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BASALT REGIONAL

LIBRARY Magazine & Program Brochure

March 2020 Issue no. 21


WHAT'S INSIDE... P.4 Adult Programs

P.4-7 Adult Programs

P.4 Library Business

P.8 Why Is the U.S. Census So Important?

P.6 Music

P.8 Why Is the U.S. Census So Important?

P.9 Census Overview

P.9 Census Overview

P.10 Pull-Out Calendar

P.14 U.S. 2020 Census FAQ

P.12 Movies

P.14-16 U.S. 2020 Census FAQ

P.17

P.18 Children's Programs

Teen Programs

P.18-19 Children's Programs


STAFF SPOTLIGHT Meet Donna McFlynn Donna's lifelong love of books began at the Ocean Park Library, in Santa Monica, as an elementary school student. As a high school freshman, she was assigned to the library as an assistant. In these libraries, the world of science and art opened before her. Recently, Jack, Donna's 21 year old grandson, asked what her favorite book was as a child. There was no hesitation, there were two... the Golden Book of Geography and the Golden Book of Fairy Tales. The libraries were safe, quiet places to spend time. In 1987, Donna moved to Emma with her husband, Tim, and their three children. She worked for the Aspen School District in Special Education for 20 years. After four years of retirement, she returned to the school district to work in the district libraries. Donna joined the Basalt Library staff in January 2018. Surrounded by the light and the open space of the Basalt Library, she enjoys her colleagues and the collection of books open to all looking for a place to learn or be entertained.

CHECK OUT A TELESCOPE TODAY! Ask how at the front desk.

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Adult Programs Art & Design Roaring Fork Quilt Guild Gathering Meet the members of the Roaring Fork Quilt Guild and view their amazing array of quilts. In addition to their smaller works that are on display in the lobby art case during the month of March, the guild members will bring larger quilts to display during this event. Community members are also encouraged to bring their own quilts to show off. This is a fantastic opportunity for local quilters to get to know one another, learn more about how to join the guild, and enjoy beautifully crafted quilts! Tues, Mar. 17, 5-6:30PM

Book Clubs First Wednesday Book Club

No required books, just come and talk about what you are reading. Wed, Mar. 4, 12-2PM

Book Review Club

No required books, just come and talk about what you are reading. Wed, Mar. 4, 6-7PM

Stream the best of The Great Courses Fuel lifelong learning with new titles now available on kanopy.com

Adult G.E.D. Prep and Academic Improvement This group is for any adult who wants to improve their reading, writing, and math skills. The focus will be on preparation for passing all four subjects of the GED tests. Participants who just want to improve those same skills without taking the tests are also very welcome to attend. All who attend will be instructed on an individual basis in a group setting and will need to purchase their own learning materials. Please register with Berenice Forrest at berenice@ basaltlibrary.org or at the front desk. Tues, 10-11AM

Citizenship Exam Preparation

Afternoon Art: Flower Painting * Use acrylic paint and simple techniques to paint a vibrant spring flower! This workshop is open to all ages; children under the age of 13 must be accompanied by an adult. Materials provided. Registration required. Email Hannah at hcondon@ basaltlibrary.org, call 970927-4311 ext 1003, or sign up at the front desk. Note: Aprons will be provided, but please dress for mess. Sat, Mar. 28, 1-3PM

Community

basaltlibrary.kanopy.com

Library Business Finance Committee Meeting Monthly meeting of the Library’s finance committee. Wed, Mar. 11, 5:15-7PM

BRLD Board of Trustees Meeting

Monthly meeting of the Library’s board of trustees. Mon, Mar. 16, 5:15-7PM

This series follows lesson plans provided to educators by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service to prepare students for the U.S. citizenship civics exam. Lessons include content on American Government, American History, and Integrated Civics covered in the Civics Handouts with interactive games and student-centered activities. Each week will have a different focus. Tues, 11AM-12PM

Drop In Chess Club

Stop by the library for a friendly game of chess. Players of all ages and abilities are welcome. Thurs, 3:30-5:30PM


5

A panel discussion addressing how the climate crisis affects our mental health, and what we can do to positively affect change for the environment and for ourselves. Representatives from Pitkin Co Health & Human Services, CMC Sustainability Program, and the Aspen Chapel will be present. In partnership with ACES and CORE. Mon, Mar. 9, 6-7PM

Free Legal Clinic * Volunteer attorneys will assist one-on-one via computer link for a max of 15 minutes. Sign-up at the front desk prior to the day of the clinic. If time allows, walk-ins are welcome. Thurs, Mar. 12, 4-5PM

