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BUSINESS REPORT’S

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OPIOID nightmares THE EPIDEMIC HITS BATON ROUGE HARD

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CONTENTS

BUSINESS REPORT’S

WHAT’S NEW IN

HEALTH CARE 2017

COVER STORY

6 OPIOID

NIGHTMARES The epidemic hits Baton Rouge hard

Publisher: Rolfe H. McCollister Jr.

EDITORIAL Editorial director: Penny Font Special projects editor: Jerry Martin Contributing writers: Melissa Bienvenu, Maggie Heyn Richardson Contributing photographers: Don Kadair, Nicholas Martino

ADVERTISING Sales director: Jill Stokeld Account executives: J.C. Applewhite, Angie LaPorte Chief marketing officer: Elizabeth McCollister Marketing assistant: Katelyn Oglesby Community liaison: Jeanne McCollister McNeil Advertising coordinator: Meagan Delatte

ADMINISTRATION SPONSORED ARTICLES

This special advertising section presents articles from providers, businesses and other organizations on the latest health care programs and options. All contents supplied by the advertisers. 14

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Louisiana Women’s Healthcare The essential three-step guide to better women’s health

Behavioral Intervention Group Baton Rouge learning center underscores scientific benefits of applied behavior analysis for children with autism and other developmental disorders

Woman’s Hospital

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I CARE Live: Promoting prevention

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Executone of Louisiana

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

System integration: A key to workflow and patient satisfaction

Audience development coordinator: Kenna Maranto

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Elevate Wellness Studio

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Baton Rouge General

A publication of Louisiana Business Inc. Chairman: Rolfe H. McCollister Jr. President & CEO: Julio A. Melara Executive assistant: Millie Coon

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Caring for generations: Clinic grows its focus on analytics and coordinated care

NHS Shelley Hendrix Autism Center – Capital Region

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Sherman and Balhoff Orthodontics

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Williamson Eye Center New technologies in eye care

SB Wellness Group Helping local businesses strike the right balance with worksite wellness

I CARE

Opened in June 2017, Elevate meets wellness with an open mind and heart Healing the whole person: Baton Rouge General offers Hidden Scar Surgery for breast cancer patients

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana

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Baton Rouge Ear, Nose and Throat Associates New solutions for relieving chronic sinusitis

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Subscriptions/Customer Service 9029 Jefferson Highway, Suite 300 Baton Rouge, LA 70809 225-421-8181 BusinessReport.com email: subscriptions@businessreport.com

Louisiana Regenerative Medicine Center Cutting-edge stem cell therapy helps Baton Rouge man get back on the course

More than smiles

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Focus on wellness, technology keeps Ochsner ahead of the curve

Innovative new tool helps Blue Cross customers shop smart for health care services

The S.H.A.C. provides new, local resources for autistic youth entering adult life

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PRODUCTION/DESIGN Production director: Melanie Samaha Art director: Hoa Van Vu Graphic designers: Tammi deGeneres, Melinda Gonzalez, Rachel Parker, Emily Witt

Woman’s Hospital launches pregnancy and baby app

Baton Rouge Clinic

Ochsner – Baton Rouge

Chief financial officer: Jonathan Percle Senior business associate: Lydia Spano Office coordinator: Debbie Lamonica Courier: Jim Wainwright Receptionist: Cathy Brown

© Copyright 2017 by Louisiana Business Incorporated. All rights reserved by LBI. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. Business address: 9029 Jefferson Hwy., Suite 300, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Telephone (225) 928-1700. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Greater Baton Rouge Business Report, 9029 Jefferson Hwy., Suite 300, Baton Rouge, LA 70809. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. No information expressed here constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities.

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COVER STORY

OPIOID nightmares THE EPIDEMIC HITS BATON ROUGE HARD BY MAGGIE HEYN RICHARDSON

ISTOCK

“So far this year, deaths from drug overdoses have surpassed the homicide rate. And it’s been a really bad year for homicides.” DISTRICT ATTORNEY HILLAR MOORE

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IN LATE AUGUST, as drug addiction experts gathered for a community meeting about Baton Rouge’s growing opioid epidemic, District Attorney Hillar Moore took a few minutes to speak to the crowd about how law enforcement is grappling with the crisis. “So far this year, deaths from drug overdoses have surpassed the homicide rate,” said Moore. “And it’s been a really bad year for homicides.” Then, like many who find themselves discussing the nation’s opioid problem, Moore told a story of a family friend—a young white male in his 20s—who had developed an addiction to prescription opiates, and later, heroin. “It’s extremely scary,” said Moore, who was able to report the young man’s

successful recovery after going through Drug Court. “But we need more detox facilities, so we don’t have to rely on law enforcement.” Building steam over the last several years, opioid dependency across the United States has morphed into a mammoth problem that has health care experts, law enforcement officials and policy makers struggling for solutions. Impacting cross-sections of communities, the opioid epidemic is different from other drug wars; it’s rooted in a cultural shift about how pain is treated in America. Opioids are a class of drugs either derived from, or chemically similar to, compounds found in opium poppies. Opioids include legal prescription painkillers like oxycodone whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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“You would not believe the number of soccer moms I see,” says Louis Cataldie, M.D., former East Baton Rouge Parish coroner.

NICHOL AS MARTINO

(OxyContin), hydrocodone (Vicodin), for supplies of the drug. Illicit users with 80% of American heroin users reporting morphine, codeine, fentanyl and others. secret addictions often needed to look no their abuse began with prescription pain Heroin, which is illegal, is also an opioid. further than their neighbor’s medicine medications. It’s created a new class of Opioids bond to opioid receptors in the cabinet, where unused prescriptions sat. In addicts across racial, socioeconomic and human body and brain, blocking pain. In 2014, nearly 2 million Americans abused generational lines. addition to providing pain relief, opioids or were dependent on opioids, according to In 2015, the U.S. saw 33,000 overdose produce feelings of euphoria and relaxthe CDC. deaths across the country, and those numation—especially when misused (taking bers are expected to be significantly higher the wrong dosage, using without a preMORE PRESCRIPTIONS THAN PEOPLE for 2016 after the CDC certifies numbers. scription). They also quickly build both Health care policies in many states have A growing number of addicts are navigating tolerance and physical dependence, which made it harder for addicted patients to “doc an expensive and complex path to recovery, can lead users to take larger and larger doses shop” and for reckless doctors to overprewreaking havoc in families. in order to feel the same relief. scribe. But significant damage has been “You would not believe the number of Between 1999 and 2014, the sale of legal done. Over the last few years in the U.S., soccer moms I see,” says Louis Cataldie, prescription opioid pain killers quadrupled a growing number of opioid addicts have M.D., former East Baton Rouge Parish corin the U.S., according to the Centers for turned to a less expensive, easily attainable oner and an expert in addiction treatment. Disease Control and Prevention. Thousands alternative—street heroin—to get the same State and local officials in Louisiana of patients with varying degrees of discomhigh. According to the National Institute have spent much of 2017 grappling with fort were introduced to “wonder drugs” that on Drug Abuse, prescription opioid misuse how to address Louisiana’s growing crisis, eased their pain and, in many cases, made can be a gateway to heroin, with nearly while addicts of all income levels search them want more. Doctors had been for sustainable treatment options. encouraged by pharmaceutical Louisiana has the sixth highest per “We’ve created a situation companies to prescribe drugs like capita opioid prescription rate in where pain pills have been over- the country—111 prescriptions per OxyContin, often in 30-day supplies even for minor procedures. 100 people. In fact, it’s one of eight prescribed, and where many While plenty of patients didn’t states that have more opioid prepeople have become addicted.” scriptions than residents. Between become addicted to opioid pain killers, middle-class neighborhoods 2012 and 2016, the death rate as a EBR CORONER BEAU CLARK became a robust hunting ground result of opioid overdoses jumped 8

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from 28 to 89 in East Baton Rouge Parish, according to the East Baton Rouge Parish Coroner’s Office. Halfway through 2017, there had already been 53 drug overdose deaths in East Baton Rouge—20 from heroin and 33 from other drugs, which in most cases involve some form of opioid. That number means the parish is on track to hit roughly 106 such deaths by the end of the year—more than any other year on record. Last year, 89 people in East Baton Rouge died from drug overdose deaths, which was the first time drug overdose deaths surpassed homicide numbers. “You assume everyone knows about it, but I tell this story every day to people who don’t yet know the severity,” says Coroner William “Beau” Clark. “In this country, pain has been treated as the fifth vital sign, but it’s the only vital sign that is measured subjectively. We’ve created a situation where pain pills have been overprescribed, and where many people have become addicted.” Families struggling with the crisis must navigate feelings of shame as well as a long path to recovery, says Todd Hamilton, executive director of O’Brien House, an addiction recovery nonprofit in Baton Rouge. “It’s very hard on families,” he says. “And

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it takes long-term commitment to recovery—for the rest of your life—to make it work.” LOUISIANA REACTS Earlier this year, the Louisiana Legislature passed three new laws to address the opioid epidemic. House Bill 192 by New Orleans Democratic Rep. Helena Moreno implements a seven-day limit on first-time prescriptions for acute pain, down from what have often been 30-day prescriptions. The law allows for exceptions for chronically ill patients or other circumstances. The longer patients take opioid pain killers, such as oxycodone or hydrocodone, the likelier long-term dependency becomes. Moreover, a person quickly builds up a tolerance to the drug, causing them to crave a higher dosage to get the same effect. A study completed this year by the University of Arkansas School for Medical Sciences found that 13.5% of patients who took opioids for eight days or more were still using them one year later. Cataldie says that patients under the age of 30 are even more susceptible to addiction. “The younger you are, the more vulnerable your brain is to these drugs,” says Cataldie.

“I don’t go anywhere that someone doesn’t tell me a personal story about a friend or family member or someone they know who is suffering from this disease.” JAN KASOFSKY, CAPITAL AREA HUMAN SERVICES DISTRICT

The Legislature also passed Senate Bill 55 by Republican Sen. Fred Mills of Parks, which strengthens the Louisiana Prescription Monitoring Program, a database for physicians and pharmacists. Before writing prescriptions, doctors must check the prescription monitoring program and recheck it every 90 days to ensure addicted patients are not changing doctors to avoid suspicion. House Bill 490 by Rep. Walt Leger, a New Orleans Democrat, creates a 13-member advisory council on heroin and opioid prevention and education. Also this year, the Capital Area Human Services District formed the Behavioral Health Collaborative, a large group of local experts in the field of addiction and other areas to address how agencies should work together to address the epidemic, particularly as new funding begins to flow into Louisiana from the federal government.

“I don’t go anywhere that someone doesn’t tell me a personal story about a friend or family member or someone they know who is suffering from this disease. It’s horrible,” says Jan Kasofsky, Ph.D., Capital Area Human Services District executive director. “The word ‘epidemic’ is not being used lightly.” In May, the Louisiana Department of Health was awarded an $8.1 million State Targeted Response grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Hospitals to address three main goals: increasing awareness of prevention and treatment, increasing the number of addicts who have access to evidence-based treatment, and increasing recovery support services. The primary populations to be served by the grant are uninsured or under-insured individuals. There’s a serious need for these kinds of services, says Denise Dugas, executive

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director for Mental and Behavioral Health at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center. “We’re seeing a lot of new patients looking for help, wanting to detox and get into treatment,” says Dugas. “What we’re finding is a lack of long-term resources.” Dugas says OLOL saw a 2,000-patient increase for mental and behavioral health cases in the emergency room between fiscal years 2016 and 2017. Opioid Use Disorder cases are included in this category. “Even patients with insurance can face a lot of challenges in dealing with this,” says Dugas. “They might really want to do an outpatient program, so they can keep their jobs, but their insurance only pays for an inpatient program.”

