my favorite color,” Alice says. “I love yellow and pink. Actually, I love a lot of colors.” From there, Meghan made a child’s version of the gallery walls she has hung elsewhere in her house. Polaroid pictures of Alice and her

’ s o a ch family, paintings by both Alice's and Meghan’s friends, and small framed posters cover the walls, adding fun splashes of color across the room. Alice points out one colorful framed painting in particular. “That’s a rainbow,” she says. “I painted it when I was 3.” Vintage furniture also decorates the room. One of the most eye-catching pieces is Alice’s twin-sized white metal bed frame. A wood midcentury modern nightstand fits into the funky aesthetic of the rest of the room. Meghan found a mauve crushed velvet bedspread for the bed’s finishing touch. The bed also happens to be Alice’s favorite part, and she tells me about how she absolutely loves to jump and belly flop on it.

Sometimes, the best way to decorate a kid’s room is to let them make it their own

Also decorating the room: a colorful woven rug, baskets overflowing with toys, rainbow-colored shelves, a mini pink electric guitar and even a mini drum set. Meghan says Alice usually likes to show off her drum skills when other kids are over, but not so much adults. “I don’t like to play in front of people,” Alice says. “I have stage fright.” When decorating a kid’s room, it’s better to take it easy, Meghan says. “I think just be playful with it. It’s going to be messy most of the time. That’s why she doesn’t have a set theme. It’s chaos, but it’s cute. It’s cute chaos.” Alice’s instructions are simple. “My advice is to paint it your favorite color,” Alice says.

—JULIA-CLAIRE EVANS

Thoughts on decorating from a 5-year-old “My advice is to paint your room your favorite color.” “This is my most favorite bunny. She helps me to have good dreams.”

“My mom’s an artist, and I’m an artist.”

💖

“That’s a rainbow. I painted it when I was 3.”

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Leroy Hayward III is the founder of Leroy’s Lip Smack’n Lemonade.

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #1 C OV E R S T ORY

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

Young business professional

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

How a kid-run business can make its way toward becoming a household brand WHEN LIFE GIVES you lemons, you make lemonade. And Leroy’s Lip Smack’n Lemonade has been doing so since 2012. It’s run by 14-year-old Leroy Hayward III. Along with his parents Sherilyn Hayward and Leroy Hayward Jr., Leroy came up with the brilliant idea to participate in Lemonade Day Louisiana back in 2012. The event teaches kids entrepreneurial skills by running lemonade stands. For the Haywards, it was life-changing. Ever since, Leroy’s eponymous lemonade business has prospered. His special take on lemonade is now bottled and sold in more than 10 locations across Baton Rouge, including groceries, restaurants and stands in Tiger Stadium. The Haywards are hoping to get into the local Whole Foods and a Mississippi-owned grocery store. Next: They plan to connect with businesses across the nation. “We are going to make Leroy’s Lip Smack’n Lemonade a household brand,” Sherilyn says. “We want it sold in every local store across the country. And I say ‘local’ because we love supporting local.” When the pandemic threw more challenges at businesses last year, the Haywards didn’t get discouraged. They got creative. They bought a truck, and the lemonade stand went mobile. It allowed them to keep sales contactless and safe, but it also opened doors to new opportunities and ideas, like selling smaller, individual-sized 16-ounce bottles. The dream doesn’t stop there, though. The ultimate goal for Leroy’s Lip Smack’n Lemonade is to make it to the happiest place on earth. “It belongs there in Disney World,” Sherilyn says. “It is a child business; why not be in a child’s place?” Plus, being involved with brands focused on children allows the business to do what it was made to do: inspire. The lemonade business serves more than just a refreshing drink—it’s a wake-up call that there are opportunities for everyone to thrive. Leroy has a growth hormone deficiency and hearing loss in both ears. “We want our brand to be known for what we do: helping and inspiring

special needs children like Leroy,” Sherilyn says. The Haywards’ motto is “use your difference to make a difference,” and they hope to encourage other children to not see their differences as setbacks. The lemonade business, after all, has made a difference in Leroy himself. Before, he was more reserved and did not enjoy being around people. Now, he loves interacting with customers. He knows every location his lemonade is sold from and often even rolls the lemonade into the store himself. He’s truly found his niche. “I am a champion. I’m a leader,” Leroy often says. His mom adds, “The business has helped Leroy more than it has helped anyone else. It’s gotten him out of his shell.” leroyslipsmacknlemonade.com

—CAROLINE HEBERT

More than a lemonade stand What can other kids learn from Lemonade Day Louisiana? The event that inspired Leroy III to open his business was started by John Georges and Todd Graves. They recall learning about entrepreneurship running lemonade stands as kids. According to the event’s website, kids who open a lemonade stand on Lemonade Day will learn: Financial literacy Supply and demand, plus all those other complicated key terms from college econ classes. College and career readiness Teamwork, customer service, branding, and other traits they’ll want for their resumes. Life skills Time management, leadership and goal setting—running a stand will have them thinking about their long-term futures. Academics Reading, math, writing—selling lemonade will sharpen the skills they’re practicing at school.

NO MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED A goal and some serious commitment will do.

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The right

(head)

space

Completed during the pandemic, Studyville keeps remote learning top of mind

Amanda Vincent, a marketing veteran and mom of two, launched Studyville last year.

A THORNY ALGEBRA problem that brings an eighth grader to tears. A paper on Hamlet that’s (what?) due tomorrow. A science project requiring a level of STEAM awareness that mystifies the average parent. It’s that time of year when an already stressful school calendar starts to feel, well, more stressful, because lurking around the corner? Are final exams. To help kids and teens get the most out of studying—and to save their parents some grief—it’s important to create the right setting, says Studyville founder and CEO Amanda Vincent. Vincent is a marketing veteran and the mom of a sixth and a ninth grader. She opened Studyville in Perkins Rowe August 2020. The teen-centric academic center gives young people a place to do their homework, access tutors and engage in college prep, including ACT tutoring and meetings with college counselors. Vincent worked with Ritter Maher Architects to create a study lounge that felt both fun and productive, and also nodded to spaces on a college campus. Because sprawling out on a bed or sofa, or trying to work in a high traffic area of the home, isn’t going to yield your teen success in school. A better strategy, Vincent says, is to establish a consistent, well-organized spot where nothing but studying takes place. “The most important thing you can do for your kids is to have a dedicated space for studying,” Vincent says. “That includes a desk, a chair, materials, all the supplies they’ll need and a charging station.” Having everything at the ready helps students keep up with their homework, complete projects and prepare for exams with fewer distractions. Your study nook at home might not mimic Studyville’s streamlined flash, but take inspiration from its design elements as you create—or tweak—the place where your kids crack the books. studyville.com

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

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How to create a smart study station Taking lessons from Studyville

1. Get a move on

1

Studyville’s exercise bikes with laptop trays make it possible for students to blow off steam while working. Athletes can use them to stay warm before or after practice. If Peloton’s not in the house, you can find more budget-friendly versions online. Or, replicate this idea by making sure your student takes regular breaks between sessions. Have them walk the dog, go for a run or do some online yoga.

2. Well supplied Studyville’s supplies nook is inviting and orderly. At home, keep everything your student could possibly need, including extra printer paper, ink cartridges, rulers, pens, pencils, scissors, glue and tape, within reach. If you don’t have a lot of space, place these items in a portable file box and stow them under the desk.

2

3. Group on Vincent says she tried to create an aspirational, collegiate atmosphere that reminded her of the reasons she enjoyed studying more in college than she did in high school. “I tried to think about why that was, and it had to do with being able to study with my friends,” Vincent says. There are numerous rooms and areas where small groups can work together at Studyville. At home, allow your student to host socially distanced small group sessions. Or, make sure the space is situated in the best possible manner for video chats.

3

“The most important thing you can do for your kids is to have a dedicated space for studying.” —Studyville founder and CEO Amanda Vincent

4. Recharged

4

A phone or computer that needs charging in the middle of a call or project is a big momentum crasher. Make sure this doesn’t happen at home by keeping chargers in outlets nearby. Studyville has outlets everywhere, including built into tables and hanging from ceilings.

5. Looking good Studyville is awash in warm navy blues and oranges, hanging plants, artwork, comfortable seating, smart boards and neatly arranged school supplies. You shouldn’t lose sleep aiming for Pinterest perfection, but try sprucing up your family’s study area with cubbies, trays, organizers, framed pictures or inspirational knick-knacks.

6. Breaking away

5

6

Taking a break is a great idea. Studyville supplies bottomless coffee and a teen-centric snack machine. It also includes a cubby with wall Scrabble and board games. At home, set the timer for regular breaks between sessions.

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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Don’t

say cheese The secrets to nailing that family holiday card photo shoot

P

HOTOGRAPHERS MAKE IT look easy, but there’s an art to taking great pictures of children. “With toddlers and younger kids, you really have a narrow window,” says Sasha Matthews, principle photographer and owner of Green Tangerine Photography, which she opened in Baton Rouge in 2014. “Their attention span is not going to last much longer than about 20 minutes, so you have to get creative.” Pros like Matthews draw from a basket of tricks—sometimes literally—to help children relax, stay cheerful and enjoy themselves. Matthews specializes in documenting families, often starting with pregnant women and returning to capture their children as they grow and change with each birthday. She uses stuffed animals, silly jokes, a tickle (if a child is comfortable) and other tested strategies to create organic, authentic moments that don’t feel forced. The trick, Matthews says, is not to pose her subjects, but to place them in situations where they laugh, look at each another fondly and engage in activities that trigger irreplaceable smiles.

—MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

R

AS SE

G

tips

N

SEAN GASSER

Sasha Matthews’ A SE

Snuggle up

Play around

Mission, accomplished

While it’s tempting to have toddlers hold new babies, a better idea is to have them lie on a cozy surface, Matthews says. “It can be hard to get (toddlers) to cooperate, and you have the consideration of the baby’s safety,” Matthews says. In this shot, joining his baby sister on the blanket helped the older brother relax.

Turn posing into playtime. When this child was tired of taking pictures, his moms began gently swinging him. “Families don’t always have to be posed and formal,” Matthews says.

One of Matthews’ favorite ploys with distracted kids is to give them a job. “I tell them to go pick a flower for Mommy, or bring me a nice rock,” says Matthews, who often shoots outdoors. For this shot, Burden Museum & Gardens was the backdrop. “It makes them feel important, and you get a really sweet reaction from both child and Mom.”

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Issue Date: March 2021 Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

C OV E R S T ORY

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Take a walk A family with a larger number of kids like this one might find that the best move is to actually move. Walking slowly toward the camera takes away stiffness. “Kids think it’s a race,” Matthews says. “And it’s hard to frown when you’re moving.”

ARE HARMFUL PARTICULATES & CHEMICALS IN THE AIR IN YOUR HOME? Air inside your home may be more polluted than outside air. A whole house polarized media air cleaner will capture pollutants much smaller than those captured by the most common standard furnace filter.

Prop it up When it’s clear a toddler has had enough, Matthews pulls out a secret weapon. “Sometimes when babies aren’t having a great session, doing something familiar usually calms them,” Matthews says. “In this case, a bath did just the trick.” Matthews keeps props like this portable vintage-style bathtub in her studio. For this photo, she filled it with warm water and rubber duckies. “It’s a good technique when you’ve tried everything,” she says.

The command to look at the photographer and say “cheese” has been ingrained since cameras were invented, but sometimes it’s looking away from the camera that yields better results. “Here, no one is looking at me,” Matthews says. “They’re engaging with each other, and you can see the closeness.” Moreover, the parents are on ground level with their kids. “That also helps children feel comfortable,” Matthews adds.

PHOTOS COURTESY GREEN TANGERINE PHOTOGRAPHY

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SURVIVAL GUIDE

PARENTING IN A PANDEMIC Tips and resources to help you navigate the challenges of pandemic life, including how to stay healthy, how to enjoy learning and working from home, and how to safely have fun as a family!

