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bathimpact The University of Bath Students’ Union Newspaper

Volume 15 Issue 6

Your newspaper. Your news. facebook.com/bathimpact Images_Of_Money

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Monday 2nd December 2013

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Student loans sold off ~ Page 5

UoB staff strike again Simon Rushton Editor-in-Chief ath SU has recently ticked a point off their Top Ten issues list, with the introduction of the Gold Button system. This will “improve access for disabled students” as it will allow students to flag any accessibility issues to the Department of Estates as a high priority. The system will operate as a simple online form similar to those already available for BUCS or Accommodation, but less complex. A system similar to this has been in place for staff who can report if doors or lifts are broken. Students who have previously had accessibility issues, and are then unable to attend their lectures, have previously had to raise their accessibility issues with Student Services. Once the issue was raised, students

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then had to hope that the staff at Student Services would have time to fill the form out in time for the issue to be fixed before the next time they needed to get to a lecture in the same place. SU Community Officer Sally Williamson has been working on implementing this system since the start of her term in office, regularly raising the issues of this during university meetings covering disability requirements. In the initial phase of negotiations, the Department of Estates were worried about students abusing this flagging system and sending in an influx of complaints, and thus causing genuine complaints to be filtered out. They proposed that only students who were registered as disabled would have access to the service, but this idea was vetoed

due to students not being obligated to disclose any disability they may have. This idea would also restrict people dealing with any temporary incapacitation, such as a broken leg. It was agreed that the flagging system would be available to all students, but strictly for accessibility issues. Sally Williamson told bathimpact that: “It’s something that was raised in the student submission to the institutional review and it has been one of the SU’s Top Ten issues this year, so we are delighted to have made such solid progress in improving access to campus for all students with access issues.” After agreement during the recent Council/Senate/Student’s Union (CSSU) meeting, a trial version of the system will be in place by Christmas. During this trial period, the

society comment

Non-religious differences

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bathimpact sends an atheist to a Christian Union meeting, to see if she can be persuaded to change her mind about the existence of God.

e pag On THAT Lily Allen music video

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Miriam Karmali talks themes in Lily Allen’s video for ‘Hard Out Here’ and why feminism needs to think about the bigger picture to make a point for everyone.

~ See Page 8

performance of the system will be constantly reassessed by both the University and the SU, and any required changes will be made. However, this should be seen as the start of a long term plan for an online mechanism for reporting accessibility issues. Sally’s next task on improving access will be working with SU Sport Officer Tom Janicot, on improving issues surrounding the inclusion of disabled students in sport. Williamson also aims to improve the representation and informing of disabled students, which will in part be undertaken during the rebranding of the Access support group with diversity and support later in the year. One improvement to this will be the provision of relevant information and feedback for students who find their disabilities affect their day to day lives.

bite

es pag bite travels back in time to 1973

8&9

This week, John and Adam bring you the best rock albums of 1973, in the last of their round up series. Be sure to check back in January for the best rock albums of 2013.


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Monday 2nd December 2013

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Editorials

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The use of “that’s so gay” D

uring their time at school, there are many phrases a young student is likely to hear. Some friendly, others harsh. One that many students hear, with a variety of intended meanings, is the phrase “that’s so gay”. To a lot of people, this means very little – it’s just a expression many people use to mean that something bothers them, or something is amusing to them but they want to state that they are laughing at it and not with it. When the word ‘gay’ is used like this, a lot of the time it is not meant in a homophobic way – but there are of course a lot of times when it is. We at bathimpact fully understand language and connotational change, and know that the way something is used may not actually correlate with its dictionary definition. In fact, the word ‘literally’ has not been used to add emphasis so much that it can also be used as the exact opposite of its definition, to mean ‘metaphorically’, but also to drive the point home. This

much is true, and this is something we understand. It is, however, false equivalence to compare the use of the word ‘literally’ with a phrase like ‘that’s so gay’, and this is for a multitude of reasons. The first is that these words do not carry the same connotations, and their uses do not have the same weight. ‘Literally’ is a word that just tells the listeners in a conversation how accurate the story being told is. ‘Gay’, however, is an entire identity. To be gay – or any other alternative to heterosexual – is still a very contested thing for a lot of people. People are still persecuted for their sexuality, even put to death in a lot of countries. Some people have their wants and wishes deemed unacceptable because of something they have no control over. For some people, when they are gay, the simple knowledge of their identity is one of very few comforts. Even for people who are not in such a delicate position, being gay is still part of who they are, and they have the right to be proud of this ir-

respective of how vocal they may or may not be about it. To these people, to hear someone use the phrase ‘that’s gay’, regardless of the speaker’s intent can hit close to home for them in a very uncomfortable way. Many people hearing such phrases are not even gay themselves – they may be bisexual, or they may be expressing gender traits that others do not consider normal, and so they equate the negativity of “that’s so gay” with their own sexual differences. The listener may even be going through a questioning phase that will ultimately help them to define themselves and feel comfortable in their identities. The point is that the phrase “that’s gay” can be very hurtful. It can make them afraid to be honest about who they are, especially if they are already suffering. Used enough, it can make a person so afraid of giving themselves space to work out their own identity that they never do, which can lead to much greater problems later. It seems a bit melodramatic, but here

at bathimpact we feel that words are powerful. Words affect people, or we wouldn’t do what we do. The gay rights organisation Stonewall in particular feel that there is power in this phrase, and are calling for schools to tackle this use of the phrase to insult people after having found that 99 per cent of young lesbian, gay, and bisexual students hear this phrase directed towards them at school. Their eye-catching posters with the words ‘Gay. Let’s get the meaning straight.’ make quite a statement, and bathimpact are on their side. Homophobia is wrong at any stage of a person’s life, but especially for impressionable school pupils, who are trying to grow up and define themselves in this context, the effect can be even more detrimental. For the sake of others who may be affected, remember that your intent is irrelevant if it causes harm – think about how you’d be affected if an arbitrary part of yourself was thrown around as an insult.

Helmets and high visibility W

ear a helmet, wear a high-vis jacket and never, ever ride without lights. Don’t wear clothes the same colours as the local buses, or black, or grey. Don’t swerve unexpectedly, signal clearly to drivers, and expect them to treat you as if you don’t exist, you second-class citizen of the road. I’m sure that most of the people reading this issue will be aware that at 21:30 on Saturday the 16th November, 19 year old Jake Gilmore was knocked off his bike and killed in a hit-and-run on Midland Bridge Road in Bath. Following this loss of life, a man has been arrested on suspicion of dangerous driving. He has been bailed until the 17th of January. Across the country the stories are the same; London is reeling in the aftermath of 14 deaths in the last year, five being within the space of nine days. Bristol has had similar problems with three recent deaths following cars colliding with cyclists. While cycling itself is on the increase, it cannot be denied that the reckless

behaviour of drivers is adding a risk beyond the control of the cyclists. It’s happened to everybody. A quick post on Facebook asking for friends’ examples of their road experiences yielded 12 responses in under an hour, and most people that bathimpact have spoken to have mentioned cars driving dangerously close while overtaking as a major cause of danger. There are many tactics that cyclists are advised to take to avoid such dangerous situations, but a recent study carried out by the University of Bath and Brunel University suggests that these are not sufficient to remove the danger to cyclists on our roads. Analysis of 5690 overtaking events measured using an ultrasonic distance sensor has found that regardless of the changes a cyclist makes to what they wear, around 1-2 per cent of drivers will pass dangerously close when overtaking – within as little as 50cm of the cyclist. Project leader, Dr Ian Walker of Bath’s Psychology department, has

said: “The solution to stopping cyclists being hurt by overtaking vehicles has to lie outside the cyclist... we should be creating safer spaces for cycling -- perhaps by building high-quality separate cycle paths, by encouraging gentler roads with less stop-start traffic, or by making drivers more aware of how it feels to cycle on our roads and the consequences of impatient overtaking”. The results have also suggested a change in drivers’ overall behaviour near cyclists over time – a study carried out in 1979 found an average gap of 179cm between the car and cyclist during overtaking, whereas this study found an average gap of 118cm. It is possible that the stress and time-pressures of modern life have led to a strengthened belief of the importance of one’s own agenda over that of others’, or perhaps an increase in disregard of those in the way. Many drivers appear to have an ingrained disrespect for cyclists – clearly demonstrated by 22 year-

old Emma Way’s foolhardy tweet in May of “Definitely knocked a cyclist off his bike earlier. I have right of way - he doesn’t even pay road tax! #Bloodycyclists”. Her outburst may have resulted in a hefty fine and seven points on her licence, but she expressed a pretty common opinion. It does however have quite a significant flaw - nobody pays road tax - it was abolished in 1937, replaced by Car tax based on CO2 emissions. The health and environmental benefits of cycling are widely known, but until drivers’ attitudes change, there is a danger attached to this activity that is out of the hands of the rider. Jake’s family recently released a statement which included the words “We don’t want to measure life by its length, but by its quality, and his friends are helping us do that”. While it is a beautiful sentiment, it is one that is avoidable with investment and education, and that we don’t want any more families to have to express.

not have a place for keeping pictures of their own face, but they also didn’t have a place to solely store pictures of themselves having fun. Why are selfies suddenly acceptable? The Oxford English Dictionary lend them some legitimacy, having made ‘selfie’ their word of the year. This, along with the current selfie-snapping Pope would make it seem like selfies are something everybody is doing daily, at any opportunity. Celebrities do it, Jon Snow does it, and chances are your best friends do it. Some critics have slandered the selfie as nothing more than a cry for help for attention and affirmation, where people can peacock themselves around along with anything else they may wish to include –

which can be anything from overly sculpted guns, to their pet cat. Others have lauded them as being a good self-esteem builder – people want to feel liked, and we always have. The selfie is just another way of getting this needed affirmation. Some have thrown the idea of selfie to one side along with other internet-based crazes, with things like planking, video blogging, and lolcats. All things that are very different, but nonetheless grouped together by people who don’t wish to engage in the activities of the younger generations. One dismissal of selfies in particular occurred after the creation of the tumblr account ‘selfies at funerals’, the people featured on which were swiftly and angrily labelled as being exactly what

is wrong with the ‘youth of today’. The pros and cons are up for debate. Many here at bathimpact got caught up in the selfie craze during our busy Freshers’ Week, when we were up until all hours and getting little to no sleep whilst attempting to produce mintyfresh for you all. We like to tell ourselves that these pictures were strictly ironic, but we’re not sure how well we can defend this. It seems the reasons behind the selfie can dictate the reaction to them, but either way – it seems to be a new way of people expressing themselves. The means may change, but people will always need to do this, as do our perceptions of beauty. Maybe, this will change further. We can only wait and see.

On the onslaught of selfies S

o when did selfies become a thing? The fact that before the days of cameraphones people didn’t really turn the camera on themselves is neither a surprise nor a contested matter. It just didn’t happen. The actual definition of ‘selfie’ is a picture you take of yourself, that you can see yourself during the process of taking the picture. This is different for the ageold practice of polaroids, where it was near-impossible to see yourself. While there is a sense of immediate gratification in both, the practice of selfies is different. Either way, it seems to be that selfies only serve a purpose in a world where social networking were king – most who were adults BS (before selfies) will probably tell you that not only did they

The bathimpact team Simon Rushton Editor-in-Chief impact-editor@bath.ac.uk

Tomos Evans Deputy Editor-in-Chief impact-deputy@bath.ac.uk

Ben Hooper bite Editor impact-bite@bath.ac.uk

Helen Edworthy News and Comment Editor impact-news@bath.ac.uk

Tom Ash Features Editor impact-features@bath.ac.uk

Connor McGregor Morton Sport Editor impact-sport@bath.ac.uk

Pedro Gomes Photography Editor impact-photo@bath.ac.uk

Gemma Isherwood Online Editor impact-it@bath.ac.uk

Poppy Peake Publicity Officer impact-publicity@bath.ac.uk

Gabriela Georgieva Design Editor impact-design@bath.ac.uk

Elliott Campbell Media Officer su-media-officer@bath.ac.uk

Advertising Enquires Helen Freeman H.Freeman@bath.ac.uk 01225 386806

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bathimpact Students’ Union University of Bath Bath BA2 7AY 01225 38 6151

The opinions expressed in bathimpact are not necessarily those of the bathimpact editors nor of the University of Bath Students’ Union. Whilst every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this publication is correct and accurate at the time of going to print, the publisher cannot accept any liability for information which is later altered or incorrect. bathimpact as a publication adheres to the Press Complaints Commission’s Code of Conduct. Please contact them for any information.


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I went to the streets, I ran for 400, 500 metres, got to the road, and then on the road I tried to calm down and to walk slowly, not to attract attention.

63-year-old French engineer Francis Collomp on his escape from kidnapping in northern Nigeria by a militant Islam Ansaru group.

The Jaguar F-Type Coupe is being heralded as

photo of the fortnight

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Jaguar’s ‘most dynamically capable, performance focus car’ it has ever made. This

jaguarmena

is in the hopes that the car will achieve greater status than the Porsche Cayman. At a top speed of 186 miles per hour and able to do 0-60 in four seconds flat, it is hoped that the Jaguar will be able to outperform its competition. With an £85,000+ price tag, the FType has big boots to fill - especially since the model has a months-long waiting list.

Fortnight in figures

1888

The last time Thanksgiving and Hanukkah occurred together

Number likes on the ‘Thanksgivukkah’ facebook page

tent. In a surprising set of results, it was found that books are the product most preferred in physical form, standing at 62 per cent of people asked, with one of the main reasons being ‘I like the smell’. Books were noticeably ahead of movies at 48 per cent, newspapers and maga-

fortnightly graphic

Graphics showing the percentage of people who prefer physical goods to digital con-

13,000

zines at 47 per cent, CDs at 32 per cent, and video games at 31 per cent.

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News Lite

updates & events UPCOMING EVENT Holburne Winter Light Installation. Billed as a ‘spectacular display of LED lights’, the installation will dance to a soundtrack compiled by English composer Matt Clifford, who has in the past produced lighting designs for ABBA and Lady Gaga. Where: The Museum Garden. When: 4th December – 5th January

NATIONAL The energy provider Npower has confirmed that over 1400 jobs will be cut within their organisation in the name of a major corporate restructuring. The company is planning to outsource a large portion of its customer service and ‘back office’ functions to other companies. Npower currently employs almost ten thousand people within the UK.

INTERNATIONAL China has sent warplanes to the Senkaku/ Diaoyu Islands in response to incursions by foreign nations into China’s newly declared no fly zone in the area . The zone covers territory claimed by other Asian countries. The Chinese government have stated that all planes travelling through the area must submit flight plans and identification, but despite this South Korea and the US have

LOCAL Numbers of extra homes adding up to the size of a town the size of Wells are being planned for the Bath area. Despite a statement that 3290 new homes are to be built in the area, developers have said that these figures do not add up, leading to B&NES council making sites for almost 10,000 news homes, which is 4200 more than they have stated will be

EDUCATION University estate directors have stated that universities in the UK occupy a combined space seven times bigger than that of Tesco’s stores. It is estimated that the population of these combined university estates is 2.3 million, with every square metre of university property having an income of £1600 per year. It was also found that universities spend almost £2bn a year in running costs.

UPCOMING EVENT Bath On Ice. The ice rink returns to Victoria Park for its second year, with a new ‘Christmas Avenue’ being lit up at night for attendees to the ice rink to enjoy the rink side café, which will be serving mince pies and mulled wine. Where: Victoria Park When: 22nd November – 5th January


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vantages of obtaining a degree. Despite the constant reminder of the lack of core graduate roles, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of young professionals taking non-graduate jobs since the recession, at 47 per cent in 2013. With many graduates now taking on jobs that don’t require a degree, there has been a backlash from students, with the general consensus of feeling misled when it comes to picking their degree subject. Richard Bullows, a 2012 art graduate has been unable to forge a career in TV and film set design, and has instead taken a job sifting through paperwork: "It is disappointing because I've invested a lot of time in my GCSEs, A-Levels, diplomas and then my degree," he said. "I was hoping to get some sort of recognition for that…I think it's fair to be angry given that degrees are sold as you as the 'magic cure', that if you've got aspirations you can get a degree and instantly get the career you want." Interestingly, the study also showed a spike in the overall number of youth unemployment, suggesting that those with degrees were more likely to find employment, and those with lesser qualifications pushed out of the workforce. Sean Coughlan from the

Some degrees remain fixed to a career like engineering, but non-career linear subjects are also rising BBC stated: “Unemployment and earnings are shown to be directly linked to levels of education - with the higher the level of education achieved, the higher the rate of pay and the lower the risk of unemployment.” The study also showed differences in earnings depending on university type, with graduates from Russell Group universities

earning £3.63 more on average than other universities. This could also be down to the link between degree subject and earnings - for example, graduates reading high earning subjects such as medicine tended to earn more than other degree subjects. The figures also showed male graduates on average earn more than female graduates. These recent findings would

seem to indicate is that whilst the number of graduates in non-degree defining roles have increased, a degree is still beneficial to a career after university, with people with degrees on average earning more than non-graduates. The steady increase of graduates in the work place is in contrast with figures detailing graduate unemployment.

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Imogen Ware bathimpact Contributor recent survey by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) has concluded that the 14 boroughs of inner city London have more graduates in the workforce than any other part of the country, exemplifying that the capital has become a graduate economy compared with other areas of the UK. 60 per cent of the working population of inner London have degrees, due to an increase in the number of recent graduates taking non-graduate jobs. The statistics from the ONS show a sharp 38 per cent increase of working-age adults in the UK with a degree. However, these 14 boroughs are the only place where graduates are in a majority; a stark difference from other parts of the UK. South East England sees 40 per cent of working age graduates, outer London 45 per cent, South West England 37 per cent and North East England has the lowest percentage at 29 per cent. The rise of graduates in the workforce has been relentless over the last 21 years, with only 15 per cent of people having degrees compared with 38 per cent in 2013. Graduates are also earning more, demonstrating the economic ad-

USACE HQ

Numbers of graduates on the rise

growth of students, asking them not to increase the number of students from the number they have had in the previous year.’ A BIS spokesperson said: “Our goal has always been to create a higher education sector that responds to student demand and has the ability to expand and create more competition. But we’ve always been clear that we have a responsibility to keep control of public finances and minimise the risk of unsustainable growth and budget, which is why confirmed our intention to introduce student number controls from 2014-15.”

Private institutes told to cut back Anthony Masters bathimpact Contributor he Department of Business, Investment and Skills (BIS) is feared to have a shortfall of £80m, after no controls were placed on student numbers enrolling for higher education qualifications at private colleges. 23 private higher education colleges have been told to halt rises in their student numbers, with a BIS spokesperson saying certain providers were expanding ‘at unaffordable levels’. The number of students enrolling for higher national diplomas (HNDs) and certificates (HNCs) has drastically inflated. During 2011-12, there were 13,000 students studying these qualifications at 46 private colleges, surging to 30,000 in the last academic year. The Guardian newspaper has seen internal forecasts for BIS’s shortfall, which has been caused by financial support of loans and grants to the expanding number of HND and HNC students, as these students may benefit from subsidies above £10,000 over their typically two-year courses, including up to £3,400 in maintenance support. About 40% of grant recipients for HNDs and HNCs are overseas students, above the sector’s average of 5%. The business department has concerns of potential fraudulence: it has stopped loans and grants reaching 5,000 students from Romania and Bulgaria

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The overspending in HE may lead to a barren graduate landscape, due to fears over money pending further residency checks, Fiscal Studies, the 2013 Spend- sion in higher education teachand stopped funding payments to ing Round announcements means ing. The abolition of the National one college, in addition to their the total real cut between 2010-11 Studentship Programme may be requests to 23 colleges. and 2015-16 in the department’s brought forward one year to save BIS is mostly responsible for Treasury-set resource expendi- £75m. Science and research fundgovernment spending on further ture limits is 30.7 per cent. Direct ing, which has been broadly stable and higher education, science and spending on higher education will in real terms over this parliament, research. The budgetary pressure be severed by 50 per cent over this may also be affected. from HND and HNC students is parliament, as universities now Universities Minister Daexpected to swell in future years, draw greater funds from reformed vid Willetts said that HNDs and creating a £330m funding gap in tuition fees. This overspend has HNCs were ‘well-respected’ quali2015-16. These upward burdens led to proposals to reduce other fications, but restraints on stuon spending at BIS come along areas of their £13.6bn budget, dent numbers have become neceswith deep incisions to the depart- such as decreasing funds to the sary. Mr Willetts added: ‘We have ment’s budget. Access to Learning hardship fund written to some of the colleges According to the Institute for of £24m, and a further £20m ero- that have got the highest rate of

This overspend has led to proposals to reduce other areas of their 13.6bn budget, such as decreasing funds to the Access to Learning harship fund of £24m.

Liam Byrne, the Shadow Higher Education Minister, said: “We need some big answers fast for how this government has let spending balloon out of control – and students now need assurances that they won’t be paying the price for this government’s incompetence.”