Dr. Jan Kasofsky, Capital Area Human Services District executive director, speaks at a meeting on the opioid epidemic at CAHS on Aug. 25, 2017, in Baton Rouge.

“We’re seeing a lot of new patients looking for help, wanting to detox and get into treatment. What we’re finding is a lack of long-term resources.”

NICHOL AS MARTINO

DENISE DUGAS, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR FOR MENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH, OLOL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

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THE PATH TO RECOVERY Historically, the dominant philosophy of addiction programs has been “abstinence-only,” in which addicts learn to admit their addiction, give up abusing drugs or alcohol, and use therapy or 12-step programs to help them stay clean long-term. Opioid addiction recovery, however, also deploys medication-assisted treatment or MAT, which includes drugs like methadone, a regulated drug therapy that has been used for decades to reduce heroin and other narcotic addictions, and more recently Suboxone, which inhibits opioid cravings. “The focus today is really on what’s called ‘harm reduction,’” says Kasofsky. “When patients move to medication-assisted treatment, they can often work and carry on their daily lives while working through the recovery.” MAT therapy can also lessen the threat of relapse, which can be particularly dangerous for heroin addicts, says Kasofsky. “Relapse is part of recovery, but it’s so dangerous in the case of heroin,” Kasofsky Continued on page 46 whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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[ LOUISIANA

W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H C A R E ]

The essential three-step guide to better women’s health

YOUR BEST LIFE begins with your optimal health. As you move through the seasons of your life, your health care needs evolve over time, with unique needs from adolescence through reproductive age, through post-menopause, and all stages in between. We recently sat down with local physician leaders in obstetrics and gynecology, and learned that while women’s health care is somewhat complicated, the path to a productive patient-physician care partnership is relatively simple. After visiting with four of the 32 physicians from Louisiana Women’s Healthcare (LWH is located in Baton Rouge and is the largest obstetrics and gynecology clinic in our state), it’s clear that the path to your best health includes three essential steps. STEP 1 – KNOWLEDGE IS POWER Women are empowered when informed and healthy: start with your gynecologist. All women should be aware of potential health risks, and seek insight into key factors for obtaining and maintaining optimal health over the years. Talk to your gynecologist to find out about important screenings, symptoms and risks related to your obstetrical needs, breast health, gynecological needs and hormonal balance. Discuss your family history with your physician to understand your personal health risks and to determine whether you would benefit from specialized testing or other surveillance. 14

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“Your best health is the cornerstone of your best life. And although you may live a healthy lifestyle and be blessed with great genes, the human experience often includes unexpected health challenges. Awareness leads to prevention and early detection. Quite often problems that are found early may be easier to treat, may be less likely to pose serious health risks, and may result in less invasive treatment. I encourage my patients to actively remain current with their personal health information, and to take time to maintain regular dialogue and reviews with their physician. Early detection saves lives, and it begins with knowing the facts,” says Dr. Michael Perniciaro. In addition to arming your personal health database with facts during breast and gynecologic cancer screenings, women are encouraged to utilize their gynecologist as a key resource for: • genetic testing • STI screening • immunizations/HPV vaccine • osteoporosis screening • menopause management • family planning • contraceptive management STEP 2 – TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR WELL BEING Make annual visits to your gynecologist a top priority. Well-woman exams should be a standing protocol. It is one of the most

important steps that women of all ages can take to protect their health. Women need screening for breast and gynecologic cancers. The annual well-woman exam is an opportunity to discuss prevention and screening of sexually transmitted infections, including HPV and high-risk HPV strains. It is also a good time for pre-pregnancy planning. Creating a long-term relationship with a trusted OB/GYN to be your care partner through the seasons of your life often begins with a well-woman visit. From your first well-woman visit to the birth of your first child, your physician will understand your health history and be able to monitor changes which may need to be addressed and be your expert source for women’s wellness. “The annual exam is much more than a Pap test—it is a time for a woman to focus on her own well-being with blood pressure monitoring, breast and pelvic examinations, cardiac disease preventions, and fertility or family planning discussions,” says Dr. Nicole Chauvin. “It is a time for her to have her questions answered and concerns addressed. It’s also our opportunity to bond with the patient and become in-tune with her specific needs. A current history and physical, as well as the personal connection, prepares us to respond more rapidly to any unexpected health challenges that might arise.” whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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“Women who have had hysterectomies are still advised to continue annual appointments,” explains Dr. O’Neil Parenton III. “The decision to continue to perform a Pap test at the well-woman visit is based on whether your cervix was removed, why the hysterectomy was needed and whether you have a history of cervical cell changes or cervical cancer. While the Pap test is often a component of the annual visit, there is much more that is accomplished.” Regular screenings are a priority for routine women’s health care. These screenings look for diseases before symptoms develop, increasing chances of early detection which can lead to improved outcomes. “Based on a patient’s age and risk factors, we may recommend screenings such as mammography, Pap test, osteoporosis screening, hereditary risk assessment, colorectal and infection screening,” explains Dr. Frank Breaux. Regular screenings for gynecological cancers are especially important, as these diseases affect thousands of women every year. Early diagnosis and treatment of these diseases vastly improves a woman’s chance of survival. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2017 in the U.S. there will be an estimated 252,710 new cases of breast cancer and 40,610 estimated deaths. However, trends indicate breast cancer survival rates continue to rise. Breast self-awareness and mammograms are the tools for early detection of breast cancer, when the chances of survival are highest. “Breast self-education is a prime example of how a woman can take control of her health and be a proactive collaborator with her doctors in early detection,” says Dr. Perniciaro. Women should report any changes in their breast whatsnewinhealthcare.com

to their doctor. For more information on the breast self-education (BSE), visit LWHA.com. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourages breast self-education for women ages 20 and older, and clinical breast exams may be offered every 1-3 years for women aged 25-39 years and annually for women 40 years and older. Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable cancers. Sadly, an estimated 12,820 women will be diagnosed with the disease in 2017. In the past 30 years, the use of the Pap test has successfully reduced cervical cancer deaths by more than 50%. Medical advances, such as the HPV vaccine and testing for high-risk HPV, have and will continue to dramatically decrease rates of cervical cancer. Dr. Breaux also notes, “In addition to cervical cancer, Pap tests detect pre-cancerous conditions and certain types of infections which need treatment.” Half of all cervical cancer occurs in women between the ages of 35 and 55. ACOG recommends regular cervical cancer screenings in patients starting at the age of 21 and through the age of 65—or longer based on individual risk factors. Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate out of all types of gynecologic cancer and is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women, with an estimated 22,400 new cases this year. Ovarian cancer rates are highest in women aged 55-64 years. STEP 3 – SEEK PROPER PRENATAL CARE & POSTPARTUM CARE Having a healthy pregnancy is one of the

best ways to promote a healthy birth, but it is also a pivotal factor in the health care journey for the mom. Early and regular prenatal care improves chances of the best outcome for both the baby and the mom. This care can begin even before pregnancy with a preconception care visit with your OB/GYN. By having regular prenatal care visits with your obstetrician, you will be able to manage your health and your baby’s health. This is the opportunity to create the optimum environment for your baby’s development and to care for your body and health through the challenges unique to pregnancy. The earlier you begin prenatal care, the better you can plan for a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. The planning and preparation starts before pregnancy. Dr. Parenton shares that women’s health care needs take on new demands during pregnancy. “Are prenatal vitamins really necessary? Yes. And not all vitamins are created equally. The importance of folic acid during the first 30 days of pregnancy—and ideally before pregnancy—is critical in reducing birth defects. Two crucial nutrients—folic acid and iron—are critical for a healthy pregnancy and affect the health of both the baby and the mom. Taking folic acid before conception and very early in the pregnancy may even lower the risk of preeclampsia. During this special time in a woman’s life, our top priority and concern is focused on both her health and the health of her developing baby.” “There are many post-pregnancy body changes that no one tells you about but which can alter a woman’s health for the rest of her life,” Dr. Breaux adds. “Many exciting changes just happened over the previous nine months. From learning you were pregnant through welcoming your new born into this world. Your body has worked hard to create and grow a new life. It’s important to recognize that your body and hormones have also gone through changes during this time. Postpartum care is the follow-through to your delivery, and the beginning to addressing your health care needs after this life-changing event.” Schedule an appointment with one of our 32 OB/GYN physicians at (225) 201-2010. Louisiana Women’s Healthcare is at 500 Rue de la Vie, Ste. 100, Baton Rouge, La., 70817, or visit us on the web at LWHA.com. W H AT ’ S N E W I N H E A LT H C A R E 2 0 1 7

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[ B E H AV I O R A L I N T E R V E N T I O N G R O U P ]

Baton Rouge learning center underscores scientific benefits of applied behavior analysis for children with autism and other developmental disorders BIG therapists follow the model described by acclaimed autism expert Dr. O. Ivar Lovaas: “If they can’t learn the way we teach, we teach the way they learn.” Therefore, data-based decisions are made as necessary to ensure that each child continually makes progress. BIG’s scope of practice includes addressing speech and language skills, social skills, self-care skills and motor skills, as well as any aberrant behaviors. Numerous studies have demonstrated that children who receive more than 25 hours per week of ABA for more than one year make tremendous gains, with some participants achieving functioning within the average range for their age. While ABA is vital to BIG’s BIG’s scope of practice includes addressing speech and language skills, social skills, self-care skills and motor skills, as well as any approach, the importance of early aberrant behaviors. intervention is critical. Studies THE ONLY LEARNING center in the Gulf “With such a wide range of skills that we show that the most effective results of South accredited by Comprehensive Appliteach, it is less about what we are teaching continued ABA therapy can be seen when a cation of Behavior Analysis to Schooling and more about how we teach it,” explained child starts an ABA program at a young age. (CABAS®), Behavioral Intervention Group Katie Jenkins, a behavior analyst at BIG. “When a young child begins ABA, the (BIG) offers a variety of services designed to “Our therapeutic approach is based on the developmental gap between the child and help children with autism and other develbelief that the repertoire of a child with an his peers could be very small; however, if opmental disorders find their path to grow autism spectrum disorder is missing some these deficits go unaddressed, the gap can on. Taking an individualized, collaborative of the skills necessary for that child to learn expand as he matures,” Jenkins says. “The and compassionate approach to learning from his natural environment in the same earlier a child can receive intensive ABA and growth through applied behavior analymanner that typically developing children services, the faster his learning and social sis (ABA), BIG provides the skills, teaching do. We strive to close this developmental deficits can be addressed.” environments and learning opportunities gap by offering an approach to learning In BIG’s Little Learners classroom, necessary to improve the quality of life for based on the proven principles of ABA.” children as young as 1 year receive full-day each student and their families. ABA services. Each child follows an indiUtilizing ABA, BIG’s ultimate goal is to AN INDIVIDUALIZED APPROACH vidualized program, which focuses on the help children unlock their full potential. Another important feature of BIG’s prerequisites for speech and language develWidely recognized as the most effective comprehensive full-time ABA program is opment, as well as social and pre-academic method for treating autism and other the 1:1 student-therapist ratio. Especially skills, manifesting in a mastery of play skills developmental disorders, ABA is a scientiffor children with lower levels of verbal and communication skills. Jenkins likes to ically proven method based on the analysis behavior, the 1:1 student-therapist ratio remind parents that “it’s never too early” to of why certain actions are taken and how is imperative to progress as it allows for start ABA services for children with autism certain skills are learned by the child, then increased opportunities for the children to or other developmental disorders. using that knowledge to teach a new skill or learn. For each student, a licensed behavior concept. ABA’s basic teaching tool is simanalyst designs an individualized program WORK AND PLAY ple—reinforcement. Using ABA principles, in order to address the developmental defiDue to the comprehensive and buildable BIG’s team of dedicated therapists reward cits the child may have. The line therapist nature of ABA, BIG’s full-time ABA classand reinforce appropriate behaviors in order implements the programs with the child room allows for maximum reinforcement of to bring about and encourage the repetition while monitoring the child’s progress on an positive behaviors, and therefore, maximum of these behaviors. ongoing basis. growth. 16