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Everything your growing child needs is close to home. You’re never far from the care your child needs at Ochsner. We offer general pediatrics plus specialty providers across the Baton Rouge region to help your family face anything, minor or major. Ochsner Health Center – Zachary

Ochsner Medical Complex – The Grove (Baton Rouge)

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Schedule an appointment today! Visit Ochsner.org/BatonRouge or call 225-240-4604.

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Dr. Truc Dinh

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s

y! e

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BEST SUMMER EVER

SUMMER AT THE DOJO:

THEY HAVE FUN — YOU SEE RESULTS

B

y now, we all recognize that technology is an imperative future industry. Children today not only utilize the tools we grownups use every day, but they are creating their own games, content, websites, movies and more. This summer, why not transform your child’s love for technology into an exciting learning adventure?

WE WANT OUR KIDS TO BE SOCIAL, BUT SCREEN TIME AT HOME IS A SOLITARY EXERCISE.

Code Ninjas® is a place where gaming is celebrated as kids gain confidence along with problem solving, critical thinking and STEM skills. The world’s largest and fastest-growing kids coding franchise, Code Ninjas has hundreds of locations in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. At the Baton Rouge Siegen Lane location, kids learn to code, build their own video games and much more. They gain problem solving, critical thinking and STEM skills in a fun, safe and inspiring space. Don’t worry, the Code Ninjas keep a tight reign on COVID safety protocol in their bright, open and totally collaborative “dojo” facility. Guided by a tested curriculum and team of Code Senseis, Code Ninjas campers are empowered to gain valuable tech skills and make new friends. The dojo hosts regular parents’ nights out and camps all year round, so this summer, reserve the camps they’ll really love!

YEAR - ROUND FUN AND LEARNING FOR AGES 5 - 14 AND BEYOND.

• Code Ninjas JR builds a foundation of coding and problem-solving skills for ages 5-7 through a fun and completely visual curriculum—no reading required! This world-class program combines storytelling and game building with hands-on projects for an immersive education experience. • In Code Ninjas CREATE, kids age 7-14 have a blast building awesome video games and developing Ninja coding skills on the path from white to black belt. This fun program lets kids learn to code year-round at their own pace! Drop-in at your SUMMER CAMPS NOW BOOK A 30 MIN GAME convenience during weeknight and weekend POSTED! SIGN UP HERE hours. BUILDING SESSION & TOUR

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MAY 24 - 28 MAY 31 JUNE 4

• 9 am-12 pm: Storytelling and Moviemaking in Minecraft ® • 12:30-3:30 pm: Designing Modifications with Minecraft ® • 9 am-12 pm: Code Your Own Arcade from ScratchJr • 12:30-3:30 pm: Storytelling with Scratch

JUNE 7 - 11

• 9 am-12 pm: Potential UNLOCKED: Become a Roblox Developer • 12:30-3:30 pm: Hackers Wanted: Uncover the Code in Roblox

JUNE 14 - 18

• 9 am-12 pm: Code Your Own Arcade from Scratch • 12:30-3:30 pm: MakeCode Arcade with Meowbit

JUNE 21 - 25

• 9 am-12 pm: Stop Motion Animation • 12:30-3:30 pm: Building the Beat: A Music Coding Camp

JUNE 28 JULY 2 JULY 5-9

• 9 am-12 pm: Become a YouTuber • 12:30-3:30 pm: DIY Website: Build Your Own Fan Page • 9 am-12 pm: Code Your Own Arcade from Scratch • 12:30-3:30 pm: Mini Makers with Microcontrollers

JULY 12 - 16

• 9 am-12 pm: Adventures in 3D Printing • 12:30-3:30 pm: A Bit of micro:bit Magic

JULY 19 - 23

• 9 am-12 pm: Stop Motion Animation • 12:30-3:30 pm: Building the Beat: A Music Coding Camp

JULY 26 - 30

• 9 am-12 pm: Become a YouTuber • 12:30-3:30 pm: DIY Website: Build Your Own Fan Page

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #2

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Celebrations are essential! COOKIES AND CAKES FROM SCRATCH BIRTHDAY PARTIES | SHOWERS | PRIVATE EVENTS 3753 PERKINS ROAD, SUITE D | BATON ROUGE, LA 70808 225-456-5002 | COUNTERSPACEBR.COM |

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Let us make it simple for you to work from home!

OFFICE FURNITURE WORLD, INC. Locally owned and operated for over 30 years “Affordable, Quality Office Furniture and Unmatched Service”

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BIG DREAMS, GROWING BODIES:

SUPPORT YOUR ATHLETE - IN - TRAINING

Y

oung athletes are not just small adults. They are still growing and developing their coordination. Because they are often training only for their specific sport, they may not know how to properly recognize injuries. Add to that their drive and determination—trying to meet coaches’ and parents’ expectations as well as their own—they often ignore a twinge or pain, assuming they’re just sore from their training. Often, parents, coaches, and administrators try to build experience in kids, and because of this extraordinary push to make professionals out of our young, growing athletes, kids are wearing their bodies out, causing injuries that will affect them for a lifetime and ending their careers prematurely. Ensure they have the proper strength, endurance, balance, coordination, and mobility for their sport by working with specialists in strength and conditioning and even prehabilitation. Prevent injuries with regular check-ins, a proactive way to support your child in their athletic and physical growth, especially when transitioning to a new or higher-level sport, at the beginning and end of the season, and after a growth spurt or puberty, as well as after any injury, surgery, or extended illness.

50-75 Parenting Pandemic Section.indd 55

The Children’s Hospital Youth Sports Medicine program offers comprehensive care for young athletes with sports-related injuries or other issues. Located on the Baton Rouge General campus right off Bluebonnet, the clinic is staffed by pediatricians and pediatric orthopedic specialists who are knowledgeable of the unique needs of children. Dr. Tony Gonzales specializes in Pediatric Orthopedics at Children’s Hospital. Dr. Gonzales has more than 15 years of experience, is certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgeons and serves as the Department Head of Pediatric Orthopedics at Children’s Hospital. He says, “I enjoy helping young people get through difficult situations in their childhood and adolescence.” Dr. Gonzales sees patients in New Orleans, Covington and Baton Rouge. Patients have access to the full array of orthopedic services offered through Children’s Hospital. In addition, outpatient services, emergency care, surgery, and other inpatient services and procedures are also offered as needed. Children’s Hospital also has a comprehensive Rehabilitation Unit, a Spinal Unit, physical and occupational therapies, and on-site X-ray, CAT scan, and MRI services if you should need them.

LISTEN TO THE PEDIATRIC ORTHOPEDIST: Dr. Gonzales shares some important considerations to keep young athletes fit

1

Not all people have the genetic make-up to be a professional athlete, and allowing children to take a few months off is not going to make or break their chances at success. Almost all of the sports injuries we see are in the second year of continuous sports, or after prolonged pain in one of the child’s extremities.

2

Current recommendations are that athletes play one sport at a time, one team at a time, and for only nine months out of the year. As a pediatric orthopedist, Dr. Gonzales often reminds parents that they would be hard pressed to find a sport that does not allow professional athletes to take time off. “If the pros get a break, then so should your young athlete.”

3

Pediatric injuries, namely, pediatric sports injuries, have increased tremendously over the past 15-20 years. All those hours of sports can lead to stress, injury and significant burnout. Parents should keep injury prevention in mind.

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OPENING APRIL 1

ST

in Baton Rouge visit us at bluezoo.us

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Our students don’t just build, they engineer Seats are still available for the 2021–22 school year! » Learn more at BASISBRMidCity.org 7921 Florida Boulevard Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (225) 308 7450 Grades K–5 21BRMC040

Our Future Is Healthier with

Lacey Clark, D.O. Pediatrician

Lane Pediatrics is here to help you with the most important job in life – raising your children. At Lane Pediatrics, our team is experienced in caring for newborns, toddlers, children and teens. From wellness checks and immunizations, to diagnosing and treating childhood illnesses including the sudden onset of viral or bacterial infections, we provide high quality care your children need and deserve. You can trust Lane Pediatrics to make their future healthier!

Same Day Appointments Available! Call 225-658-4070

“It is a privilege to care for your children. We value the trust you place in us and look forward to getting to know your family.”

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Allergies? We got -choo! Our team can determine if your symptoms are due to allergies, COVID-19 or a sinus infection and provide the appropriate treatment to help you “Feel Better. Faster!”

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LakeUrgentCare.com

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MAKING

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FRIENDS

Summer Day Camp Register NOW @ kidcamcamps.com Contact info: kidcambr@gmail.com

4 Locations in Baton Rouge Hours: 7am - 6pm

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IS YOUR BACK YARD LIVING UP TO ITS FULL POTENTIAL?

P

laying outside with friends and family is what makes summer fun. There’s a big difference between simply furnishing a patio and actually creating an outdoor living space. Let your back yard live up to its full potential. A great outdoor living area should provide a level of comfort and functionality like the living spaces inside your home. Just think of it—your outdoor living room—a comfortable and practical space designed especially for the way your family lives. Because this home improvement project has the potential to increase the value of your home, the task of designing your outdoor entertaining space should be trusted to a professional. They will be able to design something that is mindful of your family’s needs and could potentially increase your property value.

Pinnacle Exterior Construction is a locally owned and operated company providing residential and commercial construction services for southeast Louisiana. Its team of experts can design and build every aspect of your dream backyard from start to finish: custom pools, fences, decks, pavilions, outdoor living/ kitchen spaces, bulkheads, retaining walls, and much more. When it comes to building your dream home, Pinnacle is a one-stop shop.. Call Pinnacle Exterior Construction today at 225.757.6138 for a complimentary consultation and take the first step to the best summer ever. Follow on social media for more inspiration @pecbuilt on Facebook or @pinnacleconstruction on Instagram.

DREAM IT BUILD IT LOVE IT TAKE A DIP A well-designed pool area can create a resort-like oasis right in your back yard like Pinnacle’s massive pool renovation pictured here. Everyone loves the added tanning ledge and spa, also handy for younger children. You can’t help but notice the pavers and all the flatwork, both beautiful and functional. Pinnacle also designed the three tiers with waterfall and stepping pads. Very fun and absolutely stunning!

50-75 Parenting Pandemic Section.indd 59

MAKE IT FUNCTIONAL

KEEP IT COOL

If you love to entertain, an outdoor kitchen is high on the list for a great patio. Blur the line between the outside and the inside with a well-planned design tailored to the way you cook.

While spending time outdoors feels great, too much sun can ruin the fun. Plan shaded areas both in seated areas and around water features. Pinnacle designs and builds custom pergolas and pavilions that not only provide shelter, but also help to separate zones in the outdoor space.

Here, Pinnacle renovated the entire back yard with a midcentury modern pavilion with custom fireplace, beautiful outdoor living space, wood-fired pizza oven, and bar seating. Pinnacle also added the tiered landscape and lighting in this stunner.

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MEET THE NEW KID ON THE BLOCK... The Boys & Girls Club of Greater Baton Rouge and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeast Louisiana have merged to create the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Louisiana with the goal of tripling enrollment and capacity in the next 5 years to serve nearly 20,000 families across 9 parishes. BGCMETROLOUISIANA.ORG

STRONGER TOGETHER.

#PARADEGBR paradegbr.fun

BGCMLA-225Ad.indd 1 50-75 Parenting Pandemic Section.indd 60

APRIL 24 - 25, 2021 & MAY 1 - 2, 2021 1 - 5 PM This year’s Parade of Homes general admission ticket proceeds will be donated to the Boys & Girls Clubs!