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Madelaine Winn bathimpact Contributor

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s part of their course, the University of Bath’s third year Business Administration students are tasked with doing something beneficial for the community as part of their Action Project. This project aims to put theory into practice by assessing their project management, creativity and leadership skills. 7 of these students chose to organise a flash mob to take place on Union Street in Bath town centre in order to raise awareness of Friends of Young Carers. The flash mob, involving approximately 50 dancers of different ages, called on performers from the University’s Latin and Ballroom club, as well as four dance schools from the community. Two of the contributors to the flashmob were young carers themselves. The three-minute long track, mixed by Pharmacy Student Dan Jones, included a rendition of DJ Casper’s Cha Cha Slide and Psy’s Gangnam Style. The flash mob

featured a variety of styles, from street to classical ballroom. A large number of Christmas shoppers and people passing by stopped to watch the commotion; the crowd, who clapped and cheered and encircled the performers, were wearing customised t-shirts, designed by the team. The T-shirts and other promotional material were bought through crowd funding (crowdfunder.co.uk), which successfully raised the required £250.00. In order to encourage donations, the team of budding entrepreneurs offered donors a series of rewards, ranging from a handwritten thank you letter to the opportunity to appear in the video credits and promotional material, depending on the size of donations. Harry Fielder, one of the organisers, said: “It went as well as it could have. We set out to raise the profile of this small charity, and down to the fantastic turnout on a sunny Saturday, and the significant digital footprint we have hopefully left the charity in a

Harry Fielder

Bath students flashmob for charity

The flashmob included excerpts from Psy’s ‘Gangnam Style’

stronger position to secure funding in the future.” The flashmob was in aid of Friends of Young Carers, a charity based in Bath and North East Somerset since it was established to provide in 2011, designed to provide support for, and act on behalf of, young carers. A young carer is a child aged between 5 and 18 who has caring responsibilities in the home, whether that be of looking after a family member with an illness, a disability, mental health problems or a drug or alcohol addiction. Such young carers are often isolated, and miss out on the opportunity to have a normal childhood. The charity’s provision of resources, information and training supports these young carers. It is run by a committee of volunteers, in order to minimise costs and maximise the impact of received donations. The team’s innovative flashmob successfully raised awareness of the Friends of Young Carers Charity and the invaluable work they do in the area, whilst bringing a smile to the faces of many local residents.

Hollie Christian-Brookes bathimpact Contributor Higher education funding issues have once again hit the headlines following revelations by The Guardian that the government is planning further cuts. Around 500,000 of the UK's poorest students could be affected if proposals to cut 350 million pounds worth of grants go ahead. As well as this, the science budget which could potentially lose 215 million pounds. The plans, which would come into effect after the next General Election in 2015, involve converting £1,000 of every maximum grant received per year into a repayable student loan. The new policies would also scrap the National Scholarship Programme one year early, generating an extra £75 million pounds for the Department of Business and Innovation. Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, Business Secretary Vince Cable and Higher Education Minister David Willetts are currently in discussion over the proposals, but have been warned that it is a risky strategy. At a time when university tuition fees are at the highest they have ever been in the UK, the new funding scheme could deter an even greater number of students from pursuing further education as an option. The science budget would also take a hit under the proposed scheme with cuts of up to 2 per cent; this equates to the loss of 700 PhD funded student places and nearly 2,000 full-time academics. Toni Pearce, president of the National Union of Students said: “any proposal to balance the books on the backs of the poorest students would be disgraceful”. She went on to say: “The government's abject

James Cridland

Further cuts to come for HE Bath hit and run driver arrested

failure to manage the influx of private providers has deepened instability and confusion.” This is not the only tale of issues surrounding the funding of higher education, however. It was also announced this week that the government has sold off ageing student loans to a private sector company. £890m of student loans were sold for £160m Erudio Student Loans, a sub-group of a debt management consortium. The mortgage-style loans taken out by students between 1990 and 1998 are no longer a government responsibility, but Erudio will have to adhere to Office of Fair Trading guidelines on the treatment of vulnerable borrow-

ers and those in financial difficulty. The issue arose following the business report of the Student Loans Company that outlined the loans "were becoming harder to collect with time". Adopting yet another business approach to university matters, David Willetts stated the deal was "good value for money, helping to reduce public sector net debt by £160m." He went on to say: "The sale will allow the Student Loans Company to focus on supplying loans to current students and collecting repayments on newer loans". Those students who are currently on the £9,000 tuition fee scheme are unaffected by the sale.

Dane Barkly bathimpact Contributor A 52-year-old year old man has been arrested by detectives investigating the fatal hit and run of Oldfield Park resident Jake Gilmour. This is after Avon and Somerset Police said a man had been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. The accused man was released on bail by police until 17th January 2014. Gilmour, who was a barman at the Lamb and Lion in Lower Borough Wells, was hit by a vehicle whilst cycling home at 21:30 on Saturday 16 November. He was treated at Royal United Hospital for injuries, but died the following morning. Urging people to “fill the streets for him”, Gilmour’s parents have offered their support for a memorial bike ride this weekend. Toby and Sue Gilmore gave their approval to a Respect Ride, which took place on Saturday 30th March. In a message on the group’s Facebook page, the couple, along with Jake’s brother Max, said that although they could not face attending the event, they wished the organisers well. They said: ‘Sue and I welcome the efforts you are all making on behalf of the memory of our son and brother, and we wish you well. Although we are lifelong cyclists, we have no wish to visit the place where he was killed and despite our support, our hearts are too heavy to attend. Jake was harmless, unobtrusive and sociable; please show your respect for him accordingly. Fill the streets for him but save noisy protests for another time. Thank you very much.

Toby, Sue and Max Gilmore.’ The ride took place on Saturday morning, with people meeting at Kingsmead Square at 10am, before making their way to Midland Bridge at around 10.20am. Flowers were laid and candles lit before a one minute silence was held in Gilmour’s memory. The event was monitored by the Police. It is hoped that this will further raise the awareness for cyclist safety, on the rise recently in part due to six cyclists’ deaths in less than two weeks in London, which have led to a major road safety operation involving the Metropolitan Police. The operation will involve fining unsafe cyclists and motorists. Last week, Boris Johnson said he would consider a ban on cyclists wearing earphones whilst cycling. This is despite the fining in May of Emma Way, who was charged with failing to stop after an accident after she tweeted “Definitely knocked a cyclist off his bike earlier. I have right of way – he doesn’t even pay road tax! #Bloodycyclists”. All but one of the deaths in London involved a bus, lorry or HGV. Whilst cyclists can do their best to e as safe as possible on the road, recent research conducted at the University of Bath along with the Brunel University, has suggested that there is nothing a cyclist can do to stop some motorists passing dangerously close while overtaking. It found that no matter what outfit was worn during a cycle at peak times, motorists did not change how closely they overtook the cyclists.


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f these “people who sell the Big Issue smarten themselves up a bit, they might sell a few more copies. Christ, half of them look like bloody tramps!” This is just one gem from a forum dedicated to ‘jokes’ about homelessness and Big Issue sellers. But the truth is, there’s nothing funny about homelessnes; it’s a serious issue faced by thousands of people across the UK. The term ‘homeless’ generally relates to people sleeping in temporary accommodation such as hostels, people who are squatting and have no fixed address, or people who are sleeping rough on the streets. Luckily, the UK has loads of charities and initiatives set up to help people in crisis. The Big Issue is, in my opinion, one of the best out there. This could be because I’ve just started volunteering at The Big Issue office in Bath, but it could also be due to the fact that it’s a really, really great idea. Basically, The Big Issue is a weekly entertainment and current affairs magazine, which is sold by homeless and vulnerably-housed members of the public. The vendors buy the magazine from us at £1.25 and sell it on for £2.50, keeping the profit they make. All our vendors go through an induction meeting with a member of staff from our office, and we then provide them with an official Big Issue badge. We then give them two magazines free of charge and get them set up on a selling pitch. Very importantly, we also explain our Code of Conduct, which states the

appropriate behaviour expected from the vendors and is signed by all of our vendors. After two weeks, vendors put down a deposit of £15 to buy the famous red jackets that our vendors all wear. From there, it’s just a case of selling, and smiling! Sorted, spiel over. In the past, I’ve bought copies of the magazine, and I’ve stopped to chat with vendors and offered to buy food and hot drinks for people sleeping on the street when I’m on the way home. But it’s never really sunk in before. Volunteering here and getting to know the vendors as people, and not the just red jackets that so many people are incapable of seeing past, has made a huge difference in both good and bad ways. I’m ashamed to admit that I kind of got used to seeing people sleeping rough and begging. Even though I knew it wasn’t right, it kind of became… normal? Begging and rough-sleeping seems to be a common sight in so many of the places we visit, but it’s sometimes so hard to think about what it actually means. Now that I’m working with people who have made an incredibly positive decision to turn their lives around by selling the Big Issue, it makes it so much more real. It really shouldn’t take getting to know someone’s personality to make you realise that they should have somewhere warm to sleep, hot food to eat and clothes that keep them toasty and dry through winter, but sometimes it does. Now that I know those personalities and have had the chance to spend time with them, every time I get tucked up in my new flat it breaks my heart

wikimediacommons

Lucinda Vinestock bathimpact Contributor

calxfornia

A bigger issue than the Big Issue

Big Issue sellers can often be seen around Bath. How often do you stop and buy a magazine? to think that some of them have no home to go to. When I tell people that I volunteer at The Big Issue, a lot of people recoil or wince or simply look offended. There have been comments such as ‘Why help them? They’re all druggies anyway’, ‘They’re probably not actually homeless, you know. Loads of them are just conning you’, ‘Britain doesn’t have homeless people. They’re just crazy tramps who sneak off to their homes at the end of the day – I’ve seen them do it!’. I’ve even heard ‘Who cares? They’re all foreigners and crackheads anyway’. Some of these statements have come from my friends and ex-colleagues which I find astounding, upsetting, and incredibly insensitive. Yes, some of our vendors do have addiction problems – but the fact that they’re engaging with us and working with local agencies, like the DHI charity, is fantastic.

Some of our vendors don’t sleep on the streets – they sleep in hostels, they squat, they’re sleeping on a sofa somewhere where they’re at risk of abuse. Or, they’re staying in a night-shelter or in temporary accommodation: just because they’re not curled up in a cardboard box in front of you 24/7 doesn’t mean that they’re not ‘homeless’. Britain does have homeless people – some people end up living on the streets due to family breakdowns, and then can’t get a job due to the fact that they can’t shower or buy suits; others have mental health issues which have never been addressed and then affect all aspects of their lives. There are so many negative assumptions about homelessness that people seem to be avoiding the actual issue: real-life people are sleeping on the streets. I don’t understand when that just became an acceptable part of society. The

scary thing is, it could be anyone. The people I’m meeting did all have completely different lives before selling The Big Issue. We’ve got chefs, housing-maintenance men, musicians, illustrators. And if their careers and social lives and personal relations can break down as easily as they have done, that means it can happen to everyone else, too. I think about my family and can never imagine a situation where my dad would lose his job and none of us would help him, but these things happen every day. Which is terrifying. But it’s also thought-provoking and makes you reconsider your own life and how lucky you are. Hopefully, it makes you want to help those who need it most. Our vendors are regular, real people who are down on their luck and trying to turn their lives around, which I think is something incredibly commendable and warrants respect and support.

Carbon emissions not just hot air I

decades. As the rescue effort entered full swing, the paradigm was unevenly matched as world leaders met in Warsaw in a lacklustre attempt to produce a ‘roadmap’ for Paris 2015, exhaustingly nicknamed ‘Copenhagen: take two’. The event proved a farce; Japan dropped its commitments to the Kyoto Protocol, whilst the Australian representation arrived in casual wear. To add to the wanting progress, Poland – the event organisers – planned a ‘clean’ coal conference within walking distance from the climate talks. What proves more troubling is,

Takver

Benjamin Butcher bathimpact Contributor t is difficult not to feel the pain of the Philippines Chief Negotiator, Yeb Saño, whose impassioned speech on the first day of the Warsaw climate conference shed light on what many developing countries are currently experiencing: climate change is no longer a ‘what if’; it is happening. Typhoon Haiyan will perhaps embody this reality in years to come; the most powerful storm on record in an ocean which has seen steady temperature increases over the past few

just weeks after the release of the IPCC’s latest report stating that scientists are 95 per cent certain that humans are exacerbating climate change, leaders have moved the issue to one of conscience rather than one of urgency. This is particularly resonant in the UK, where David Cameron has deleted records of his infamous PR trip to the Artic and was recorded in private last week calling for an ‘end to green crap’. In a dangerously cynical comment piece a month ago, the Conservative bible The Spectator wrote an article claiming climate change could actually be good for the United Kingdom. The news is, as ever, disconcerting. Denying an issue makes it far easier to do nothing, but the reality remains: if a doctor was 95 per cent certain you had cancer, you would more than likely act on it. But there is solace to be taken. As it becomes increasingly clear that action has to be taken by those not chosen to lead, it is heartening to see so many institutions – public and private, small-scale and large – committed to acting in some way. The University of Bath is a good example of this, even if it may go over our heads. By the end of next year, the

university plans to have reduced CO2 emissions by 19 per cent against the 2005 baseline, with aims to push this up to 43 per cent by 2020. Small-scale projects, including LED lighting and refurbishment of accommodation will help reach these targets, as will larger goals like the £232,320 biomass boiler for the STV and the £350,000 worth of solar panels on accommodation. The University epitomises what we can be doing. By investing upwards of £6.5m over five years with little external funding, they are tackling one of the great threats of our time and ensuring long-lasting economic stability. Of course, there is more they can be doing, but the Carbon Management Programme (available online) is a fantastic start. If the plan, which is due completion by 2016, is a success, it will be a sensible place to plan even more ambitious targets. The progress made by the university is, as some will point out, mandated by the government. Under the Climate Change Act, Britain is obliged to reduce carbon emissions by 80 per cent for 2050. Given the current government’s shift in tone and an increase in climate scepticism, it is unclear whether these targets will be

adhered to. This is a particular point of contentionin the way of green infrastructure and long-term energy efficiency programmes. It is vital, therefore, that even if changing governments attempt to alter legislation those not hindered by greed and short-sightedness make the changes they can. As a centre of knowledge, the University of Bath’s stance is symbolic of the rationality and progressiveness we represent. It is a humiliating indictment of our politicians when those at the bottom are forced to take the lead, whilst those at the top fail in every possible sense. Climate scepticism ignores science in a desperate attempt to maintain the status quo, a trend which is drastically catching speed. As ministers flew home from Warsaw after a last-minute deal which fell drastically short of what is required, it is imperative for us to access what we can do, both individually and collectively, when those who are supposed to lead fail to do so. As so many attempt to whitewash science and bury their heads deep in the sand, we can take some comfort that there exist city councils, businesses and public institutions who are making ambitious changes.


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Monday 2nd December 2013

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Comment

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It’s harder out here for some of us U

ers every aspect of feminism but it would be unreasonable to honestly expect this from a pop song. Having said this, there are glaring inequalities shown in the video, especially that of the objectification of the mainly black dancers in the video. The problem is not limited to her; Miley Cyrus’s recent VMA performance in which she seems to fetishize black women and has claimed to be making ‘black music’ was deemed unacceptable to say the least, and by more than a few people. Her VMA performance was incredibly controversial largely because of the race element. Lily Allen is in danger of being accused of the same patronizing tone towards black women, but it is important to bear in mind the message of the song in its entirety. Her references to Robin Thicke’s depressingly neolithic ‘Blurred Lines’ (my favorite being the brilliant use of balloons to let us all know abut her baggy pussy) highlight the fact that recent pop music has seriously backtracked, and the use of these women as dancers shows that both your race and your gender can still determine how you are perceived. The slow motion shots of twerking show how utterly strange your butt cheeks look when they’re being slapped and having champagne poured over them – not sexy, just weird. Maybe all we needed was somebody to show us a slow motion shot of butt jiggling in order for us to think twice about its sexual appeal, and maybe the entire structure of gender relations while we’re at it. This is not to say that if you find this sexy that you are

wrong/a crap feminist, but it does go some way to help us realize that you don’t need to be able to fit the mold of ‘sexy’ prescribed to us by the media in order to be considered a valid, fully functioning woman. To adapt Evelyn Hall’s words to a modern situation, I may not want champagne poured over me but I will defend to the death for your right to have champagne poured over you. The issue of feminism, what it is, whether it is good or whether it is merely sexist bile threatening men and their livelihoods has been at the forefront of recent news because women are great and are doing great things, and this evidently worries some people. Pussy Riot, Malala Yousafzai, Egyptian and

top ten in the country for disparity between the highest and lowest paid salaries. As students, these ‘achievements’ shame us. The average salary for Vice Chancellors in the UK is around £250K. The Vice Chancellor at Bath is paid more than £360K. And yet, whilst most staff are being given a below inflation pay offer of just 1%, the Vice Chancellor and other high earners have been given a pay rise of almost 10%. It seems our increased tuition fees are lining the pockets of the University’s senior management instead of rewarding the hard work of our academic and support staff. The state of affairs is worrying across the country, but is particularly bad at the University of Bath, and will continue to get worse unless we act. The vast majority of Students’ Unions in the UK are supporting their staff, and we believe that the University of Bath Students’ Union must now end its silence and speak out too. Firstly, on principle, it is important that we stand with our staff, who are being mistreated and taken for granted by an increasingly self-serving senior management. Secondly, the staff unions supported us in fighting increases to our tuition fees, and even funded transport for students in Bath to join protests in

London. Can we really turn our backs now that we are in a position to help them, and can we ever expect their support in future if we do? Finally, consider how the mistreatment of staff impacts us as students. Many of our academics could leave

Saudi Arabian female protestors these are but a miniature handful of women trying as best they can to change the basic fabric of society when faced with hurdles such as the Taliban shooting you, systematic rape, genital mutilation, or being banned from driving and having to abide by strict curfews. Despite all this, feminism soldiers on and will continue to do so for as long as these issues continue to exist. The problem does arise (and I have been wary of including Pussy Riot in the same sentence as other middle eastern groups because of this) of lumping all kinds of feminism together into one monolithic ideology, which it is not at all. The struggle is relative, and it is patron-

izing pretending to know anything about a woman’s struggle in Saudi Arabia when I come from North London. So, having said this, it is of the utmost importance to respect all kinds of feminism and maintain the delicate balance between showing support and keeping a respectable distance. But in reference to what I suppose you would call ‘Western feminism’, there is still much to be done and protested about, and Lily Allen has finally brought this weird and wonderful notion into the mainstream media. So let us not forget the wise words of Ms Allen: We’ve never had it so good, yeah we’re out of the woods, and if you can’t detect the sarcasm then you’ve misunderstood. John Vander Haagen

Miriam Karmali bathimpact Contributor pon watching that Lily Allen video, as it has been called over the past fortnight, inside my head I was screaming ‘yes, finally feminist pop and blue lipstick are back’. However, the more times it was watched, the more people realized that while the lyrics may have been spot on, many people (including myself) couldn’t understand the video. For example, the dancers are mainly black, Lily is clothed (and rocking amazing glitter eye make-up), and the female dancers are twerking all over the shop whilst she throws money at them. Suggesting what, exactly? The rebranding of feminism has been all the rage recently - probably because a lot of people find it absolutely terrifying, and some don’t feel it reaches out enough to men. In my opinion this is patronising nonsense at best, but the people want what the people want. This whole ‘rebranding’ phase was partially started by the campaign in Elle magazine earlier this year, which consisted of Elle teaming up with advertising agencies in a meek attempt at rebranding feminism. This is why I particularly enjoyed Lily Allen’s brilliant, new, three-years-too-late pop song. In 3 minutes she managed to say what a lot of women, girls, men and boys feel about the workplace, the music industry, university, family, relationships - and in fact any space where men and women interact with one another. Of course, it is simplistic and by no means cov-

An open letter to the UoB SU

Bath Students Support Our Staff bathimpact Contributor n Tuesday 3rd December our academic and support staff will be taking strike action over pay and conditions. As students, we believe it is vital that we show our full support and solidarity, and are disappointed that our Students’ Union has not yet done so. We would like to take this opportunity to explain why. This year, staff at our university have received a pay offer which actually amounts to a pay cut. Given that their pay has already fallen by 13% in real terms over the past four years, this latest reduction only adds insult to injury. But it was not until we discovered more about the current situation at Bath that we realised just how bad things had become. The University has done much to promote the latest student satisfaction results. However, there are some statistics that it is much less vocal about. Our University is now among the worst in the country for low pay, pay inequality and job insecurity. We have more teaching and research staff on zero hour contracts, and more staff on minimum wage, than any other university in the country. We are also now in the

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cember. 2) Contact the University by email (Vc-pa@bath.ac.uk) to explain that, whilst we stand with our staff in their demand for fair pay and conditions, this strike action is causing significant disruption to our studies that

The vast majority of Students’ Unions in the UK are supporting their staff, and we believe that the University of Bath Students’ Union must now end its silence and speak out too.

the University for private industry and instantly increase their salaries. If conditions worsen, talented academics and support staff will leave. That hurts us, future students and the reputation of our university much more than a day of strike action ever could. So what can we do? We believe that the vocal support of our Students’ Union is important because both staff and students benefit when we stand together. It is crucial that you explain the situation to students, and outline the three effective ways in which we can show support to our staff. We can: 1) Join the picket protests that will be located at all main entrances to the University on Tuesday 3rd De-

will ultimately be reflected in future National Student Satisfaction Survey results. 3) Use social media (www. facebook.com/uniofbath & @UniofBath) to show solidarity with striking staff, to make it clear to the University that staff and students will not be divided. We, the undersigned, want to be proud of our university, but while there remain serious unresolved issues relating to staff pay and conditions, that is simply not possible. As students, and as members of the University of Bath Students’ Union, we ask that you represent us and join our demand for staff to be treated with the

respect and dignity they deserve. Bath Students Support Our Staff This letter is signed by 145 students and alumni and can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/ojxj5ju

bathimpact asked the Students’ Union for a response, and they stated: The position of the Students’ Union is to ensure that the 16,000 students we represent have all the information they need to understand the potential impact of the strike action and to be able to make a fully informed choice about getting involved. This is a national strike that will happening at universities all over the country. The three campus unions UCU, Unison, and Unite have organised an information session that is open to all students on Monday 2nd December 1:15pm in 3E 2.1. This will give students an opportunity to understand why industrial action has been called, the potential impact on them and what the University is doing, especially if their studies are affected. We are promoting this meeting and providing information widely, so all students can find out why action is being taken and how they can get involved if they choose.