Alpine Legal Services: Ask a Lawyer Free 15 minute consultations with an attorney. No appointment necessary. Translation services are not guaranteed; please plan accordingly. Questions? Call Alpine Legal Services 970-945-8858. Thurs, Mar. 26, 5-7PM

War Stories with Paul Andersen * The sixth annual War Stories will be moderated by Paul Andersen, founder and executive director of Huts for Vets, and will feature veteran writers who are either alumni of the Huts for Vets programs or Huts for Vets board members who are also writers. There will be five discussion sessions, each featuring an individual veteran and their work. These writings will be compiled in advance and handed out to program participants. Registration is required, please sign up at the front desk or by calling 970-927-4311. Thurs, Mar. 19 & 26, 6-7:30PM

Stars Over Basalt The library's astronomy club! Professional and amateur astronomers will gather behind the library to observe the stars. Telescopes will be provided or you may bring your own. Dress warmly! Hot drinks will be available. Mon, Mar. 23, 6-8PM

basaltlibrary.org/ mango-language

EN

Community Conversations: Outer Climate/Inner Climate

ES PA Ă‘O L

* Advance registration required

En EspaĂąol

Clase de Ingles

In collaboration with the Valley Settlement Project, we will be offering English classes. In a collaborative manner, students will set goals with the teacher which will be used as the lesson plan for the class. We will learn vocabulary by reading and through games, practice grammatically correct verbs used in everyday life, and model conversions based on your employment, your children, and their teachers. We will also be offering childcare, where your children can have fun and learn to share. To register please call Ingrid at Valley Settlement 970-230-2767 or Berenice at the Basalt Library 970-927-4311 ext. 1002. Fri, Mar. 6 & 13, 11:30AM-2:30PM

Escape Room Stranger Things Escape Room * Step into Hawkins, Indiana, to join Mike, Eleven and Dustin on their next adventure. Solve clues and use your psychokinetic abilities to escape before the supernatural threat hits in 30 minutes. This escape room is designed for adults 18+. Sign up in groups of up to six people. Register at the front desk or by emailing lbaumgarten@ basaltlibrary.org. Fri, Mar. 27, 4-7PM


6

Games How to Play Mahjong

Test your abstract strategy skills and learn to play mahjong. All skill levels welcome, previous experience not necessary. Sat, Mar. 7, 10AM-12PM

Bridge Club

Stop by the library to play bridge. No previous experience necessary, beginners to advanced players are welcome. Sat, Mar. 14 & 28, 2-4PM

Handiwork & Crafts Yarn Group

Bring your knitting, crochet or needlepoint projects, share ideas with others, and get help if you need it. Hosted by Sarah Blaine. Some experience required. Tues, 5-7PM

Literature & Humanities Philosophy Club

What are the philosophical implications of climate change? We will find out how philosophy can help us adapt to crisis in a changing world. Philosophy Club is for people interested in having big conversations about the meaning of life, society and the ideas and ideologies that surround us. Tues, Mar. 3, 5:30-7PM

Local Author Presentation: Charles Morris

Charles Morris, author of "Butterfly: the Journey from Loss to Recovery, A Guide for Transformation", will speak about his book and his experience with loss. Thurs, Mar. 5, 5:30-6:30PM

Healing Properties of Grief Panel Discussion

A panel of guests—featuring Charles Morris, author; Jarid Rollins, licensed Clinical Social Worker; Wewer Kehone, Ph.D., artist and author of "Artful Dreaming"; and Vanessa Porras, artist and art educator—will discuss the healing properties of grief as well as their interactions with it. Charles will address the story we tell ourselves along with neuroscience behind it. Jarid will weigh in on the consequences of unprocessed stress, while Wewer will cover the role of the subconscious and Vanessa the role of art expression in her relationship with depression and suicide. Tues, Mar. 10, 5-7PM

Social Security Webinar with Wealth By Design Josh Weller, public affairs specialist for the Social Security Administration, will discuss how social security benefits are calculated, eligibility requirements, the application process, planning tools available on SocialSecurty.gov and more. Wed, Mar. 11, 12-2PM

Winter Writing Workshop

Writers of all levels are invited to join Alicia Creyts for a writing workshop series. The workshop will be held once a month through June, with each month having a different focus. March's focus is calligrammatic poetry. Sat, Mar. 14, 11AM-1PM