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A NEW DAY FOR BATON ROUGE SCHOOLS: 100 DAYS CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

T

he East Baton Rouge Parish School System has a new Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Sito Narcisse. Dr. Narcisse is a man with a plan, hitting the ground running, working remotely his first week on the job before moving his family to Baton Rouge in January. He comes to EBRP from his last station as the Chief of Secondary Schools of District of Columbia Public Schools. Dr. Narcisse has been a teacher, a principal— opening a high school in the Pittsburgh Public Schools and leading turnaround efforts in a Boston Public High School—a Director of School Performance and Acting Chief School Improvement Officer for Montgomery County Public Schools (MD), and an Associate Superintendent overseeing school improvement efforts for 74 schools in Prince George’s County Public Schools (MD). Dr. Narcisse most recently served as the Chief of Schools for the Metro Nashville Public Schools (TN) supervising and supporting 167 schools in the city of Nashville. The son of Haitian immigrants, Dr. Narcisse’s family moved to Long Island, NY, in pursuit of a better life. He learned to navigate both the social and academic obstacles that confront millions of students today. His success as a student led him to enroll at Kennesaw State University in Georgia where he graduated with a degree in French and pursued a Master’s Degree from

Vanderbilt University in Secondary Education. Doctoral studies led him to the University of Pittsburgh where he earned a Doctorate in Educational Administration and Policy Studies and Leadership from the University of Pittsburgh. “In order for East Baton Rouge Parish to be a successful school system, it is important that the school board and I establish a positive, trusting, and collaborative working relationship,” Narcisse says.

“This relationship will be fostered and strengthened through my first hundred days, working with the board to discuss issues of governance, management, core values, and beliefs as well as consider what challenges we face.” Knowing its importance, Narcisse has set himself about a rigorous plan to establish public trust by engaging the community in a series of extensive listening sessions to cultivate and build lasting relationships by seeking all stakeholders’ perspectives. Narcisse has a clear vision and a process already taking action to facilitate the creation of key performance indicators to confirm and drive the school system’s efforts to improve student learning, address operational efficiencies, and improve equitable access for historically underserved children, families, and communities. Through a collaborative effort, the district can improve school and organizational culture, strengthen instruction, and accelerate the learning for all children in the school district, especially those who have been historically underserved. “The goal is to work with the community to understand the culture, history, and diversity of the schools and communities. I will be proactive and deliberate in reaching out to stakeholders traditionally underrepresented in public education to make certain their voices are heard and valued.”

CHANGE STARTS HERE The East Baton Rouge Parish School system has a clear vision and goals for Dr. Narcisse’s first hundred days: • Collaborating with the EBRP School Board to build a trusting, productive,team-oriented relationship and establish effective governance within the district. • He is meeting with school system stakeholders in a series of forums to understand the perspectives and viewpoints of various coalitions and individuals relative to their support of/for EBR’s children and families. Stakeholders include school district staff, teachers, support staff, school leaders and central office staff as

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well as community partners including, from the business community, university partners, parents, and the faith community. • Create EBR Roundtables for students, school leaders, and teachers to listen to their assessments of the school system’s plans and responses in handling the coronavirus, particularly the challenges and the successes relative to virtual/distance instruction, social-emotional learning, self-care of/for/by

• Meet with department supervisors and current executive staff to discuss current work and structures needed to begin addressing specific challenges. • Increase the school district’s organizational capacity, efficiency and effectiveness by examining the alignment of mission and vision; the strategic, technology, and capital plans; budget priorities; curriculum and instruction; expenditure of federal funds; and student achievement.

health.

Read more about Dr. Narcisse’s entry plan at ebrschools.org.

adults in schools, instructional equity, and collaborations with local departments of

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CREATIVE SCIENCES AND ARTS MAGNET PROGRAMS Park Forest Elementary

Park Forest Middle

Park Forest Elementary has a STEAM Themed Magnet Program that offers an innovative SMARTLab where students can explore robotics, software engineering, mechanics and structures, circuitry, scientific data and analysis, alternative energy, computer graphics, and digital media arts. Park Forest Elementary also has a state of the art recording studio where students learn to produce various forms of media as a product of their comprehension of STEAM integrated content.

Park Forest Middle offers a variety of STEAM integrated classes such as animation, coding, digital media, engineering design, renewable energy and robotics. Park Forest Middle recently integrated aviation into their curriculum offering an aviation simulator on site. In aviation courses, students learn the basics of flight, laws of nature, and necessities for unmanned and manned aerial vehicles in air and space.

Villa del Rey Elementary Villa del Ray Elementary has an innovative kindergartenfifth grade STREAM program that integrates Science, Technology, Reading, Engineering, Arts and Math in all areas of the curriculum. It also features a SmartLab which allows students in all grades to engage in Digital Communications, Mechanics & Structures, Robotics & Control Technology, Scientific Data & Analysis, Software Engineering, 3D Printing and Sustainability. Villa del Rey has also partnered with Sweet Jones Farms & the Generational Growers Coalition to create a school farm where students gain knowledge about agriculture through the integrated STREAM theme.

Belaire High School Belaire High School provides a rigorous academic curriculum in a highly structured learning environment. The areas of study are innovative and driven by the booming Science and Arts Industry. Belaire has a professional recording studio where students learn about media production and the structures of the music, film and video game industries. These hands-on experiences allow students to explore how the use of manufactured components are used to enhance or make possible any sort of entertainment experience.

APPLY NOW! www.ebrmsap.org | 225.922.5460

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Parenting Pandemic Phase ThRee

For answers on how to safely return to some of your favorite activities, look for our blogs in the upcoming 225 Daily emails or visit BRGeneral.org!

The Return of Summer Camp

Vaccinate Yourself for Your Family

How to Safely Host a Kids’ Birthday Celebration

What does your Family Vacation look like this Summer?

Mid City | BlueBonnet | AsCension

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #2

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FOR 7 TH G R A D E G I R L S A ND P A R E NT S

THINK!

WE CAN’T WAIT TO MEET YOU!

DON’T DRINK

An alcohol, drug abuse and violence prevention program

(225) 226-2273 | icare.ebrschools.org |

#DON’TDRINK

icareebr

TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 2021 STOP UNDERAGE DRINKING

*Drinking alcohol during the teen years can affect your child’s growth and development

DRIVE THRU DRIVE THRU DRIVE THRU DRIVE THRU

Socially distanced tours offered between 3:30 and 6 p.m. Tour campus with Student Ambassadors. Visit with teachers and administrators. Learn all about what makes the Academy so special. Please note that you must register for a specific tour time. Reserve your time at visitsja.org. Questions? Our Admissions Team is ready to help. admissions@sjabr.org or (225) 388-2243

6TH ANNUAL TOUCH A TRUCK BREC STATE FAIRGROUNDS

1991 • 1996 • 2002 • 2016

Founded in 1868 by the Sisters of St. Joseph. St. Joseph’s Academy has a non-discriminatory admissions policy. 3015 Broussard Street Baton Rouge, LA 70808 (225) 383-7207 | www.sjabr.org

225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #2

Issue Date: April Ad2 proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

Sushi Burrito - Poke - Ramen

Enjoy fresh and delicious food in our fun dining atmosphere! With a variety of menu items, FinBomb has something for everyone! (TAKE-OUT & DELIVERY OPTIONS ALSO AVAILABLE)

VEGAN BURRITO

POKE BAKE

HAWAIIN BOWL

CO NTEMP O R AR Y J AP AN E S E & HAW A IIA N F U S IO N C U IS INE

LOCATED AT ARLINGTON MARKETPLACE

Kids’ Camp Registration Now Open for ages 7-14

660 ARLINGTON CREEK CENTRE BLVD, SUITE 4F 225.663.2128 | @FINBOMBSUSHIBR

Register at Arworkshop.com/batonrouge

DOWNLOAD OUR APP TODAY!

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18303 Perkins Rd E Suite 406 | 225-663-7997 |

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A WELCOME SIGHT OF SUNSHINE & BLOOMING FLOWERS, UNFORTUNATELY FOR SOME OF US THIS MEANS THE DREADED ALLERGY SEASON IS UPON US.

ASK THE EXPERT HOW DO WE KEEP FROM FEELING MISERABLE DURING SUCH A BEAUTIFUL TIME OF YEAR? IS IT ALLERGIES OR COVID-19? This year many people have a hard time determining if their symptoms are allergy related or COVID-19 related. For most people runny noses are associated with seasonal allergies. If your runny nose or sneeze is accompanied by another symptom such as cough, sore throat, loss of taste/smell, shortness of breath, fever, etc., you should see your primary care physician to get appropriately evaluated.

FOR MILDER CASES, there are several over-the-counter medications targeted toward allergy relief known as antihistamines, which are available at your local pharmacy in various forms such as pills, chewable tablets, and even nasal spray formulations. Itchy watery eyes can be treated with prescription antihistamine eye drops. If you have not tried allergy medications in the past, discuss the appropriate dosing with your physician before administering any medications.

FOR MORE SEVERE CASES, a referral to an allergist may be beneficial in

order to pinpoint the cause. Knowing what triggers your allergies is the key to preventing them, as avoidance is the best treatment. An allergist may recommend immunotherapy or allergy shots for severe allergy patients. Immunotherapy is an extended treatment that is somewhat slow to work, but over time helps 80% to 90% of recipients. If you are unsure of your symptoms or they worsen, contact your physician today to set up an evaluation.

MAIN CLINIC: PERKINS l BATON ROUGE, 70808 ROAD l BATON ROUGE, LA 70808 PLEASE CALL (225)7373 246-9240 TOROAD MAIN CLINIC: 7373LAPERKINS 769-4044 TODAY l BATONROUGECLINIC.COM SCHEDULE AN(225) APPOINTMENT (225) 769-4044 l BATONROUGECLINIC.COM 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER •SPECIAL ANY TYPOSADVERTISING SECTION This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ONE BOOK ONE COMMUNITY Join us this spring as we celebrate The Yellow House by Sarah M. Broom, a National Book Award-winning memoir named one of the 10 Best Books of the Year by the New York Times. We’ve planned a variety of FREE virtual and in-person programs & events beginning in March, through mid-May, including book discussions, genealogy classes, crafts and more!

CHECK OUT WHAT’S COMING UP Sa ra h M . Br oo m

DIY ORAL HISTORY WORKSHOP 3 p.m. Sunday, April 11, Main Library at Goodwood

For a detailed schedule, visit the Events Calendar at ebrpl.com For more information about the One Book One Community selection and program, go online to the InfoGuide at ReadOneBook.org.

THE YELLOW HOUSE VIRTUAL BOOK DISCUSSION WITH DR. ROBYN MERRICK Noon Friday, April 16, Main Library at Goodwood

HEALING WORDS: TELLING STORIES AND POEMS TO FIND PURPOSE AGAIN IN THE YEARS AFTER KATRINA 3 p.m. Sunday, April 25, Main Library at Goodwood

AUTHOR EVENT WITH SARAH M. BROOM & MARGARET WILKERSON SEXTON Time TBA, Saturday, May 15, Main Library at Goodwood

14 Branches Open Conveniently 7 Days a Week Available 24/7 Online

7711 Goodwood Blvd. • ebrpl.com • 225.231.3750 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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STRESS LESS WITH THESE RESOURCES LEARNING

BASIS BATON ROUGE PRIMARY – MATERRA CAMPUS 7550 McCall Dr. 225.308.7450 Basised.com/baton-rouge We provide a tuition-free, world-class education to students in grades K-12. As a part of the BASIS Charter Schools network, this school (and its Mid City campus) offers a STEM-infused liberal arts curriculum, a co-teaching model for the primary grades, and a wellbalanced variety of courses, all of which inspire creativity and subject mastery. Our expert teachers lead classes with enthusiasm and intellect, preparing students for a lifetime of learning and achievement.

BASIS BATON ROUGE PRIMARY – MID CITY CAMPUS 7921 Florida Blvd. 225.308.7450 Basised.com/baton-rouge-mid-city We provide a tuition-free, world-class education to students in grades K-5. As a part of the BASIS Charter Schools network, this school (and its Materra campus) offers a STEM-infused liberal arts curriculum, a co-teaching model for the primary grades, and a wellbalanced variety of courses, all of which inspire creativity and subject mastery. Our expert teachers lead classes with enthusiasm and intellect, preparing students for a lifetime of learning and achievement.

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EBR PARISH SCHOOLS 1050 S. Foster Dr. 225.922.5400 Ebrschools.org

EBR PARISH MAGNET PROGRAMS P.O. Box 2950, 1050 S. Foster Dr. 225.922.5443 Ebrmagnet.org

The EBR Parish School System, in partnership with our community, educates all students to their maximum potential in a caring, rigorous and safe environment. ONE TEAM. ONE MISSION.

