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LEWISTON

What’s in a Name: Libbey Libbey Forum was donated to Bates by Lewiston textile mill owner W. Scott Libbey.

The 20I8 Great Falls Balloon Festival was the region’s 26th.

COURTESY PAUL LIBBEY

BATES IN BRIEF FALL 20I8

When It’s Libbee, Libbey, Libbe English originally, the name in America has been spelled Libby, Libbey, Libbee, Libbe, Lebby, Lebbey, Lebbee, and Lebbe. Big Break Born in 1851, W. Scott Libbey started off as a self-taught telegraph operator, and he made the news when he took 6,000 words of Morse code — tens of thousands of electric dots and dashes — without requesting a “break,” or a request for the sender to repeat a word. He Who Hews A Lewiston mill owner, Libbey also owned the Lewiston & Auburn Electric Light Co., built a hydropower dam above Lewiston’s Great Falls, and founded an electric railroad line, the Portland-Lewiston Interurban. Libbey “practically hews the fortune out of the very town in which he began,” said Americana. Libbey Legacy Libbey, who died in 1914, sent three of his four children to Bates, and many descendants are Bates grads. Libbey’s grandson Paul, now in his 90s, is a trustee emeritus who lives in Lewiston. The family’s mausoleum is at Riverside Cemetery near campus. Society’s Sake Dedicated on Oct. 1, 1909, Libbey Forum created space for the college’s three literary societies as well as the YMCA and YWCA. Today, the building houses two offices, Student Financial Services and the Registrar. Hit the Bricks The 1917 Bates Catalog said the new building was “probably the most solid and substantial structure in Lewiston.” Train of Thought After announcing his intention to give Bates a building, Libbey traveled widely, studying possible designs. While it’s been said that Libbey Forum was intentionally designed to resemble a train station, that’s probably apocryphal. It was modern for its time, yet in keeping with early-1900s buildings with large interior spaces, such as schools and, yes, train stations.

Right: A distinctive Bates building, Libbey Forum features a Romanesque entrance and hipped roof.

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Fall 2018

JAY BURNS

Right top: W. Scott Libbey poses with his son W. Scott Jr. in 1911.

Isuken Food Truck, selling fresh local food and Somali Bantu cuisine, opened in September.

Profile for Bates College

Bates Magazine, Fall 2018  

The issue's cover story looks at Bates alumni and their cool Antarctic doings. The photo, by Billy Collins ’14, shows an equipment operator...

Bates Magazine, Fall 2018  

The issue's cover story looks at Bates alumni and their cool Antarctic doings. The photo, by Billy Collins ’14, shows an equipment operator...