Monday 2nd December 2013

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Business

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British Airways’ new marketing strategy Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No. Well yes, it’s flight BA723 from New York! The campaign is no doubt an incredible form of digital advertising. How does it work? The ads are located on electronic billboards in Heathrow flight path areas such as Piccadilly Circus and Chiswick. It is then when a BA aircraft comes in to land that these digital billboards use customised surveillance technology in order to track the plane and its details where once obtained, the display will change to the image of a child pointing and walking towards the plane. The message shows that aircraft’s flight number and the destination that it is arriving from. For instance, one board could read:

“It’s the BA0255 from New York”. This will then be replaced by a further message relevant to that destination like “Fly the new A380 to New York at ba.com/lookup. It is also likely that information such as the lowest fare and temperature will appear on the screen. It is innovative, yet so original, since it really encapsulates the appeal of flying. In the simple format of a story told, it also reveals how the world can be easily accessible. And, it is British Airways who are now embracing this message. More impressively, it is British Airways that will now be viewed as an innovative airline, an

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Peter Nagle bathimpact Contributor Marketing is now well placed in the digital sphere. For the best part of the decade, companies and brands have accepted this move in benefitting from the perks of data. Their greatest efforts in harnessing the Big Data Revolution have come mainly from an online analysis and targeted advertising campaign point of view. Now, data is becoming more interactive: so interactive that British Airways is claiming that the use of technology for its ‘Magic of Flying’ campaign is the first of its kind in the globe.

interpretation that has rarely been associated with the airline before. The technology is breath-taking, as it catches the plane coming into sight which then triggers the message. The system also has a weather feed that detects cloud heights in order to guarantee that the plane will be visible before showing the advert. Even better, it can be done on a regular basis since their aircraft are landing roughly every 5 minutes at Heathrow. This live feed principle makes it a never-ending message, something which most ads fail to achieve. It is magical, and that is what marketing should be these days. The use of real-time data should be the basis of creating something supernatural. This campaign looks set to be the new benchmark of digital advertising. British Airways have played their cards right here as they have targeted their promotion in an ideal location: areas along the flight path. Why? Because anyone can see the sky! More suitably, tourists will be able to see these messages, the perfect market already for British Airways but also for commuters. The M4, one of the UK’s most congested motorways, is situated along the flight path, a great way of enticing motorists into travelling. In addi-

tion, the ad makes a strong case for safety. For those who may have a fear of flying, the Lookup campaign shows that even when you are off the ground, radar detects your location and thus may alleviate any concerns of being lost in the air. Using real-time data has been a major facet of company objectives in terms of customising their product performance. However, this increased use of data is likely to spur companies into operating in a digital battle in more competitive environments. Who knows, it may even come down to the scenario wherein the creativity of a firm’s marketing campaign may become an even greater determinant on the path to an eventual purchase. The automotive industry should take note, as using this method may in time promote authenticity. Volkswagen could post a message on one of the many screens along the M4 stating: “500 Polos have driven by in the last hour, get yours!” Or if Aston Martin want to go down the exclusivity route: “No Aston Martins have driven on this road today, could you be the first?” It looks like electronic billboards offering real-time data is going to be the new age of digital advertising.

of burning the fuel for longer would be ‘infeasible production’. The story, therefore, breaks one of the key theories in economics. It is generally agreed that the only way said graph can be manipulated positively is if we have some kind of change in technology: faster machinery, harder-working labourers etcetera. It is unlikely that the Maccabees

found any such way to burn oil more efficiently than we do today, so there is only one explanation we can accept as economists: Hanukkah spirit. That’s right. Whilst Christmas spirit is used to induce gullible consumers into buying crap we will all forget about by the New Year, Hanukkah spirit has the ability to help solve the upcoming energy crisis.

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erhaps the most famous Jewish economist around this time of year is Ebenezer Scrooge. The unsympathetic antihero with his hatred of Christmas famously attempted to maximise profits by forcing his humble clerk, Bob Cratchit, to work on the twenty-fifth. Who could blame the man? The winter of 1844 saw Hanukkah fall on 6th December, meaning that by the time his servant’s holiday arrived, his was long-gone; all Scrooge was worried about was paying back the bills from the Festival of Lights. Christmas has always had a monopoly on the season. From around mid-November, the TV screens fill with relentless advertising about Coke-drinking Santas and magical snowmen. Like any monopoly, it is incredibly difficult to break up. Advertisers, governments and shopping centres all trade in one commodity: Christmas spirit. Unfortunately for other religions, Hanukkah spirit or Diwali spirit just doesn’t sound right. One way in which monopolies can be broken up is via government regulation, something which has been attempted before. In Birmingham in 1997, the council decided to combine the holidays of Diwali, Chinese New Year, Christmas, Eid, Hanukkah and Halloween under the guise of Win-

terval. The all-inclusive holiday in one of the UK’s most diverse cities was a disaster. The media picked it up as a war on Christian values, and after two years the event was abruptly cancelled. So is there any room for Hanukkah? The answer is probably not, primarily because the holiday has little prominence in the Hebrew calendar. Secondly, only 0.5 per cent of the British population identifies with Judaism; meaning, in marketing terms, there are very few people to exploit. But can we explain the miracle of Hanukkah in economic terms? The story goes that after a brutal fight against the Greeks, the victorious Jewish freedom fighters, the Maccabees, attempted to purify their temple by burning ritual oil for eight days. The miracle is that, despite having only enough oil for one day, it managed to last the required time. The miracle is a play on the production possibilities frontier, a graph which helps us understand the tradeoff that occurs in a world of limited resources. It is used to explain, for example, that if a country wants to produce guns they could produce around 300 guns a day. If, however, they decided to produce butter as well, they would have to redirect resources, decreasing the amount of

guns they can produce. The result is a curve which helps explain how tomanage these trade-offs to produce the optimum quantity of each good. So imagine we replace butter with ‘days of light’ and the guns with ‘purification of the temple’, the graph might explain that even the most efficient burning of the Menorah would be only one day. Any hopes

Ron Almog

EconomicsHanukkah of


Monday 2nd December 2013

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World

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Just another leisurely Arctic cruise

The Arctic 30’s message is being overshadowed by their capture

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he Arctic 30 consist of 28 environmental activists and 2 journalists who boarded the Arctic Sunrise, a Greenpeace campaign ship, to sail towards the Prirazlomnaya oil rig in the Pechora Sea, an ice-resistant oil platform being explored by Russian oil industry giants Gazprom and Rosneft. Commercial drilling was supposed to begin in the region in 2012; however, it was delayed until spring 2013 at least, due to safety concerns. The environmentalists on board took part in a peaceful protest at the oil rig to call attention to the threat of oil drilling and climate change. On 19th September, armed Russian military stormed the ship and arrested the activists on the grounds of ‘piracy as part of an organised group’, with the charge of piracy later being changed to hooliganism. Currently, all members but one have been granted bail; one member remains in detention and another, Australian Colin Russell, has been detained until February. The oil industry holds perhaps a rose-tinted view in its excitement at what seems to be a new opportunity presented by retreating sea ice. Arctic oil and gas exploration presents a new challenge to the industry, yet Greenpeace is adamant that Gazprom and Rosneft: lack

the experience of offshore projects, have a poor environmental and health and safety track record, lack transparency in company reporting and have questionable corporate practices. Ultimately, these unpredictable corporate practices pose a threatening risk; if drilling goes ahead, a serious oil spill is both inevitable and potentially devastating. Rosneft is responsible for 75 per cent of spills in Russia’s largest oil province Yugra, and Gazprom has taken no steps to address the lack of drilling expertise. Search Arctic 30 on the web and you will find little information on the initial protest itself; instead, you will come across a myriad of petitions and articles calling on the Russian government to free the activists of imprisonment and their potential charges. Critics argue that the Greenpeace focus has shifted completely; instead of raising awareness of the dangers of oil drilling and climate change, Greenpeace has had to pay over £1 million pounds in bail, and the primary focus is now on getting the members home, which seems to have obscured the environmental argument. At the same time, the international support for the release of the activists has raised the Arctic 30’s profile immensely. In recent months, six women climbed the shard, the tallest building in Britain, also in protest

against oil and gas drilling in the Arctic. Aurora, a giant people-powered polar bear was taken through the streets of central London drawing attention to Shell’s ongoing attempts to drill for oil in the Arctic. According to an Arctic 30 activist: “Shell screwed up in the US Arctic, so now they’re teaming up with one of the most reckless oil companies on earth to exploit the weak regulations in Russia. Shell’s

board must know that an Arctic oil spill would mean financial and reputational ruin, but they’ve run out of options and are desperate for the last drops of oil left on the planet.” Greenpeace stresses the risks of oil drilling; consequentially meaning that, in the event of a major oil spill, devastating consequences will engulf the region. This assertion is supported by scientists who

confirm that oil spills will not break down in the Arctic, and marine life will be affected. Conversely, oil exploration is driven by market demands, and for Russia, exploitation of the Arctic region’s oil and gas resources will further its geopolitical strategy and ensure energy security. Will we compromise the last of the Earth’s relatively untouched ecosystem for increasing energy demands? It seems likely. Osvaldo Gago

Marral Shamshiri bathimpact Contributor

Protestors in Madrid campaigning for the Spanish government to push for the Arctic 30’s release

Latin America should be fuming Fumigation is one of the worst US policies in the war on drugs Tom Ash bathimpact Features Editor

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Revolution_Ferg

hen American politicians took to the airwaves a few months ago to condemn the Syrian regime’s use of chemical weapons on innocent civilians, my first thought ran along the lines of “God, how awful.” My second must have sounded like “bit rich, though”; for it is a fact, long-overlooked by Western countries, that for years the United States government has been waging chemical warfare against some of the poorest peo-

ple of Latin America. The United States has pursued a tactic of fumigation in the last couple of decades in the war on drugs. What this means is, in collaboration with Latin American governments (notably Mexico and Columbia), they send aeroplanes to spray large swathes of agricultural land with herbicide in order to kill off drug crops (chiefly coca, the key ingredient of the white powdery stuff that has dustily graced so many £20 notes). The problem with this ‘non-violent’ solution is twofold; firstly, coca is

Coca leaves are left outside to dry before cocaine production

a very robust crop, meaning the dose rate of glyphosate, the main herbicidal chemical in question, has to be very high; and secondly, the spraying is indiscriminate, meaning it hits other crops such as maize, which are being grown to feed families, as well local flora. It contaminates still bodies of water, which domestic and wild animals then drink, leading to slow, painful death. Should it be inhaled or ingested by humans, it causes respiratory illness, vomiting, diarrhoea, fever, eye infections, rashes and migraines. Friendly. Let’s ignore all that emotive stuff for the moment though. Fumigation may kill your favourite chicken and cull your sacred trees. It may give half the rural population the shits every time a plane passes overhead (which is more serious than it sounds when proper sanitation is lacking). The moral bankruptcy of fumigation still pales in comparison to the sheer stupidity of it in practical terms as a method of reducing drug production. What does that mean exactly? Is ‘sheer stupidity’ a bit harsh? One would beg to move that it is not. In a nutshell, by killing off all the legal crops, the US essentially ensures that peasant farmers will

cultivate drugs. As mentioned, coca is far more hardy than most other crops; not to mention its exponentially faster turnaround from plantation to harvest. It can grow pretty much anywhere. So if you were a Columbian campesino whose food supply had been destroyed with the assent of your own government, what would be the obvious solution to make a quick buck in order to feed your family? Well, deforesting swathes of the Amazon in order to grow coca bushes would seem like a viable option. The environmental effects of increased drugs production are not just limited to deforestation. The by-products of cocaine production in the excitingly labelled ‘jungle laboratories’ form a delicious cocktail: kerosene, sulphuric acid, lime, calcium carbide, acetone, toluene, hydrochloric acid and ethyl ether. As the process is completely unregulated, said mixture then gets pumped into streams and rivers, notably into the Amazon itself, poisoning a key agricultural water supply, as well as one upon which humans and other fauna depend. So what is the American answer to this complex problem? Well, their overall approach is baffling.

Although they are investing money in economic development plans for poorer communities, designed to promote the cultivation of legal, sustainable crops (good idea), they are simultaneously raining chemical death down upon the products of their own investment. If chemical warfare wasn’t enough, the US government is also exploring the possibility of adding a biological element to the fumigating mixture it ejaculates from its aircraft: fungal spores. After all, everyone would much prefer to breathe in microscopic mushrooms. It is difficult to discern a logical outcome to the US government’s policy of fumigation, other than turning the Amazon, along with most of Columbia and Mexico’s arable land, into a barren wasteland. Even though the use of fumigation, in tacit acknowledgement of its failings, has been steadily declining since 2007, it is still the prevalent strategy of the US government and its Latin American partners. So long as it continues, it will undermine Latin America’s economies and the legitimacy of its governments; in so doing, it will be directly contributing to the failure of the US’ ongoing war on drugs.


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Monday 2nd December 2013

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Science

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Digitising the human tastebuds

A new electronic lollipop has been developed to simulate tastes

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friends and family, as well as cute videos of cats and dogs who think that they’re human. Whilst this is a huge breakthrough, the rather “clunky” gadget still needs to undergo some improvements. The user has to stick their tongue out whilst utilising the device, so the team are currently developing an upgrade which allows the user to keep their mouth almost closed throughout the occasion. Furthermore, the digital lollipop has yet to add the fifth main taste to its repertoire, the savoury “umami” tang, as well as smells and texture - all of which are very important ingredients for the whole tasting experience. Ranainghe believes, and I whole heartedly agree, that this technology could have a range of uses in the future. Talking to the New Scientist, she says, “In a gaming environment we could come up with a new reward system based on taste sensations. For example, if you complete a game task successfully, or complete a level, we can give a sweet, minty or sour reward. If you fail we can deliver a bitter message.” The digital lollipop would also

revolutionise watching TV cookery shows, and medicine. With regards to biotechnological applications, Ranainghe states, “People with diabetes might be able to use the taste synthesiser to simulate sweet sensations without harming their actual blood sugar

levels. Cancer patients could use it to improve or regenerate a diminished sense of taste during chemotherapy”. Although you won’t be able to get this in time for Christmas as a reward for all your hard work this semester, just think that

next time you’re watching Jamie Oliver or Gordon Ramsey sample one of their so-called masterpieces on television and groan in delight, know that the day will come soon, you won’t have to just take their word for it. I for one, cannot wait. greenbes

Esther Osarfo-Mensah bathimpact Contributor cientists really are a useful species of human. Thanks to them, we’re living better for longer, learning more about the complicated world we live in, and giving me fascinating things to write about. Now, a group of researchers from the National University of Singapore have successfully revamped the way that we can interact with the world around us - through digital lollipops. The research team, led by Nimesha Ranasinghe, revealed at the ACM Multimedia conference in Barcelona that they have developed a silver electrode that, when placed on top of and below your tongue, is able to recreate the basic salty, sweet, bitter and sour tastes. Semiconductor elements fool your tongue by marginally varying in temperature whilst passing a fluctuating alternating current, which stimulates the taste buds. Additionally, the scientists have cooked up a new data format, TOIP (Taste Over Internet Protocol), which could potentially allow us to one day message our favourite tastes to

Analog lollipops will continue to dominate for the moment, but could be supplanted in the future

Is it time to turn off the gas yet? We do not have long left before our stores of fossil fuels run dry

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ast week, energy firm RWE shelved its £4bn Atlantic Array plan – an offshore wind farm of huge proportions that would have been capable of powering a million homes and created thousands of jobs during its production. With the state of environmental subsidies for energy companies becoming more precarious as David Cameron is

rumoured to have slated green levies as “crap”, the incentives the big six energy companies have to turn their eyes towards more low-carbon power sources are weakening. Local councils of West and North Devon are rejoicing at the loss of the “unsightly” plans, plans which would have been a significant step towards plugging the UK’s energy gap using something other than gas. Scientists agree that to prevent

catastrophic climate change at least two thirds of the world’s current known reserves of oil, gas and coal must remain in the ground. As time increases and we burn more fossil fuels, the percentage of available reserves that we are able to burn without irreversible damage is, of course, shrinking alongside it. Despite this, the energy firms dealing in the exploration for new reserves of oil and gas are not only upping dbgg1979

Holly Narey bathimpact Contributor

their game in their search deeper and further for remaining caches of ancient power, they are being helped to do so by our government. There is £2.6bn available in yearly subsidies and tax cuts for the coal, oil and gas industry. This is six times the size of the subsidies available for renewable energy industries, a perverse fact when considering the government’s commitment to reducing our dependence on non-renewable fuels. Fossil fuels still made up 87 per cent of the world’s primary energy consumption last year, and the use of all of their forms is still increasing. The 2012-2013 Energy Bill outlined the intention to cut carbon emissions by closing coal and nuclear power stations, to increase use of renewables and decrease dependence on fossil fuels. The plan to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent of 1990 levels by 2025 is an honourable intention indeed, but how could it be possible? The Energy White Paper of 2007 anticipated a necessary increase of 30-35 Gigawatts of new electricity generation capacity to plug the “gap” created by the closure of power stations. The Atlantic Array would have had the potential to provide up to 1.2GW, a significant amount; however wind farms are notoriously unreliable, as is solar, and tidal is expensive (yet clean and reliable). So thoughts turn to nuclear, or back to fossil fuels. If we want to reduce the projected 4°C warming to a less devastating, 2°C warming, these delays and evasions must end.

Climate change refugees are becoming a real thing, and they are the poorest of the world’s inhabitants, clinging desperately to the edges of the planet’s most battered countries, displaced as the waters rise as a result of the carelessness of the world’s wealthiest. Climate talks in Warsaw last month ended with few changes, ignoring the hunger strike of a desperate Philippine negotiator Yeb Sano, reducing targets and putting off decisions to 2015; longer than many developing countries can wait. This year marked the significant event of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide passing 400 parts per million for the first time in recorded history. Following this we saw an Oklahoman town devastated by a tornado, parts of the Australian outback decimated by wildfires, and super-typhoon Haiyan claiming the lives of thousands in the Philippines. As we sit in quiet, calm England, with our dependable, mundane weather and steady, trustworthy ground beneath our feet, it is easy to forget the tragedy that is befalling the rest of the world and shrug as a company again drifts away from renewables back into the arms of fossil fuels. What does it matter? As long as our TVs keep running and we can get to and from work, in our safe, grey pocket of the world, we can contentedly snooze through life, turning the channel away from disaster. Put the kettle on, will you? The nights are drawing in; I feel a cold snap coming on.


Monday 2nd December 2013

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Science

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Students lead physics workshops Physics students have been teaching classes in and around Bath

Valentin Haemmerli

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the ages of about seven and eleven. I and several of my first year colleagues, as well as physics students from throughout the Department, have recently had the pleasure of leading workshops in Bath, Radstock, Paulton, Shepton Mallet, Wells, Frome, and, most recently, in Midsomer Norton on the 16th November. I was lucky enough to be involved in two of these workshops. We spent a rainy Saturday in the libraries of Shepton Mallet and Wells, engaging in

fun, lively and often intriguing discussions with budding young scientists. Questions ranged from “What are radio waves?” to “How does a tuning fork work?” The children were able to carry out experiments sponsored by the IOP and kindly arranged by the BRLSI, namely Paul Thomas, as well as Dr Alessandro Narduzzo from the Physics Department here at the University. These included very simple activities, such as making a ‘telephone-like’ device from two paper cups and a string, which I am sure many of us will remember from our childhood, and also more technical experiments, for example speaking into a microphone and seeing the trace appear on an oscilloscope: something which fascinated many of the children. Another activity which was apparently utterly captivating was dipping a vibrating tuning fork in a bowl of water, to see the water suddenly splash unexpectedly and the fork stop vibrating. Almost all of the children involved in the workshop in Wells found this to be their favourite experiment, although this may also attributed to the fact that splashing

water is almost always interesting to young children. The day was very satisfying for university students and children alike, with most of the participants leaving smiling, even though some had started the workshop in tears. For us as student volunteers, the success

of the workshops was enough to leave us in high spirits and with a sense of personal accomplishment. In addition, the experiences gained will be very valuable, especially for those who took a leading role in introducing and rounding off the workshops. Valentin Haemmerli

Valentin Haemmerli bathimpact Contributor he Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution (BRLSI) and the South West Branch of the Institute of Physics (IOP) have made it possible for several students from the Physics Department at the University of Bath to spend time leading one hour workshops in local libraries in and around Bath. These are held on various physical phenomena, such as sound, electricity and magnetism, for children between

Prof Science - Spiders from Mars

Does Curiosity’s discovery mean there is life on the red planet?