The program offers a challenging interdisciplinary curriculum for high achieving students in grades K-12, offering advanced study such as dual enrollment for college credit, extended day services (elementary), expanded elective courses, STEAM -based and college readiness courses.

EXPERIENCES BY THE NUMBERS: The EBRP School System has offered a hybrid learning model to its 35,000 students in the past year. About one-third of them continue to learn “virtually” at home.

BARN HILL PRESERVE

11342 LA-955, Ethel, LA 225.286.3003 Barnhillpreserve.wixsite.com/ barnhillpreserve Barn Hill Preserve has a goal to educate guests about exotic animals through hands-on experiences. In addition to on-site animal experiences, we deliver educational programs to elementary schools across the Gulf Coast.

BREC

6201 Florida Blvd. 225.272.9200 Brec.org More than 180 parks and a unique mix of facilities—a state-of-the-art observatory, swamp nature center, equestrian park, zoo, performing arts theatre, arboretum, botanical garden, water park, extreme sports park, golf courses and much more.

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LIVE AND LEARN:

CODE NINJAS 8657 Siegen Lane 225.427.0701 Codeninjas.com

STEM education opportunities for children age 5-15. Camps include old favorites like Modding Minecraft and new offerings that teach kids how to create shareable STEM content.

A day at the museum is a great way to break the monotony of these pandemic times. Among the Louisiana Art & Science Museum’s many exhibits is that of the Ancient Egypt Gallery, which houses a mummy from the Ptolemaic Period (323 BC to 30 BC).

LOUISIANA ART & SCIENCE MUSEUM 100 River Road South 225.344.5272 Lasm.org

We seek to enhance the understanding and appreciation of art and science for general audiences and students by presenting unique, educational and entertaining experiences that encourage discovery, inspire creativity, and foster the pursuit of knowledge.

EBR PARISH MAIN LIBRARY 7711 Goodwood Blvd. 225.231.3750 Ebrpl.com

RED STICK REFINEMENT 443 Cornell Ave. 225.921.7235 Redstickrefinement.com

All you need is your Library card, an all-access pass for all ages that will get you FREE use of online databases, print books and magazines, e-books and online magazines, audiobooks, CDs, DVDs and BluRay, streaming movies, online homework help, genealogy research, children’s storytimes, meeting rooms, FREE computer classes, and more!

Red Stick Refinement is a local business that teaches etiquette to children, teens and adults. Group and private lessons are available, as well as events.

KNOCK KNOCK CHILDREN’S MUSEUM KIDCAM SUMMER CAMP

1900 Dalrymple Dr. 225.388.3090 Knockknockmuseum.org

All summer, all fun! Join Kidcam camps this summer, making memories and friendships. Hours 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. For children entering Kindergarten to age 13 (one site with preschool).

Knock Knock Children’s Museum is a nonprofit organization committed to providing an inclusive gathering place where families and children of all backgrounds and experiences can interact and learn through play. Knock Knock’s focus is on the development of the whole child.

Multiple locations 225.485.6633 Kidcamcamps.com

STUDYVILLE

10156 Perkins Rowe, Suite 170 225.408.4553 Studyville.com Summer at Studyville is going to be incredible. From coding and robotics to photography and video editing, your student will have fun learning all summer long!

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HOME OFFICE FURNITURE WORLD

CHANGE OF SCENERY:

12944 Coursey Blvd. 225.751.4024 Ofwbr.com

Fresh air and sunshine can boost your mental health, so plan an outdoor activity the whole family can enjoy.

Chairs, desks, bookcases and other items for your home office or school station. Delivery available.

PINNACLE EXTERIOR CONSTRUCTION 13825 Jefferson Hwy. 225.757.6138 Pecbuilt.com

UPTOWN CLIMBING 10505 Coursey Blvd. 225.831.1117 Uptownclimbing.com

Take your kids from cooped up to Climb Up. Burn energy, build confidence, problem solve, conquer fears, and develop focus. Rock climbing is awesome.

VALUZZO COMPANIES 8710 Jefferson Hwy. 225.408.4008 Valluzzocompanies.com

We’re proud to continue serving our Baton Rouge community during this time. We look forward to sitting down at a table over golden fries soon.

You don’t need to leave the house to build memories with your family. Let us build you the back yard of your dreams—pools, fences, outdoor kitchens, and more!

HEALTH

=

BATON ROUGE CLINIC USS KIDD VETERANS MUSEUM 305 S. River Road 225.342.1942 Usskidd.com

This ship is the centerpiece of a memorial that honors the men and women of our American armed forces. Through the exhibits, visitors can step back in time and learn about their sacrifices for the freedoms we enjoy today.

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YMCA OF THE CAPITAL AREA 350 S. Foster Dr. 225.923.0653 ymcabr.org

The YMCA of the Capital Area focuses on youth development, healthy living and social responsibility.

6955 Perkins Road 225.246.9290 Batonrougeclinic.org

From everyday healthcare needs to highly specialized medical services, you can trust The Baton Rouge Clinic to provide clinical excellence and compassionate care for your entire family. After all, we have been here for more than 70 years—caring for generations.

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BATON ROUGE ORTHOPAEDIC CLINIC 8080 Bluebonnet Blvd. 225.924.2424 Brortho.com

The Pediatric Center at BROC (Baton Rouge Orthopaedic Clinic) is pleased to serve patients at both our main clinic on Bluebonnet and our clinic at Our Lady of the Lake Children’s Hospital.

I CARE PROGRAM

12000 Goodwood Blvd. 225.226.2273 ebrschools.org (search ICare) The I CARE Program equips students for a healthy, safe and drug-free future, and provides prevention education in the areas of alcohol, tobacco, other drugs, violence, crisis response and management.

LAKE AFTER HOURS KIDS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF NEW ORLEANS SPECIALTY CLINIC 9001 Summa Ave., Suite 342 225.424.6367 Chnola.org

Our new clinic features 24 exam rooms, two treatment rooms and a dedicated room for echocardiograms. The expanded clinic will allow for increased capacity, expanded provider coverage for pediatric subspecialties, and the addition of mental and behavioral health services.

12525 Perkins Road 225.765.5437 Lakeurgentcare.com

We’re focused on making urgent care easy for you. With paperless check-in, you can now register and fill out your paperwork online from home or your mobile device. That means little or no wait when you arrive.

OCHSNER MEDICAL COMPLEX – THE GROVE 10310 The Grove Blvd. 225.761.5200 Ochsner.org

OMC-The Grove represents the latest in healthcare innovation. This facility is conveniently located off the I-10 E. Service Road between the Mall of Louisiana and Siegen exits.

OUR LADY OF THE LAKE 5000 Hennessy Blvd. 225.765.6565 Ololrmc.com

At Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, you can expect safe screenings upon entry, socially distanced waiting areas, e-check in, rapid test results, masks and daily deep cleaning. This, plus many other examples, are how we continue to serve our communities with excellent healthcare.

LET’S FACE IT:

HOLISTIC BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES

2156 Wooddale Blvd., Suite 750 225.930.8058 Holisticbh.org Holistic offers therapeutic counseling services to individuals and families that will promote social well-being, success and mental perseverance.

Coronavirus spreads easily, so wearing a mask is step number one in staying safe. Steps 2 and 3 are to wash your hands frequently and practice social distancing when you are with a group of people.

WOMAN’S HOSPITAL 100 Woman’s Way 225.927.1300 Womans.org

From birth to mammography, from cancer care to surgery, we want to be your resource for exceptional care. You’ve chosen a hospital that specializes in the care of women and babies and is equipped to handle the expected as well as the unexpected.

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• Additional r

Carefully che

Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #6

This ad design

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER •SPECIAL ANY TYPOSADVERTISING SECTION This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

We’re on a LOVE mission.

AT OUR CORE, our business is based on love. We embrace the belief that when we love ourselves, we are able to love the world around us. It’s with love that we have the ability to enhance the vitality of every person we touch. With love at the center of our culture, we live out our cause to have a positive impact and to provide transformational experiences to our guests. We are a female founded, family-owned business. Our fearless leader, Debra Neill Baker guides our company with the intention to expose, evoke and evolve our thinking. She’s a woman who lovingly challenges our team and shares her wisdom with us so we are able to reach our full potential. Debra is a huge believer in self-love and personal care. She gives us the freedom to slow down and take care of ourselves. It’s so important to her that we give attention to our personal growth. And as a mother, she’s instilled these qualities in her two children, who are also actively working in the family business.

WANT TO EXPERIENCE SELF-LOVE AND CARE? HERE ARE A FEW OF OUR CLIENT FAVORITES. AVEDA SHINE TREATMENT BLOWOUT: Gives your hair instant shine using an all-vegan formula of plant derived oils that leave your hair visibly shiny and healthy. HYDRAFACIAL: a non-invasive way to chemically and mechanically exfoliate the skin. It extracts your pores and infuses while hydrating with no down time. AVEDA BOTANICAL HAIR REPAIR TREATMENT: repairs your hair from the inside out. This service will instantly strengthen and create new hair bonds. Your hair is visibly revived, shinier-naturally full of life.

HERE’S WHAT MOTHERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT SELF-LOVE & MENTAL HEALTH:

“ “

As a mother, I am the center of my family and when I am not taking the time I need for myself and my well-being, it affects my entire family’s well-being. Allowing myself to get a HydraFacial or have my roots touched up makes me feel beautiful, and I need that.” Jenny Being a mother is a full-time job in itself. It can be a very selfless job, teaching them to love, learn, and grow. When you give so much to something, sometimes you forget to give to yourself. That’s why it’s important to take moments to treat yourself. A little recharge. Whether it’s getting a fresh color and haircut, or a day at the spa. Paris Parker can help make you feel whole again.” Sasha

Getting my hair colored helped my mental health by helping me look my best (or as close to it as you can get) when I was otherwise exhausted after the birth of my second child.” Amy

TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT AT ANY OF OUR PARIS PARKER LOCATIONS, CALL OR TEXT 877-878-4438. YOU MAY ALSO BOOK ONLINE AT PARISPARKER.COM 74 

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• Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

SPONSORED CONTENT

SURVIVAL GUIDE TIPS

SPONSORED BY:

VALLUZZO COMPANIES MCDONALD’S: COMMITTED TO BEING AMERICA’S BEST FIRST JOB

H

ow old were you when you got your first job? When you bought something you wanted with money you earned? Working hard is a skill that translates over to schoolwork and into adulthood. Having a summer job at McDonald’s can teach your child work ethic, time management, patience, and teamwork in the workplace – all while developing key skills applicable throughout all areas of life. Working in fast food may not be a teen’s first choice, but the benefits may make it worth considering. With the cost of college at an all-time high, a scholarship or tuition reimbursement is a huge perk. Valluzzo Companies McDonald’s offer many scholarship opportunities in addition to world-class training that engenders confidence and fosters valuable skills to help employees thrive wherever they are on their journey, whether they stay at McDonald’s, further their education, or springboard into a different career. Find out more about opportunities on social media @ValluzzoCompanies. Kaitlyn Roy grew up with her father, John Roy (now VP of Operations at Valluzzo Companies) working in management roles at the local McDonald’s. She knew of the great opportunities with the company and when it came time for her to find part time work in town, she turned to the golden arches for a flexible working experience. She has been working at McDonald’s for over two years through High School and now during her time at LSU. She has enjoyed learning to train crew members and especially enjoys the challenge of fulfilling orders in the drive-thru in a timely manner. Her work schedule adjusts around her school schedule and allows her to make both school and work a priority. Kaitlyn is utilizing the Archways to Opportunity benefit as she attends LSU . She says that this global pandemic has inspired her to want to go into a career where she can help people.

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SKILLS TO GROW ON: A part-time job like McDonald’s exposes teenagers to elements like punctuality, attire, management structures, performance feedback and reviews, filling out tax withholding forms, understanding paycheck deductions, appropriate conversation topics, and more. THE VALUE OF A JOB WELL DONE: Teens need jobs in a safe and low-risk environment with managers who are used to training and overseeing that age demographic. McDonald’s has always been a people business, and fostering a safe, inclusive and respectful workplace is a paramount value. Valluzzo Companies continue to prioritize safety, provide opportunity, nurture talent, develop leaders and reward achievement.