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Jenkins explains, “While an entire day of ABA might seem like a lot of time, we are actually working on multiple functional skills throughout the day and focusing on what motivates the child to learn in various environments. The majority of the time, it’s almost indistinguishable when a child is ‘working’ versus when he is ‘playing.’” Starting in the Little Learners classroom, therapists aim to encourage the child to communicate, increase his community of reinforcers and increase his play skills. As he advances, the goals are similar, but the focus may include more complex language development, teaching children how to play cooperatively in a group setting and how to learn with less support from adults. Peer models, a unique feature of BIG, are another important component of the Little Learners classroom. Peer models provide the children with learning deficits the opportunity to see and interact with their typically developing peers, and in turn allow therapists to better facilitate the appropriate language and play skills throughout the session. Jenkins states, “These peer models offer something that adults could never teach:

The 1:1 student-therapist ratio is imperative to progress as it allows for increased opportunities for the children to learn.

spontaneity and excitement.” As students mature and excel, BIG grows with them. BIG has now expanded to teach elementary-aged children, which includes

Turning

POTENTIAL into PROGRESS

access to the Life Skills Lab where functional living skills are taught in a mock apartment setting. In addition to the comprehensive ABA program, BIG offers a variety of services for children with and without developmental disorders, including the Developmental Pre-K/Kindergarten program, academic tutoring, social skills groups and parent coaching services. BIG is the only learning center in the Greater Baton Rouge Area that provides full-time ABA services to its students. BIG is also the only CABAS®-accredited learning center in the Gulf South. CABAS®, a research-driven systemwide approach, provides individualized programs for children with disabilities. Its specific applied behavior analysis program designed for the school environment offers a proven, effective teaching system designed around the individual. BIG’s CABAS® accreditation ensures that the systematic scientific procedures, in conjunction with ABA, help children find and develop the skills they need to grow and learn independently. For more information about BIG, Little Learners or other ABA therapy programs, visit big-br.com or call (225) 757-8002.

At BIG, the Gulf South’s only CABAS® accredited learning center, we specialize in providing the necessary skills and learning opportunities to nurture and advance your child’s academic, social and behavioral development. For children with autism spectrum disorders or other behavior/learning disorders, our science-driven approach provides you and your child with:

Highly individualized programs

Monitored and measured results

Peer Models

1:1 Child-instructor ratio

big-br.com | 225.757.8002

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[ WOMAN’S

H O S P I TA L ]

Woman’s Hospital launches pregnancy and baby app SOME WOMEN CRAVE pickles during pregnancy; others crave ice cream. Some women even crave a concoction of the two. But there’s one thing almost all women crave during pregnancy: knowledge. With Woman’s Hospital’s new app, knowledge is at their fingertips. The “Woman’s Pregnancy” app offers educational resources and helpful tools for expectant moms to utilize throughout pregnancy and after baby arrives. It combines medical information from trusted sources with the best features from the most popular apps. EDUCATION Delivering more than 8,500 babies each year, Woman’s is in a unique position to improve the health of women and infants by educating women on healthier pregnancies and significantly increasing breastfeeding rates. The Woman’s Pregnancy app was designed to be a comprehensive resource for pregnant and breastfeeding women; it includes all of the educational information that Woman’s recently published in a pregnancy journal. Through the app, a woman can learn about living a healthy lifestyle, nutrition, exercise and breastfeeding. It provides her with information about not only how her baby is growing, but how her body is changing as well. Additional education includes information about postpartum depression, safe medications, safe sleep, when to seek medical attention and more. “Education is an essential part of a healthy pregnancy,” said Cheri Johnson, Woman’s vice president of perinatal services. “Through the Woman’s Pregnancy app, we’re able to share our expertise with women all across the country, furthering our mission to improve the health of women and infants.” PREGNANCY & LABOR TOOLS Using the app, a woman can enter her due date and then track her baby’s week-byweek development, from poppy seed-size in week four to watermelon-size in week 40. To-do lists will remind her to get on daycare 18

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waiting lists and add her baby to her insurance plan. The kick counter will help her track little flutters and karate chops, and the contraction timer will let her know when it’s time to head to the hospital. TRACKING BREASTFEEDING AND DIAPER CHANGES Women will find the app useful beyond pregnancy as well. The breastfeeding and pumping tool will help women easily track

breastfeeding sessions. Research shows that breast milk provides health advantages beginning at birth and continuing over a lifetime. These include a stronger immune system and fewer respiratory illnesses, ear infections and gastrointestinal issues. New mothers also benefit; weight loss occurs more rapidly, and breastfeeding may reduce the incidence of certain types of cancer. Tracking feedings also offers parents insight into baby’s hunger patterns and helps them establish a routine based on baby’s needs. The app also features a diaper change log to help new parents keep track of baby’s wet and dirty diapers; this is the best way for a breastfeeding mother to know if her baby is getting enough to eat. Beyond including educational information and helpful tools like the breastfeeding tracker and diaper change log, the app also includes fun features, such as tools to store favorite baby names, ultrasound photos and journal entries. The free app was created in collaboration with Baton Rouge-based software firm Envoc. It is now available in the App Store; simply search “Woman’s Pregnancy.” An Android version is currently in development. whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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you positively need our app We combined the best features from the most popular pregnancy and baby apps to create the only one you’ll need!

Weekly Tracker To-Do Lists Education

Contraction Timer

Feeding Tracker Diaper Change Log

Other features include a pregnancy journal, bump photos, kick counter, weight tracker and more. Woman’s

whatsnewinhealthcare.com

I 100 Woman’s Way I womans.org

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[ THE

B AT O N R O U G E C L I N I C ]

DON K ADAIR

Caring for generations: Clinic grows its focus on analytics and coordinated care

INNOVATIONS IN TECHNOLOGY continue to change the landscape in health care. The combination of physician expertise and medical analytics can positively affect clinical outcomes. The Baton Rouge Clinic, AMC, is now using clinical informatics to outreach to patients for prevention and awareness. Giving practicing physicians access to their patients’ complete medical data in an electronic format allows physicians to review and analyze personal patient information so that proactive steps can be taken to prevent potential illness. Focusing on HEDIS (Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set) outcomes, the Clinic has reached high benchmarks for colorectal cancer screening, breast cancer screening, high-risk medication monitoring, cholesterol control and diabetes management. Though health care is rapidly changing, one focus has always been sacred at the Clinic: the doctor-patient relationship. This concept remains core to the Clinic’s culture and mission. As we begin our 71st year of service to the Greater Baton Rouge community we are mindful of the ongoing recovery efforts in our area and realize that care for those who are ailing is needed now more than ever. From four founding doctors to now more than 100 physicians and 17 specialties, the 20

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Clinic has grown to serve the needs of the community and is now the largest independent physician group in the state. In 2018, the Clinic will participate in a Medicare ACO (accountable care organization) with Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady Health System. This participation will continue the Clinic’s efforts in care coordination and population health. The Clinic is also planning to implement an integrated behavioral health program tied to its population health efforts. Through the years the Clinic has achieved recognition and awards for excellence from various sectors of the health care industry. The Clinic’s patient satisfaction scores have remained above 97%—significantly higher than regional and national benchmarks; insurance companies have recognized the Clinic’s high quality and lower cost outcomes; and national organizations such as American Medical Group Foundation, the National Committee for Quality Assurance and American Diabetes Association have bestowed accolades upon the Clinic. The Clinic’s original office was a small space above The Pig & Whistle Restaurant, located on Plank Road. The Clinic is now located at 7373 Perkins Road in a 170,000-square-foot building, along with an Urgent Care Center, a satellite office in

New Roads and a second satellite office on Industriplex Boulevard. The office on Industriplex Boulevard is from the merger of The Pediatric Clinic with the Baton Rouge Clinic, which also increased the Pediatric Department from 16 pediatricians to 21. Our motto, “Caring for Generations,” is very appropriate. “In this day and age you can’t simply practice medicine,” says Ed Silvey, Clinic CEO. “You must have an impact on the community. And in our 70 years here, we feel we have touched the lives of thousands.” Besides being an innovative, collaborative leader in transforming the health care delivery system, the Clinic continues to give back to the community through St. Vincent de Paul’s Fill a Prescription Campaign, Pat’s Coats for Kids, Feed a Family Campaign and Hand it On, to name a few. Thanks to the dreams and dedication of its founders and its many other physicians and employees through the years, the Baton Rouge Clinic has grown from modest beginnings providing routine health care to a full-service, regional health care provider of the 21st Century. Despite the changing landscape in health care, the Clinic continues to be a trusted, familiar place for quality, compassionate care. whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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From routine healthcare needs needs to highly medical procedures, we have been From routine healthcare tospecialized highly specialized medical procedures, providing quality, compassionate care forcompassionate nearly 70 years...Caring for70 Generations. we have been providing quality, care for years...

Caring for Generations.

A Host of Specialty Doctors

Allergy • Dermatology • Endocrinology • ENT • Gastroenterology • Neurology On-Site Specialties and Services: OptometryAllergy • Pediatric Neurology • Pulmonology • Rheumatology • SurgerySurgery • Urology Gastroenterology Pediatric Neurology

Dermatology Internal Lab & Radiology Pediatric Psychology Urgent Care Endocrinology Neurology Pulmonology Urology Baton Rouge Clinic is open 7 days a week. No Appointment Necessary! ENT Urgent Care Optometry Rheumatology

The Baton Clinic Baton Rouge Clinic Urgent Care: 7479 Perkins Road – at the Rouge corner of Essen-&Main: Perkins | (225) 246-9997 7373 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, (225) 769-4044 • www.BatonRougeClinic.com • LA 70808 The Baton - Pediatrics 7373 Perkins Road, Rouge BatonClinic Rouge, LA 70808at Industriplex: 12351 Industriplex Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA 70809

(225) 769-4044 • www.BatonRougeClinic.com • Baton Rouge Clinic Urgent Care is open 7 days a week. No Appointment Necessary! 7479 Perkins Road - at the corner of Essen and Perkins | (225) 246-9997

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[ NHS

S H E L L E Y H E N D R I X AU T I S M C E N T E R – C A P I TA L R E G I O N ]