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he findings of the Curiosity mission are indeed super exciting. NASA scientists believe that 4 billion years ago the planet was covered in gorgeous landscapes, full of lakes and fluffy clouds. It may seem hard to believe, especially because this blissful image is such a far cry from the dusty, dry and extremely cold Red Planet we know today. But there is good evidence that water once flowed on Mar’s surface. The Curiosity Rover is equipped with the most sophisticated technology to date, and is searching for inhabitable environments on Mars. It is not able to detect life directly, but it can determine if the ancient environment was inhabitable and look for organic compounds, an indicator for life. It has sampled countless soil samples, and found that the Martian surface contains about 2 per cent water by weight. Water is the basis for all life on Earth, and in fact water facili-

tated the formation of the first life forms.Water enables organic compounds to mix with one another. In multicellular organisms it acts as a solvent and delivery system, dissolving nutrients from food and delivering them to every cell in the body. It also plays a major role in regulating our body temperature, as evaporation of sweat aids cooling on hot summer days. This temperature regulation also affects the Earth’s climate, as bodies of water, such as the world’s oceans, absorb heat from the atmosphere in the summer and release it in the winter. Evaporation from oceans, lakes and rivers gives rise to rainy days all over the world. Of course, these bodies of water are home to many life forms. There is no living organism on Earth that can do without it. How much water does life need to survive? Most organisms need a lot. Jellyfish, for example, are made up of up to 98 per cent water and the human body contains on average 60 per cent of water. However, organisms have developed several strategies to cope with limited water resources. Some can live with very little water and are able to extract even the tiniest amounts from their environment and food. Living the extreme are some microorganisms, such as the common mold, which can take up water from the atmosphere if the humidity is high

enough. Even in the driest places on earth, such as the Atacama desert, scientists have found a small number of microorganisms in the dry soil. These microorganisms live in the tiny spaces between soil particles. How they obtain water and food resources is still poorly understood. But understanding life in these extreme environments may help researchers in the hunt for extra-terrestrial life. Liquid water cannot exist on Mars today, as it would quickly freeze or boil off due to the cold,

low-pressure atmosphere. Why Mars is so different today than it is believed to have been 4 billion years ago is still unknown and much research is going into finding out what happened. So, could there be life without water? Maybe. However, whatever the life form, it would most certainly require some sort of liquid medium in order to sustain cellular functions fundamental for life, such as transports of nutrients to gain energy. Scientists believe that such non-

water based organisms would be very different. Just because the conditions of Earth, with liquid water and rich resources of carbon, are favourable for life, does not mean that no other conditions could support life. There are at least 100 billion planets in our galaxy alone, so chances of extra-terrestrial life are overwhelmingly high. The big question is, would we be able to recognize the signatures of such life and the habitats in which they live? Darius N

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ear Professor Science, The Curiosity rover has been exploring the surface of Mars for over a year now, and everyone got very excited when NASA announced that it had found water. Does that mean that they have found evidence for alien life? – Edwin


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Society

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Religion’s move towards modernity Have the reforming efforts of spiritual leaders been successful? Mike Szweda bathimpact Contributor

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ietzsche is often quoted, out of context, declaring that “God is dead”. Despite this proclamation, the world’s five most popular religions have over 5 billion adherents and many of them want their religion to have a place in the modern world. Thus religious bodies are having to ask of themselves the question: “how can we modernise?”

The Church of England (CofE), in the past weeks, has made a big step towards creating female bishops; one leap among many towards the modernisation of the CofE. It all started with the first female priests being ordained in 1994. The first woman to be ordained in the CofE was Angela Berners-Wilson, who is now, coincidentally, the University of Bath’s Chaplain. It is clear that the current Archbishop of Can-

terbury, Justin Welby, is trying very hard to make the church more modern, especially through installing women bishops. He has moved away from the churches previous homophobic views saying “You see gay relationships that are just stunning in the quality of the relationship”, although despite his support of LGBT couples he still opposes same-sex marriage, which some commentators have argued makes his message

The Dalai Lama has reopened the debate about abortion and sexual conventions within Buddhism

a little unclear. The Dalai Lama has also tried to modernise the views of Buddhism. He has said that abortion should be viewed on a case by case basis. He has also moved away from the traditional view on sexuality and expressed concern over homophobic attacks. In India, where the Dalai Lama lives, there is also a growing movement to reform the caste system which divides labour and wealth within the country. Although the prevalent theory argues that the caste system in its current form was instituted by the British Empire, it has now become entrenched in part thanks to Hinduism. It is accepted by the majority of external analysts that the system functions as a hindrance for social mobility and, as a consequence, therefore enables human rights abuses. This is steadily changing though; four years ago, Meira Kumar, who is from a Dalit (or lower caste) community, was elected as Speaker of the Indian parliament. The new Pope and his PR team are likewise trying to change the image of the Catholic Church, away from the organisation that once declared crusades and held sway over medieval European politics. Several weeks ago, Pope Francis made headlines by kissing and blessing a severely disfigured man. This is one

of the many surprising things that the new Pope has done to distance himself from the more reserved Pope Benedict, along with ‘cold-calling’ worshipers; creating a Vatican cricket team; taking a ‘selfie’; and even suggesting that atheists could make it into heaven. These efforts to modernise religion have not been universally loved. The Catholic news site Rorate Caeli has criticised the Pope for not allowing monks to celebrate traditional Latin mass. Some people do not like modernisation in any form; the website NovusOrdoWatch claims that the Vatican is only the head of the psuedo-Catholic church of Vatican II, in reference to the wide-reaching reforms of the second Vatican council. Due to this belief, they celebrate Pope Pius XII as the last true pope, even though he died in 1958. Despite these efforts to appear more modern, when one defines modernism as being focused on practical experimentation and scientific thought, organised religions may encounter difficulties in becoming truly ‘modernised’. When a great part of religion depends upon tradition and ritual, as a number of critics (such as biologist-turned-full-time-atheist Richard Dawkins) have pointed out, there will always be a certain divide between faith and modernity.

Don’t you even dare be a nuisance The coalition government wants to control ‘potential annoyances’

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ave you ever annoyed anyone? I’ve probably annoyed all those readers who believe articles should not start with a question. Any spelling or grammatical errors will annoy the sub-editors. The coalition government, in their Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Bill, have launched two new nuisances to expressive freedoms in Britain. IPNAs (Injunctions to Prevent Nuisance and Annoyance) can be given to anyone over the age of 10, where the court is satisfied, on the balance of probabilities, “the respondent has engaged or threatens to engage in conduct capable of causing nuisance or annoyance to any person”. These orders will replace ASBOs (Anti-Social Behaviour Orders), which required someone to have caused another person “harm, alarm or distress”. The IPNAs will dramatically widen what types of behaviours fall under court injunctions. These orders also render such court considerations speculative – courts will ask whether someone’s behaviour might induce nuisance or annoyance. Any behaviour may be considered annoying to another person. Indeed, the idea of a person so incapable of affecting those around them is actually quite annoying. A

street preacher may prove a grotesque nuisance to passers-by, but be an enlightening salvation for darkened souls. A football game might be great exercise for the youthful players, but the constant bouncing will probably annoy their neighbours. Ordinary behaviour may fall beneath this sprawling jurisdiction. Many charities wrote to The Times to say IPNAs “could unnecessarily criminalise children for simply being children”. PSPOs (Public Spaces Protection Orders) share the same futuristic scope as IPNAs, where authorities may limit activities “carried on in a public place within the authority’s area have a detrimental effect on the quality of life of those in the locality” or activities are “likely” to have such an effect. These orders last for three years, but can be infinitely renewed. New dispersal powers in Part 3 of the Bill mean high-ranking officers may authorise the diffusion of citizens from unspecified localities “for the purpose of removing or reducing the likelihood of members of the public in the locality being harassed, alarmed or distressed”. Civil liberties group Liberty point out that the Bill does not even attempt to define “locality”. Bans could apply across a street, or even a county. Given many activities that accompany legitimate

protest – chanting, cheering, holding placards – could fall under PSPOs, they have serious implications for the student body’s ability to protest. After the success of the ‘Reform Section 5’ campaign, which deleted the crime of “insulting” words or behaviours from the Public Order Act 1986, this is a strange move from the government. The Coalition Agreement stated: ‘We will be strong in defence of freedom. The Government believes that the British state has become too authoritarian, and that over the past decade it has been abused and eroded fundamental human freedoms and historic civil liberties’. In 2010, the new Home Secretary Theresa May said we should “move beyond the ASBO.” Despite the coalition government’s loose mantle on civil liberties, IPNAs have risen out the ABSOs pyre, and will undoubtedly be much worse. Lord Macdonald QC, a former Director of Public Prosecutions, said these new civil injunctions amount to “gross state interference” with basic freedoms and citizen’s private lives. Simon Calvert, the Director of the ‘Reform Clause 1’ campaign alliance, said “This is a crazy law. It will not deter thugs and hooligans who are normally already breaking lots of other laws anyway.”

These laws may suppress individual freedom with vague criminalisation, dulling our vibrant streets and tempering our

ordinary activities with cascading injunctions. The coalition government must rethink this disastrous Bill – it is a nuisance to public life. ukhomeoffice

Anthony Masters bathimpact Contributor

Home Secretary Theresa May wants an alternative to the ASBO


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Monday 2nd December 2013

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Society

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An atheist goes to Christian Union

A non-believer sees whether she can be convinced by Bath’s CU

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nother day of lectures was over and I felt like I always do: hungry. Hence, as any self-respecting university student would do, when I found out I could receive a free lunch just by attending an event, I embraced the opportunity with open arms. The kind provider of my lunch was the Bath University Christian Union (CU). Apparently, what I observed was the first of a series of events in the CU’s endeavour in ‘Exploring the heart of Christianity’ over the course of a week, entitled ‘Convinced?’ In fact, I have been aware of the CU’s use of free food as an attempt to attract people to their society since Freshers’ Week, when I was offered free bacon. Given how crowded the event room was though, I can’t say it doesn’t work. The one thing that astonished me upon entering the room was the CU members’ hoodies. ‘It is no longer I who live but CHRIST who lives in ME’. Personally, I do not condemn faith; I think it can be of great benefit to some people, in different ways like giving them strength, reassurance, moral values. Yet, I refuse to accept that devoting oneself to organised religion, with an attempt to recruit and, in essence, control people through the preaching of the bible, could be of any benefit to anyone. The presentation, entitled “Con-

vinced Science has Buried God?”, started shortly after and discussed whether one can be a scientist and have faith at the same time. Personally, I think that it is entirely possible, mainly because there are different kinds of scientists and different kinds of faith. Having a BSc degree technically qualifies a scientist, but in practical terms it doesn’t say much about a person. In addition, individual interpretations of God range from the force of nature, to the human-looking father of the universe. Throughout the event, several quotes were used to demonstrate that atheists can be opposed to scientific research and theists occasionally support it. Needless to mention that in that case, and all others, theist meant Christian. Yet, as was brought up in the presentation, there are many kinds of Christians, and, as was failed to be mentioned, many kinds of scientists, which more or less makes that argument redundant. Statistics were also displayed to support that 1/3 of scientists are theists. Sadly, the researcher and the sample of the specific study were not mentioned, thus it cannot be used as valid evidence. A recurring theme I took notice of was the stereotyping of scientists as people who believe they can explain everything; that the theory of evolution rationalises the world, and that there is only one truth to be found. In fact, a small satiric clip was played

portraying a scientist claiming there is a gene for every specific behaviour, such as ‘enjoying the flavour of coconut’. Although the video and the other attempts to ridicule scientists were rather humorous, they still fell into the informal fallacy of reductio ad ridiculum and, thus, were not particularly convincing arguments. Towards the end, a special guest was introduced, to pose as an example of a theist scientist. His degree

was in psychology and zoology and, during his studies, he converted to Christianity. Unfortunately, for reasons unknown, he informed us that he has now stopped being an active scientist, which seemed to defeat the object of using him as an example in the first place. Leaving aside matters of faith or a lack thereof, I have to admit one thing about the spokesperson of the event: he was charismatic. He knew how to

present everything in the most convincing way and he was swift to come up with answers fit to each question he was asked. If truth be told, if I hadn’t researched my own position, I might have been persuaded as well, which renders the point of this article even more crucial: when someone obviously makes an effort to win you over, decide if their argument stands up to scrutiny. Research your own opinion and be prepared to defend it. bathimpact

Phaedra Florou bathimpact Contributor

The global struggle for diversity

Intolerance of differences remains a problem for all countries Alexandra Egan bathimpact Contributor

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that evening with 7.7 million people tuning in. The world people know today is completely different to the one that past generations grew up in. Even with all of the civil rights, gender equality and social movements that have been won over the

Fibonacci Blue

n a world that is becoming more diverse, multinational and advanced every day, open-mindedness and acceptance have become important aspects of daily life. In

April the French state passed a law allowing same-sex marriage, there are more people with dual nationality nowadays than there ever were before and the Paralympics closing ceremony in 2012 was the most watched programme on television

Pro-gay rights movements have sprung up across the Western world, but are suppressed in Russia

past few years, change still seems to scare a minority of people. The polemical actions of the Russian government have recently been thrown under the spotlight, having passed a controversial anti-gay law that prohibits the distribution of propaganda of ‘non-traditional’ sexual relations to minors. As a result, there has been a significant increase in hate crimes motivated by homophobia, and the world has seen scores of LGBT activists uniting against Vladimir Putin as well as the most recent violent protest in the form of naked artist Pyotr Pavlensky nailing his genitalia to the Red Square. The minority of people who are against diversity is not limited only to Russia, but exists also within the United Kingdom itself. One example would be the English Defence League and its protests against Islam, which have become predominant recently after the murder of British soldier Lee Rigby in May; an increase in hate crimes motivated by race in the UK has subsequently ensued. However, it is important to note that the majority of the British public has become more sensitive to diversity and younger generations are the most open-minded they have ever been. Cerrie Burnell, a presenter on the children’s channel CBeebies since

2009, has herself been helping shape the incoming generations into more accepting individuals. After a small number of parents contacted the BBC complaining about Burnell’s missing right hand scaring their children, she was able to spin a negative into a positive by championing the subjects of inclusion and diversity. Burnell refused to bow to pressure from certain adults to resign as a presenter due to her disability, believing that children seeing her every day would start to see disability as anything but negative. Burnell is also dyslexic, stating: “I couldn’t write until I was ten or read until I was eight”, yet insists that this is more of a positive attribute than a negative one, explaining that her listening skills are extremely acute as a result and that dyslexia “gives you a huge capacity for imagination and thinking outside the box…it’s just part of the way I think”. Alongside her presenting for the BBC, Burnell has written a children’s play The Magical Playroom, which features disability as well as Snowflakes, a children’s pictures book that tackles the issues of race. Burnell, along with Russian LGBT protestors, is living proof that even within the 21st century there are still people fighting for an end to discrimination.


Monday 2nd December 2013

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SPOTLIGHT: Engineers Without Borders

Inspiring today’s youth to engineer a fairer future expertise to our work. By taking part in our activities, our members are making a difference to people’s lives around the world. Within the Uni, we run frequent workshops, training events and talks on a whole range of topics. Previous work has included building a 20m wind turbine, designing a set of manual water pumps, experimentEWB

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We support partner organisations across the world by providing young engineers to help them with their projects. EWB-UK is built on a vital network of branches at universities across the UK, where volunteers run events and activities for their members and communities. Professional engineers get involved to lend their

Amnesty Flash Mob

from different backgrounds here to show our support for the free Pussy Riot campaign led by Amnesty International. The questions only got more probing: who are Pussy Riot and why are they in prison? The answers soon followed; they are in prison for fighting for freedom of expression, feminism, LGBT rights and the release of the crushing grip of Vladimir Putin. We’ve collected over 300 supportive signatures. But most importantly, we raised awareness of the Russian situation and showed not only the students of Bath University that they have the power to facilitate justice and send a powerful message in a peaceful way, but also that it is okay to be a feminist and to be gay and to exercise your democratic right of freedom of expression, because Amnesty is here to support you, by supporting Pussy Riot. Igor Mukhin

14th November marked a momentous occasion for the University of Bath Amnesty society in our contribution toward the international Pussy Riot campaign. The campus Parade became a canvas of eclectic colours as students in luminous balaclavas spun, jumped and danced with vigorous energy to the lyrics of A Punk Prayer, the song that led three Pussy Riot members to imprisonment. The demonstration drew inquisitive gazes from onlookers in the library and passers-by. This unexpected display, partnered with the bright colours, punk music and laughter left everyone wondering what the hell was going on. So we achieved what we had intended to do. We got people asking questions, what was this all about? Why are you doing this? To which we replied; we’re all students here at the University representing different societies and

ing with carbon fibre and running an extensive Outreach programme. EWB runs an Outreach Program that is designed to inform and inspire young people aged 4 – 18 about global development issues. Through presentations that focus on some of the biggest human development issues, fun activities designed to explore them, inspiring thought and discussion, the scheme raises awareness and understanding of the problems, and how these young people can be a part of the solution. Workshops include: ‘Water for the World’ investigating how this precious resource gets from source to us, and how the situation differs around the world; ‘Shelter for the World looking at what defines adequate shelter and how engineers are working to improve the current’

slum crisis; ‘Going the Distance’ exploring how crucial transport infrastructure is to climbing out of poverty; ‘The Solar Car Workshop’ investigating the potential for utilising solar energy in the developing world; and ‘Food for Thought’ debunking the myths surrounding food production and hunger. EWB Bath is teaming up with TeachFirst to provide training to Outreach volunteers that will give volunteers the skills and confidence to run some really successful workshops. It contributes towards the Bath Award too, if that’s your thing. We have seven school visits planned, with scope for much more. The TeachFirst training will take place on November 6th, with our first workshop on November 13th – so now’s a good as time as any to get involved. We are also looking to team up with Enactus to run a project to help struggling students at Bath College. So far this semester, EWB Bath has run workshops on rope and washer pump construction (see below) and testing, and hosted a talk on Post-Conflict Urban Reconstruction. Also in the pipeline are trips to the Eden Project in Cornwall and the Centre for Alternative Technology in Mid Wales, and the EWB Challenge – a UK wide design competition for undergraduates in the disciplines of engineering, architecture, science, social science and business to develop solutions to international development problems. The aims of trainings and talks are to share knowledge on international development issues, raise important questions and to impart practical development skills. Trainings are a fun, practical contrast to the more theory-driven content of our degrees. Trainings aim to build technical knowledge of alternative technologies while building ‘soft skills’ such as teamwork, leadership and conflict resolution. Don’t worry: an engineering background is not necessary! EWB

Sam Atwell bathimpact Contributor ngineers Without Borders UK is a UK-based registered charity and NGO that aims to remove barriers to development through engineering. Our programmes provide opportunities for young people to learn about engineering’s role in poverty reduction.

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Activities

Events Coming up this fortnight Monday 2nd-Wednesday 4th December BUST Auditions BUST are running auditions for two performances: ‘The Miracle Worker’ and ‘A Woman of No Importance. Location and Times: Contact BUST for details

Wednesday 4th December Fabric Formwork workshop Learn about this exciting emerging alternative technology with the capacity to revolutionise concrete architecture and reinforced concrete structures.

Location and Time: See bathstudent.com for details

5th - 7th December A Christmas Carol In keeping with the festive season, BUST are putting on a performance of A Christmas Carol. Tickets £5 Location: University Hall Time: 18:15

Monday 9th December Ever wanted to donate to worthy charities and also be in with the chance of winning cash and other prizes? Well, with our new lottery, you can! £2 a ticket, half goes to charity and half to a prize pool you’re automatically entered into. Plus, you could also win prizes from one of our many kind sponsors. Watch out for the RAG Raffle on campus and Facebook. Location: Online and around campus Time: From 9th December onwards!