COLLEGE ASSISTANCE: Whether you plan to pay for your child’s college education, or not, there are a ton of expenses associated with going to college and living on their own for the first time. Candidates of all ages are encouraged to focus on their education with flexible scheduling, and after 90 days, students can qualify for up to $3,000 tuition assistance. Additionally, Valluzzo Companies is proud to support Mayor Broome’s Youth Workforce Experience.

WORK HARD PLAY HARD Join the team this summer. •

9470 Greenwell

355 W. Lee Drive

LSU Student Union

Springs Road

14985 Airline Hwy

12387 Plank Road 10011 Dawnadele Ave

1544 Harding Blvd

8009 Florida Blvd

4979 Jones Creek

9959 Perkins Rd

110 Rushing Rd

720 Government St

2278 O’Neal Lane

31707 Hwy. 16

10330 Coursey Blvd

10501 Burbank Drive

200 Main St. Baker

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2021 NatioNal Merit® FiNalists

Abhay Basireddy Class of 2021

Matthew Bickham Class of 2021

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Gregory Field Class of 2021

Elaine Gboloo Class of 2021

Joseph Ismail Class of 2021

Evan Jurkovic Class of 2021

Alex Nelson Class of 2021

Marshall Pentes Class of 2021

E PISCOPAL School of Baton Rouge Connor Porthouse Class of 2021

Bethany Reid Class of 2021

Charles Roth Class of 2021

Preparing Tomorrow’s Leaders

Katherine Scarton Class of 2021

2021 NatioNal Merit® CoMMeNded sCholars

Celebrating our Nationally Recognized Scholars! 12 National Merit Finalists | 3 Commended Scholars 7 National AP Scholars | 40 AP Scholars with Distinction 15 AP Scholars with Honor | 13 AP Scholars

Allison Binning Class of 2021

Andrea Norwood Class of 2021

Robert Xing Class of 2021

AP SCHOLARS 2020

National Merit Finalists and Commended Scholars represent 15% of the Class of 2021 National AP Scholars Granted to students in the United States who receive an average score of at least 4 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 4 or higher on eight or more of these exams.

AP Scholars with Distinction Granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams.

John Campbell Ryan Field Nicholas Johannessen Laura Kurtz Alex Nelson John Pojman Adam Reid

Maia Adams Robert Alleva Adam Azmeh Abhay Basireddy Sara Be Matthew Bickham Severin Breaux Sean Brooks John Campbell James Christian Grant Coffman Gregory Field

Ryan Field Elaine Gboloo Hudson Graham Hayley Gregoire John Honeycutt Nicholas Johannessen Celia Kiesel Laura Kurtz Wyatt Laiche Gautam Mahes Jackson Morris Alex Nelson Andrea Norwood Adeline Owens Jane Parker John Pojman Adam Reid Bethany Reid Charles Roth Ian Sabolik Katherine Scarton Ellie Sim

Sydney Summerville Jack TerHaar Ryan Whaley Robert Xing Savannah York Emily Zartman AP Scholars with Honor Granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams. Madison Bell Allison Binning Dariah Deskins Tucker Harrell Oliver Jack

Kathryn Knight Fabian Mbagwu Grace Moraes Christine Myer John Neumann John Nictakis Halle Roman Grace Scott Macie Sentino Anna Whaley

Trevor Heath Jylliann Huff Mollie Hyde Charles Lee David Melton Lathan Minton Jack Sulzer Ashton Wood

AP Scholars Granted to students who receive scores of 3 or higher on three or more AP Exams. Saad Ali Thomas Besselman Sarah Collier Makenzie Daugherty Nils Dernoncourt

Episcopal School of Baton Rouge | 3200 Woodland Ridge Blvd | Baton Rouge, Louisiana | www.episcopalbr.org | Nondiscriminatory Admission Tuition Assistance Program

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I N S I D E : Local artist Tommy Do’s bold wardrobe

M Y S PA C E

Bird of paradise B Y J E N N IFE R TO R MO // P H OTO S BY CO L L I N R I C H I E

A vacation home provides a tropical escape in the middle of the city An acrylic, freestanding farmhouse-style tub is the centerpiece of the bathroom in this Mid City vacation home.

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STYLE //

THERE ARE ONLY two small windows in Apartment 22. But where some might have seen a design challenge, Tyson O’Brien saw opportunity. He created his own natural light in the Acadian Thruway one-bedroom condo, by turning vibrant, large-scale paintings into wallpaper and painting every surface a deep, Hawaiian Punch-blue. It was his way of rejecting what he calls “The Great White-Out” that’s dominated mainstream design over the last half-decade. “Everyone is just doing white on white on white,” he says. “As a designer and a builder, you see so many shades of white, it starts to make you sick.” In small-space, low-light settings,

some might think a lighter palette is the key to brightening things up. But it’s actually a chance, he says, to do the opposite: Go dark, and go bold. O’Brien is a licensed Louisiana architect and contractor. He moved from Texas to Baton Rouge in 2002 to study construction management and architecture at LSU. Afterward, he stuck around, immersing himself in the community, where he’s currently the sitting president of the Mystic Krewe of Apollo. More recently, he’s turned his attention to rental homes. He has a short-term rental house in the LSU Lakeshore area as well as Apartment 22, which goes by “The Queen of Mid City” on Airbnb. O’Brien finished renovations and started listing the condo on vacation

“Part of the charm of having a vacation rental is that you can do things you wouldn’t normally do in your own home.” —Tyson O’Brien

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rental sites about a year ago. There are plenty of lessons to take from its upgrades. He aimed to refinish the condo as sustainably and budget-consciously as possible. He used remnant lumber for all the trimwork. To save on countertops, he selected granite slabs that were partly unpolished— they are weathered, he says, but still just as beautiful. He purchased many of the finishes and appliances from hardware stores like Home Depot and Lowe’s. He focused the rest of his budget on making the condo feel like an escape from the outside world. In the bathroom, guests can choose between a double rainshower or a farmhousestyle soaking tub. In the bedroom, a pull-down projector screen serves as a built-in entertainment unit instead

of a bulky TV. In the powder room off the kitchen, O’Brien had one of his favorite paintings, Gustaf Klint’s “The Woman in Gold,” printed as a floorto-ceiling wallpaper. “Part of the charm of having a vacation rental,” he says, “is that you can do things you wouldn’t normally do in your own home.” And that vacation rental charm is perhaps most on display in the bedroom, where a bird-of-paradise patterned wallpaper makes the “Queen of Mid City” come alive. Lush flowers snake across the walls in rich oranges and sultry reds. It feels almost like being transported to the wild, where the bird-of-paradise can reach heights of 30 feet. In fact, some even call it the “queen” of the plant world.

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A Philips Hue LED light strip encircles the bedroom. Guests can change the colors using a remote or a mobile app.

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A custom bird-of-paradise patterned wallpaper frames one of the apartment’s only windows.

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Sliding barn doors connect the bedroom to the main bathroom and living room. Frosted glass panels let light travel from the bedroom and bathroom windows, but also offer privacy and rustic style.

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4 Black Forest granite

is a showstopper in the kitchen—and was sourced on a budget. O’Brien gave a second life to imperfect slabs from TC Stone.

5 Benjamin Moore’s

Tucson Teal covers the walls, cabinetry and trim. The moody paint choice is grounded by the bright white carrera marble backsplash and the herringbonepatterned, wood-look tile flooring.

6 Color-changing LED

lights peek out from glass windows in two of the upper cabinets.

7 A pair of gold sputnik-

style chandeliers and a set of fuzzy barstools are the finishing touches, softening and adding symmetry to the space.

8 To help blend off-

center air ducts over the TV, O’Brien built an extra faux vent to balance the wall.

9 A curved, neutral-

colored sectional provides plenty of space to stretch out and watch movies.

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STYLE //

CLOSET CHECK

No rules

Baton Rouge artist, apparel designer and Euph Group performer Tommy Do’s daring, sultry style has no limits

B Y CYN TH EA CO R FA H // P H OTOS B Y CO L L I N R I C H I E

TOMMY DO IS the type of person you might spot in the pages of a fashion magazine, strutting in the images of a street style story and inspiring designers for next season’s runway shows. The 25-year-old Baton Rouge native’s style is bold and unforgettable, and does not conform to any gender expectations. Do’s wardrobe is rich with edgy chain necklaces, preppy sweater vests, black Dr. Martens boots, white tank tops with cut-outs and black leather pants. Every outfit is like a treat for the mind. There’s something new to appreciate with each glance. Whether it’s an oversized LSU jersey styled with a gold choker and platform Pumas or a button-up shirt worn off the shoulders, Do treats clothes like art. Each piece and accessory contributes to a bigger picture. “I believe in my vision and the story I’m trying to tell with my presentation,” Do says. Do is a local artist, apparel designer and performer who graduated from LSU in 2018 with a bachelor’s degree in apparel design. Since the pandemic, Do started experimenting with other creative pursuits, launching a K-pop dance group called Euph Group with two friends. The group films choreographed dance covers to popular K-pop songs while wearing outfits that showcase their personal styles and correlate with the theme of the video. “It’s an opportunity to live out a fantasy and combine a lot of my passions,” Do says about the dance covers. In Euph Group’s videos, Do’s outfits are just as fierce as their dance moves. In the cover video for “90’s Love” by NCT U, Do can be spotted wearing baggy navy blue cargo pants, white sneakers, an athletic top, layered chain necklaces and a bright red, hooded fur coat. One of the most intriguing parts about Euph Group’s videos is never knowing what to expect from Do’s outfits. The same goes for Do’s everyday style. There’s always an element of surprise. Do’s favorite closet staples include a sheer, nude-colored, high-neck, long-sleeve top covered in tattoo-style patterns; an oversized, dark gray blazer; and designer hoodies. Do doesn’t play by fashion rules. They look at the shape and silhouette a garment can create and style it from there. Growing up, Do was inspired by anime and would sketch imaginative outfits and fictional characters in school notebooks. In high school, Do looked forward to “free dress days” when students could ditch their school uniforms and show off their style and wear whatever they wanted.

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Tommy Do is a Baton Rouge-based apparel designer, performer and artist.

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Do’s senior clothing collection at the LSU Fashion Show in 2018 was inspired by Gogo Yubari, a character from Kill Bill: Vol. 1. In the 2003 film, Yubari is a young schoolgirl and deadly assassin. Do incorporated elements from her outfits, like plaid skirts and accessories. The looks were spiced up with metal details to resemble Yubari’s meteor hammer (a weapon with two weights connected by a chain). After college, Do began designing edgy street-style clothing as a side hustle while working at retail stores like Time Warp and Urban Outfitters.

“Fashion is at the core of who I am,” Do says. Through personal style, Do encourages thought, incorporates irony, highlights pop culture and explores what is deemed as appropriate or risque. In a society that promotes conformity, Do’s fearless attitude is like a breath of fresh air. “There’s a difference between looking good and looking different,” Do says. “I like having something weird about my outfit. I want to take up space.” Follow them on Instagram @thomasdo

Do enjoys wea ring nontraditiona l outfits that combine desig ne with ever yday r clothing wear.

Do uses wardrobe styling to highlight their personality, interests and provoke thought.

Do is creatively inspired by anime, K-pop, pop culture and high-fashion designers.

Closet Check is a 225 feature exploring the wardrobes of stylish Baton Rougeans. Tell us who we should feature next! Pitch us at editor@225batonrouge.com.

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I N S I D E : Mushroom Maggie’s Farm / Retro springtime recipes

Caribbean

comfort

COLLIN RICHIE

Island influences and Southern cooking converge at The Bullfish

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TA ST E / /

Co-owner Jasmine Lombrage shares a plate of slow-cooked Curry Goat with rice and plantains.

Head to the restaurant’s bar for the Bullfish’s take on the Dark & Stormy or nonalcoholic tropical drinks like passion fruit or hibiscus punch.