The S.H.A.C. provides new resources for young adults with autism DO YOU REMEMBER your first job? Maybe you cut grass, stocked grocery shelves or bussed tables at a local restaurant. Whatever you did, you had to learn skills that were building blocks for your next job; while some were already developed, sheer experience helped you develop others. Today, as young adults move toward job readiness, similar issues confront them—they have an unsure, underdeveloped skill set, but they seek opportunities for gainful work experience to grow themselves. This cycle of skill attainment and meaningful employment is something every generation experiences, but there is a swelling population of young adults out there struggling to find their niche unlike any other generation. These young adults, who are also diagnosed with physical, mental and cognitive ability disabilities, have been unable to reap the same rewards that their peers have been able to achieve—but that is about to change. In the Capital Region, a special group of individuals have made it a core mission to serve and treat those youth transitioning to adulthood with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In March of 2017, NHS opened the NHS Shelley Hendrix Autism Center – Capital Region (The S.H.A.C.), bringing its passion and promise in serving individuals with ASD to those up to age 21 and their families. The S.H.A.C. offers applied behavioral analysis treatment and habilitation services for individuals through age 21, an invaluable community addition for families struggling to find viable treatment options for their older children. Additionally, The S.H.A.C. provides a variety of other programs and services including the Bee Me Center, a developmental pre-K, educational services for students who require a higher level of care 22

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in the public-school system, clinical speech therapy and occupational therapy services. MAKING THE TRANSITION Within these programs, NHS has developed an innovative transition track designed to teach students and young adults the tools necessary for their pathway to self-sufficiency. Facilitated by highly trained transition staff, these programs utilize evidenced-based assessments, therapeutic models and curriculums to develop highly individualized transition plans for building blocks of the compensatory strategies needed to bolster daily living proficiencies, social development, community integration, and an array of soft and hard employment-related skills. The S.H.A.C., conveniently located in

Baton Rouge near I-10 and Jefferson Highway, features several transition classrooms and a complete model residential home, which will serve as an acquisition center for the skills of independent living. The transition “home” provides a working lab for daily living skills and a student-run community enterprise where students will learn aspects of working in a business. The NHS Transition program incorporates two tracks comprised of basic life skill development and vocational employment activities. Both tracks focus on the end goal of sustained community-based employment and skills to achieve greater levels of independence, allowing students to effectively navigate their own community. The program also engages families as active partners in advocating for their children, while also supporting the families’ role, which further enhances the transfer of these learned skills at home and in the community. NHS always strives to identify first an individual’s strengths and gifts, then teach to a structure custom-designed for each person with ASD that accompanies them anywhere they go, whether that is home, work or out in the community for recreational purposes. Consistency is key regardless of the environment. A PARTNERSHIP THAT WORKS For young adults with ASD to achieve their goals of self-sufficiency and independence, it takes a partnership beyond the families living with autism and the S.H.A.C. No one understands that better than Central residents Steve and Sharon Whitlow. The Whitlows have experienced living with autism, and to ensure their son had a place to land in the world, they founded the Gateway Transition Center and Gateway Ink in August 2014. Every day whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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NHS has developed an innovative transition track designed to teach students and young adults the tools necessary for their pathway to self-sufficiency. Gateway works diligently to respond to a need for specialized transition services for individuals with autism transitioning from high school to adulthood. In spring 2017, the S.H.A.C. and Gateway Transition Center established a working partnership to raise awareness among the business community of the needs and value this group can bring to the workforce. Working together with Unlocking Autism and other area nonprofits, the Genesis Employment Coalition seeks to develop a consortium of regional employers who can support training and employment opportunities for teenagers and adults with ASD.

Shelley Hendrix

The NHS transition program opens its doors in fall 2017 to those with ASD seeking pathways to self-sufficiency, independence and an opportunity to achieve these goals together. Creating a full continuum of care and learning from pre-kindergarten to a life of independence as an adult is now possible thanks to NHS. Hope in the Capital Region for those living with autism has never been brighter. For more information regarding program referrals and admissions, please contact the NHS Shelley Hendrix Autism Center Director, Al Tuminello, at (225) 960-7689 or visit nhsonline.org/services-education-autism.html.

ENROLL IN 1, 2, OR ALL OF THE SERVICES IN THE NHS AUTISM CENTER CONTINUUM Acceptable forms of payment include Medicaid, Commercial Insurance & self-pay.

NHS EDUCATION SERVICES • Provides services for students with autism, ages 5-21 • Partners with your home school district • Specializes in educational techniques with a foundation in ABA curriculum tailored to maximize each student’s potential • Teaches Transition Services for students to successfully enter adulthood

BEE ME CENTER -

Coming Soon!

• Kindergarten Readiness program for children of all abilities, ages 3-5 • Specializes in children with autism and other developmental delays • Utilizes the research-based Creative Curriculum and Teaching Strategies GOLD Assessment Tool

ABA THERAPY

SPECIALIZED THERAPY

• Provides services for students, ages 2-20 • Provides center-based services • Home-based services - Coming Soon!

• Provides services for students, ages 2-20 • Specializes in Speech and Language, and Occupational Therapies

We pride ourselves in offering supports to enhance social skills and peer to peer interactions across all service offerings.

CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION AND A TOUR! 9150 Bereford Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 | 225.960.7689 | www.nhsonline.org whatsnewinhealthcare.com

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[ SHERMAN

AND BALHOFF ORTHODONTICS]

More than smiles A HEALTHY, BRIGHT, confident smile is priceless and so important to social and career success and long-term health. Oral health extends beyond a regular dental check-up. While having straight teeth is aesthetically pleasing, it also plays a large part in the overall health and function of your smile. Along with the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO), Dr. Stephen Sherman and Dr. David Balhoff recommend that a child’s first visit to an orthodontic specialist should occur at age 7 or even earlier if a problem is noted by the parents, family dentist or physician. “It is important to pay attention if your child has oral habits because they have the potential to affect their oral health,” says Dr. Balhoff. “An early orthodontic evaluation is a valuable preventative measure in controlling dental and skeletal irregularities in a growing child, like those caused by thumb sucking and also tonsil and adenoid issues.” This may involve interceptive treatment, controlling habits or simply periodically monitoring the patient’s growth. In this way, the timing of treatment can be correlated with the best skeletal, dental and psychological maturation level for each patient. Orthodontic treatment is often viewed as an option for only children and teenagers. However, the alignment of teeth can be changed at any age as long as the supporting structures and gums are healthy. There

are a variety of treatments that are designed for different age groups, including adults. An orthodontist is a highly trained specialist who has not only graduated as a doctor of dental surgery, but has also completed a two- to three-year post-graduate residency program. Dr. Sherman and Dr. Balhoff have a combined 41 years of experience in orthodontics. Continuing their education and training is extremely important to them, as well as the education and training of their staff. With 155 years of experience among the entire team, they collectively possess various certifications such as Expanded Duty Dental Assistant (E.D.D.A.) and Certified Orthodontic Assistant (C.O.A.). TYPES OF BRACES The two types of traditional braces are metal and ceramic. Both are affixed to the teeth and wires are threaded through the slots in the brackets. Metal braces are

“We enjoy treating families and developing relationships with them,” says Dr. Sherman. “It’s almost like becoming part of their family.” generally made of stainless steel and have built-in memory clips that hold the wires to the brackets. This provides an almost frictionless/low-energy method of tooth movement. It is common for adolescents to choose metal braces since they have the ability to change the colors of the ligatures. Ceramic braces are made of tooth-colored ceramic or porcelain materials, making them next-to-invisible. Most adults typically desire the ceramic braces because of the low-profile. INVISALIGN® With the Invisalign® system there is one obvious difference from braces, it is virtually invisible. First introduced in the late 1990s as a computerized approach to tooth movement, Invisalign® has gone through numerous software upgrades. Today

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patients’ mouths are scanned and then the orthodontist works directly with Invisalign® to straighten teeth and correct the bite on the computer. They use iTero® scanning and photographic imaging of the patient to help complete the ideal treatment plan. A series of clear plastic trays are produced to gently align the teeth, while wearing each tray 20-22 hours a day. With the development of the new, highly elastic “SmartTrack” aligner material, patients can now change trays each week, which can reduce overall treatment time. Invisalign® is available to all ages and has no restrictions when it comes to diet because aligners are removed when eating. For most adults and adolescents who want to straighten their teeth without metal or ceramic braces, Invisalign® is a great alternative to achieve the same results. STATE-OF-THE-ART IMAGING AND COMFORT Sherman and Balhoff Orthodontics keeps its practice on the forefront of technological breakthroughs, positioning its patients to receive the highest quality of care and allowing them to achieve the same results in a shorter amount of time. These advances in technology lead to a higher level of patient comfort while in treatment. Patient comfort is a top priority at Sherman and Balhoff Orthodontics. In addition to providing innovative solutions to ensure comfort during treatment, they also provide whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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a warm and inviting atmosphere that many describe as feeling “at home” when they walk through the door. “We enjoy treating families and developing relationships with them,” says Dr. Sherman. “It’s almost like becoming part of their family.” NO IMPRESSIONS OR “GAG” Thankfully, old school impressions are no longer the only option. Sherman and Balhoff Orthodontics uses the iTero® scanner to generate a iTero Impressionless 3-D Imaging highly accurate, completely digital 3-D image of the individual characteristics of a patient’s teeth that prints models instantly and saves them and gum tissue. This allows them to obtain in a digital file. precise imagery without the goop or gagging associated with traditional impressions using “MORE THAN SMILES” alginate material. Sherman and Balhoff OrAside from orthodontics, Dr. Sherman thodontics also has an in-house 3-D printer and Dr. Balhoff are both heavily involved in

the community and they have created an overall philanthropic atmosphere within their office and their employees. They support charitable organizations such as: 4theKids, St. Jude’s Dream Day Foundation, Braveheart, Inc., and many more. Dr. Sherman takes an annual trip to Guaimaca, Honduras, where he and a team provide dental services to those in need. Dr. Balhoff dedicates a lot of his time serving on the Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Team at Our Lady of the Lake. Sherman and Balhoff Orthodontics was the first orthodontic practice in the state of Louisiana to participate in Smiles Change Lives, a nonprofit discounted program for kids in need of orthodontic treatment. These are just a few of the many reasons Sherman and Balhoff Orthodontics is “More Than Smiles.”

225.769.1276 | ShermanBalhoff.com ShermanBalhoff SBorthodontics whatsnewinhealthcare.com

8311 Bluebonnet Blvd. Baton Rouge, LA 70810

14465 Wax Rd., Ste. B Central, LA 70818

13375 LA Hwy. 73, Ste. A-B Geismar, LA 70734 W H AT ’ S N E W I N H E A LT H C A R E 2 0 1 7

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[ WILLIAMSON

EYE CENTER]

New technologies in eye care OPHTHALMOLOGY IS ONE of the most technologically advanced specialties in all of medicine. There is constant innovation within this space, with new devices and treatments coming out each quarter. Luckily, residents of south Louisiana have access to these advancements faster than most around the United States. This is because the Williamson Eye Center has been at the forefront of pioneering new technology for decades. Oftentimes when scientists and medical device companies in the ophthalmology community are looking to launch a device in Louisiana they come to Williamson Eye because they trust the skill and expertise of our doctors. Here, we highlight some modern technology that has revolutionized the vision correction, glaucoma and dry eye industries. These innovations have led to a reduced need for glasses and contacts, a reduced need for dry eye and glaucoma drops, better vision, and better quality of life. LASER VISION CORRECTION Age 18-45: Modern wavefront guided bladeless all-laser iLASIK Despite many common myths, modern laser vision correction can now be safely performed in patients with farsightedness, nearsightedness, thin corneas and astigmatism. We see many patients who were told they were not a LASIK candidate, only to find out they were all along with today’s technology. Remember that the LASIK of today has about as much in common with the LASIK of the ’90s as your cell phone has in common with your cell phone in the ’90s. A recent peer-reviewed study, one of the largest of its kind, showed that with modern LASIK over 90% of patients are 20/20 or better and nearly 99% of patients were satisfied with their results! At Williamson Eye, we only perform customized bladeless all-laser iLASIK, as opposed to old mechanical blades that were used in decades past and are still utilized in discount LASIK centers. 26

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Using an all laser approach leads to better precision, accuracy and safety. The wavefront guided technology which has revolutionized the procedure takes into account all the internal aberrations of the patient’s eye, yielding a truly customized treatment for that individual. This procedure is painless, takes only minutes and is one of the safest elective procedures performed in the U.S.

more focusing ability at near range. This procedure is painless and can be completed in minutes. It can also be combined with LASIK surgery to enhance both distance and near vision.