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11th December Location: Bath Abbey Time: 8pm


Monday 2nd December 2013

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19

Media

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LoL BotSW tournament round-up Nerdmeister general Ron Morrow on his League of Legends event

and welcome, to League of Legends: Best of the South West!” My second is an unfortunate “Sorry for the delay, we had technical difficulties.” Bath’s second ever live-streamed video game tournament was a huge success all-in-all, but we’re not quite

at Bath in a knock-out style tournament, including some of the best in the UK such as the Cardiff A team and Bath’s own Kill Harry Gaming. The final actually resulted in a showdown between the two of them, with KHG managing to take the win and

Pedro Gomes

experts in the field of event management just yet. 14 teams from across the South West applied to compete, and the first 8 to put in their applications were invited to come and play

head home with a cash prize, trophies, and a load of in-game content acting as spoils for the victors. A note on etiquette should you ever fancy entering a tournament of any kind: it’s polite to turn up (here’s looking at you Plymouth Beta). Somehow however, once we actually got everything up and running, the day was a complete success. With just a small team, we managed to host a constant 8 hour broadcast that covered 7 games with full commentary and presenting before and after each game. Trying to do anything for 8 hours straight, let alone manage a room full of nerds (myself included) is a difficult task, but thanks should be offered to all of those who did come to spectate the games for being such wonderful guests. Not to mention all those who watched consistently throughout the day online, kept entertained in the breaks between games by our broadcast team playing far too cheesy music. Before university I had never been involved in any kind of television broadcast, and yet here I am a few years later, hosting what is now an annual event and being asked for advice by other universities who want to follow suit. Gaming and the e-sports scene may well often be dis-

missed as a niche, only enjoyed by a few, but there is an opportunity right on your doorstep to get involved with Student Media and BUNCS, the video gaming society, and help Bath

make a name for itself in a scene you never knew was growing so quickly. Want to help organise the next tournament? Get in contact with Ron at CTV-Manager@bath.ac.uk Pedro Gomes

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he floor goes quiet. Months of planning, days of equipment testing, hours of set-up. As I step on to the stage to present, my opening line is a powerful “Hello

Bath Students’ Union

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BREAKING NEWS: u s Te l e v i s i o n

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Monday 2nd December 2013

bathimpact

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Sport

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Thomas George Brady impactsport Contributor

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ngland’s men have qualified for next year’s World Cup in Rio, as they bloody well should. The real work, however, begins now. Two friendlies have come and gone, and neither yielded a positive result. Against Chile, England found the South Americans’ slick passing and rapid movement difficult to deal with, and failed to convert their own chances. The Germans delivered a performance of consummate professionalism in the next game and again Roy Hodgson’s side were found wanting. Hodgson did, however, give valuable international experience to some of England’s younger generation: Andros Townsend, Adam Lallana, and more briefly Jay Rodriguez and Ross Barkley. It is one thing to play these young talents in a friendly, it is quite another to play them on the biggest stage in the world. I would argue, though, that Hodgson has no choice, if his tenure is to be remembered for anything other than the

mediocrity by which it has thus far been characterised. Roy’s natural conservatism has emerged since he took over the England job. Steadfastly he has relied on the old guard, particularly in midfield, with Gerrard and Lampard often the focal points. Any possible credibility this style may have had is swiftly being reduced. Lampard in particular was largely redundant against Chile, and whilst Gerrard performed slightly better, he was similarly a passenger against the quality of the Germans, reduced to chasing shadows in the midfield and speculative efforts from a long way out. Conversely, the one stand-out piece of play from England in that game was Townsend cutting in from the right, and drilling a fierce left footed shot against the upright. Lallana also shone sporadically, showing glimpses of his undoubtable natural ability. England consistently reaches the quarter finals of World Cups; it happens regularly. Usually what then transpires is they play a more accomplished side to whom they

succumb immediately. To most observers, this would indicate a team that was capable of progressing to the last eight, but no further. And yet still, the management at major tournaments hasn’t had the imagination to look beyond the obvious team selection. As it is, the stalwarts have kept the younger players out of the first team when their performances have not merited it. It would now be impossible for those younger players to adapt completely to their environment on the international stage; it is too late. But better late than never, and the simple truth is, that if the likes of Townsend, Lallana and Barkley aren’t integral components of the squad for Rio next year, why should we expect any improvement in England’s major championship performance? I’d like to see him go further, and include West Ham’s precocious young talent Ravel Morrison. There are simply no Englishman at this moment with more talent, to play in that attacking midfield position, and whilst Lampard can be relied

celebrating its 150th year anniversary. Rather, this is what I’d imagine a history lesson with Wayne Rooney as your teacher to be like: extremely biased and foul-mouthed with the pungent smell of alcohol resonating around the classroom. There is always the wariness of violent scenes erupting in an England versus Germany fixture, being that it is one of the longest standing rivalries in world football. It must be noted that behaviour on the English part, irrespective of the described torment above, has a completely new face when considering the insane level of violence that often lead to deaths from as recent as the late 1980s. When shocking examples of the 1964 Lima stadium rioting in Peru resurfaces on anniversary occasions, it puts blatant practicality to the issue of football violence. To put this into perspective; not that a death tally ever needs reaffirm-

ing, Hurricane Sandy, the most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season is left in Peru’s wake when it comes to death tolls, Peru causing more than double at 320 deaths and over 500 injured. The late 20th century saw football hooliganism discursively termed as a disease in Britain, emphasized through, but by a long stretch not limited to, the stories of 39 dead and more than 400 were injured in the 1985 Heysel tragedy. Which was just before the European cup final involving Liverpool. Hundreds of football fans were arrested after causing damage estimated in the millions before and after the 1983 friendly between England and Luxembourg. Yes Luxembourg. Finally in 1974, after violence in Rotterdam left 30 fans in hospital with stab wounds and other injuries. After Spurs fans stormed the pitch, sports ministers from the Council of Europe con-

Wonker

Out with the old & in with the new

Roy Hodgson has given the younger players, like Lallana a chance upon to sweep home the odd pen- ers. Criticising James Milner and alty, he could never carry the ball the like has attained the popularity with such speed and precision as of taking the piss out of Coldplay, the former Manchester United jun- and this is no more helpful. But for ior does. once, things are looking up for the This is not to diminish the younger generation of English playachievements of the last crop of ers. Surely the selection for the naEngland’s international football- tional team should reflect that.

Hooliganism in England eases off Prince Kwakye impactsport Contributor

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RHL Images

here were repeated reminders of two well-known historical events that were the world wars being echoed all around me. A frequent countdown from “there were 10 German bombers in the air, and the RAF from England shot them down”- although the satisfying task of successfully counting down to zero German bombers proved a feat too tall for the heavily drunk ‘singers’. Confident chants preaching bragging rights of one world cup to Germany’s none (even though the old West Germany has tripled the amount of England). Many a racist phrase, few without the word Nazis, which were seamlessly conjoined with every obscene swear word from the English vocabulary that erred a shiver of guilt along my spine for the children behind me. Not the best way to commemorate the FA’s final exhibition game

Football Hooliganism, although still a pretty glaring issue, has calmed down in recent years

vened to discuss how to stop what one called “soccer terrorism”. I mean, Margaret Thatcher, in the midst of a huge socioeconomic crises, seemed to take time out simply to deliver a stern word, disciplining a cultural group of misbehaving infants by insisting, “we have to get the game cleaned up from this hooliganism at home and then perhaps we shall be able to go overseas again” subsequently after the incidents in Belgium. What havoc like above does seem to do, is put the soulfully-expressed ballads at Wembley, firmly into the banter category, as apposed to exceedingly racist. The 2011-12 English football season had the lowest total of footballrelated arrests on record, meanwhile in Europe, as the report put it, “more than 100,000 English and Welsh club fans travelled to Champions League and Europa League matches outside of England and Wales … these 44 matches resulted in just 20 arrests of away fans.” While most reports acknowledge that violence is no longer a cancer in world football, rather, it is a scab (not as deadly but painful nonetheless) that’s aggravated every so often. Race based aggravation is now at the forefront of hooliganism, fans in England not being the best example for this case. When the European competitions resumed, attention fell onto CSKA Moscow and their fans that were ordered to play their Champions League match against Bayern Munich behind closed doors as punishment for their monkey chants towards Yaya Toure. Many reasons have been offered for England’s apparent cleansing, some using Marxist theories to explain a resurgence of discontentment with the clubs hierarchy.

Norbert Elias’ ‘a civilising process’ talks directly of this, coining the term ‘Parliamentarization’ along with ‘sportization’ to explain a diminished thirst for violence that elevated and plagued sport since its inception. Referring to being utilised in close correlation to war training by the Greeks and taken on even further by the Romans, when gladiators entertained, the masses through ‘Ludi’, also known as ‘blood games’, inside the spectacle that was the Coliseum. While other reasons like better stadiums and higher police presence can all claim a hand in the reduction within England, I highly respect Elias’ notion of ‘Parliamentarization’ where the increased social pressure to exercise self-control through the education of wider society on prejudice and now with the convergence of European personnel and principles into the premier league, and whether we like it or not, into society, this certainly reflects onto the fans and therefore has to play a huge role in tackling antics of racial hooliganism. Put plainly, most appreciators of football, supporting England, and all Arsenal fans inside the stadium did not boo when Per Mertasacker scored the winning goal, and dare I say smiled after a wonderful passage of play from the Germans. I may be being naïve; the smiles could have been for the glaring miss at the end of the passage of play. So in letting the sledging slide slightly, what I did learn from that football match is summed well by Gary Lineker, “Football is a simple game. Twenty-two men chase a ball for 90 minutes and at the end, the Germans always win.” There were no German bombers in the air.


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Monday 2nd December 2013

Sport

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hen a world-class sports star decides it’s time to bring their career to an end, the inevitable comparisons start to flow. Are they the greatest performer from their nation; or perhaps the greatest of their generation? Once in a while, a true legend hangs up their boots and we are provided with the question, are they the greatest ever? This very unusual situation is where we now find ourselves, following Sachin Tendulkar’s retirement from all forms of cricket on November 16th. Tendulkar burst onto the seen as a fresh-faced 16 year-old, becoming one of the youngest players to play in the test arena. His first test appearance was nothing remarkable, but came in the typically explosive encounter between India and Pakistan, a real baptism of fire for someone so young. Tendulkar’s maiden test century came a year later against England at Old Trafford, before a 165 against the same opposition three years later was his first century on Indian soil. Runs continued to flow for the Bombay born batsman and by 1998 he had established himself as one of the greatest batsman in the world. Scoring two centuries against Australia that year, Tendulkar earned his nickname the ‘Little Master’. Runs and records continued to flow for Tendulkar, with the 50over, one-day international format also proving to be to his liking. At the 2003 Cricket World Cup, the Indian helped his nation reach the final by scoring 673 runs in 11 matches. Although Australia defeated them in the final, Tendulkar was named Man of the Tournament due to his outstanding performances. In the test arena, Tendulkar was also free-flowing. In 2005 he passed Sunil Gavaskar’s record for the highest number of test centuries, and in 2008 he became the highest run scorer in test history, passing Brian Lara’s previous mark of 11,953. Naturally, Tendulkar was already regarded as one of the greatest players to have played the game, but the 5 ft 5in batsman wasn’t finished. An incredible innings against South Africa in 2010 saw Tendulkar become the first player to ever score a double-century in a one-day game. The one-day format continued to bring out the best from the Indian, as he helped his side win the World Cup on home soil in 2011 by scoring nearly 500 runs during the tournament. Tendulkar’s greatest feat came in March 2012, when he scored his 100th international century in a one-day game against Bangladesh. As this article first postulated, whether Tendulkar is the greatestever is an argument that will continue to rumble. Trying to compare players from different eras is notoriously difficult, and statistics are

Becoming a national treasure in India, when the population is 1.3 billion, is an incredible feat always looked at in different ways. number one ranked test nation highest civilian honour, the Bharat Donald Bradman finished his ca- during his career, in addition to be- Ratna. The award was announced reer with a frankly absurd average coming the most capped player in hours after the culmination of Tenof 99.94, and Brian Lara holds the test history. dulkar’s final test, and is made on a record for the highest individual However, Tendulkar’s legacy recommendation by the prime minscore following an incredible in- won’t just last on the field. Adored ister to the president. Tendulkar is nings of 400 not out against Eng- by the cricket mad Indian public, the first sportsman to be given the land at Antigua in 2004. the whole of Tendulkar’s career was award and at the age of 40, also the Both of these players have many played under intense pressure with youngest. supporters when ‘the greatest ever’ every move scrutinised. With all this considered, it seems argument arises, but in the author’s Despite this, the batter has al- fair to give Tendulkar the title of eyes, neither come close to Ten- ways lived his life as a perfect role ‘greatest cricketer ever’, and how dulkar. model, with no Lance Armstrong long this stays will remain to be 24 years at the top level is re- drug scandals, or Tiger Woods af- seen. Records are always there to markable longevity and the list of fair fall-outs. Even Michael Schu- be broken, and following an incredboth individual and team honours macher and Michael Phelps have ible career in which he scooped so collected speak for themselves. seen careers tainted by controver- many, Tendulkar will now be seen Tendulkar retires as the highest sy, but Tendulkar has been a rock as the benchmark for future playscorer in test cricket with 15,921 of consistency both on and off the ers. runs in 329 innings at an average of field for his nation. But rather than getting caught 53.78 and the highest scorer in oneThe ‘Little Master’ is rightfully up in the frenzy of this debate, let’s day internationals with 18,426 in held in high regard by authorities just reflect on an amazing career 452 innings at an average of 44.83. away from cricket as well, as dem- from one of the most naturally giftHe helped India become the onstrated by the awarding of India’s ed sports stars ever to have lived. Pulkitsinha

Michael Powell impactsport Contributor

Guppydas Mel B.

Is Tendulkar the best ever?

Morton’s Mumbles & Moans Last weekend I took a trip home, and as a result was able, due to a dodgy connection to an Irish Tv channel, to watch Saints play against Arsenal. (Although the trip home wasn’t for that reason; I have a new Puppy is the reason, and Mum can cook better than I can.) I feel it kind of painted the whole weekend with a horrible brush covered in, like, shit or something. Although if you’re reading the sports section of this paper, (especially in so much detail that you’re in fact reading these exact words) you’re probably aware of what I like to call “the worst goal ever scored,” I’ll fill everyone else in. The ball came back to the goalkeeper for Southampton, Boruc, and instead of clearing the ball like a good goalkeeper, he decided he’d try out his elite football skills against Giroud, a footballer whose job it is to get the ball off and out-manoeuvre other players. As you can probably imagine, Giroud then just took it off Boruc and banged it into the net. (Though, in my opinion, he should have just left it, any self-respecting footballer should be too embarrassed to score such a goal.) Until this point, my following the football seemed like such a great idea, with the Saints actually playing football that is worth watching. Well, let’s all hope that they buck the fuck up and get back to making watching them worthwhile, because I wasn’t even compelled enough to finish my second cider. Although, Boruc, to his credit, has been a banging goalkeeper so far, and this one accident will hopefully shake off any ego he’d gained because of being pretty damn awesome up to this point, and get him back into focus. He also took the piss out of himself on twitter, which made me laugh, and if you haven’t seen it, should make you laugh, too. The other goal was basically shit as well; any footballer who can’t score a penalty should just give up. As far as I can tell, Saints haven’t got it easy the next few weeks though, but that remains to be seen. My phone is fixed, so at least I can check every five minutes in lectures when they begin to drag on. Which of course is all the time, and in every lecture. In other sport news, I ran to a lecture the other day and also cycled for about half mile and when I got to my location, I was shot to bits, so may just rest up. Plus, my hands got frickin’ freezing, too. Well, I’ve pretty much ran dry of things to say for this fortnight, so see ya!


Monday 2nd December 2013

bathimpact

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Sport

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Ben Cochrane impactsport Contributor hould more sports be played naked? Yes, yes they should. Unfortunately I have to elaborate, but it’s fairly obvious why this is a good idea isn’t it? People love looking at naked people, it’s a fact, it’s why we’re here now, it’s why humans exist. Men spend copious amounts of time looking at naked people on the Internet and women, don’t tell me you don’t like naked people, because I am sitting next to someone on which I have hard evidence that they are a women, and very much like looking at naked people; so don’t give me that bollocks that women are all ladies and find the sight of forbidden areas inappropriate, because deep down you are all saucier than a direct hit on a Heinz factory. Pros for naked sport: The participants are naked. Cons for naked Sport: There are none because everyone is naked. But some people say there are a few downsides to naked sport, I will dismiss them: 1. Your naughty bits are exposed. This has the benefit of exposing the naughty bits of the participants, which as we all know is unbelievably fantastic. But we also know that these naughty bits are incredibly sensitive and so any contact of skin to sporting implement or other skin from a different being will be painful to the point of very. However in many sports, only a thin bit of clothing is covering these sensitive and so don’t offer much protection and so there is really no

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point wearing clothes in the first place, hence advocating the need for the participants to be naked. 2. It can get cold. Though there are things called warm-ups that do indeed warm you up therefore relieving the need to wear clothes in the first place. The conclusion? All the participants should be naked. 3. People are self-conscious. Boys – Grow a pair and then you won’t need to be self-conscious. Women – you’re naked, hence beautiful. All women are beautiful anyway; it’s just nakedness augments beauty in any sense. 4. Old people might get offended. Their offence is out of jealousy; therefore all of the participants should be naked. 5. You get dirty. That’s the point. Ipso facto, everyone should be naked. 6. Naked sport inevitably means that there will be perverts in the crowd. We all are perverts – naked participants. 7. It’s hard to differentiate between the teams. Body paint. Naked participants. 8. It’s not socially acceptable. Fuck the police. Naked sport. 9. People may film it. This isn’t bad; this allows more people to enjoy the nudity. Naked Sport. 10. It may deter people. These people are boring and do you really want to associate yourself with boring people? No? Naked sport. 11. Children should not see people naked before they lose their virginity on their wedding night. Bollocks. Naked sport. Therefore there really is no downside to playing sport naked. It’s

duncanmacinnis

On sporting nature, and naturism

Look how liberated this man looks whilst baring all whilst streaking, surely this would be better? liberating and stimulating; it brings that to continue? No? Stop wear- does it try and kill us every now and us closer to nature and who says if ing clothes. Not wearing clothes again? It’s pleading for you to stop we do get closer to nature then we will make people more confident as wearing clothes. can work together to save our planet there will be nothing to hide behind Isn’t it obvious? The signs that from pollution and other mean and and so everyone will be themselves. clothes are the work of evil and nasty things that are created by peo- The outcome? No more wars. Don’t should be banished into the depths ple who wear clothes. like wars? Stop wearing clothes. of time and space. Clothes create a prison that All the fingers point to not wearThey’re everywhere, so why don’t blocks the mind and the body. A ing clothes, it will leave us with we listen to them? It’s literally killwise man once said “Hope can set a better world and who doesn’t ing us and who wants to be killed? you free.” He was wrong. Nudity can want that? Hitler didn’t want that I’m writing this article naked as we set you free. and look what happened there. So speak and I feel so bloody good and Open yourself up to the world please, I beg you for the good of I urge you to do so too. Please, I beg and the world will open itself up planet earth – stop wearing clothes, of you. Do it immediately. Now. to you. Let your body breathe and it’s mankind’s downfall. Ever since Take your clothes of and go walk your body will let you breathe and Ugg skinned that bear all those cen- on parade. Naked. Let your body we all know how important breath- turies ago and put it on his back, the free. Naked. Lots of nudity. Naked. ing is. Banish all the evil from your world has declined significantly. Do Boobs, bums, willies. Do it make it body. Do you know where evil comes you want an example? The appen- so. Naked. All be naked. Just naked. from? Clothes, that’s where. Clothes dix. Ever since Ugg killed that bear Nothing else, naked. Nude. Naked. are made in sweat shops by children and ate it, the appendix – a sign of Bare. Naked. who are beaten and not paid enough all things good in the world – has Yes I am sexually deprived so if to take care of their bed ridden fam- shrivelled and died. The appendix someone is in the same predicament ily all dying of an incurable disease is now extinct. Happy Humanity? as me, give me a call: 07923 205399. they contracted when they were The death of the appendix is not a It won’t be special, but it will probsneezed on by a horse. Do you want bad thing I hear you shout. Well why ably be sex.

The vital importance of inclusivity

Vishala Ramswami, on disabilities in sport & on-campus fundraising try, with Lord Coe, chairman of the 2012 Olympics, concluding that the games had a “seismic effect on shifting public attitudes” and adding that he didn’t think that people would ever see either disability or sport in the same light again. Whilst this might have been an overly optimistic statement to make, and discrimination does sadly still persist even after the games, there is no denying that they have had a role in changing people’s attitudes to the disabled for the better. As Liz Nicholl, CEO of UK Sport, puts it: “The London Paralympic Games will be remembered as a time when we saw ability first and disability second”. Channel 4, whose coverage of the Paralympic games attracted an audience of 40 million people (69 per cent of the British population), found that two-thirds of its viewers felt that the games had changed their perception towards the disabled, and as many as three-quarters of its viewers appreciated the appointment of disabled presenters and enjoyed the informative discussions regarding disability.

