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Students play tug of war on Lake Andrews in 1957, a year before the college excavated and landscaped the area to create a formal retention pond.

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rink behind Parker Hall” for football rallies and other gatherings. Then, in the late 1950s, Lake Andrews got a brand-new look when Bates embarked on a building program around Lake Andrews, including the creation of Page Hall. Because the addition of new buildings, plus their roofs and parking lots, creates more stormwater runoff, the college likely chose to excavate and landscape the area, turning Lake Andrews into a retention pond by fall 1958. An urban pond like Lake Andrews has challenges that its country cousins don’t. For one, its runoff is mostly “unfiltered by forests, land, and soil,” explains aquatic biologist and limnologist Scott Williams ’71. That runoff tends to be overloaded with nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. That can lead to eutrophication: algae blooms, decreased oxygen, and the demise of animal life. Through the 1990s, Lake Andrews fought eutrophication, and algae blooms gave the pond a dodgy reputation. Even in Williams’ era, “no one would stick their pinky in it,” he recalls. By the mid-1990s, it was a “sick little body of water.” That changed 20 years ago, when Jack Keigwin ’57 and his wife, Beverly, gave $1 million to support a major restoration project, for which Williams served as consultant. As Littlefield had in 1857, Jack Keigwin saw what could be. “The Lake Andrews area has a significant potential as a place of respite and rejuvenation,” he said.

MUSKIE ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS LIBRARY

The next winter, hockey got college support from Director of Athletics Royce Purinton, Class of 1900. Also lending a hand was a young and energetic superintendent of grounds and buildings, Delbert Andrews, Class of 1910. The Student praised him for helping “in any plan that the fellows really want in order to have some real sport.” On March 2, 1916, the homemade Bates rink hosted a “friendly” hockey game between Bates and a Brunswick town team that mostly comprised Bowdoin students. The game may have been historic: The Student said it marked “the first intercollegiate hockey game in Maine for more than six years.” Bowdoin won, 2–0. The game was slow-paced, and it’s unclear if the rink had boards: The Student reported that “the puck kept sliding into the snow at the edge of the rink.” By then, students had dubbed the flooded area “Lake Andrews” in the superintendent’s honor. In President Chase’s annual report, Andrews said that skating provided recreational opportunities “most welcome both to students and citizens.” (A leader of the hockey team in that era, Joseph Pedbereznak, Class of 1918, would later change his surname to Underhill — and bequeath funds so Bates could construct Underhill Arena.) The Andrews name stuck, and some sort of rink endured for a number of years, located perhaps where today’s Lane Hall is. Archival film from the late 1920s shows hockey being played on a rink, with boards. Through most of the 1950s, the Student would direct students to “the skating

Profile for Bates College

Bates Magazine, Fall 2018  

The issue's cover story looks at Bates alumni and their cool Antarctic doings. The photo, by Billy Collins ’14, shows an equipment operator...

Bates Magazine, Fall 2018  

The issue's cover story looks at Bates alumni and their cool Antarctic doings. The photo, by Billy Collins ’14, shows an equipment operator...