Music Music at the Library: Broadway to Jazz

There is no formula to explain why particular great Broadway songs become jazz standards. But history suggests that the chosen Broadway songs inspired improvisation in artists. Cathy Markle, well-known local singer, actress, florist, and landscape architect brings together David Dyer, the quintessential performer and arranger of show tunes, Steve Cole, renowned jazz woodwind player and singer, and Mike Monroney, the marvelous chanteur and actor for a fascinating journey, filled with body and soul. Thurs, Mar. 12, 5:306:30PM


7

* Advance registration required

Instagram Basics *

Technology Classes

Master the basics of the mobile social media

To suggest a class topic call 970-927-4311 ext 1013 or email cbaumgarten@basaltlibrary.org. To book an appointment for one-on-one help, visit cbaumgarten.youcanbook.me.

platform Instagram. Learn

Grow With Google: Spring Into Action Livestream

interact with others and

how to create an account (if needed), post pictures,

Start the year off on the right foot by learning how to use Google Analytics to gain insight into how consumers engage with businesses online. Learn best practices analyzing customer trends and turning these insights into actionable decisions. Wed, Mar. 11, 10-11AM Wed, Mar. 18, 5:30-6:30PM

more. Participants will need

Overdrive 101 *

cbaumgarten@basaltlibrary.

to bring their own mobile device, such as a smart phone or tablet. Register by calling 970-927-4311 ext. 1013 or emailing

Need help with Overdrive? Stop by to learn how to check out and download eBooks and eAudiobooks from the library's Overdrive collection. This workshop will touch on using the Overdrive app, as well as the Libby app. Participants should bring their library card number, and are welcome to bring their own devices. Register by calling 970-927-4311 ext. 1013 or emailing cbaumgarten@basaltlibrary.org. Thurs, Mar. 5, 1:30-2:45PM

org.

Mac Computer Basics *

pictures, edit the menu and

Get started on learning how to use your Mac laptop such as using Finder, the dock, system preferences, tips and more. This class is based on OS Mojave. Registration is required and participants must bring their own computer. Register by calling 970-927-4311 ext. 1013 or emailing cbaumgarten@basaltlibrary. org. Mon, Mar. 9, 1:30-2:45PM

Mac Photos Basics * Learn how to use Mac's Photos app. This workshop includes navigating the app, importing and exporting images, creating albums and more. Register by calling 970-927-4311 ext. 1013 or emailing cbaumgarten@basaltlibrary.org. Thurs, Mar. 12, 1:30-2:45PM

iCloud 101 * Demystify iCloud! Learn the basics, including what it is, why to use it, and some of the different ways to use it. Participants will need to know their Apple ID and password. Register by calling 970-927-4311 ext. 1013 or emailing cbaumgarten@basaltlibrary. org. Mon, Mar. 16, 1:30-2:45PM

Mon, Mar. 23, 1:30-2:45PM

Website Building Basics: Weebly.com * Learn how to create your own website using Weebly. Pick a template, add more. Register by calling 970-927-4311 ext. 1013 or emailing cbaumgarten@ basaltlibrary.org. Thurs, Mar. 26, 1:302:45PM

YouTube Basics * Master the video platform YouTube. This workshop includes finding and playing videos, creating an account (if needed), creating a channel, uploading and publishing videos and more. Register by calling 970-927-4311 ext. 1013 or emailing cbaumgarten@ basaltlibrary.org. Mon, Mar. 30, 1:30-2:45PM


8

WHY IS THE U.S. CENSUS SO IMPORTANT?

By Mark Mather & Paola Scommegna The 2020 Census count began in January, kicking off a oncea-decade operation in which every household in the United States will be asked to answer a short series of questions that will influence policymaking and planning for the next decade. The U.S. Constitution mandates that a census be taken every 10 years to count all people—both citizens and noncitizens—living in the United States. Responding to the census is mandatory because getting a complete and accurate count of the population is critically important. An accurate count of the population serves as the basis for fair political representation and plays a vital role in many areas of public life. Here are six key areas where the information collected in the 2020 Census will help drive policymaking and shape the future of the United States. 1. Apportionment State population counts from the decennial census are used to reapportion seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. No state has permanent claim to their current number of assigned House seats. State population counts determine how the 435 seats are split across the 50 states based on each state’s share of the national total. After the 2020 Census, southern and western states are expected to gain seats—and political clout—at the expense of states in the Northeast and Midwest.