THE BASICS: Owners Angel and Jasmine Lombrage took over Bullfish in summer 2019 and amped up the restaurant’s existing Caribbean theme with dishes from their respective Haitian and Bahamian heritages. It brings a unique twist to the restaurant options just outside LSU’s campus. WHAT’S A MUST: Warm up with the Soup Joumou, loaded with chicken, greens and potatoes. Snack on the fried pork bites and pickled veggies of the Haitian Griot appetizer. For an entree, the Curry Goat is slowcooked to perfection, and the Jerk Shrimp is swimming in a spicy brown gravy.

R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W

The Bullfish Bar + Kitchen   BY D.J. B E AU T ICIA // P H OTOS B Y CO L L I N R I C HI E Our food critic’s name may be false, but the credentials are not. This gastronome has studied the history, cultivation, preparation, science and technology of food for more than 30 years. thebullfishbar.com 4001 Nicholson Drive, Suite D Tuesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

YOU DON’T OFTEN find South Louisianian and Jamaican and Haitian cuisines in the same restaurant. But after reading about co-owner Angel Lombrage’s heritage, it became clear his French Creole family lineage and Caribbean influence from the family’s stopover in the French West Indies led to a most interesting confluence of

culinary influences once they settled here in South Louisiana. At this restaurant south of LSU, we kicked off our experience with the Griot and Jamaican Beef Patties appetizers. Served with pikliz, a Haitian pickled vegetable relish, the Griot’s fried pork bites were slightly crisp from

the fryer and tender with barbecue honey notes. Beware of those pikliz, though. The vinegary crisp vegetables will draw you in, but the heat of fresh peppers will shock your tastebuds and scorch your tongue in the nicest way possible. The Jamaican Beef Patties had a flaky bright yellow, mildly flavored crust with a smear of meat that was ground to almost a pureed consistency. It was quite delightful. A tart salmoncolored sauce accompanied this appetizer, but the patties were nice on their own. The seemingly simple execution made for an interesting and satisfying starter. Soups loaded with so many greens are rare around town, but that’s what we got with the Soup Joumou. Listed 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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on the menu as the “Haitian National Dish,” and described to us as a warm hearty bowl of goodness, this ample soup of chicken, greens, carrot and potato chunks was filling. The night of our visit was chilly, and it warmed our bellies and stirred our souls. It could easily become your new favorite comfort food. Moving on to the entrees, the Curry Goat came with a choice of two sides. We went with Plantains and Lima Beans. The tender, firm sweet plantains were a perfect foil to the piquant and slightly salty goat. I normally find goat too pungent and gamey, but had I not been told this one was goat, I would have assumed it was braised beef. Our other side of lima beans was earthy with a slowcooked, homespun essence. I was impressed by the amalgamation of spicy, earthy, sweet and salty across all aspects of the entree. The Jerk Shrimp entree with its succulent brown gravy, had a sneaky spice that went straight to the back of the throat. A side of Caribbean Rice and Peas had the look of a rich jambalaya but with a sprinkling of kidney beans among perfectly separated grains of al dente rice and pops of Jamaican spices. For the other

Though more of a seasonal offering, the Soup Joumou provides a hearty bowl of chicken, greens, carrot and potatoes in the Haitian national dish.

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The Griot appetizer is a mound of fried pork bites in a sweet honey-barbecue marinade.

The Curry Goat is serious business, with slow-cooked goat meat falling off the bone. Pick some sides like Plantains and Lima Beans to provide some creamy and sweet balance to the entree.

side, the crisp and soft Fried Yuca helped calm the heat while offering a wonderful textural contrast to the rest of the dish’s components. Thoroughly stuffed and fully gratified, we faced the prospect of dessert. Much like other local restaurants, the only house-made dessert was Bread Pudding, though our server gushed about it so much we had little choice but to order. It was super soft with an overt cinnamon flavor and aroma. Sweetened condensed milk-like sauce added sugary sweetness but little else. Though not made in house, the Key Lime Pie seemed like a nice foil to the Bread Pudding. But it had an unpleasant grittiness and a tartness that leaned more lemon than Key lime. But while dessert was not Bullfish’s forte during our visit, the restaurant provided a tasty escape from the mundane. And with the uncertainty of if or when any of us can once again escape to the islands, now is the perfect time to run away to a local spot where at least we can get a taste of the tropics. Be careful, though—with the delicious heat this food is exuding, a suntan might come with dinner.

Summertime

and the livin’s easy

LovetroLux Photography

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BITES

Magic mushrooms We break down the uses and benefits of the bounty from Mushroom Maggie’s Farm By Maggie Heyn Richardson // Photos by Collin Richie

MUSHROOMS ARE BEAUTIFUL and versatile. Packed with bracing umami and a texture that makes them the perfect meat decoy, they are the darling of vegetarian cooking. They’re equally winning alongside proteins, where they add elegance and depth of flavor. Think how much better a steak tastes when drizzled with rich mushroom sauce, or a burger is with mushrooms planted in gooey Swiss cheese. Those assets don’t stop at flavor and texture. Mushrooms have also been recognized for reducing inflammation, improving cognitive function and delivering other health benefits. And lately, growing mushrooms has become a trendy activity

among adventurous DIYers. Local purveyor Maggie Long of Mushroom Maggie’s Farm in St. Francisville reports a big uptick in sales of her mushroom fruiting blocks during the pandemic, particularly among parents who want to teach their homebound kids about the wonderful world of fungi. Mushrooms, let’s just say, are having a moment. We turned to Long for advice on how to use the wide variety she sells each week at the Red Stick Farmers Market. Here’s how to make the most of this delightful ingredient in your spring cooking. Find Mushroom Maggie’s Farm on Facebook

Lion’s Mane

A doppelganger for crabmeat or even pulled pork, delicate Lion’s Mane mushrooms are prepped by peeling apart the threads, then tossing them in a hot skillet with butter or olive oil and seasonings. Mushroom Maggie’s also makes Lion’s Mane tinctures, thought to enhance brain function. The liquid supplement is becoming a trendy addition to specialty coffee drinks and craft cocktails. “I’ve had a few people asking about it for those purposes, so I’m eager to see how that might become more mainstream,” Long says.

Slice those thick stems into medallions for a faux scallop sauté!

Fuzzy, delicate and good for your brain!

King Trumpet Long recommends cooking and eating the stems of all the mushrooms her company sells, and that works especially well with King Trumpets, a classic stirfry ingredient. Long says some of her chef customers have also sliced King Trumpets cross-wise and sautéed them in garlic, butter and wine. “It’s like a faux scallop,” she says.

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Pioppino

Shiitake

Diminutive caps, lithe stems and a golden brown hue make Pioppino mushrooms whimsical enhancements to short flower arrangements. That takes care of your table. As for your plate, use them in stirfrys, Long says, because the stems are as flavorful and robustly textured as the caps.

The most familiar of the line-up, juicy, meaty shiitakes provide reliable toothsome texture and round flavor. This mushroom screams to be sliced and sauteed in an iron skillet with onions and beef broth, then poured over an old-fashioned hamburger steak.

They may look delicate, but those thin stems will hold their shape and texture in a stir-fry.

Oyster

Full of flavor, quick to sauté and creamy in texture, oyster mushrooms are the workhorse of the gourmet mushroom world. Add them to pasta, or toss them in olive oil and salt and pepper and spread them on a sheet pan to roast until crisp for a savory snack or salad topper. This spring, look for pink and gold varieties.

Oyster mushrooms come in a variety of shades, including this silvery gray version.

Chestnut

Chestnuts work particularly well in risotto, Long says, because they’re mild, nutty and easy to cook. Long jokes that about one-quarter of her farmers market customers have shared their mushroom risotto recipes, so popular is this particular dish among fungi fans.

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DINING IN

Springtime lunch A menu for an Easter celebration or just a classic Southern-style weekend spread B Y TR AC E Y KO C H A N D STE P HA N I E R I E G E L P H OTO S BY AMY S H U T T

SPRINGTIME IS A favorite season for us. Everything is fresh, green and blooming. It reminds us of spending time outside, playing in the garden with our children and enjoying Easter. We wrote this month’s lunch menu with those holiday memories in mind. When our kids were younger, we always enjoyed getting them involved in meal prep. These recipes bring the

whole family together and involve them in every step of the process. The roasted garlic glaze, in particular, is an easy recipe to put together for the ham and a fun one for the little ones to help with. Though the flavors may seem a little advanced for younger palates, getting little hands involved in the cooking process is a wonderful way to entice children to become more adventurous eaters.

On the menu • Baked Ham with Roasted Garlic Glaze • Smothered Green Beans with New Potatoes and Onions • Southern Baked Pineapple Casserole (Find this recipe at 225batonrouge.com/recipes) • Buttermilk Pie with Toasted Coconut and Dark Chocolate Recipes by Tracey Koch

Baked Ham with Roasted Garlic Glaze FOR THE HAM: 1 6- to 7-pound smoked ham of your choice Roasted garlic glaze

1. Heat the oven to 300 degrees and remove the ham from the packaging.

2. Line a roasting pan with foil and place

the ham in the pan. Cover the ham with more foil and put into the preheated oven.

3. Roast the ham 15 minutes per pound or until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees. 4. Unwrap the ham and liberally brush it with the glaze. 5. Reduce the heat to 225 degrees and Shopping for the right ham can be a little overwhelming, with all the different ways they are labeled. Ham comes from the back thigh and rump of a pig. Generally speaking, the hams you find at the supermarket or butcher shops are cut down and sold in portions—either the shank end, which comes from the lower leg; or the top portion, which comes from the butt end. The shank tends to be less fatty and leaner, which also makes it a little tougher when cooked. However, it is easier to slice with just one bone in the center. The top portion is a bit fattier than the shank. A picnic ham is not technically a true ham cut, but actually comes from the front shoulder. It’s cured and smoked like a traditional ham, though. Most hams are sold cured and smoked. Even though most are fully cooked, they still require being heated through to the recommended 140 degrees before serving. The size of the ham will determine baking time. Generally, that comes out to 15 minutes per pound to reach the perfect internal temperature.

Servings: 8

place the ham back in the oven for another 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and once again brush with more glaze.

6. Tent the ham with foil and allow it to rest for 10 minutes before serving.

FOR THE GLAZE: 1 pod fresh garlic 2 tablespoons olive oil Kosher salt, to taste 2 cups apple jelly 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons yellow mustard 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. 2. Keeping the garlic pod intact, peel

excess skin from the outside and trim the top to expose the cloves.

3. Line a small baking dish with foil. Place

the garlic pod into the dish, drizzling with the olive oil and sprinkling with a pinch of kosher salt.

4. Roast in the oven for 20-25 minutes, or until the pod has become tender and golden in color. Allow it to cool. 5. Gently press the garlic pod to release

all the cloves. (The cloves will be soft and should easily squeeze out.)

6. Place the cloves into a sauce pot. Add the apple jelly vinegar and mustards.

7. Turn the heat on to medium. Stir until

the glaze begins to simmer, and the jelly is completely dissolved.

8. Remove the glaze from the heat and

allow it to cool until you are ready to use it. Store any extra glaze in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. This glaze can be used on other cuts of pork, chicken, shrimp or salmon.

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Smothered Green Beans with New Potatoes and Onions This is a favorite side for a crowd because it serves as both a vegetable and starch. It is also a lighter side to balance a holiday spread that otherwise might be dominated by heavier dishes. This time of year, when new potatoes and green beans are so fresh and tender, it does not take much for these veggies to shine.

Servings: 6-8 2 pounds fresh green beans, cleaned and trimmed 2 pounds new potatoes 1 cup thinly sliced sweet onion 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon black pepper 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth

1. Trim the tips off the green beans and rinse them. Leaving the skin on the new potatoes, cut them in halves or quarters, depending on their size.

2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet. Sauté the sliced onions 2 to 3 minutes or until they have become soft and translucent.

3. Add the new potatoes, salt and pepper and continue cooking another 2 to 3 minutes, stirring to prevent the potatoes from sticking. Pour in the chicken broth and allow the mixture to come to a boil.

4. Reduce the heat to a simmer and add in the green

beans. Simmer the green beans and potatoes for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender and the green beans are soft but still hold their shape.