But inclusivity in sport is not only important because of the way in which it positively influences external perceptions towards the disabled; more crucially, participation in sport has a positive effect on the disabled themselves, helping them improve their health, increase their self-confidence and enjoy the benefits of social interaction, and being part of a team or a community. It is for these reason that a group of seven BBA students (Alexandrina Dimitrova, Damian Starek, , Jerry Jaehwan Noh, Laura Clarke, Lukas Judodihardjo, Russell Sims and myself) organised an event in association with British Blind Sport, the leading UK charity for providing sporting opportunities for the visually-disabled, at Bath University, on the 21st of November 2013. We felt that this was a particularly relevant charity to bring to the University, given the strong sports culture on campus, and the distinguished presence of several paralympians amongst our student body. We held a blind-folded penalty shootout on the parade, with the

aim of raising awareness about the obstacles experienced by the visually-disabled when playing sport, and supplemented this with a bake sale and prize draw supported by local businesses, in order to raise funds for British Blind Sport. Nearly 100 people participated in our penalty shoot-out, many of whom hadn’t heard of British Blind Sport previously, and several donated to our cause and took home leaflets and magazines that explained the charity’s work; by the end of the day, we had managed to raise approximately £500 for British Blind Sport. In addition, we had a representative from British Blind Sport visit a primary school in the city, talk to a group of seven year-olds about disability, and conduct mini blindfolded football matches for them. Working with the charity was a tremendously rewarding experience, and it is our hope that we’ve inspired some of the people we interacted with during our event to contribute to the cause in some manner, or even simply to be more cognizant and respectful of disability in any manner.

Bath Snowsports

outright hostility and aggression. The vast majority of disabled people agree that negative media portrayal of the disabled as fraudulent benefits-seekers (although, in reality, these only comprise a tiny minority of the disabled population) is the leading cause for such discrimination, and most also agree that this can be rectified by a more positive media portrayal, with more disabled people shown as achievers in public life. It is precisely for this reason that the Paralympics 2012 was seen as such a turning point for the perception of disability in the counSteve Selwood

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early seven million British citizens of working age, or one-fifth of the total working population, experience some form of disability; this might sound like a surprisingly high proportion, but what is even more shocking is the proportion of disabled people who reported to having felt discriminated against: according to a survey conducted by Scope charity in early 2012, three-quarters of disabled people have had experiences where others have refused to accommodate to their disability, and 64 per cent of the disabled population have reported to suffering from


impactsport Paralympics, fun and fundraising, page 23

Monday 2nd December 2013

Inside Karate chop the opposition impactsport

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unday the 24th saw the University of Bath Karate Club rise at an ungodly hour for a 7.30am coach to the WKU Winter Invitational Karate Competition. It seems it was well worth the early start, as men and women put in medal worthy performances in both the kumite and kata categories. In men’s individual kata Dan Barclay and Tim Foster both achieved bronze, in team kata Roger Guldbrandsen and Nathaniel Walmsley also achieved bronze. Women’s kata saw impressive performances from Yuvika Rampal and Charlie Durant, earning them both silver medals for their catego-

ries. As for kumite, all teams put up a brave front against fantastic talent from both the Bristol and Welsh teams. Two of the teams came out with bronzes, and addition bronzes were achieved by Nikhil Bassi, Alasdair Cross and Rob Thomas in individual kumite. Andy wignall added to the count with an inspirational gold. The women were not going to be outshone, and Yuvika and Katie Wise followed her example- for a gold and silver respectively in their kumite division, too. The club are now looking forward to continuing their outstanding performances at BUCS in February, and hopefully bringing home even more medals. Congratulations UBKC, you’ve done the University of Bath proud! If you’re interested in Karate, find us on bathstudent.com/sport/ clubs/Karate/ or email our chair on yr206@bath.ac.uk

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Poppy Peake, Women’s captain, on the WKU comp

Hooliganism is having a hard time impactsport Contributor Prince Kwakye talks about the lessening, but still dire problem of football nutters, Turn to page 21 to read it all

The sheer glee of being awesome at Karate is pretty clear here

Taking-pictures sport

Club. The men’s first team beat Newquay 19-18 in their first home game on 19th Oct, and last Sunday they also beat Cardiff 37-28. The women’s first team played their first game of the season on

The next chance to see Bath Handball Club in action will be on Saturday 7th Dec, at 14:30 in the Founders Hall when the Bath Women meet Cranfield University. Feel free to come along and see what handball is all about. Find us on bathstudent.com/ sport/clubs/handball/ or email our chair on sa326@bath.ac.uk

Is Tendulkar the best to ever grace to game? impactsport Contributor Michael Powell talks about the life and career of one of the greatest cricketes of all time, Turn to page 22 for more

Boruc really, really dropped the ball impactsport Editor Connor McGregor Morton watched the terrible Saints game, and hated it. Taking-pictures sport

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Saturday 23rd Nov against Southampton University in the Founders Hall. In the last 10 minutes of the game the Bath ladies were down by 29-32 and through the leadership of team captain Karoline Oppen Berntsen, and the support of the spectators, Bath managed to end the game at 34-34.

impactsport Contributor Thomas George Brady assesses the situation in regards to England’s team for Rio 2014, Page 21 has the full story

You have to hand it to them Solveig Alsaker, chair, on this year so far o far undefeated, the season is looking good for the teams of Bath University Handball

Time for the oldies to step aside, Hodgson

page 22 has the full column

The human form should be embraced in sport impactsport Contributor Ben Cochrane reviews with due eloquence and good taste, the merits of playing sport in birthday suits, page 23 has the full story

Get involved

Look at the intensity of Michael’s gaze- no wonder Bath are ace

If you are interested in sport and want to contribute, then contact impactsport Editor Connor McGregor Morton (impactsport@bath.ac.uk) to find out more details about how you can get involved. We’re always looking for writers, photographers, people to take part, or just all round sports buffs to help out. So, if you have a story you want to share, don’t be afraid to get in touch!


Sam Short

bite music & culture

p4 live music reviews p5 the guide p7 cocktail masterclass p8&9 best rock albums of 1973 p10 tash fash p13 bite meets Jake Morley p13 theatre review

news & social

p3 Alex Philpotts explores Intoxication and creativity p12 best ways to cure a hangover and Reasons for abstinance p14 bite news

Fun fun fun

p15 Horoscopes & sex p16 Puzzles

Intoxication


Monday 2nd December 2013

ijustwanttobeperceivedthewa....

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Brian Griffin has been representing for alcoholic canines since 1999 - he’s dead. If this isn’t an excuse to go out, get wankered and talk to dogs. We don’t know what is...?

The Green Park Tavern, probably Bath’s greatest pub, closed last year, hence the sad face. Well, maybe there’s some kinda good news on the horizon... But we’ll see. The former owners of Banglo are opening up a new place at the same venue - eyes peeled .

Timjnr

EDITORIAL This weeks’ theme: I n t o x i c a t i o n This week bite is looking at intoxication in as many ways as our writers can, at this frantic time of year. We’re all far too sober and thus not intoxicated. Or are we, is the application of the mind in the realm of study not a different form of intoxication?

Christmas is happening We’re all very excited, Christmas is happening and here’s what Cliff Richard had to say in a song - paraphrased of course. “Apparently there will be mistletoe and some sort of fermented grape beverage... but that could be a rumour. I may be old but one thing’s for sure... I’m gonna be off my ‘tree’ (get it - unlike the gifts) on ket! enjoy!”

impact-bite@bath.ac.uk

opensourceway

Recently Pharrell released the world’s first 24 hour music video, some have been comparing it to the ground breaking videos of yesteryear. But let’s face it, what’s the point. If we’re going to congratulate him for this; we can congratulate people who attempt to get ‘the most drawing pins in their eye’ or ‘anus’. Which is in fact, in the video.

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is good, ready to wake up early and actually do stuff. In the bi-ed lead article, Alex Philpotts is going to discuss the nature of intoxication and creativity and how these two things interact and how their relationship is responsible for some of the most fascinating and influential art of the modern and arguably, classical era. So enough about alcohol from me, I’m just drunk, in fact writing that last paragraph sobered me up. Stay with me here, I mean, I think what’s happening is, I’m going on an artistic journey and I hope, I’m taking you with me. I promise I won’t go to sleep, and as of yet I haven’t a headache.

So. Yes, down with alcohol. You know what I mean. Intoxication as a word has many connotations, both good and bad, but initially at least usually conjures up very distinc first thoughts; thoughts primarily of, alcohol, sex, love and drugs (as if alcohol isn’t a drug) Intoxication, in whichever sense, I believe is a wonderful thing. It can in some ways be wholly unhealthy, for instance if you decide you’re obcessed with a certain individual and abandon your friends, your family, your work… your children; that could be seen as a mistake and we’ll carefully tiptoe over that subject. So what does this intoxication do for you? How does it change things? It gives you something to focus on. Many will disagree when I say, that most people are fundamentally better off and happier when they’re smitten with someone, with the possibility of finding someone they love than _Max-B

Pharrell Williams has done a mental

ere I sit, intoxicated, alone, far away from home. Intoxicated. Alone. Far away from home. It’s ok though, I’m inebriated, gazeboe’d, wankered, Micheal fucking Mckintyred. The beautiful thing about intoxication *revelation alert* is that in gives you the ability to do thing that you wouldn’t ordinarily do. What do most people really assume alcohol does for a person, does it make them converse more freely? Does it make them more appealing to the opposite sex? No, but it turns Pumbas into Nalas (Lion King reference) . It also allows you to explore a new layer of yourself, this, my friends is the surface just between drunk and sober, on the other side of inebriation. On no scientific basis at all, I shall try and explain. The process of getting drunk seems to me, more pleasurable when it’s a slow process, this is because the fuzzy feeling of all your cares and worries drifting away is much easier to savour. Now, from the perspective of a recovering social alcoholic, that fuzzy feeling was almost always succeeded by a feeling of complete twattedness. If it wasn’t (meaning I’d stopped drinking for some reason) then it was definitely followed by one of these three: contagious grumpiness, headache and selfloathing. Then maybe drinking again. SO… it is mostly essential for me to carry on. The beautiful moments in drunkenness for me, are those that come as one begins to de-gazebo, as previous events begin to come into perspective, as the hangover train’s impending arrival looms in your minds digital platform display board but just before the headache… sometimes, just sometimes, that fuzzy happy feeling comes back. As the sun begins to rise, it makes one feel happy to fall asleep in the open morning air. Ready to face another day, and if the weather

when they’re actually in love. At least I hope they would. This is because it’s that intoxication, that feeling of desire, of mortality that rushes through your veins. Yes, yes relationships are all very nice, what are we having for dinner darling and oooh let’s watch another episode of Magnum P.I. But really, that initial moment, those first few weeks, that chase; that’s what makes us feel truly alive, when there is something to fear. Are there any other types of intoxication that compare? Yes. But they are rare and probably very hard to grasp in a day to day sense, unless you’re lucky enough to find a partner to share your life with, a person that truly is the embodiment of your soul’s craving. Otherwise I imagine all one has is the love of one’s family, which is often of the most strong forms of love – but this is only intoxicating when it is threatened, it is never a constant. It is the constancy of the former that gives it its uniqueness, its beauty. The only other thing I can compare it to, is the intoxication one might experience after having a child. Having spoken to parents and been around people who have, especially those with new-borns, it is incredible the amount of unprecedented love they feel for an amorphous blob of humanity, how can one feel so much love for a shit machine? Let’s not go in to the biology of it, Mr and Mrs science. Suffice to say, it’s the only comparison I can make. The chase, the spark comes up trumps for me every time, because that way you just get to pine over someone instead of feed someone mushed up carrots and clean up shit. So. Boys and girls. Now perhaps you’re worried, worried you won’t find any of that, worried you’ve never had any of that. Maybe you think I’m a rambling moron. But if you don’t, and you are a bit miffed, don’t fear. You can always get pregnant. Failing that, just get pissed.


Monday 2nd December 2013

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The drugs don’t work, well...

Marcel Proust once wrote: “The real voyage of discovery consists of not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” - Alex talks about how artists try to do just that Written by Alex Philpotts

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eriously, don’t do drugs kids. Now that we’ve made that clear, let’s talk about some of the masterpieces spawned by genius minds whilst absolutely off their tits. A few weeks ago, the legendary frontman and inspiration behind the Velvet Underground, Lou Reed, passed away after extended liver problems. In his 71 years however, he celebrated the rock lifestyle to pseudo-Keith Richards proportions. At his peak, he cut loose with David Bowie and Iggy Pop, and was a documented heroin and amphetamine addict, yet he still found time to write and perform some of the most inspirational rock music ever. This sparked an idea, is there a genuine connection between intoxication and creative genius? Sex, drugs and rock-and-roll, it’s right there in the description isn’t it? From the Clash’s “Hateful” to Ed Sheeran’s “The A Team”; as Lily Allen sang: “Everyone’s at It” (you have never uttered wiser words, Lily). The Beatles were undoubtedly the biggest band in history, but with legendary songs such as Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds (LSD, anyone?), would they have been the same band if John Lennon had decided to go cold turkey? It’s doubtful even lyrical genius Paul McCartney could ever have written a song so addictive and yet, so mind-bogglingly simple as “Yellow Submarine” without a bathtub-cocktail of booze, happy pills and marijuana. So when The Beatles, and the rest of the ‘British Invasion’ of the 60s, kickstarted a revolution in rock and pop, they were also part of a precedent set for an entire culture of drug-addled

binges at the heart of the blossoming music industry. From Bob Dylan to The Clash; Bowie, Elton John and probably not Cliff Richard – hard drugs are liquid inspiration in the veins of the modern creative. The hippie culture in California was aflame with psychoactive free-loving - whilst in New York, Andy Warhol’s Factory was the meeting place of not only musical genius such as Dylan and Reed, but the likes of Truman Capote, Salvador Dali and Warhol himself. Music has never been the only art form to draw on intoxication, it fuels the creativity behind some of the world’s most expensive artworks (if you don’t know British artist Tracy Emin, she’s the dead-eyed vampire bat who feeds off cigarette ash, vodka and the souls of the moronic). Aside from certain individuals in the artistic world however, genuine inspiration has been mined from the dark side of the pharmaceutical industry for centuries. Vincent Van Gogh’s dependence on prescription drugs and absinthe may have even been the root of his fondness for the colour yellow (both absinthe and digitalis – a prescription drug he was fond of – have been linked to yellow-tinted vision). Take Edvard Munch’s The Scream (one of the most expensive paintings ever sold) and tell me he wasn’t tripping balls when he devised it. Creative types take a bashing though when it comes to the real significance of their work, but should any geeks out there be feeling smug (and I include myself under that moniker), did you know that the late Steve Jobs once described taking LSD as “one of the two or three most important things I have done in

my life”? Maybe that goes some way to explaining why Apple Maps is still refusing to believe in Stratford-upon-Avon. It should come as no surprise that with all these examples of creative majesty sparked by intoxicated whimsy, intelligent individuals took the time to investigate the truth behind the correlations. In 1954, psychiatrist Dr Oscar Janiger created a study on the effects of LSD on artists and creativity. Some of those artists included Cary Grant and popular Hollywood junkie-extraordinaire, Jack Nicholson. Go figure. Interestingly, whilst Janiger’s study showed no significant change to the quality of artwork produced, patients under the influence of LSD produced brighter, more abstract pieces which filled the entirety of the canvas. Perhaps then, drugs don’t create inspiration as much as unleash it. Imagine giving a child a piece of chalk and a blackboard. Depending on his or her age and gender, the result will likely either be a horsie or a disturbingly elaborate depiction of male genitalia. If, however, you were to give the same child some paint, canvas, a crate of fireworks and a box marked “woodland animals”, the possibilities are as boundless as they are terrifying. So with intoxication seemingly being both the inspiration and the key to artistic genius, it begs the question, if there were no drugs or alcohol, would there even be anything to sing about? Yes, thankfully. Prince of the rock-anthem Bruce Springsteen has remained squeaky-clean throughout his 44-year career – as has, would you believe it, Gene Simmons (if you can call 4,600 women clean). The difference? If it were

that easy Janiger’s study would have been wholly unnecessary, but aside from that, how can you tell what was the real inspiration behind a piece of art? The artist might tell you it was a falling leaf on the wind, or their lover’s breath in their ear, but do you really need to be spaced-out on acid to spot an autumn leaf? Probably not, but taking a leaf and turning it into a spectacular ode to the triumph of love is perhaps more likely to happen when you can’t tell your left foot from the colour popsicle. Yet Springsteen and so many others have managed it. So then, are drugs and alcohol just a shortcut to inspiration, and more importantly, are they worth the potentially fatal consequences? That is a question which humanity is unlikely ever to agree on. The loss of so much youth – Hendrix, Cobain and Winehouse – says no. Then again, we would likely never have heard of any of them without their respective poisons. It would be nice to think that without vodka, amphetamines or heroin the likes of The Rolling Stones et al. would churn out creative genius, but in truth we can never know for certain. If you take the drugs away from a junkie, all you have is a miserable junkie looking for the next hit; fixing people isn’t that simple. For the time being the rest of us mortals can simply sit back and enjoy the highlights. Regardless of how it may have come to be, The Beatles were still a spectacular band, Jack Nicholson will always portray a wonderful lunatic and Charlie Sheen has always been, and will always be, an inexplicable asshole.


Monday 2nd December 2013

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Sam Short

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Live Review: Slow club written by Alexander Ilija Coles

Live Review: Hudson Taylor

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written by Connor McGragor Morton

e arrived at the Exchange quite late, but still managed to catch the end of the first act, Fabienne, but didn’t really get to see any, because we had to get the ciders in. In fairness, the first act wasn’t actually billed on the website, so I don’t feel too bad about missing it, but from what I heard she was pretty good, because the whole chilled out guitar/singing thing isn’t a genre that jumps out at me. Then the first of the officially billed musicians came on stage, a vibrant girl (also with guitar) with the most decent hairstyle I think I’ve witnessed in the last ten years. Kimberly Anne was her name. (This was because there is a female body builder named Kimberley Anne with a second e, she told us in an interview after she played) but I’m mixing up the order of how I’m supposed to do this so: back to the review. So, Kimberly Anne comes on stage, makes a few genuinely funny awkward quips, and I’m enjoying everything so far. When she sings, it’s nothing like her talking voice, which caught me off guard, in a good way- she has a pretty decent set of pipes on her; imagine Adele bit a bit more ruggedly emotional. This was pretty impressive, and her nice guitar tunes were pretty good accompaniment, which was strange, as guitar based female singer songwriters aren’t usually my thing. (Alanis Morissette can do one) So, her own songs were pretty awesome (audience participation was included, and for a change for a small venue wasn’t at all awkward) and also

covered Heart of Glass by Blondie, which she put a pretty cool twist on it, making it a harrowing number instead of the out and out poppy hit of a tune the original was. The lyrics in her songs were original too, instead of the whole “love,love,love” bullshit that a lot of similar styled artist fall into, she had clever, funny and insightful lyrics about actual life, which was very nice to hear. So, she sadly had to end her set, and I was wondering how good the main act must be to have her supporting; she was a pretty hard act to follow. So when the venue got even more crammed than it already was in preparation for the main act, I was feeling pretty excited for it, especially seeing as though as folk goes, it’s always pretty easy to please me. Hudson Taylor took to the stage, and they were a couple of cheery Irish blokes and their backing band (two of whom had full, luscious and vibrant moustaches.) Their songs were foot-tap worthy, but pretty formulaic and didn’t really break the mould in the way I like folk to. The lyrics were pretty damn shallow, too. I mean, I liked the band, they were the kind of guys that I want to succeed in the music world, but they had their balance mixed. The fact that they are brothers meant that the guy who was the clear frontman had to share the role with his brother, who although he sang well enough, didn’t have the stage presence to match. This was reflected in the last song, their most famous one, where when the one guy took centre stage, it was much more enjoyable, actually the last song was a banger in my opinion.

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he last time I saw lovable indie folksters Slow Club was way back in the summer of 2012 at a very wet, cold and muddy Green Man Festival. Braving the conditions they provided me with one of my all time favourite gigs and memories. For after wowing the crowd with a truly fantastic little set Rebecca Taylor (the co-lead singer and songwriter along with bearded legend Charles Watson) leant out into the crowd and exclaimed something that I interpreted to be ‘everyone, lets get topless’. So I did. After I took my top off though it became sadly obvious to me that she hadn’t said that at all and I was quite clearly the only naked Welshman in this very muddy Welsh field. Queue me then being groped all over to ‘Giving Up On Love’ by strange women as they rubbed mud on any part of dry flesh they could find! So when I heard Slow Club we’re playing in Bristol it wasn’t long before I’d booked my tickets to see if I could have just as good a time! I recruited a merry band of gig goers and off we went to the Colston Hall on Monday the 25th ready for them to treat us with what was billed as a very special two piece set. And treat us they did. It was clear from the get go though that this was not going to be any ordinary gig. For a start there were chairs, and with the audience all sat down it’s fair to say this wasn’t the most raucous gig I’ve ever been to and certainly not the most appropriate to get topless to either! Nonetheless it was truly one of the most lovely gigs I’ve been to this year. For in short they were perfect. Their harmonies during fan favourite ‘Never Look Back’ (and pretty much every other song) were spectacular and continually brought some proper old goosebumps to

my wee Welsh arms. This is just my opinion but I really do think they’re up there with the likes of Fleet Foxes and Kings of Convenience for the best harmonies around at the minute. Along with this the vast amount of new songs they played sounded absolutely beautiful and as a result they’ve now got me properly excited for when their new album hits the shelves of my local record store next year. I should warn you though that if you want to catch the Slow Club that makes you want to get topless and dance in the mud and the rain then this tour is most certainly not for you. It features almost exclusively new songs and as lovely as they are they can often leave you feeling a little bit out of place at times when you don’t know the words or melody and end up just sitting there like a bit of a plum for minutes on end. This was only temporary however and the beautiful harmonies along with some of the most wonderfully mundane yet hilarious crowd interaction I’ve ever heard more than made up for this and resulted in a truly wonderful little gig to be present at. But, if you do want to get topless and properly grooving in your dancing shoes I’d probably wait until they tour again in December where they’ll be joined by a full backing band and promise to play some of their more lively and well known songs. So really if you’re a Slow Club fan then they’ve given you a nice little choice to make. Beautiful new songs or beautiful old songs? Up to you. But having experienced both I can conclude that both are worth the watch for Slow Club really do have the knack of providing great memories either way.