The Census Bureau will publish apportionment population counts by December 31, 2020, affecting the size of state delegations for the 2022 U.S. House elections and state votes in the U.S. Electoral College for the 2024 presidential election. 2. Redistricting State and local officials use decennial census results to help redraw congressional, state, and local district boundaries to contain roughly equal numbers of people to ensure each person’s voting power is closely equivalent (meeting the one-person, one-vote rule). The Census Bureau will publish redistricting data no later than March 31, 2021—within one year of Census Day. 3. Money to States and Localities Census totals help determine the amount of funding that state governments and local communities receive from the federal government for the next decade. Census Bureau data were used to distribute more than $675 billion in federal funds to states and local communities for health, education, housing, and infrastructure programs during Fiscal Year 2015. Accurate census counts ensure that funding is equitably distributed for numerous programs such as Medicaid, highway planning and construction, special education grants to states, the National School Lunch Program, and Head Start. 4. Planning Data from the census inform a wide range of government,

business, and nonprofit decisionmaking. Governments and nonprofit organizations rely on decennial census data to determine the need for new roads, hospitals, schools, and other public sector investments. Census data are also vital to businesses as a key source of information about the U.S. population’s changing needs. 5. Emergency Response Detailed population information is critical for emergency response in the wake of disasters. First responders and disaster recovery personnel use census data to help identify where and how much help is needed. Similarly, demographic details from the census assist epidemiologists and public health personnel in everything from tracking disease outbreaks, to combating the opioid epidemic, to improving child health. 6. A Base for Federal Surveys Decennial census data provide a population base for dozens of federal surveys. The Census Bureau’s Population Estimates Program uses census data in combination with birth, death, and migration data to produce annual population and housing unit estimates. These estimates are then used as population controls for the American Community Survey, Current Population Survey, and many other federal surveys—so that the numbers of housing units and people in certain categories agree with the Census Bureau’s official estimates. Reprinted from https://www.prb.org/ importance-of-us-census/


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Additional fact sheets available for download at: colorado.gov/census For questions, please contact the State Demography Office: 303.864.7 Updated: 7/29/2019


Sunday 1

Monday

Tuesday

Wednes

2

3

4

10:30-11AM Mother Goose on the Loose

10-11AM Adult G.E.D. Prep and Academic Improvement

10:30-11:30AM Bolsitas R Club

4:30-7PM Dungeons & Dragons

10:30-11AM Toddler Tales

12-2PM First Wednesday

11AM-12PM Citizensip Exam Preparation 2-3PM Free Lunch at the 3:30-4:30PM Paws to Read

3:30-4:30PM Kids Learni

3:30-5:15PM Teen Moveis After School: "Now & Then"

5-7PM Books on the Big "BlacKkKlansman"

5-7PM Yarn Group

6-7PM Book Review Club

5:30-7PM Philosophy Club 8

9

10

11

10:30-11AM Mother Goose on the Loose

10-11AM Adult G.E.D. Prep and Academic Improvement

10-11AM Grow with Goog

1:30-2:45PM Mac Computer Basics

10:30-11AM Toddler Tales

6-7PM Community Conversations: Outer Climate/Inner Climate

4-5PM After School Adventures

2-3PM Free Lunch at the

5-7PM Healing Properties of Grief Panel Discussion

3:30-4:30PM Kids Learni

10:30-11:30AM Bolsitas R Club

11AM-12PM Citizensip Exam Preparation 12-2PM Social Security W

5-7PM Yarn Group

5-7PM Documentary Nigh the Wall"

5:15-7PM BRLD Finance C 15

16

17

18

10:30-11AM Mother Goose on the Loose

10-11AM Adult G.E.D. Prep and Academic Improvement

10:30-11:30AM Bolsitas R Club

1:30-2:45PM iCloud 101

10:30-11AM Toddler Tales

2-3PM Free Lunch at the

4:30-7PM Dungeons & Dragons

11AM-12PM Citizensip Exam Preparation 2:30-4:30PM Retro Video Kart Tournament 3:30-4:30PM Paws to Read

5:15-7PM Board of Trustees Meeting

22

5-6:30PM Roaring Fork Quilt Guild Gathering

3:30-4:30PM Kids Learni

5-7PM Yarn Group

5:30-6:30PM Grow with

23

24

25

1:30-2:45PM Instagram Basics

10-11AM Adult G.E.D. Prep and Academic Improvement

5-7PM International Cinem "400 Blows"