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Buttermilk Pie with Toasted Coconut and Dark Chocolate Coconut desserts and Easter go hand in hand, and this pie is a quintessential dessert to please any sweet tooth. The toasted coconut is combined with creamy and slightly tangy buttermilk and rich dark chocolate, which makes it the perfect way to end any meal. It is easy to prepare using a readymade pie crust, plus it can also be made several hours ahead of time. Our kids always loved baking with us in the kitchen. This pie is a great recipe to make with your family—the steps are not too involved, but there are enough things to keep curious little cooks engaged. Mixing and measuring are all great ways to practice basic math, reading and fine motor skills all at the same time.

Servings: 8 1 9-inch, readymade pie crust 1 stick of butter, softened 1 cup sugar ¼ teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons flour 3 eggs 1 cup buttermilk 2 teaspoons vanilla 1 cup toasted coconut flakes 1 cup dark chocolate chips

1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees and press the readymade pie dough into a 9-inch pie plate.

2. In a large mixing bowl, cream together the softened butter and sugar until smooth. Add the salt and flour, and stir until well combined.

3. In a separate mixing bowl beat the eggs until frothy. Add them into the sugar-butter mixture and stir until well combined. Fold in the buttermilk, vanilla, coconut and chocolate chips.

4. Pour the mixture into the pie shell. Bake in the oven for 30 to 40 minutes or until the top is golden and a tester poked into the center of the pie comes out clean. 5. Allow the pie to cool for about 15 minutes before serving.

HOW TO MAKE IT A FEAST

Issue Date: April Ad proof #2

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

This simple menu can be paired with many other 225 recipes for a grander holiday spread. Some other dishes to add to this menu: • Savory Rosemary Scones • Sauteed Spring Peas with Garlic and Mint • Spring Salad with Roasted Beets and Oranges Find these recipes at 225batonrouge.com/recipes.

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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from newsstands April 12th!

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GIVING OUR READERS MORE GOOD NEWS EVERY DAY.

COMMUNITY PEOPLE FOOD THINGS TO DO CULTURE FASHION Subscribe for your free DAILY dose at 225batonrouge.com/225Daily or scan here For all 225 Daily advertising opportunities, contact ERIN POU today!

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CULTURE When can we do this again?

JORDAN HEFLER / COURTESY BLUES FESTIVAL

I N S I D E : ‘The Art of Seating’ exhibit / More local music and arts events

A previous edition of the Baton Rouge Blues Festival

It’s a silent spring for most local live music events, but look to fall for the return of favorite festivals B Y MAG G IE H E YN R I C HA R D S O N

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LOUISIANA’S WARM WEATHER festivals are as elemental as crawfish and azaleas, but they were among the first events to be canceled last spring with the arrival of the coronavirus pandemic. Things still aren’t back to normal yet this spring, but the news isn’t all bad. Arts organizations continue to find ways to pivot, with some holding modified versions of events this spring, and others rescheduling them for the fall. Organizers of the Baton Rouge Blues Festival, the Arts Council’s Ebb & Flow Festival, Baton Rouge Oyster Festival, Bandito Festival and Live After 5 are all planning to shift spring and summer events to the fall. Regionally, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and French Quarter Festival have acted similarly, pushing their usual spring dates to October. Lafayette’s Festival International in April is going virtual again this year. It’s usually in April that blues fans get their fill of swamp blues—Baton Rouge’s indigenous blues form. But the Baton Rouge Blues Festival won’t happen this year until Sept. 18, says Kim Neustrom, executive director of

the Baton Rouge Blues Festival and Foundation. “The festival footprint will be the same, but the flow may be a little different,” Neustrom says. “We may not have as many stages, and we may scale back the arts market. But we are planning on resuming the full-blown festival about six months later in April 2022.” Ebb & Flow, the city’s Mississippi River-themed arts festival, also anticipates a September date, rescheduled from its normal date in April. Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge President and CEO Renee Chatelain says the event could be held in conjunction with a possible conference held by the Mississippi River Cities and Town Initiative, which Mayor Sharon Weston Broome co-chairs. The conference is tentatively planned for Baton Rouge. “It could be something where we curate local arts performances and presentations around a conference,” Chatelain says. “We really like this idea. It’s how South by Southwest operates, and it’s what we originally envisioned.” Live After Five in downtown Baton Rouge

COLLIN RICHIE

Families dance along to the music at the Bandito Festival.

KRISTEN SELLE

C U LT U R E / /

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C U LT U R E / /

JORDAN HEFLER / COURTESY BLUES FESTIVAL

Local favorite Kenny Neal performs at a previous Baton Rouge Blues Festival.

Mark your calendar The information in our story is as of press time in mid-March. Find the latest information on upcoming local festivals at their websites: Baton Rouge Blues Festival, rescheduled to Sept. 18 batonrougebluesfestival.org

Baton Rouge Oyster Festival, rescheduled to Aug. 28 batonrougeoysterfestival.com

Ebb & Flow Festival, rescheduled to an as-yet-determined September date ebbandflowbr.org

Bandito Festival, currently scheduled for June 25-26, but could be rescheduled to Aug. 21 banditofestival.com

Live After Five, all 12 concerts are scheduled for the fall starting Aug. 20 downtownbr.org

June on the Shaw Center’s fourth floor terrace. “Until we’re allowed to do music inside again, this is what we’ll do,” says John Kaufman, Manship Theatre director of marketing and programming. “We still have holds on [inside] shows in the fall. It will just depend on the mandates.” Downtown’s free concert series, Live After 5, normally features six outdoor concerts each in the spring and fall.

This year, all 12 concerts will be held in the fall, says organizer Lauren Lambert Tompkins. Produced by the Downtown Business Association, the series will run on consecutive Friday evenings from Aug. 20 to Nov. 5. “We’ll be taking all the necessary precautions to have a safe event,” Tompkins says. “All of the festival organizers have been working together about what things are going to look like, and we’ll be prepared to adjust if need be.”

Tompkins doesn’t know yet if capacity will be limited. The Oyster Festival, normally held in late May, will shift from a two- to a one-day event on Aug. 28 with headliner E LL SE EN KRIST the Gin Blossoms. Bandito Festival, which launched for the first time in 2019 and fuses alt-country and rock music with rock, tacos and barbecue, was scheduled for June 25-26 as of press time. Organizers say it’s possible the event will be rescheduled for Aug. 21. Both events will be ticketed and have limited capacity. It’s been a long, hard road for festival and performing arts organizers, but Neustrom believes her organization and the artists it represents are poised to bounce back. “The blues was born out of tense times, pain and sadness,” Neustrom says. “And while this is not ideal, we’re going to lean into what created us as an organization, and have some amazing blues songs to sing when we gather again.”

RAEGAN LABAT

But even if that coordinated effort doesn’t happen this fall, Chatelain says some version of Ebb and Flow will still take place in September. Spring festival events haven’t been completely shuttered. Beauvoir Park played host to the South By St. Patrick’s Day Fest in March, with eight days of outdoor music for ticketed attendees at the Perkins Road overpass venue. The Third Street Songwriters Festival, held March 20, shifted from its usual location inside downtown bars and restaurants to the outdoor amphitheater at Pointe Marie. And in lieu of Manship Theatre’s annual gala, which normally attracts hundreds of participants to the Shaw Center for the Arts, it is holding smaller ticketed outdoor concerts in April, May and

Kids work on art pieces at one of the booths at Ebb & Flow Festival.

MUSIC BEST BETS

APRIL 17 Jam out to some of Ryan Foret and The Foret Tradition’s swamp pop songs under the stars at PointeMarie Village Square. pointemarie.com HE

TE SY T

APRIL 9 The Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge brought back its Jazz Listening Room concert series this spring. Next up is Baton Rouge’s own Esco McCollum and his

soul band EscoSoulMusic. The concerts are held outdoors on the Chorum Hall patio and start at 7:30 p.m. Chorum Hall is at 1024 Executive Park Ave. artsbr.org

L ARTS COUNCI

APRIL 8 + 22 Need a creative outlet to showcase your talent? Tin Roof Brewing Co. is hosting its Open Mic Night, so show what you’ve got, and bring your friends and family, too. Find the event on Facebook

UR CO

APRIL 20 Head out to the Red Dragon Listening Room to listen to the blues sounds of Albert Cummings in the venue’s intimate setting. Find the event on Facebook APRIL 21 The Manship Theatre hosts Grammy Award-winning Latin jazz conga player Poncho Sanchez alongside his band for an outdoor show at the River Terrace of the

Shaw Center for the Arts. It’s the next installment of the River City Jazz Masters series presented by the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge. manshiptheatre.org

APRIL 22 New Orleans’ The Dirty Rain Revelers take the stage at La Divina Italian Cafe, showcasing its rootsrock, Americana and blues sound. Find the event on Facebook

Esco McCollum

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Issue Date: April 2021 Ad proof #3

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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C U LT U R E / /

A RT

Best SEATS in the house IMAGES COURTESY LSU MUSEUM OF ART

LSU Museum of Art exhibit explores the history of seating design Centripetal spring armchair by Thomas E. Warren, 1850

“McKinley” armchair by David Wolcott Kendall, 1894-1896

Shaker ladderback arm rocking chair, 1840

Slipper chair by John Henry Belter, 1860

High stool by Frank Gehry, 1971 Current chair by Vivian Beer, 2004

Johnson Wax Company chair by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1938

Large diamond lounge chair by Harry Bertoia, 1952

THUMB THROUGH ANY home or interiors magazine, and you’ll see how a nice chair can really become a statement piece for a room. But it can also tell an intricate story about necessity and luxury, function and form, the craftspeople who built it and even the history of design itself. With more than 40 chairs on display—some dating back to the mid1800s—the LSU Museum of Art is encouraging us to consider where we take a seat with “The Art of Seating: 200 Years of American Design.” The

exhibition opened in March and runs through June 6. It couples ornate furniture from the museum’s permanent collection with showstoppers from the Jacobsen Collection of American Art, which features pieces from the likes of Frank Lloyd Wright, Frank Gehry, and Charles and Ray Eames. Curator Courtney Taylor says the museum was drawn to hosting the touring exhibit because of how it illustrates the crossroads of art and domestic American life.

Prominent designers reimagined the humble chair with new shapes, lines and upholstery; advances in mass production brought popular designs into the average home; and later, people were drawn back to the personal, handmade touch of individual furniture makers. “A lot of times you think of art as something separate from everyday life. A chair is something very much lived in,” Taylor says. “But at the same time you have all those design elements in there, and it’s charged with all the

societal movements happening when it was produced. It’s all intertwined.” This month, the museum will host two virtual events connected to the show: “My Favorite Chair” on April 11, featuring local designers and collectors showing off their unique furniture finds; and a visit to the design studio of local maker Damien Mitchell on April 29. Find out more about the exhibit and register for the virtual events at lsumoa.org.

—BENJAMIN LEGER

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C U LT U R E / /

D AT E S

July 2021

An early rendering of renovations to the River Center Theater

WHEN RENOVATION WORK on the River Center Theater is set to be completed. The 45-year-old venue is undergoing a facelift to the tune of $16.26 million that includes new seating, installation of some VIP boxes and a more inviting lobby and entrance area. Construction work began before the pandemic, and crews ran into some hiccups that upped the price tag from its original $15.8 million. “There hasn’t been any work done since the theater was built, so we are having to upgrade a lot of things, and we are finding some unforeseen things behind the walls,” says Bubba Cashio, city-parish director of building and grounds. RENDERING BY POST ARCHITECTS + HMS ARCHITECTS / COURTESY DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT

duction of Naomi Iizuka’s Anon(ymous), which offers a reimagining of Homer’s Odyssey through the eyes of a young refugee in America. lsu.edu/cmda/theatre

APRIL 9 + 11 Opéra Louisiane presents its season finale performance of The Tales of Hoffman at the Manship Theatre at Shaw Center for the Arts. Tenor Frederick Ballentine will play the title role of poet E. T. A. Hoffmann. operalouisiane.com

APRIL 23 Spend an evening with the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra as it performs Beethoven’s “SymSO phony No. 7” with guest conductor Earl Lee at Istrouma Baptist Church. brso.org R YB ES RT

APRIL 23-MAY 2 Check out Theatre Baton Rouge’s production of the APRIL 13-18 comic play Blithe Spirit, diLSU Theatre stages a prorectedDate: by ClayApril Donaldson. Issue Ad First proof #4 • Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees.