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Monday 2nd December 2013

THE GUIDE

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The Holbourne Winter Light Installation: Light to Light – The Museum Garden – 4th December until the 5th of January - Free (£3 charge for hire of headphones)

Want to be blown away? Then head down to The Museum Garden and bear witness to the magical display of LED lights of ‘varying brightness and colour’ that create a rich and layered ‘bed of light that ripples and dances to a soundtrack compiled and created by English composer Matt Clifford.’ With the ‘silent’ headphones you’ll find yourself immersed in a performance of colour, light and sound.

Peter Pan – Theatre Royal – 12th December until 12th January

Feeling overwhelmed by your holiday work and just want to feel like a kid with no worries once again? If your answer is yes then make sure you see Peter Pan for a night that will be jam-packed with comedy, singing, dancing, beautiful costumes and plenty of costume participation. Essentially all the ingredients one needs to make the perfect, swashbuckling and unmissable Christmas pantomime.

Bath on Ice – Royal Victoria Park – 22nd November until 5th January -Tickets - £7.50

The perfect for an outing with friends and family or a romantic date for two – nothing feels more wintery or Christmassy than the open air ice rink with its beautiful lights and wondrous atmosphere alongside the glorious scent of fresh mince pies and roasted chestnuts and mulled wine one could not ask for a more perfect way to spend the day.

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JP Cooper – Moles - 13th December - £7.00

JP Cooper is the perfect mixture of soul, blues and folk - his soulfully expressive and unique vocal style accompanied by his even more unique and wholly unexpected vocal flights captivate audiences all over the world. Don’t miss out on what is bound to be a truly mesmerizing vocal performance at Moles.

Dutty Moonshine - Moles – 20th December – £7.00

In the mood for something new and different? Then head down to Moles and catch dutty Moonshine where you can witness a combination of genres never before fused together. The mix of ‘electro-swing’, dubstep, drum and bass and hip hop work in harmony to set Dutty Moonshine apart from other acts on the bill.

Thea Gilmore – Komedia – 4th December – £19.50

She’s been described as “the most coherent, literate and charged British singer-songwriter of her generation” and you’d have to be a complete and utter fool to miss out on her performance! Her rich and soulful voice in conjunction with her intelligent, often biting lyrics that convey a sense of sadness and wisdom promise a night of truly beautiful music. A must see for all you music fans.

MUSIC

The Racist: Trevor Noah – Komedia – 10th December- £15.00

After seeing his performance you’ll want to go and personally thank Eddie Izzard for discovering this truly fun and unique comedic act. He has the luck of being instantly and effortlessly in control of the room and provides an entertaining insight into his life growing up as the son of a black Xhosa mother and white Swiss-German father under the apartheid regime. A brilliantly refreshing act.

COMEDY

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Additionally, on the 7th and 8th December, the Cats & Dogs Home in Bath will be holding a fun festive indoor market raise vital funds for the home’s many canine and feline residents. Make sure you check it out and help our furry friends!

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‘Him and Me’ is a ‘’treasure trove of familial lunacy, from what may very well be Jack’s finest performance to date’’ – faking Tourette’s and a slight mental illness to get out of attending the illustrious Dragon School – to Michael’s high jinx in the Marlborough College fathers’ race. However, underneath all the antagonistic banter lies a testimony to the deep bond that can exist between a father and son.

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Jack and Michael Whitehall – Pavilion – 7th December - £10.00

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Monday 2nd December 2013

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A little party never killed nobody Written by Natasha Thompson

Bath student fashionistas were out in style on Monday 25th November, to celebrate all things student - drinking! Perhaps not celebrated in the conventional form, instead of binges and cheap varnish tasting vodka from Sainsburys, liquor was consumed in a classy and sophisticated manner. Hidden away from the common boozers of the city, a group of refined and stylish students drank the night away mastering the art of making the perfect cocktail. Already known for their array of tasty flavoured vodkas and delicious cocktails, Revolutions Bath’s expert mixologists imparted their cocktail-mixing wisdom to students who enjoy the finer things in life. Who wants to be spotted downing £1 shots at Spoons when one can be spied basking in the ambiance of cocktail luxury? After being greeted in the private upstairs bar with a strawberry daiquiri welcome drink, the Revolutions team stepped behind the counter teaching the participants, to great acclaim, how to mix like professionals in a unique 90 minute master class. Recreating 5 drinks in total, ranging from the Classic Mojito to the Porn Star Martini, inhibitions were left at the door as guests were transported to the magical era of 1920s America. Daisy would have been proud as the fashion on show would rival that of one of Gatsby’s infamous parties. bite’s fashion reporters spotted Mulberry handbags, Alexander McQueen rings and art deco necklaces all channelling the ritzy theme of the evening demonstrating to society that fashion and alcohol can make an unlikely pair. After 90 minutes of sumptuous drinking, devilish dancing and outfit ogling I think it’s safe to say - a little party never killed nobody!

Photography by Pedro Gomes


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Monday 2nd December 2013

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1973 Rocked: A facebook.com/bathimpact

10. Herbie Hancock - Head Hunters

Every bass player knows the riff from Chameleon. This is a little ironic as it’s actually a bass *synth* riff. Four top-quality extended instrumentals with fancy but unostentatious solos. Head Hunters is unusual in that it can be enjoyed at almost any volume level; the detail is there if you want to pay attention, but it really doesn’t care if you just leave it in the background to funk up your life a bit. It’s not super original, but it’s about as original as you’re going to get in the jazz funk world. And it is very funky.

9. Roxy Music - For Your Pleasure Van Der Graaf Generator were on hiatus in 1973, and Roxy Music nicely fill the void for dark, deranged and saxophone-containing music. The production is top notch, with dramatic transitions and busy arrangements feeling fluid and cohesive. Some of the more over-the-top special effects have dated, but they are not used badly. Do The Strand deserves more credit than it gets, but the hit song is In Every Dream Home A Heartache, an ode to an inflatable doll; in many ways one of the less interesting tracks, but memorable and haunting thanks to Bryan Ferry’s consistently strong lyrics. Seemingly straightforward rocking Editions of you contains a crazy synth solo courtesy of Brian Eno, and after a couple of weak instrumentals the album ends well with its title track; the clear moral is that music is generally improved when Bryan Ferry opens his mouth. The outro is slow, mixing ambient production with crisp, precise drumming. There was another Roxy Music album later in 1973, Stranded, but while Stranded was improved by being more cohesive and confident, For Your Pleasure is just that bit more fun and creative.

8. Electric Light Orchestra - ELO 2 I’m going to put this out here: I’ve never liked ELO. To me, they’re a poor-man’s Beatles, due to their largely unoriginal sound. Not even the thoroughly enjoyable hit Mr. Blue Sky was enough to salvage their later albums which, to me, embodied the commercial sound for which they became so disliked - but this album was long before that and it definitely shows. I love albums that have a clear distinguishable sound of ordered disorder blended with extremely dramatic melodies; 1973 was definitely the year when it was acceptable to do this. It’s very bold compared with what ELO produced later; there’s an overarching melodic theme that is carried on their characteristic “orchestral pop” in 10-15 minute songs which go a great deal to show ELO were once capable of producing more than just disposable singles and hits. I suppose this makes the top ten out of sheer optimism, kinda like when you read a book and you know the character dies at the end; at least you can read it and think ‘maybe they’ll make it this time - I know they could have if they did THIS…’, but the ending doesn’t change. Nonetheless, this album is a surprising listen and definitely worth a mention.

7. Led Zeppelin - Houses of the Holy Given that Led Zeppelin are famous for distorted guitar riffs and vocal wails, Houses Of The Holy offers an unexpectedly relaxed feel for the modern listener. While less well-known than their numbered (and untitled) releases, and somewhat lacking in mega-iconic riffs and choruses (although you do know the riff from Dancing Days), it really is some of their best work. While still just about rock music, there’s an impressive level of intricacy and it’s clear that the distortion has been dialed back a bit so we can enjoy it more. Their darker folk influences overcome the blues here; these had always been present (Black Mountain Side, Friends, Four Sticks and, of course, Stairway to Heaven.) Basically this is the sound of rock stars refusing to stagnate.

Written by Jonathan Arche

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hirty years before 2003, there was 1973, the Thatcher had not arrived yet. The North of E and the US was exhausted from a now unw ment was spying on its opposition and committin hemisphere, Pinochet achieved his US-backed cou dom of speech in Chile. Transcending this all, howe some of the best albums released came from the p ary today. As prog fans, the authors (Adam and Jo to new albums, but in fact greatness was across the to the sheer volume of good albums. With the pow wrong for these amazing artists. Here are our top t

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9. Pink Floyd - Dar

A: Ok, let’s do this. The most positive review I ha will ever give anything. This is the greatest album ev by anyone. It practically defines the album as a form matically linked, but not restricted to a defined st cause it was made for vinyl, the two sides work well listened to in order. Available technology was used sound that hasn’t really dated at all. The insane le fact that everything from the artwork to the lyrics brato in the saxophone solos couldn’t conceivably b of no other rock album that is performed this regul highly professional tribute bands. It happens becau out and feel the hairs rise on the back of their nec forty minutes. J: Adam’s pretty much said it all, this album is so a conceived entirely by accident! Pink Floyd had pr album saying “let’s do a bit of that, and a bit of thi THE greatest album ever made; I’m really NOT jok

Honourab

David Bowie - Alladin Sane: It really pains m 70s were Bowie’s prime and b) Alladin Sane Bowie’s form: Fantastic singles but

Emerson, Lake and Palmer - Brain Salad Su rest of the album is really shit pop music -- b better than D

Gary Glitter - Touc

Yes - Tales From Topographic Oceans: Trying To The Edge (AKA the best track in the histo More of an imita

Rick Wakeman - Six Wives of Henry VIII: Afte this critically praised concept album based o the victims thereof. We didn’t include be

6. Mike Oldfiel

So much has been said about Tubular Bells There’s clearly something interestingly imperfe it as people have insisted on remaking it, tinke it and launching other things off the idea. The ‘m titracking everywhere’ format may have been already (Les Paul’s life story is quite something) Oldfield’s glee comes through as he finds more a instruments to play with. It’s very relatable, an what lost in the adaptions. You can’t get around that the music is a bit simplistic and even touche in places, but it’s such a memorable and joyful work I don’t really care.


Monday 2nd December 2013

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A music review facebook.com/bathimpact

er (J) and Adam Jackson (A)

e OTHER best year for albums. Punk and Margaret England was still intact (albeit largely unproductive) winnable war in a far-away country, while its governng serious democratic crimes. Down in the southern up d’etat, which began a 16 year oppression of freeever, was the Golden year of British rock music, where premium british bands - bands which are still legendon) naturally consider this the best ever year to listen e board. Writing this article was extremely tough due wer of hindsight, we also look back at where it all went ten albums of 1973:

rk Side Of The Moon

ave ever and probably ever conceivably made rm. The songs are thetory (as in opera). Bel on their own or when d skillfully to create a evel of perfection; the to the little bits of vibe improved… I know larly, in its entirety, by use people want to go cks and stay there for

accomplished but was retty much made this his” and the result was king.

2. King Crimson - Larks’ Tongues In Aspic

J: King Crimson frontman Robert Fripp once remarked oh so modestly that King Crimson is not a band, more a way of doing things. He said this in 1981, and 8 years previously this was already true, as King Crimson returned in 1973 after the first of their MANY hiatuses with a completely new line-up involving the immeasurably talented Bill Bruford on drums (who famously left Yes after the phenomenal Close to the Edge because he had achieved everything he wanted to achieve with that album), the formidable John Wetton on bass, and a guy who ran around hitting sheets of metal. I maintain that King Crimson invented modern progressive metal with this album. Their blend of disturbingly chaotic dissonant chords with stabbing guitars and hard hitting riffs was a novel sound for the time. Considering the insane thrash of the 80s required the taboo-breaking ideas behind Punk, this album had been released long before even such a revolution had taken place, which is what makes it so fascinating! The title track - parts 1 and 2 - is definitely the highlight of the album, especially with the reprise at the end of the album in 10/8. A stunning listen and a personal favourite of all time. A: A lot of the things that are shocking here for a popular audience were shocking classical music audiences about 50 years earlier. This doesn’t really undermine how great Larks Tongues is; Fripp basically cuts out the ‘progressive’ middle man and just brings raw avant garde madness to the rock scene. If you’re not familiar with it, give it a listen and drop your expectations; you’ll probably like it more than you think you do. J: Also worth mentioning is the first use of electronic guitar effects used with Bass guitar courtesy of John Wetton - done 30 years before Muse were praised (in our previous article) for it.

3. Stevie Wonder - Innervisions Disgustingly tight, ultra-funky, perfectly produced. The ‘arrest’ sample in Living In The City would not be out of place on a political album today; in something so digestible it becomes more subversive. Overall the tracks are varied, wellpaced and complement each other well. The filthy synth bass lines are perhaps a little dated now and the lyrics are a bit cheesy but the delivery is absolutely phenomenal. Looking at comparable music today I see overproduced, autotuned descendents which really add nothing.

ble mentions

me (Jon) to not put Bowie in the list when a) the e is Bowie’s best work. Sadly, it’s hampered by t albums that are a chore to listen to.

urgery: Karn Evil 9 is a stunning track, but the before it was even the 80s and obligatory. Still Dream Theater.

uch me: Enough said

g to make anything that could follow up Close ory of popular music) was probably a mistake. ation than a reprise.

er leaving Yes, Rick Wakeman went on to make on the pioneer of institutionalised divorce and ecause this article was just too proggy as is.

ld - Tubular Bells

already. ect about ering with more muln around ), but the and more nd somed the fact es on dull l piece of

4. Genesis - Selling England By the Pound The early seventies saw ‘the Golden Years’ for Genesis, that ended with the shaky concept album Lamb Lies Down on Broadway. Released a year after their phenomenal album Foxtrot, Selling England by the Pound was a continuation of the form, opening with the outstanding Dancing With the Moonlit Knight and followed closely by I Know What I Like (in your wardrobe), the only top ten hit Genesis would have until the atrocious Follow You Follow Me five years later.

5. The Who - Quadrophenia Probably The Who’s magnum opus. The ‘rock opera’ never really caught on as a serious musical form, but you can’t accuse The Who of not trying. The ambition of Quadrophenia is absurd, a double album set around multiple personalities and the 1960s England ‘mods and rockers’ social scene. In spite of the grandeur and complexity, the riffs and melodies are relentlessly rock and roll and almost every moment can be related to something from The Who’s more accessible catalogue. Pete Townshend is both an iconic raucus guitar hero and a skilled composer who wrote real art music. Bangin’.

9


Monday 2nd December 2013

bite

10

Help! I moustache you to dress me...

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Written by Abi Glencross

So December has come, and most of us are getting all jolly with Crimbo round the corner (or crying about the pre-exam hibernation beginning...) However, some are reminiscing about the end of the preceding month. A time of fireworks, baking royalty visiting Bath and that crappy 'turning into Winter' weather...but primarily kick-ass moustaches to promote testicular cancer awareness. My friends let us celebrate Movember. In times of...long ago the beard represented wisdom, sexual virility and masculinity; though in more modern society it basically signifies a lack of cleanliness. However with celebs such as Ryan Gosling, Jake Gyllenhaal and Mumford & Sons recently supporting hairy faces, it seems the beard is back in business and is this year’s fashion accessory. Rightyho let’s see what Bath University had to offer for Movember 2013, I present to you the gents’ (and ladies’) guide to fashion facial awareness.

The Billy Connolly The Cookie Duster

There’s always some pleb that dyes their tash, only acceptable for fancy dress, or if your mate pushes you into a paint pot.

The Bare Faced Barry

How to grow one: Hair + a bottle of Schwarzkopf Live. Make sure its semi-permanent, unless you are interviewing for the circus.

Tried and failed miserably. A month’s growth, nothing. Shocking.

A thick upper lip jobby that oozes sophistication. Be aware you may get mistaken for Colonel Mustard. Dusts your cookies well though.

How to grow one: Look for alternative methods...

How to grow one: Thick on the top side, no beardy requirement.

The Weary Traveller

The Pop-up Tash

The Chinese Emperor

You know when that facial hair just appears for no apparent reason…just me then? How to grow one: With someone else’s hair and some glue.

An unconventional choice. This bold, well-trimmed tash is artfully sculpted. This bad boy takes work. How to grow one: Fast and bushy hair growth is required to culminate Movember with such a finish. Plus time to spruce, otherwise you enter the realm of the ‘tramp’ beard.

Basically anyone who has come back from travelling will have one of these. No access to a razor, or sanitation... How to grow one: Any hair type, just let it grow baby!


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Take a gamble


12

Monday 2nd December 2013

bite

Best ways to cure a hangover Written by Sian-Maria Morgan

sheet sekushy

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Had too much to drink last night? Were you a bit inebriated? A tad intoxicated? No problem! We’ve got the perfect solution for your blindingly painful hangover (or just your slightly irritating one).

10. If you have a ridiculously well-stocked fridge with ginger or coconut water then grab these bad boys and have them. If you’re HARDCORE, then eat that ginger whole.

If you’re less cool and a bit of a sissy, then just grate a bit into your cup o’ tea and it’ll relieve your nausea. Coconut water on the other hand will basically do the same thing as water and help hydrate your now sucked-to-the-bone-dry brain - but! It has loads of electrolytes in it, which, are, well, good for you and stuff.

9. Is bananas B-A-N-A-N-A-S?! Make sure to eat at least 20 bananas the day after a big night out. This way you’ll stock up on the potassium and magnesium which can help reduce nausea, weakness and tiredness and can leave you feeling completely rejuvenated!

8. If you are feeling really motivated and are not dying in bed from the pain of a hangover or are a complete freak then go for a run. Even though the ‘sweat it out’ theory is a myth, doing exercise can release endorphins and make you feel better, just make sure you have water so you don’t dehydrate yourself further.

7. Simply don’t get out of bed. Sleep more. Sleep forever. Just think of a hangover as a big bully, ignore it, and it’ll eventually get bored and leave you alone. Trust me on this one, it’s basically scientific fact and not something I just thought of. But seriously, just sleep it out.

6. Do you like piña coladas and getting caught in the rain? Good. Then, if you have had too many of those delicious piña coladas the night before, help cure that horrendous

hangover by getting caught in the rain, which in the UK is quite easy to do. Or, simply take a shower. It’ll make you feel fresh and less queasy and will hopefully let you wash off any guilt from the shenanigans you got up to the night before.

5. If you’re a complete baby and can’t deal with your hangover and won’t stop whining then just take some pain killers. No one wants to hear your incessant bitching, you’re just annoying everyone. Just don’t take Tylenol because that can cause liver damage, although, you might have already caused that with your binge drinking.

4. Avoid ‘The Hair of the Dog’, this weird Norwegian saying basically involves drinking more alcohol the morning after, but although it might help numb out the pain of the hangover, in the long run you’ll be dealing with twice as much hangover-ness. Note: don’t eat dog hair. I imagine that won’t help with a hangover.

3. Do you like your eggs sunny-side up? Scrambled? Boiled? Poached? Either way, anyway you want it – that’s the way you need it. Eggs are almost the best cure for a hango-

ver; eggs in their infinite-amazingness contain Cysteine which helps break down acetaldehyde, the yucky headache-causing chemical that’s left over when the liver breaks down ethanol. So eat up!

2. Let’s talk about sex, baby. Let’s talk about you and me. Just do it. Although, it has been proven that sex can’t actually get rid of a hangover, it’s a good way to pass the time and it makes you happy so, it must help in some way. Just careful with your motions, too much movement might just make you feel sicker.

1. Finally, the best cure for a hangover: water. It is as simple as downing that sweet H20 before you go to sleep and you’ll find that your hangover will be greatly reduced the morning after. Let’s not forget that water, is, after all the elixir of life. So, drink up baby!