Age 40-59: Raindrop inlay Ever wonder why you’ve seen well your whole life but once you hit 40 reading close up has become difficult without the help of glasses? This is because you have developed dysfunctional lens syndrome. Everyone will develop dysfunctional lens syndrome at some stage. The good news is that ophthalmology now has safe technology to correct this problem and get you seeing without reading glasses again. The Raindrop corneal inlay was recently approved by the FDA, and the Williamson Eye Center was the first in Louisiana to implant the device. The Raindrop is a microscopic, nearly invisible disc made mostly of water that is placed underneath a corneal flap. The Raindrop causes the shape of the cornea to change, which provides whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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The Raindrop is a microscopic, nearly invisible disc made mostly of water that is placed underneath a corneal flap.

compared to older, more traditional glaucoma surgeries.

Age 55 and up: LASER cataract surgery and the Symfony lens The bad news is that everyone will develop cataracts at some point if they are blessed to live long enough. The good news is there has never been a better time to have cataract surgery, with the advent of the femtosecond laser and advanced lens implants. Using these new technologies your surgeon can not only correct your cataract, but they can correct your astigmatism and dysfunctional lens syndrome too. This means we can now correct your vision and reduce the need for bifocals and reading glasses after surgery. We accomplish this by performing the most pivotal steps of the procedure using a laser instead of performing them by hand using blades. The result is a more precise, reproducible and gentler procedure with faster visual recovery. After your surgeon removes the cataract you must replace it with a clear lens. These days you have a choice about what type of implant goes in your eye, and you can customize your vision much like you could customize a new vehicle. The newest lens classification approved by the FDA is the extended-depth-of-focus Symfony lens. The first Symfony lens in Louisiana was implanted by surgeons at the Williamson Eye Center, and we are also one of the highest volume laser cataract centers in the U.S. whatsnewinhealthcare.com

DRY EYE MiBo Flo and BlephEx Dry eye disease is one of the most underdiagnosed conditions in ophthalmology. This is because many patients are unaware that they don’t necessarily need to “feel dry” in order to have the disease. In fact, more than half our patients with dry eye disease don’t experience a feeling of dryness … instead they experience teary or watery eyes. This is because when the eye is dry it signals the brain to stimulate the glands that produce tears. The most common symptom of dry eye MIGS disease is simply fluctuating vision, and Cypass and Xen stents it seems to affect the majority of patients Glaucoma is one of the most common we see in our clinic. For many years all we causes of blindness in the U.S. For many had to offer were artificial tears. That is years the only options patients had for theruntil recent research has taught us that one apy were either costly drops or invasive surof the main causes of dry eye is actually geries that had many complications. A new Meibomian gland disease, an inflammatory era in the treatment of glaucoma has been condition that effects the oils our eyelid ushered in with the advent of “minimally glands normally secrete to protect our tear invasive glaucoma surgery” or “MIGS.” film. Healthier eyelid glands lead to healthAll of health care is moving toward ier tear film. more minimally invasive approaches, and Two new devices called the BlephEx and ophthalmology is no different. Just like MiBo Flo have been utilized in our clinic to cardiologists have used stents to clean the eyelids and offer our dry avoid more invasive heart eye patients a more lasting surgeries, eye surgeons improvement in their are now placing symptoms. The prostents inside the eye cedure is performed to delay the need by our eyelid for more comhygienist and plicated proceis non-surgical, dures. Two stents quick and comapproved by the pletely painless. The Cypass stent FDA this year were Many of our pathe Cypass and the tients actually comXen. Our surgeons were ment that it feels like a the first in south Louisiana massage on the eyelids. Just to implant these devices and like you visit your dentist yearly have been able to reduce or in many cases for cleanings, patients with dry eye disease eliminate the need for our patients to take should be visiting their eye doctor to have daily glaucoma medications. These stents their eyelids cleaned annually. can be placed at the same time as cataract —Dr. Blake K. Williamson, M.D., surgery and have an excellent safety profile M.P.H., M.S. W H AT ’ S N E W I N H E A LT H C A R E 2 0 1 7

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[ SB

WELLNESS GROUP]

Helping local businesses strike the right balance with worksite wellness

ARE YOU CONCERNED with how to balance employee health and well-being while making an impact on the bottom line in today’s challenging climate? Most of the employers we work with agree that their employees are the most important part of the organization. Employee well-being directly affects productivity, disposition and quality of work. We know that company leaders have some serious pain points to deal with: rising health care costs, decreased productivity, increased absenteeism, highly medicated employees and high turnover to name a few. How do companies strike the right balance between employee well-being and running a successful business with a healthy bottom line? SB Wellness Group has been helping clients do just that over the past 21 years, and we know that there are a few ingredients that have to be present for success. With our high-touch personalized programming and small army of dedicated and talented professionals, SB Wellness Group is winning in wellness. THE INGREDIENTS The ingredients that are helping our clients succeed with worksite well-being 28

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programs? According to owner Shelly Beall, consistent, well-designed, well-implemented programming is crucial to getting results. “We have helped revitalize entire groups of people in the workforce through our onsite wellness coaches and comprehensive programs,” says Beall. “From start to finish, we have a formula that is working for us. However, it is never a cookie cutter program. Each group we work with is unique, and we love the challenge of finding out what is going to work specifically for that group. We are able to do this by being highly engaged with the groups we work with.” Regular face-to-face health coaching and health status check-ups are the heartbeat of SB’s programs and successes. We are able to show employers through aggregate reporting how employees are improving. A report might show how many employees stopped smoking in the program period, how many lost 5% or more of their weight, how many got off medications or started taking them correctly, and the associated cost savings for each of these things to the company. “Our employees respond very well to the professional and knowledgeable staff of SB Wellness,” says Debra Taylor, PHR, AVP

Human Resources at LWCC. “Through our partnership with SB Wellness, we are able to provide valuable wellness education to our employees and health screenings that help detect health concerns before they become more costly problems.” Programs that support, encourage and engage employees in taking control of their health will make the biggest impact on things like productivity, absenteeism and health care cost control. SB Wellness Group has something special when it comes to providing these services to employers. “It’s all about relationships,” says Beall. “Health is too personal not to work on building trust and accountability into the relationship—on the company and individual level. We treat every company as if it were our own and all of the employees in each company as if they were family members. This philosophy lends itself to a level of empathy and understanding that can be missing in other programs.” HOW DOES THIS LOOK IN ACTION? Obesity is one of the issues that cost a company, mainly in health care costs, lost productivity and high-level absenteeism. whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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Louisiana has one of highest rates of obesity in the nation at 36.2%. Through our coaching and high touch approach, we have made great progress with our weight management program. In one of our groups, 175 participants completed two years in our program. 68% experienced some weight loss, 54% lost 5% or more of their initial body weight and 61% lost more than three inches in their waist. These are significant changes in the weight management world. An even bigger impact on this group? Physicians discontinued a total of 51 different medications for weight management participants. What does this mean for the individuals participating in the programs? Employees are reporting back to us that not only has their physical health improved, but also their energy levels, physical mobility, general mood, self-confidence, productivity and happiness. This is all beneficial for company culture and the overall success of an organization. One of our success stories knows just how valuable this can be. Over seven years of participating in our wellness programs, she made and maintained gradual but substantial changes. She lost 60 pounds and 13 inches in her waist since 2011. She

significantly lowered her blood glucose, improved blood pressure to a healthy range, and improved her HDL cholesterol from 27 to 74 mg/dL. “The changes I have made impacted all areas of my life in a positive way,” says Cheryl Hinton, a BCBSLA employee. “I have a more optimistic viewpoint on life and I have energy to do the things that I enjoy. Most importantly, I feel great! I have so much more energy now than I had before making healthy choices.” ON-SITE AND IN-PERSON On-site, in-person wellness coaching is a huge factor in the success of our programs. Our coaches are passionate about helping others sort out health issues, improve wellness habits, or simply reach wellness goals. They are familiar with addressing issues employees often struggle with such as weight loss and reducing health risks. Our coaches also uncover often overlooked issues such as sleep, pain, medication and health care adherence. They build relationships with our clients and foster a sense of trust. “As a result of SB Wellness Group’s personal engagement with our employees, we have seen the relationship from our

employee’s perspective evolve from initially somewhat skeptical to now very open and trusting. Our employees look forward to the visit and the feedback provided,” explains Randy Whittington, CEO of GCAL. Coaching sessions allow us to intuit the real issues employees face today. From financial worries, taking care of kids and aging parents at the same time, to confusion over medical treatments and medications, our coaches are trained to address it all. We began to pay attention to the currently talked about “opioid abuse” several years ago, because of what we were seeing in our coaching sessions. From that we created a campaign for some of our groups to address this issue. From strategies to addressing this through our one-on-one coaching to educational seminars and campaigns for the masses, we have been ahead of the curve on this topic. SB Wellness Group has a proven track record of helping local companies strike the right balance, and we have a loyal client base to prove it. For the employer this equates to less turnover, fewer sick days, reduced risk of high-cost episodes like hospitalization, and the ability to attract and keep top talent.

HEALTHY EMPLOYEES. HEALTHY COMPANY. Investing in Employee Health is Good Business

STRATEGIES FOR A HEALTHY WORKFORCE • Flexible, customized, affordable wellness programs • Improve Employee Health and Bottom Line

EMPLOYEE WELLNESS

• High Impact, Whole Person, Whole Population Wellness Solutions • Start from the top with our exclusive Executive Wellness Coaching Program

HEALTH COACHING

OUTCOME BASED PROGRAMMING (225) 445-5814 • www.sbwellness.com

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[ OCHSNER

– B AT O N R O U G E ]

Focus on wellness, technology keeps Ochsner ahead of the curve

Rendering of the Ochsner Baton Rouge Medical Office Building

OCHSNER’S MISSION TO save and change lives remains unchanged, and staying true to this mission has created deep roots in the community. Through a relentless pursuit of high-quality patient care and treatment options, Ochsner – Baton Rouge has achieved national recognition with top distinctions such as the 2017 Truven Everest Award, given to only 10 facilities throughout the country for the highest levels of care. As the Greater Baton Rouge communities and surrounding parishes continue to grow, Ochsner stands at the forefront, ready to deliver the care that is needed close to home, where patients live and work. With 13 health centers, four urgent care centers, two 24-hour emergency rooms and a full-service hospital on O’Neal Lane, Ochsner’s health care is available conveniently, when and where families need it. “Louisiana unfortunately ranks near the bottom in so many health categories and, as a health care leader in the state, we want to change that,” said Eric McMillen, chief executive officer, Ochsner – Baton Rouge. “It’s the reason we are investing in new services and locations and seeking the solutions that will help our patients battle 30