COU

ALL MONTH The Louisiana Art & Science Museum presents modernist painter and naturalist Will Henry Stevens in its Soupçon Gallery through July. His work represents naturalism and Southern modernism in landscape and abstract pieces. lasm.org

staged in London’s West End in the 1940s, it tells the story of a writer who invites a medium into his home for a seance, only to summon the ghost of his angry first wife. theatrebr.org

APRIL 24 Contemporary dance company Of Moving Colors is using its spring performance to showcase dance works inspired by legends of modern music. “POP” features original choreography to songs by Prince, Cher, Stevie Wonder, Elton John, Madonna, Lady Gaga, RuPaul and more. Check out the show at the Earl Lee Brown-Holt Theatre at The Dunham School. ofmovingcolors.org

Of Moving Colors celebrates pop music with its spring show.

EYE WANDER PHOTO / COURTESY OF MOVING COLORS

ARTS BEST BETS

Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

THE

PARTY PLANNING & RENTALS BIRTHDAYS & CELEBRATIONS FOR ALL AGES WEDDINGS | BABY SHOWERS DATE NIGHTS | CORPORATE EVENTS

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Your Adventure

This Month [ A P R I L ]

@ BREC

CARDIO AT THE PAVILION

ADAPTIVE SUNSHINE SOCIAL: DISCO FEVER

April 5 + 12 + 19 + 26 | 5:30-6:30 p.m.

April 16 | 6-8 p.m.

Independence Community Park

Virtual

SENSORY BUNNY

BIOBLITZ

April 7 | 2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

April 16 + 17

NICK BROSSETTE SPRING BREAK FOOTBALL CAMP

RECTIME

North Sherwood Forest Community Park

Kathy Drive Park

April 7 + 8 | 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

TEEN POP-UP & UNPLUG

Zachary Community Park April 10 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

SATURDAY CAMP

Baker Recreation Center April 10 | 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

BIRDS & BEYOND

Highland Road Community Park April 10 | 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Zachary Community Park

North Sherwood Forest Community Park Zachary Community Park April 16 | 5:30-8:30 p.m.

PADDLE AWAY

Bayou Fountain

April 17 | 9 a.m.-noon

ART UNWINED: BIRD NERDS

Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center April 17 | 10:30 a.m.-noon

SPRING BREAK HOLIDAY CAMPS APRIL 2 + 5-9

brec.org/holidaycamp

E-SPORTS TOURNAMENT: MARIO KART 8 Virtual

April 17 | noon

WEBB CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENT Webb Memorial Golf Course April 17 + 18 | Tee Time 8 a.m.

10 & UNDER TENNIS TOURNAMENT

Highland Road Community Park April 24 | 8:30 a.m.-noon

LIBERTY LAGOON WEEKEND OPERATIONS BEGIN April 24

CAMP-IN

Cadillac Street Park

April 17 | 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

BREC.ORg/thismonth BREC does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, religion, veteran status or sexual orientation in its programs and activities.

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CALENDAR //

april all month

FARM FRESH GOODS Need some farm-to-table freshness for your next dinner party? Head to the Red Stick Farmers Market for locally grown fruits and veggies. The Thursday market is at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, and the Saturday market is at Main Street Market downtown. And on April 3, Baton Rouge Arts Market will host its open-air showcase of your favorite local artists and craftsmen at the downtown market. breada.org and artsbr.org

Is your company one of the best places to work in the Capital Region?

This event is designed to honor the Capital Region’s best employers. Local employers are given the opportunity to participate in a professional program conducted by Best Companies Group on subjects such as Leadership and Planning, Corporate Culture and Communications, Training and Development, Work Environment and much more. A detailed survey is provided to participating businesses, and leading companies are recognized in Business Report and honored at an awards event.

To register your company for participation and award consideration, please visit:

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PARTICIPATION IN SURVEY IS FREE!

10

SUPPORT LOCAL ARTISTS The MidCity Makers Market is back. After being paused for several months due to COVID-19, the market returned in March and will be setting up for April at its new Electric Depot location. Meet local artists, and take home some of the unique finds. midcitymakersmarket.com

17

LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL (WITH A RUN) Yes, you read that right: Mardi Gras is still here for Baton Rouge. Join Capital City runners for the rescheduled Mardi Gras Mambo, Freshjunkie Racing’s 1-mile fun run, 10K and a 15K through downtown Baton Rouge. Find the event on Facebook

FILE PHOTO BY COURTNEY HOLDEN

The Business Report and Society for Human Resource Management are pleased to present the annual Best Places to Work Awards

FILE PHOTO BY RAEGAN LABAT

NOMINATION DEADLINE: APRIL 30

PRESENTED BY:

ON THE ROAD NEW ORLEANS

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY: Virtual Concert: The JFA All-Star Jazz Ensemble, Find the event on Facebook

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APRIL 6: Walking with Whiskey with Sazerac House, sazerachouse.com

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Issue Date: April Ad proof #1 CALENDAR //

Where play aro to Baton R und o this monuge th C ompiled b Brittney Fo y rbes

• Please respond by e-mail or fax with your approval or minor revisions. • AD WILL RUN AS IS unless revision requests are received within 24 hours. • Additional revisions must be requested and may be subject to production fees. Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE NUMBER • ANY TYPOS This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2021. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

ALSO THIS MONTH ALL MONTH Namaste in shape with Tin Roof Brewing Co.’s Wednesday Yoga on Tap events. While you learn how to be more zen with Leela Yoga Lifestyle Studio, you can find out about Tin Roof’s craft beers. tinroofbeer.com APRIL 1 Get in the spirit of crawfish season with the Southern University Laboratory School at its second annual Grab and Go Crawfish Boil fundraising event to support its ESports programs. Find the event on Facebook

APRIL 1 + 27 Find your inner zen while on the lakes at BREC’s Yoga at the Lake event at Milford Wampold Memorial Park. You can learn different yoga poses while also taking in nature around you. brec.org APRIL 3 Heading to a free Body Sculpt Barre Studio class at Mid Tap sounds fun, but having brunch and bottomless mimosas immediately after makes it even better. All you need to bring are your friends; no other equipment is necessary. Find the event on Facebook APRIL 5 Join the online “lunch and learn” event hosted by the Friends of LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens. Executive Director of Bellingrath Gardens Todd Lasseigne will discuss a garden created by Bessie Bellingrath via Microsoft Teams. Find the event on Facebook.

FILE PHOTO BY COURTNEY HOLDEN

30

CELEBRATE NATURE Show off all the Baton Rouge ecosystem has to offer for the Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater Baton Rouge’s 2021 City Nature Challenge. Snap and share photos of the wildlife and plants around you during this four-day nature competition, which runs April 30 to May 2. Your finds will compete against entries in the Greater New Orleans area and other cities around the world. Upload images to iNaturalist.org. Find the event on Facebook Editor’s note: Event details are as of press time in mid-March. Please check with the events for the latest information.

LAFAYETTE

APRIL 9: Drive-In Theater Tour: An Evening Under the Stars with TOBYMAC and the DiverseCity Band, cajundome.com

APRIL 8 Trying to up your pizza game? Join the Louisiana Culinary Institute for its sourdough pizza night with Chef Jeanne Mancuso. You’ll learn to whip up a classic antipasto, fresh sourdough pizza and tiramisu. lci.edu APRIL 15 Learn how to make a creative fruit pie that your mother-in-law would love. Chef Jeanne Mancuso is teaching you how to make a sweet strawberry pie and a tart peach lattice that will be perfect for summertime. lci.edu APRIL 15 Tune in to the Knock Knock Children’s Museum’s third annual Storybook Soirée on Facebook Live, where you’ll learn how the museum encourages kids to play and explore through imaginative spaces. knockknockmuseum.org

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APRIL 23-25: A virtual and immersive Festival International de Louisiane, festivalinternational.org

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WRITE ON //

Family matters always free or inexpensive—because I TALK TO my grandmother on the they were more about the company, phone almost every day now, and it’s anyway. all thanks to the pandemic. When we asked local parenting I started calling her more regularly writer Tricia Raney to compile ideas last spring, as soon as I realized no one for fun things to do with kids during would be visiting her because of the the pandemic, we were hoping for a coronavirus outbreak. I couldn’t stand list full of local hidden gems. Raney picturing her being trapped all alone definitely delivered on that end, but in her house, so I’d dial her number she also surprised us with some of the and keep her company. sweetest DIY projects Even though she’s now she’s invented alongside vaccinated and able to her five kids. have visitors, our phone Of all her suggestions, call habit is here to say. one of my favorites is the We chit-chat about car wash tour. She and the weather or what her kids map out nearby we’re making for dinner. car washes and turn it Sometimes I’ll call her into a competition. They from the car, and she’ll keep score on each car say, “I better let you go, so wash’s price, length, you can drive safe!” strength and aesthetic. A few weeks ago, I I adore her ideas for surprised her by shipping By Jennifer Tormo making a French fry her a king cake. She charcuterie-style board nearly cried when she with tastings from local restaurants, opened the box; she was so happy. and for making cars, rockets and I love how she shouts into the phone trucks out of Amazon boxes to stage sometimes to make sure I can hear her your own “drive-in movie night.” properly, almost as if talking louder It brought me back to my own might bridge the 900 miles between childhood memories: My dad teaching her home and mine. me to swim. Catching butterflies with But mostly, I love how the last year my mom. Having my hair cut by my has brought us closer. She has grown grandma. Building forts from sheets even tighter with my mom and the with my brother. rest of her children, too, as we’ve all When I interviewed Regina tried to be there for her through the Adams about how she started a kid’s ups and downs of the last year. clothing line with her twins, I loved The pandemic has given me a talking with her sons, Channing and massive push to stay in better contact Kingston, as they bounced in and out with my family and loved ones, of the room during our chat. especially those who don’t live close to But what touched me the most me. Witnessing so much loss around was Regina’s story. She told me how the world puts things into perspective. launching a business with her 8-yearIt’s a sharp reminder how precious olds has deepened their bond. and fleeting life is. Regina lets the boys pitch ideas and Unfortunately, my family has expeapprove designs. During the creative rienced its own string of tragedies over process, their relationship goes beyond the last year, including the recent loss a parent-child connection. They of my uncle. My cousins are shattered become closer to peers, or mentors by the loss of their dad. Though they and mentees. are in their 20s now, the thing they I hope their business continues to keep saying over and over is: “There is flourish, and they get to work together so much we never got to do with him.” as collaborators when the boys grow It’s had me thinking nonstop into adolescence and beyond. about the relationships between They’ve inspired me to take a child and a parent. About how up projects with my family, like important the memories we make scrapbooking my grandma’s recipes or together are. About how formative upcycling furniture with my mom. those experiences are as we build our Because we have to stay connected futures and the rest of our lives. and keep calling each other. And we Editing this month’s cover story should never stop making memories reminded me how the best adventures together—even when we’re grown up. from my upbringing were almost

REACH JENNIFER TORMO AT JENNIFER@225BATONROUGE.COM. 225batonrouge.com  |  [225] April 2021 

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FRAMED //

In every issue of 225, you’ll find a free print on this page. FRAMED celebrates life and art in Baton Rouge, each one featuring a local photographer, place or graphic designer. Cut it out to hang in your cubicle, or frame it for your home gallery wall. Show us where you hang them by tagging them on social media with #225prints.

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PAINTING BY DAVID GARY / facebook.com/davidgaryart GET FEATURED We love spotlighting local photographers, artists and designers for this page! Shoot us an email at editor@225batonrouge.com to chat about being included.

[225 April 2021  |  225batonrouge.com

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BRING BACK

ADVENTURE.

So much to see. So much to do. Talk with the Louisiana leader in minimally invasive spine surgery about all the places a life without back pain can take you.

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BATON ROUGE • PRAIRIEVILLE • WALKER

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[225] Magazine - April 2021  

[225] Magazine - April 2021