Arguments for Abstinence It’s a well-known fact, at least amongst the blood-alcoholically endowed, that being tippled beyond all reason turns you from a dad at a wedding to Fred Astaire. Well, I have bad news for you. It doesn’t. I, he and you look like epileptics without their meds and frankly people are more concerned about being hit by your flailing limbs than they are with your possible sexual prowess. A golden rule then: unless they’re drunker than you, your moves won’t get a woman into your bed or into a romantic cubicle in the club toilet.

Written by Nick West

sjon

So you think you can dance?

No, iffocer, I’m not as thrunk as drinkle pink I am… Please, sir, take that traffic cone off your head. No, it’s not a fashion statement, it’s a criminal act. No, I’m not starting with you. Could you please- no, please stop vomiting on my shoes. Could you please walk- oh god, it’s going everywhere. I’m gonna need backup. Bzzt dispatch, I’m gonna need new pair of shoes, a bucket and an intern. Over. Oh god, what’s he doing- Please sir, I’m going to need you to put your trousers back on. I know it’s a warm evening, but I didn’t need to see- Oh Jesus…

Always carry protection We’ve all been there. It started with a bottle of cider, pretty soon you’re having a couple of jägerbombs and then you’re chugging the vodka neat and telling that pretty girl all about how you went to Wales to discover yourself. Then one thing leads to another, you leave the bar and head down a dingy alley where you meet a Tory councillor who offers you a position in his office and as many poor people as you can eat and just like that, you’re a member of the Conservative party. You start reading the Telegraph, you grow a pencil moustache which you keep religiously trimmed and you start moaning about how things were better in your day. The moral of this story is that on a night out, you should always carry protection. A copy of Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book should protect you from political conversion.

Oh god, what have you done? This isn’t my bed. What is that mountain of flesh next to me? OH GOD I CAN’T FEEL MY ARM. When you’re drunk people go from looking like Susan Boyle in a hall of mirrors and start pressing all your love buttons until you’re in a horny rage where you’d sleep with a sheep without even being Welsh. That’s not to say that I’m shallow, but let’s be honest you didn’t pick your one night stand for their charming personality or love of fine culture. Yes, that’s right, you think you’ve found the perfect bridge partner and you want to cement that new relationship by making the beast with two backs. Oh yes, they know Shakespeare too. I know, right, phwoar?

You sit there staring, the scene lying in front of you plain as day, what you’ve done staring at you like an accusation as you try and get your head around the enormity of your actions. You promised yourself it would never be like this, that you’d never spend an evening doing what you did. The shame washes over you and you realise that you’re not alone. You’re surrounded by witnesses, by fellow criminals all in the same boat as you. How did it go so wrong, where did you leave the path that was right and true? At what point did you become the sort of person to sit in the library on a Saturday night and do your coursework? If only your mother could see you now…


Monday 2nd December 2013

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13

How did you get into your style of playing?

“I’d always associated clever guitar music with just, well, fret wankery, politely, showing off without necessarily having an emotion behind it, no message or point apart from look how good at guitar I am. Massive respect for their technical ability, but wasn’t emotionally moved by their music.” Jake then described the most beautiful song he’d seen “Stuart Davis - Nothing In Between on YouTube. The live vid where he’s not wearing a shirt. What a song!!” he said he obsessed over it until he could play it and that he “played it to death”. Eventually I stated to write music with those elements to it but I couldn’t see what I was doing, so started experimenting with it on my lap.

Alex Genn-Bash

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What happened to the songs you wrote prior to that?

I then threw away all of my old songs and I’ve never played them since, I thinks about them sometimes, and play them on my own, Verrrry occasionally . Whatever you play though, it doesn’t matter, everything serves the song. That’s what inspiring about learning guitar, you don’t to be brilliant, it’s all about expression.

How do you go about writing songs?

Jake Likened it to meeting new people, and all the different ways there are to do so. Getting to know that person is different every time. Saying he meets his songs in different ways “there’s no set formula to it” ...“get to know what this thing is, why are they here, what do they want to say and then to be true to the character of this thing you’re trying to make – find out who it is”

Future for your song writing… are you scared of fame?

I’m not scared of fame, I don’t want fame – trying not to be naïve and reckless is important, fame doesn’t just happen “along the way, people choose for it, always, well, almost always.” It’s important to me to live comfortably, to be artistically true to myself and to have the resources of time and money to be able to explore creatively what I want to explore. As far as touring goes, wherever I go it would be nice to play to a few hundred people each gig, and maybe sometimes a bit more. Lately Jake has been playing regularly to 50+ people depending on the gig – with a bit more, more albums, more good songs, more touring, he said there’s “no reason I can’t get to that point of having a few hundred at each gig.” He’s also played to crowds of 10,000

So what’s the difference between large and small crowds?

They’re just different, they both have their benefits. Getting a small crowd atmosphere, with a large crowd is all about authenticity. Just know yourself, be comfortable in yourself and you’ll put everyone at ease. If that’s what you want, not all artists want intimacy of course

Biggest influences? (a question which Jake hates [we’re sure many feel the same]) so we asked what part of the influences are most seminal.

It’s hard to say really, for me, my influences help me find my own voice, by escaping them. The key to writing the best music you can is simply to know yourself, having the ability to look deeper, to escape your influences, to have your own voice. “The best artists carve out something that is truly theirs, we’re all fundamentally the same and all fundamentally different. They’re both true aren’t they, it’s mad, but those that sound a bit the same are the ones who haven’t been able to explain their differences well enough, unlocked something that explains how they see the world differently” Is it hard to escape those trends, those influences Harder for some and not for others – this question floors me at times – going with trends is what you do if you want to be popular and trends. We are influenced by what we hear, we can’t escape those twelve notes. No one is 100 per cent original, we’re all just thieves, but we have to keep trying.

“Of all the gin joints, in all the towns, in all the world, she walks into mine…” Written by Tom Ash

W

hy are you reading this? How did you come to pick up this newspaper? Why are you at the University of Bath? (That is, if you even are.) These are the sorts of questions that Sylvia Rimat would ask you, if she were composing this review of herself. As it happens, I’ll be the one writing the review, but I’ve asked them anyway. Answers on a postcard. If you like probability, bunny rabbits, bathrobe-wearing Germans and crisps, you will probably like Sylvia. Her performance begins rather eerily, with a laundry bag, a blackboard and a microphone stand populating an otherwise barren and dimly lit stage. In the rather humble setting of the Museum of Bath at Work, this opening gambit flirts with the overdramatic; however Sylvia’s appearance on stage in her dressing gown and her down-to-earth attitude dispel any immediate concerns that her performance is going to be a simple exercise in solipsism. Indeed, her efforts to involve her audience are appreciable; from the get-go we are invited to change seats and position ourselves twixt two new faces. I’ll admit that I had already set up camp for the evening in row seven, seat six, which was by now nicely warm; so I just stayed where I was. Voltaire never actually said “judge a man by his questions, rather than by his answers” but, for the sake of expediency, let’s pretend that he did; it is an apt maxim to apply when watching Sylvia’s performance. She questions the likelihood that we, performer and audience, would ever be brought together as a specific group of individuals; and she actually calculates the probability that we would all be sat in our individual seats. It’s one, divided by a number containing considerably more zeros than even Colonel Gaddafi’s bank balance. Performance theatre which just involves asking your audience questions might sound a little boring; I would urge you, however, to give it a chance. Sylvia’s approach is to intersperse her questioning with humorous anecdotes; recordings from her conversations with psychotherapists, mathematicians and even astronomers; psychological manipulation of the whole and dressing up in a costume of the audience’s choice. Naturally, we opted for the bunny rabbit outfit, even when it was made clear that it would be less Jessica Rabbit and more Bugs Bunny in nature. The interaction between the audience and Sylvia became more and more intimate. At first it was simple requests and closed questions, allowing answers to be delivered through the simple turning on of a torch at the appropriate moment; then a chap was dressed in one of Sylvia’s alternate costumes; and finally, in perhaps the most surreal twist of the evening, I was given £20 by Sylvia, plus about £6 from other audience members and tasked with going to the shop to buy copious amounts of comestibles for the after-party. Oh, and she gave us the torches at the beginning. What’s the likelihood of an entire theatre audience each bringing a torch?

European Southern Observatory

Bite meets Jake Morley


14

Monday 2nd December 2013

bite

bite news

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Things which may have, but at the same time definitely did not, happen.

Thomas Gane Mental

N

ew reality TV programme “The Million Gram Drop” has been praised as the greatest artwork of the twenty first century after attracting an audience of over 40 million. However, the show has been condemned by human rights groups for its complete disregard of basically all human rights. The show was born when VICE Magazine gave Danny Boyle some LSD and told him he had two days to design the Olympic Opening Ceremony. The show features the UK’s most hated celebrities (chosen by public phone in) facing their German counterparts in a 2010 World Cup replay match with Ant and Dec commentating. Throughout the match the players are tracked on Twitter and the least popular player at each break is taken away to have their legs donated to Comic Relief. Running parallel to the match are two seemingly random events; the Queen playing The Million Pound Drop with 10,000 thousand bees and Tim Henman playing tennis against a brick wall. The football goes on for as long as Tim does and when he stops, every bee the Queen loses is

released into the arena. The show seems ridiculous but delved deep into the human psyche. The Twitter vote pitted the Britain’s love of celebrity pain against their love of beating Germany, creating incredible results on and off the pitch. For example, Piers Morgan and Alan Sugar putting aside their differences and manipulating Robbie Savage by reminding him of every time Adrian Chiles had criticised him. This led to a horrific challenge that broke Chiles’ ankles, thereby rendering him useless and causing his Twitter ranking to fall. ‘The Guardian’ noted “seeing Chiles crawling desperately through honey really resonated with me. He couldn’t escape the men in white who were coming to take him away, but by God he tried, screaming in agony all the way. It was almost like he was human”. ‘The Times’ focused in on the innovative use of Henman; “The wall was the perfect metaphor. He can’t lose. Surely not to an inanimate object! Yet at the same time it was inevitable. We all knew it and so did Henman. You could literally pinpoint the second his spirit broke; it went straight to the core of the human condition. The poster of Andy Murray

Member since 2005

Comic relief relaxes donation policy

Ant will be flying solo now after his favourite bum boy bought the farm, he looks good here though dun’he

with the Wimbledon trophy was also an ingenious touch”. Ant and Dec’s performance was also gripping. They stole the show when Simon Cowell tripped and the midfield partnership of Morgan and Sugar set upon him with shards of wood ripped from the advertising hoardings. The three

minute ordeal was made all the more intense by Ant’s impassioned screams of “For the love of God why?” and culminated in Dec’s suicide. The only detractor for most critics was the Queen as she seemed disinterested and spent large parts of the contest simply waving at

the crowd. ‘The Telegraph’ seemed in complete shock, writing “she had the means to limit a large proportion of the suffering going on all around here and she barely did anything. Her efforts seemed like a token gesture”. As of yet no one has pointed out the irony to them.

A

new wave of legal lows are infiltrating our society, these legal lows can now be found in offices, schools and even at home. The drugs which mimic illegal lows such as torture, emotional blackmail and shell shock are now not confined to specialist organisations such as the CIA and British Army, and have spread into the mainstay of human society, according to leading charity Reclaim. Legal lows offer a promise of future happiness at the expense of short term mental security and human compassion. Creators of such drugs claim that they increase personal drive and financial security and that the health concerns of the products they sell are in no way in the magnitude of selling your soul to the devil. There have been many stories however of people claiming to have had their lives ruined by such substances. Jack Everett a self-proclaimed user now actively campaigns from his seven story house in Cambodia. He thinks the promotion and sale

of such substances should be banned, saying “My, life was a mess, I forgot how to be human, I had a wife, I had children; but I didn’t love them. I was so busy trying to be successful, buying into delayed gratification that I forgot what was truly important. I suppose I just want other people not to fall into the trap I did”, Jack now lives with his new wife lo-ping and has never looked back. Sadly the tale of Jack is becoming ever more prominent, many people are dying cold and alone, after alienating there entire family due to the personality dysfunctions that lows can produce. Due to the drug’s effects of increased productivity and passivity; governments actively encourage their consumption, claiming that the benefits to society as a whole outweigh the detriments to the individual. The worldwide charity Think! describes this type of drug as endemic “Only now are we fully coming to terms with socially conditioned optional unhappiness (the technical name for legal lows), due to increases in science and the decline of religion

Who’s really in power? More often than not it’s just an evil purple bear

only now people are questioning the principles of delayed reward.” Think! further expounds upon this point claiming “we all know that sometimes we have to work hard in order to secure a

more enjoyable future, however, prescribing to someone else’s ideas of success whist sacrificing all personal integrity is damaging, and should be labelled and categorised as such.”

Part of growing older inevitably coincides with experimentation, and the image of powerful men and woman who gain the promised reward of money and power whilst retaining a glimmer of humanity, only serve to glorify the sixty year turmoil this addiction can bring. One mother with a family of four described the negative effect this kind of advertisement can have stating “I’m a single mother whose husband died in a freak chip pan fire last year, I am constantly mocked for my reliance on the state however, there is no way I can look after my children and work. Why should my children have to suffer because addicts expect everyone to selfharm as much as them!” strong words. With parliament now debating new regulations to further push a life of materialistic servitude upon its populous, the question on everybody’s lips is: when is the apocalypse? I for one can’t wait to run free with wolves and catch my own lunch. Surely this new regulation is a step in the right direction. Long live Kathulu. KAZVorpal

John Barlow Chief Pringle Editor

quinn.anya

The pursuit of crappiness


Monday 2nd December 2013

bite

Sex Column

Horoscopes

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Intoxicated sex

outcast104

 Scorpio

October 23 - November 21

She doesn’t love you... She doesn’t love you... She doesn’t love you... She doesn’t love you... She doesn’t love you... She doesn’t love you... She doesn’t love you... She does love you...(only joking you twat) She doesn’t love you...

Sagittarius

Capricorn

November 22 - December 21

December 22 - January 20

You feel like things are slipping through your grasp, the more you hold on the more they will float away, sand is a thing you should not hold this week. Have you moisturised your hands? It doesn’t matter; the reality is that you can’t hold things. Maybe invest in a hook - or hope for telekinesis?

This week is bad for you; check the fridge

Aquarius

January 21 - February 19

Pisces

Try to recognise the difference between February 20 - March 20 a winter sweater and a christmas sweater; great shame will visit you should you make A loss in your family will result in great the wrong choice. financial gains for your family’s legal council.

 Aries

March 21 - April 20

Don’t attend any social occasions this week, as your friend’s secretly hate you. Instead, stay at home and think of what you would do if they were suddenly lost in a fatal philately incident

Gemini

 Taurus

May 21 - June 20

April 21 - May 20

If you were planning on watching the Dr Who. 50 year anniversary episode anytime soon, you’re too late – it was taken down from iPlayer yesterday.

Why are you reading this? You must know these things are shit. If you look for some kind of absolution in these words, you are an idiot. Comedy is for the weak. I hate you. Death. Death... Death... and Blood; Death and Blood.

There is a time in every large night where a collective decision is made to no longer revel in the company of friends and to venture into the cold dark night in search of lonely vaginas. This decision is usually aided by a heavy supply of booze and a smattering of physical insecurity. Of course I never do this, I go out extremely drunk, to make meaningful connections and dance to the chart music I love. Ha ha…ha. To be honest though I don’t go out either to get laid or dance or anything else and do you know why? Because drunken sex is not fun, for either party. It involves being intimate with a stranger whose coordination is seriously impaired, who can hardly feel anything and is not emotionally attached. I don’t deny that there are those that revel in anonymity and unfamiliarity, however, these are in the minority, for most of us lowly humans are ever searching for something more I go out to be intoxicat-

 Cancer

June 21 - July 21

Looking out of your cold bedroom window this week, you will think of a warm and sunJuly 22 - August 22 ny land. This land has sands RARRRRGGGHHHHH... of pure gold. Literally! You WHOOOOOSHHHHH, ZOOOOMG! may think you’re rich but, Yeah, awesome. you’re in Bath, studying for exams.

15

Leo

ed, I’ve always gone out to get intoxicated, I just never realised. The other stuff I once thought were the reasons, are actually a by-product for my desire to lose myself in the moment, to be unexplainably passionate about something, I just want to lose myself in the night. Occasionally I find this, I’m not sure how it happens; but it defiantly does. Most people will find it at some point, the blatant disregard for consequences coupled with the intense enjoyment of the moment; this I feel is true intoxication, everything just seems more, more exciting, more important, more intense. The slightest look can speak volumes and can evoke feats of confidence that you never knew you had. So why settle for anything less? Why do we want to wake up in strange beds with women we don’t care about and then make promises we know we won’t keep? I personally don’t want to anymore and so I no longer try to sleep with people when drunk, I’ve given up on one night stands… Unless, of course I’m truly intoxicated. Intoxication cuts through drunkenness and pettiness and selfishness. When I get drunk I never know when intoxication will hit, sometimes it is a conversation or a song, sometimes a smile, a gesture or a turn of phrase sometimes it’s never at all. But there is one thing I am sure of, when it does, I will leap in with both feet and live with no regrets!

 Libra

 Virgo

August 23 - September 22 Wear your socks in an expressive manner.

September 23 - October 22 Venus is in your cycle, Jupiter caresses your kneecaps. Its spin has convoluted your follicles. Break free of its spot and return to mars’ frozen underbelly. Do you feel the planets inside you. Do you care for their children! DOYOU! DO YOU?!?!?!

Illustrations illustrated by Charles Bertram Jones Horoscopes written by Barlowscasanova and Jbeard


16

Monday 2nd December 2013

bite

Snuzzly Puzzly Zone

facebook.com/bathimpact

Quick Quiz 1. Discovered in 1799, the Rosetta Stone was key to deciphering which ancient writing system? 2. Which African country has a film industry popularly known as Nollywood? 3. Millard Fillmore was the last US President from which political party? 4. Who is believed to be the subject of the Chandos portrait, the first artwork ever acquired by the National Portrait Gallery? 5. Which is the smallest (by area) of the five boroughs of New York City? 6. In Greek mythology, the three sisters, Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos are better known by which collective name? 7. Where does axillary hair grow? 8. In Cornish place names, what does the element “chy” mean? 9. Who invented Meccano? 10. Which item of clothing is named after the site of a 1946 US atomic bomb test?

Across

Arithmaster

For crossword solutions, visit our facebook page and like, to view.

1 Qualificatory document (7) 5 Frame for an automobile (7) 9 Surgical pincers used e.g. for delivering babies (7) 10 Mythological fire-breathing monster; wild, fanciful idea (7) 11 Very rarely (4,2,1,4,4) 13 Exclamation of surprise (3) 14 Punch to the face (7,8) 16 Not easily wrinkled (6-9) 22 Pretend to be; major division of a play (3) 23 Done without prior planning; spontaneous (4-2-3-6) 25 Violating ethical standards (7) 26 Flightless Antarctic bird (7) 27 No longer working (7) 28 Infinite, eternal (7)

Puzzles created by Dorian Lidell

Dialinear

Bridge it

Quiz Answers:

1. Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics 2. Nigeria 3. The Whigs 4. William Shakespeare 5. Manhattan 6. The Moirai (Three Fates) 7. In the armpits 8. House 9. Frank Hornby 10. The bikini (after Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands)

Draw a diagonal line through each square such that any point with a circled number has precisely that many lines meeting at it and the diagonal lines never form a loop.

Connect all the islands (circles) by horizontal or vertical bridges (straight lines) such that the number of bridges from each island is equal to the number inside the island, no two bridges cross, and all the islands are connected. A maximum of two bridges (drawn in parallel if required) may run between any two islands.

Box of fun created by a packet of crisps with too strong a flavour :( Liu peng

Down 1 Deprive of ecclesiastical status (7) 2 Device for slowing descent (9) 3 Stone pillar; the printer's dagger (†) (7) 4 Make less severe; soothe, relieve (7) 5 Spiral cavity of the inner ear (7) 6 Flavour of ouzo, sambuca, absinthe, etc. (7) 7 Shorthand writer or typist (5) 8 Firm, loyal (7) 12 Ask earnestly; implore (7) 15 Device for producing a visible picture from invisible electromagnetic radiation (5,4) 16 One working a till; dismiss from the armed forces (7) 17 Abrasive cleaning pad (7) 18 Disconcerted, shaken (7) 19 Ornamental church tower (7) 20 Rejected with contempt (7) 21 Infectious disease characterized by muscle contraction and spasms (7) 24 Not achieved; unfulfilled (5)

Enter the numbers 1–6 into the grid so that each number appears precisely once in each row and column. For each barred block, the result of applying the given arithmetic operation to the numbers within the block must equal the given result.

This week’s Box of Fun is ALL about the fun, lately the box has been experiencing somewhat of a crisis. This week the box is blank, but it’s in no way empty. So, we urge you to write in the box, a faux-manifesto for the position of SU President. The best manifestos will be entered into the prize draw to win 5 scotch eggs. Please include contact details.

bathimpact Volume 15 Issue 06  
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