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chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer. This is about a longterm commitment to the parishes across this region that will result in a healthier population.” Understanding that the future of health care requires providers to adapt to new care delivery models, Ochsner is staying ahead of the curve by placing additional focus on health and preventative wellness. Through an investment in attracting and adding primary care physicians and specialists to serve health centers in communities throughout the region, and with plans to add future clinics, the goal is to continue creating a health care system that meets the growing needs of our patients. Included in this future growth is the newly opened Ochsner Cancer Center – Baton Rouge, offering clinic visits, chemotherapy infusion and radiation oncology, and the future Medical Office Building, Specialty Hospital and Surgical Center along the 1-10 Bluebonnet/Siegen Corridor. In total, this expansion means over $100 million in community investment. Through the current access points of medical care, families can always choose

the location and physician that is right for them. The 13 health centers provide a range of services, including: • Primary Care • Pediatrics • Diabetes Management • Women’s Services • Gastroenterology • Oncology • Neurology • Cardiology/Cardiovascular Services • General Surgery • Orthopedics “Physicians, advanced practice providers and health care clinicians are the backbone of medical care for any community, and Baton Rouge is no different,” said Dr. Edward Martin, chief medical officer, Ochsner West Region. “Our strength as a system is due in large part to being able to offer the quality care in a wide range of specialties with complete integration through a common electronic medical record in the inpatient and outpatient settings.” Patients can choose a home for their medical needs, knowing their care is seamlessly available throughout the entire Ochsner system through Epic, the syswhatsnewinhealthcare.com


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tem’s electronic medical record. Epic is fully integrated and allows providers to securely access patient health information so they can truly deliver individualized, patient-centered care. And through MyOchsner, the online patient portal, all patients have the ability to directly communicate with their physician, make online appointments, request prescription refills, and view their test and lab results at any time. Ochsner – Baton Rouge is one of Ochsner Health System’s 29 owned, managed and affiliated hospitals. The system also includes more than 80 health centers and urgent care centers. It is Louisiana’s largest nonprofit, academic, health care system and is the only Louisiana hospital recognized by U.S. News & World Report as a “Best Hospital” across four specialty categories caring for patients from all 50 states and more than 80 countries worldwide each year. Ochsner employs more than 18,000 employees and over 1,100 physicians in over 90 medical specialties and subspecialties, and it conducts more than 600 clinical research studies. For patient appointments at any Ochsner - Baton Rouge location, call (225) 7615200 or visit ochsner.org/batonrouge.

The health challenges we face are relentless. So are we. When it comes to your health, good is never good enough. That’s why we champion groundbreaking innovations, medical advancements and use the latest technology. From primary care to diabetes management, oncology and neurology, keeping our community healthy is at the core of everything we do. To schedule an appointment online, visit ochsner.org/appointments. Only Hospital in Louisiana to receive...

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[I

CARE]

I CARE Live: Promoting prevention FOR OVER 36 years, the I CARE program has served as the alcohol, drug abuse and violence prevention program for East Baton Rouge Parish public and nonpublic schools. In addition to working with youth, the program has a long history of providing support to parents and caregivers regarding prevention education and resources for the total family. Traditionally, I CARE has provided workshops and trainings in schools on topics ranging from substance abuse to bullying and suicide prevention. Historically, I CARE specialists have regularly delivered workshops for parents utilizing local prevention data and information. Parents have also been able to consult with trained I CARE specialists on meeting the challenges of raising healthy, drug-free children. In an effort to increase community outreach and better serve those who touch the lives of children, I CARE has created the I CARE Live Initiative. Essentially, I CARE Live is a series of internet-streamed presentations, delivered by local experts and community members who know the specific challenges and needs of the Baton Rouge community. I CARE Live is going into its third year of promoting prevention for educators, parents and community partners. I CARE Live is supported by the YouTube Live Streaming and produced in the I CARE office using local resources, experts and talent. I CARE Live is driven by the I CARE Advisory Council, whose purpose is to keep I CARE connected to the community while maintaining program relevance in delivering prevention education services. As opiate and heroin abuse is increasing among adults and young adults, the I CARE program is striving to be proactive in providing prevention education to students and parents in and out of school settings. The I CARE program has provided

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information from the Louisiana State Police Crime Lab and Baton Rouge Coroner Beau Clark to deliver up-to-date statistics to parents, students and community members, as opiate abuse is a possible threat to everyone. I CARE Live will feature the topic of opioid abuse (provided by Dr. Dionna Mathews) along with other prevention topics in upcoming months. I CARE Live is easily accessible by the community. Anyone with a smartphone or internet access can visit icare.ebrschools.org and click the I CARE Live tab or visit the I CARE Facebook page at ICAREEBR to view the live streamed broadcast. Presentations are scheduled to run monthly on the first Wednesday at noon. The idea is to encourage parents to use lunch time to learn about issues and methods for improving the lives of young people in the community. I CARE Live has an additional component that has prov-

en beneficial to parents and community members with extremely hectic schedules: I CARE On Demand. I CARE On Demand provides an index of previous I CARE Live sessions, organized by topics, including violence, safety and substance abuse. The sessions include downloadable PowerPoint slides, links to websites, and have been useful in facilitating group discussions among parents and community members. They may be viewed at any time directly from the I CARE website. The I CARE program has followed through with its plan to engage more community members in the development of the I CARE Live Initiative including topic ideas, speakers and providing a platform for posting comments regarding previous sessions. I CARE Live has been designed to grow and evolve with the everchanging needs of the community and our schools.

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icareebr @icareparents

Care Connect Communicate

RED RIBBON MONTH YOUR FUTURE

IS

KEY so STAY

Learn about I CARE’s Drug and Alcohol Prevention efforts online at:

icare.ebrschools.org

225.226.2273

#icareredribbon whatsnewinhealthcare.com

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[ EXECUTONE

OF LOUISIANA]

System integration: A key to workflow and patient satisfaction HOSPITALS AND OTHER health care facilities rely on information to provide the very best patient care and satisfaction. One of the most exciting products on the market today is ASCOM’s Myco, an Android-based Wi-Fi smartphone that puts integrated workflow intelligence in the palm of a nurse’s hand. Pocket-sized and easy to use, Myco was designed based on the needs of real nurses. This handy device sends nurses their patient assignments and connects them to patient records and lab reports. Messages, alerts and alarms can go directly to nurses’ handheld devices instead of being broadcast to the entire ward. In return, Myco reduces “alarm fatigue” because each nurse only receives information about patients assigned to them. It is allowing nurses to easily see what type of alarm is coming in and arranges them according to the severity of the alarm. Nurses also have the options to forward or escalate the alarm. Myco is specifically designed to withstand the rigors of a hospital setting, with a long-lasting battery that can be quickly swapped, lightweight yet tough, moisture-resistant and easily operated with one hand. Just as importantly, ASCOM’s Myco works in conjunction with a facility’s existing technology, including most major brands of nurse call systems. ASCOM is the only manufacturer offering a complete solution that can combine nurse call system, middleware, and mobile information and communication devices. Spending less time tracking down patient information allows caregivers to spend more time interacting with their patient. This results not only in more satisfied patients but also in higher HCAP scores for the hospital. Thanks to smart technology offered by a local company, that flow of information has never been more seamless. “Getting critical information to the correct person—the moment they need it—will improve response times and save lives,” says Executone President Ronnie Juneau. “Considering the evolution of electronic medical records, patient monitoring equipment, lab systems, telemetry systems, wired and wireless communication, even patient entertainment/educational information systems—it is crucial to integrate all of them. We have middleware software for 34

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every system out there, and we can integrate into all of a hospital’s systems.” For over 56 years, Executone has been delivering the latest health care communications technology—from the simple nurse call systems of yesteryear to today’s comprehensive systems. Representing ASCOM and Mitel, two of the industry’s largest manufacturers, Executone now serves 80% of the state’s hospitals and half of its nursing homes. Executone’s five locations, in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, Alexandria, Shreveport and Lake Charles, ensure that live, local, 24-7 support is always nearby. “We don’t view health care facilities as clients but as partners,” Juneau adds. “We stay connected and informed, matching their challenges with our solutions to achieve their ultimate goal of ideal patient care/ satisfaction. We stay informed about our partners’ future needs and expectations by

working directly with them, as well as attending trade shows and nursing seminars. We are also active in the local community and in supporting charities.” Being the only truly local company of its type in Louisiana also builds client satisfaction. Executone’s health care partners enjoy 24-7 support and service by live, local, factory-trained employees. “It is important to us to provide face-toface training and troubleshooting rather than online support as other companies do,” says Chad Coppola, vice president of sales and operations. “Our service and support is local and timely.” That is just one reason Executone has partnered with three of the state’s largest hospital groups as well as many other health care facilities. In addition, it provides innovative solutions for assisted living, nursing and retirement facilities. Executone of Louisiana’s 56-year existence and stability is another plus. The company is debt-free, and its manufacturers are dominant players in the market. This longevity really shows in the tenure of Executone’s staff. With about 50 employees, the average term of duty is 19 years. Juneau has been with the company for 40 years. “Executone of Louisiana has weathered many changes over the years,” says Juneau. “That has reinforced our belief that we must stay ahead of the competition in the telecommunication and system integration industries and continue striving for excellence.” www.executonela.com whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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[ E L E VAT E

WELLNESS STUDIO]

Opened in June 2017, Elevate meets wellness with an open mind and heart IS ELEVATE ‘NEW’ IN HEALTH CARE? YES! Elevate Wellness Studio is offering a combination of unique, personalized services not typically found under one roof. While services like massage and facials are widely offered, others like Schroth method for scoliosis treatment, dance physical therapy, physical therapy in the wellness model, vocal unloading, Ayurvedic lifestyle counseling, and myofascial release are rare here, and some are absolutely new to the Baton Rouge community. The studio’s classroom hosts yoga and barre classes, as well as learning events and workshops, leading the way for limitless possibilities of what may be offered in the future. This model allows for change fueled by on Goodwood Boulevard, across from Independence Park and the Main Library, Elevate resides in a renovated ‘80s era unfolding ideas based on evolving Located building with a “good feel.” needs of individuals and the community. It is apparent Elevate’s holistic goal done online or with a phone call, and is not specialties, also practicing in the traditional is to provide many offerings that attract bound by arbitrary insurance limitations. It insurance-based model at Brown-Rogers those interested in living a full life. is empowering that in the bustle of everyday Therapy. You can find an excellent descripwork and life, this model allows fast and dition of each PT under the “Staff” tab on WHAT IS THE “WHY” BEHIND rect access to care, especially for those who our website, BRElevate.com. appreciate privacy, flexibility, and superb THIS BUSINESS? Because it was developed by Brown-Rogone-on–one sessions. It is appealing to those COMMUNITY CLASSES ers Therapy, Elevate was created with an who have large deductibles or health savings Community lectures, workshops and idea of wellness that comes from authentiaccounts, where one may choose to spend classes at Elevate are geared toward health cally understanding people and health care. health care dollars in this setting. and wellness of the mind, body and spirit. Known for quality professional outpaSince opening, owners Angelle Brown On the upcoming schedule for the fall tient physical, occupational, and aquatic and Ginger Rogers say clients have chosen of 2017 into spring of 2018, there are therapy, Brown-Rogers has for 14 years PT at Elevate for several reasons, includmany choices in lectures from incredible understood that the individual comes first ing acute conditions or flare-ups, chronic professionals. in health care. At Elevate, clients are met conditions where hands-on manual care and A few wonderfully diverse options to with creative and customized services in a dry needling are invalunurturing, private, well-appointed spa enviable to maintaining daily ronment, while the treatments received are function, and cases where from professionals who continually work clients simply want clartoward actualizing skills, loving what they ification or education on share with others in improving their lives. their condition or injury. Integrating the request of the individual Overall, everyone with highly skilled and talented professionappreciates the spa-type of als, in a beautiful, calm atmosphere, is the experience, the expertise trifecta of Elevate’s philosophy. of professionals, and the skilled manual work. WHY CHOOSE PHYSICAL The director of physical therapy at Elevate is THERAPY AT ELEVATE? Unlike traditional pathways, with Claire Melebeck, DPT. All physical therapy at Elevate the originator of physical therapists there care is the client. Scheduling is easy, can be are the best in their chosen 36

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look for: Mindfulness and Meditation, Use of Essential Oils in Everyday Life, Understanding Chronic Pain, Posture Basics, An Introduction to Ayurvedic Lifestyle and Nutrition, and The Yoga of Eating Eating. DO YOU WANT TO FEEL BETTER? Elevate your YOGA! Because these sessions are limited to six participants, the instructors can specialize to each person’s needs. With a focus on posture, Spine Alignment classes at Elevate are for all levels of people who may have back and/or neck pain, the most common diagnoses we treat at Brown-Rogers Therapy. Even if someone has never tried yoga in any form before, whether 25 or 75 years old, try this class! Breathing and awareness starts on the mat, and carries over to the rest of your life. Yoga for Digestive Heath is a unique class to Elevate and Baton Rouge. All yoga addresses the whole person, but this class applies extra focus on strengthening the “pelvic rotator cuff,” the dynamic muscleWNHC group responsi#4 ble for upholding internal organs. ThADeseWILL support work RUN AS muscles IS best when coordinated with the breathing diaphragm and core

muscles of the abdomen and low back, so this class is also excellent for those who need posture strengthening. Yoga With Weights and other new classes are being introduced at Elevate as we respond dynamically to the needs and requests of clients. Elevate your BARRE! Barre classes are limited to seven participants, so expect your instructor to stay on top of your form and you will achieve fantastic results in sculpting and strengthening! Barre classes are intense workouts with small, targeted movements that are safe for any level. This class takes place in a gym space, with mirrors, a

LOUISIANA BUSINESS INC.

ANNOUNCING THE OPENING OF

Artfully Created by

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large window, pitched ceiling, a clean and beautiful environment so you can clear your mind and focus on yourself for this devoted time to exercise. Elevate your MAT PILATES! These classes are also for all levels and ages, appealing to those who would like to strengthen, tone and increase flexibility with low impact exercise—no equipment needed! A MESSAGE FROM ELEVATE We understand that not being at your “best” can come from so many places in life. If there has been too much work or home stress and your body is asking for a relaxation massage, or if an old injury has caused chronic back pain and you would like a private PT visit or you would like to start a gentle yoga exercise plan, we would be honored to be part of your journey toward health and wellness. We welcome you to visit in person, like us on Facebook or Instagram, or submit your email address through BRElevate.com to receive schedule updates and promotions. Booking is easy online or by phone: (225) 478-4500.

Physical Therapy Gait/Movement Systems Analysis Comprehensive Spine Analysis Schroth Scoliosis Treatment Vocal Unloading Massage Reflexology Myofascial Release Treatment Facials Dance Physical Therapy Community Classes Yoga Barre Exercise Ayurveda Mat Pilates Visit www.BRElevate.com Call 225.478.4500 for pricing details W H AT ’ S N E W I N H E A LT H C A R E 2 0 1 7

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[ B AT O N

ROUGE GENERAL ]

Healing the whole person: Baton Rouge General offers Hidden Scar Surgery for breast cancer patients MOST WOMEN STRUGGLE with body image their entire lives, and breasts, which symbolize femininity, beauty and fertility—are an important part of that image. Recovering from breast cancer can be exceptionally difficult, because of the emotional toll of cancer and the physical scars that are often left behind after a lumpectomy or mastectomy. Though survival rates are high, many women’s recovery is hindered due to surgical scarring, a visible reminder of what they have lost. Baton Rouge General is one of the first hospitals to offer a new procedure that can greatly reduce scarring after breast cancer surgery. Dr. Everett Bonner, surgical oncologist and chair of the breast committee at Baton Rouge General, is one of just a handful of physicians qualified to perform a procedure called “hidden scar surgery.” “While breast surgeons are skilled at removing cancer or cancer risk, it’s equally important to find one who prioritizes the patient’s cosmetic goals,” said Dr. Bonner. “Some women see their breast surgery scars as an empowering symbol of beating cancer, but many do not. I want my patients to walk away not only healed, but feeling whole and happy again.” Studies show that 72% of women are unhappy with the location of their scars and 87% are self-conscious due to their scarring. Scar tissue, which replaces the injured skin, can form a lump or it can appear flat, stretched or discolored. Many women develop numbness or pain if scar tissue forms around the nerves. These are physical concerns, but they can impact a woman’s psychological and emotional recovery, as well as quality of life. Women with scars from breast cancer often report a diminished sense of their femininity, a loss of self-esteem, and a feeling of disconnection from their bodies. Hidden scar surgery can

alleviate many of these negative feelings. The hidden scar technique allows surgeons to remove the cancerous tissue through a single incision placed in an

of recurrence than patients who undergo a different technique. “When it comes to cancer care, you have a choice,” Dr. Bonner said. “It is important for women to know that there are new options available that didn’t exist just a few years ago. These options can make a big difference in emotional healing.” If you have been diagnosed with breast cancer, your physician will explain your medical and surgical options based on factors such as family history, the size and location of your tumor, your age, and your breast size and shape. Here are some questions you should ask: • What type of cancer do I have and how serious is it? • What are my surgical options, and why? • Am I a candidate for the hidden scar technique? • After reconstruction, will both of my breasts look the same? Cancer changes the lives of everyone it touches, and you should learn as much as possible about your options so you can make the choice that’s best for you. Options like hidden scar surgery can not only speed your recovery, but also help you reclaim your self-esteem and confidence.

“While breast surgeons are skilled at removing cancer or cancer risk, it’s equally important to find one who prioritizes the patient’s cosmetic goals,” said Dr. Bonner.

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inconspicuous area, preserving the natural shape of the breast while reducing visible scarring. Patients who undergo this approach experience better clinical and cosmetic outcomes, and are at no higher risk

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Surgical Oncology Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy IL2 Treatment Genetic Screening Imaging Arts in Medicine Patient Navigation Nutritional Support

#1 in Greater Baton Rouge Cancer Care Carechex (2016) Innovator Award Association of Community Cancer Centers (2016) Breast Imaging Center of Excellence American College of Radiology (2013) Louisiana’s 1st Accredited Comprehensive Breast Center National Accreditation Program for Breast Center (2009) Region’s First Accredited Cancer Center Commission on Cancer (1989)

Clinical Trials Hidden Scar Surgery Rehabilitation Therapy Cancer Support Groups Cancer Wellness Program Mid City • Bluebonnet • Zachary BRGeneral.org


S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

[ BLUE

CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF LOUISIANA]

Innovative new tool helps Blue Cross customers shop smart for health care services

IF YOU’RE LIKE a lot of shoppers, you comb through circulars to compare grocery store prices. Or you shop and compare the cost of vitamins or video games on Amazon. You know smart shopping can add up to big savings. Imagine if you could go online and shop around for a new knee? Price-checking to find the best value on MRIs, knee replacements and other common procedures is the future of health care, and it’s here. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana has launched SmartShopper, a tool that lets customers compare prices online for many medical procedures. The tool displays price ranges for health care services in nearly 300 categories, based on facility and ZIP code. “Blue Cross is taking advantage of new technology and sophisticated tools to analyze our own claims data and give customers more information about how different health care providers compare on costs,” says Somesh Nigam, Blue Cross senior vice president and chief data and analytics officer. “We’ve worked with a health care transparency company over the past two years to bring their SmartShopper tool 40

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to our members. We want to be a source our customers can trust to navigate the health care system.” With SmartShopper, customers can see price comparisons for everything from kidney transplants and spinal surgery to colonoscopies and brain surgery. Customers using SmartShopper will no-

tice that there is often a wide range in costs for the same medical service—for instance, costs for MRIs and common surgical procedures can vary from hundreds to thousands of dollars. SmartShopper brings the Amazon shopping approach to health care. For example, if your doctor tells you that you need a colonoscopy, you could use SmartShopper to see the different hospitals and clinics close to you that perform colonoscopies, and a range of what you could expect to pay out of pocket by having your colonoscopy at each facility. By choosing a facility that costs less, you could save money. TRANSPARENCY AND OUTOF-POCKET COSTS With the growing costs of health care, transparency in pricing has never been more important, especially in Louisiana. A 2013 Institute of Medicine Study showed that six of the 10 highest-spending Medicare markets in the country are located in Louisiana, including Baton Rouge. “As health care costs keep rising, our members want greater whatsnewinhealthcare.com


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transparency so they better understand the price differences for various procedures,” said Brian Keller, Blue Cross senior vice president and chief marketing officer. “Our customers on high-deductible plans, on which they are paying a higher portion of costs out of pocket, could really benefit from SmartShopper.” SmartShopper shows price ranges of common procedures at facilities that are in network on Blue Cross’ broadest, PPO plan. Customers should keep in mind that just because a facility is in network for Blue Cross doesn’t mean it’s in network for their particular plan types. They should confirm a clinic or hospital is in their network before scheduling medical services there. Blue Cross plans to continue adding more information and other medical service categories to SmartShopper, which will give customers more access to details on health care pricing. FINANCIAL INCENTIVES FOR SMART SHOPPING Blue Cross business customers are getting the opportunity to save on health care costs. Financial incentives for smart shopping are being piloted for the organization’s business customers later in 2017. Employees of these businesses could pocket cash incentives by doing some price comparisons and choosing facilities that cost less. Cash rewards may also be in the future for individual members after more testing. “SmartShopper will give customers cash rewards to shop and choose high-quality, affordable care—which puts money back in everyone’s pocket,” says Keller. Customers can be assured that lower-cost whatsnewinhealthcare.com

facilities are still quality health care providers that meet the standards to be in Blue Cross’ provider network. All health care providers listed on the SmartShopper tool are appropriately licensed to provide the services offered at those locations. HOW TO USE SMARTSHOPPER Customers can access SmartShopper pricing information at bcbsla.com/ SmartShopper or by going directly to bcbsla.vitalssmartshopper.com or by calling (866) 217-5282. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana customers who are age 18 or older, with the exception of those covered through the Federal Employee Program, can access SmartShopper. The tool is also available to Blue Cross network providers. Customers will create an online account on their first visit to the site, which they will log in with each time they use SmartShopper. After logging into the site, with the click of a mouse, customers can search for different medical procedures and their costs. As with any medical service, customers should follow their doctors’ clinical guidance when deciding what types of care they need. SmartShopper is operated through a partnership with Vitals, an independent company that provides transparency around cost and access information—paired with member engagement, actionable data and predictive analytics—to empower people to make more informed health care decisions.

age savings gained by shopping for health care services. According to figures published in the 2016 Vitals SmartShopper Book of Business Report, the average savings for a colonoscopy when people shopped for better value care is $1,275. With 15 million colonoscopies performed each year in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, health care savings on this one procedure comes to $18.75 billion. Multiply the effect of many consumers shopping for health care procedures from quality providers to be more selective about where they get care, and the overall savings add up. “Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is committed to lowering health care costs while making them more transparent to consumers,” says Keller. “And together, we can work to reduce health care costs.” By making health care costs easier to find and understand, the company hopes consumers will be more confident and informed when making health care decisions. “SmartShopper is designed with the consumer in mind. If customers take some time to shop and compare costs of medical services and procedures, they can save a lot of money,” Keller says. While health care shopping is relatively new in the health care industry, it is more than a trend. So the next time you need a new knee or a hip replacement, be a smart shopper. Use the SmartShopper tool to save.

HEALTH CARE SAVINGS FOR ALL Vitals has accumulated data on the averW H AT ’ S N E W I N H E A LT H C A R E 2 0 1 7

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[ LOUISIANA

R E G E N E R AT I V E M E D I C I N E C E N T E R ]

Cutting-edge stem cell therapy helps Baton Rouge man get back on the course BILL BERNHARD IS a successful businessman in Baton Rouge with a passion for two things outside of his family: his business and playing golf. When not working, Bernhard, a widower with two grown sons, fills his idle time with his golf game. He and his brothers are in the mechanical contracting business specializing in plumbing, heating and air conditioning services, a company started 34 years ago by their father, William Bernhard Sr. Bernhard has been a fixture at the Country Club of Louisiana for many years. He loves the game of golf and the fraternization it has provided him through the years. This pastime seemed to be coming to an end in recent years as his health became a consideration he could no longer ignore. He was suffering unbearable pain in his knees and was diagnosed with osteoarthritis in both of them, a condition that affects Louisiana Regenerative Medicine Center in Baton Rouge operates in conjunction with the Kansas Regenerative Medicine Center. many people later in life. Bernhard tells his story like this: “My are your body’s natural healing cells. They The clinic is currently seeing patients knees had been hurting for 12-15 years. I are recruited by chemical signals emitted for orthopedic, osteoarthritis, neurological had meniscus surgery on both knees, which by damaged tissues to repair and regenerate and autoimmune diseases. Another plus in relieved the pain for a few years. On June your damaged cells.” adipose stem cell therapy is that a patient the 1st of 2016, I had stem cell injections A person’s own body fat is an extremely is using his or her own stem cells in each into both knees and by September began rich source of stem cells. Through a relativetreatment protocol. Research being connoticing the level of pain began to reside. At ly painless liposuction procedure, a small ducted throughout the world indicates that this time, I am not experiencing any pain at sample of fat can be taken from the patient’s stem cells derived from one’s own adipose all; in fact, on June the 7th of 2017, I was body, and stem cells are harvested from this tissues is the next major advance in modern able to join my regular golfing friends on a sample as physicians isolate the stem cells medicine. trip to Park City, Utah, at the Promontory and other regenerative cells from Ranch Club and played the Pete Dye Canthe fat. yon Course and the highest, most difficult This population of cells is course in Utah, the Jack Nicklaus Painted called stromal vascular fraction, Valley Course.” and it provides physicians, under Bernhard received his stem cell treatinvestigational protocols, the ment at Louisiana Regenerative Medicine ability to deploy these stem cells Center in Baton Rouge and was the clinic’s to treat a number of degenerative first patient. Drs. Chris Trevino and Jamie conditions and diseases. The proBroussard performed the procedure there. cedure takes less than three hours LRMC operates in conjunction with from start to completion. The the Kansas Regenerative Medicine Center patient is able to leave the facility in Manhattan, Kansas, which has been and resume normal activities in existence for the last four years. Boyd immediately thereafter. Results Robert, co-owner of the LRMC along with can be experienced soon after the business partner John Roques, explains the procedure, or within up to a few During a procedure that takes less than three hours, patients receive stem cell story in this way: “Your stem cells months. an injection of their own stem cells. 42

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S P NUMBER E C I A L A• D VANY E R TTYPOS I S I N G F E AT U R E Carefully check this ad for: CORRECT ADDRESS • CORRECT PHONE This ad design © Louisiana Business, Inc. 2017. All rights reserved. Phone 225-928-1700 • Fax 225-926-1329

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Stem cell therapy helps enhance the lives of individuals who are suffering with various health issues associated with Orthopedic Diseases/Injuries, Auto-Immune, Urological and Neurological Diseases with quicker recovery than major surgeries.

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Office: (225) 716-9100 | Toll Free: (844) 319-9100 | info@louisianarmc.com OR Visit us online at www.louisianarmc.com 9456 Jefferson Hwy St A | Baton Rouge, LA 70809

Outpatient Procedure Little to No Down-Time No General Anesthesia whatsnewinhealthcare.com

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S P E C I A L A D V E R T I S I N G F E AT U R E

[ B AT O N

R O U G E E A R , N O S E A N D T H R O AT AS S O C I AT E S ]

New solutions for relieving chronic sinusitis CHRONIC SINUS PAIN and pressure can make life miserable, especially when medications and office visits don’t bring long-lasting relief. In these cases, surgery may be recommended, but traditional sinus surgery has some drawbacks. These include undergoing anesthesia with its risks and some recovery time. Fortunately, a breakthrough procedure available at Baton Rouge Ear, Nose and Throat Associates can often deliver the same results as traditional surgery but without the drawbacks. The experts of Baton Rouge Ear, Nose and Throat Associates are proud to offer Balloon Sinuplasty, a non-invasive method of treating chronic sinusitis. This relatively new procedure is just one of the clinic’s offerings from a full spectrum of services for treating sinus, allergy, hearing and audiology problems. The six physicians of Baton Rouge ENT Associates combine Benjamin F. Walton IV, M.D. personal customer service with the sinus passage, helping to drain mucus from most advanced technology to bring the best the blocked sinus and restore normal sinus health care results possible. drainage without cutting and with minimal Dr. Benjamin F. Walton and Dr. Collin bleeding. This approach also preserves the B. Sutton are the clinic’s staff specialists in natural structure of the sinuses. Balloon Sinuplasty. Dr. Walton is a graduate Balloon Sinuplasty is normally done in the of LSU and LSU Medical School in New doctors’ office under local anesthesia. The Orleans. He completed his Otolaryngology procedure is less invasive than traditional residency at the University of Texas Medical sinus surgery and allows most patients to Branch in Galveston. Dr. Sutton graduated return to normal activities within 48 hours. from LSU School of Medicine in New OrThe reported complication rate is low. leans in 2011. He completed his residency Balloon Sinuplasty is covered by most in Otolaryngology at LSU Health Sciences health insurance companies for qualified Center in New Orleans. candidates. HOW IT WORKS: Drs. Walton and Sutton find that Balloon Sinuplasty can often relieve the pain and pressure experienced by chronic sinusitis sufferers who are not responding well to antibiotics, nasal steroids, or over-the-counter drugs or other medications. The procedure works similarly to how angioplasty uses balloons to open blocked arteries. With Balloon Sinuplasty, a specially-designed catheter is inserted into the nose to reach the blocked sinus cavity. A small balloon is inflated, which widens and restructures the walls of the 44

A QUICKER RECOVERY “Balloon Sinuplasty provides the compelling benefits of patient comfort and improving sinus disease while allowing patients to get back to their normal activities more quickly,” says Dr. Walton. Not everyone is a candidate for it, he notes, but “we frequently find that patients who are getting antibiotics or steroids for sinus infections several times a year tend to have a treatable problem that we can address with Balloon Sinuplasty. We can usually get them feeling better for a longer period of time with fewer acute sinus problems.” In addition, studies have shown that Balloon Sinuplasty has similar results to traditional sinus surgery, and these results appear to be long-lasting. Since receiving FDA clearance, Balloon Sinuplasty has been used in over 560,000 procedures (over 88,000 procedures in the office) to treat more than 510,000 patients. Call to schedule your consultation if you would like to learn more about Balloon Sinuplasty or the other treatments available at Baton Rouge ENT Associates.

Collin B. Sutton, M.D.

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SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR OVER 30 YEARS

Your specialists for ear, nose & throat care!

Otolaryngology is the medical specialty concerned with disorders and conditions of the ear, nose, and throat (ENT). We specialize in allergies and sinus

disorders including allergy testing, allergy therapy and diagnostic CT scans, Audiology; including hearing testing, hearing aids and balance testing and all surgeries associated with ear, nose and throat disorders. SPECIALIZING IN: Sinus • Audiology • Allergy • Hearing Products 225.769.2222 • ENT-SSC.COM • 8080 Bluebonnet Boulevard Suite 2222 • Baton Rouge, LA 70810

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COVER STORY

Continued from page 12 Nurse Courtney Lyons holds a meeting with residents at the O’Brien House, an addiction recovery center in Baton Rouge.

NICHOL AS MARTINO

says. “A person might be clean for a few months, then go back to using the same dose as before. That dose can be fatal because the receptors in the brain have down-regulated.” Moreover, heroin is often laced with other drugs including the opioids fentanyl and carfentanil, says Susan Julius, medical director for Townsend Treatment Centers Baton Rouge, which has seen a 50% increase in patients struggling with opioid use disorder. “When you get heroin on the street today, you have no idea what you’re getting,” says Julius. “Within seconds, the overdose can happen.” Addiction recovery experts say that addicts and their families need to recognize the importance of committing to recovery for life. “Recovery is every day,” says Julius, who kicked a prescription opioid dependency 10 years ago after going through inpatient treatment. “It’s really important for people to get help, and to recognize it’s a chronic disease in the brain that you cannot fix on your own.”

Exceptional CARE J Around Just Aro r und tth ro thee Corner When you need outstanding care with unparalleled treatment, look to St. Elizabeth.

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Celebrating 135 Years of Insuring Families and Organizations in Louisiana When it comes to your world, you have to be as prepared as possible. In your personal life and your role as an organizational leader, you are vulnerable to infinite risks. We can help with the full spectrum of your needs today and your needs as they change and grow over time.

Contact one of our Louisiana offices today and learn how we can help you achieve your business goals. Alexandria (318) 473-2906 | Baton Rouge (225) 336-3200 | Gonzales (225) 647-5767 Hammond (985) 340-4092 | Lafayette (337) 223-0530 | Lake Charles (337) 439-7777 Metairie (504) 875-3036 | Metairie Causeway (504) 212-4861 | Metairie Veterans (504) 754-7800

1. BancorpSouth Insurance Services Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of BancorpSouth Bank. 2. Insurance products are • Not a deposit • Not FDIC insured • Not insured by any federal government agency • Not guaranteed by the bank • May go down in value. 3. BancorpSouth Insurance Services, Inc. is an insurance agent and not an insurance carrier. 4. Always read your policy for coverage terms and conditions.


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The Gulf Coast’s Only Provider of

SPINAL STENOSIS

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Louisiana’s Back & Neck Pain Experts

Charles R. Bowie, MD Neurosurgeon (225) 768-2050

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Paul J. Waguespack, MD C. Chambliss Harrod, MD Neurosurgeon Ortho-Spine Surgeon (225) 768-2050 (225) 766-0050

Scott D. Nyboer, MD Pain Medicine/PM&R (225) 768-2050

Samir K. Patel, MD Interventional Pain (225) 768-2050

Kelly J. Scrantz, MD Neurosurgeon (225) 768-2050

Kevin P. McCarthy, MD Ortho-Spine Surgeon (225) 766-0050

Jyoti S. Pham, MD Pain Medicine/PM&R (225) 768-2050

PROUDLY PHYSICIAN OWNED 10105 Park Rowe Circle | Baton Rouge, LA 70810 | www.TheNeuroMedicalCenter.com/Spine-Hospital |

2017 What's New in Health Care  
2017 What's New in Health Care  

This special advertising section presents articles from providers, businesses and other organizations on the latest health care programs and...