6-8PM Stars Over Basalt

11AM-12PM Citizensip Exam Preparation

5-7PM Movies that Matte

5-7PM Yarn Group 5-6PM Slideshow with Jillian Kops 29

30

31

10:30-11AM Mother Goose on the Loose

10-11AM Adult G.E.D. Prep and Academic Improvement

1:30-2:45PM Youtube Basics

10:30-11AM Toddler Tales

5:30-7PM Couples Parenting Class

4-5PM Art Explorers

11AM-12PM Citizensip Exam Preparation 5-7PM Yarn Group 6-7:30PM Mountain Voices Project Civic Conversations: Health Care

M

TEA


sday

Thursday 5

Rojas/Little Red Bag 10:30-11AM Preschool Adventures

y Book Club

e Library (under 18)

ing Lab

1:30-2:45PM Overdrive 101 3:30-5:30PM Drop In Chess Club 5:30-6:30PM Local Author Presentation: Charles Morris

Screen:

Friday

Saturday

6

7

10:30-11AM Baby Storytime

10AM-12PM How to Play Mahjong

11:30AM-2:30PM Clase de Ingles

10AM-12PM CrafterDay

6:30-8PM Astronomy Night

b

gle

12

13

14

10:30-11AM Preschool Adventures

10:30-11AM Baby Storytime

10AM-12PM CrafterDay

Rojas/Little Red Bag 1:30-2:45PM Mac Photos Basics

Webinar

e Library (under 18)

ing Lab

3:30-5:30PM Drop In Chess Club 4-5PM Free Legal Clinic

11:30AM-2:30PM Clase de Ingles

11AM-1PM Winter Writing Workshop 2-4PM Bridge Club

5:30-6:30PM Music at the Library: Broadway to Jazz

ht: "The River and

Committee Meeting 19

Rojas/Little Red Bag 10:30-11AM Preschool Adventures

e Library (under 18)

o Games: N64 Mario

3:30-5:30PM Drop In Chess Club

20

21

10:30-11AM Baby Storytime

9AM-1PM SAT Prep Workshop 2-4PM Movie Event: "The Mask You Live In"

6-7:30PM War Stories with Paul Andersen

ing Lab

er: "Jojo Rabbit" Google

ma Night:

26

27

28

1:30-2:45PM Website Building Basics: Weebly.com

4-7PM Stranger Things Escape Room

10AM-12PM CrafterDay

3:30-5:30PM Drop In Chess Club 5-7PM Alpine Legal Services: Ask A Lawyer

1-3PM Afternoon Art: Flower Paintings 2-4PM Bridge Club

6-7:30PM War Stories with Paul Andersen

MARCH

AR OUT TO SAVE THE DATES

970-927-4311 14 Midland Ave basaltlibrary.org/events-calendar


4 Books on the Big Screen: "BlacKkKlansman"

Director Spike Lee | 2018 | English | 135mins "Ron Stallworth, an African American police officer from Colorado Springs, CO, successfully manages to infiltrate the local Ku Klux Klan branch with the help of a Jewish surrogate who eventually becomes its leader. Based on actual events." - IMDb Wed, Mar. 4, 5-7PM

Mov

11

Documentary Night: "The River and the Wall"

Director Ben Masters | English | 2019 | 97mins "The River and the Wall follows five friends on an immersive adventure through the unknown wilds of the Texas borderlands as they travel 1200 miles from El Paso to the Gulf of Mexico on horses, mountain bikes, and canoes. They set out to document the borderlands and explore the potential impacts of a wall on the natural environment, but as the wilderness gives way to the more populated and heavily trafficked Lower Rio Grande Valley, they come face-to-face with the human side of the immigration debate and enter uncharted emotional waters." - IMDb Wed, Mar. 11, 5-7PM

18

Movies that Matt Rabbit"

Director Taika Wait 108mins "A World War II sat a lonely German bo (Roman Griffin Dav view is turned upsid discovers his single Johansson) is hidin Jewish girl (Thoma their attic. Aided on imaginary friend, A Waititi), Jojo must c nationalism." - IMDb Wed, Mar. 18, 5-7PM


vies

8

ter: "Jojo

titi | English | 2019 |

tire that follows oy named Jojo vis) whose world de down when he e mother (Scarlett ng a young asin McKenzie) in nly by his idiotic Adolf Hitler (Taika confront his blind b M

21

Movie Event: "The Mask You Live In"

"Follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity. Pressured by the media, their peer group, and even the adults in their lives, the protagonists confront messages encouraging them to disconnect from their emotions, devalue authentic friendships, objectify and degrade women, and resolve conflicts through violence. These gender stereotypes interconnect with race, class, and circumstance, creating a maze of identity issues boys and young men must navigate to become 'real' men." - thepresentationproject.org Sat, Mar. 21, 2-4PM

13

26 International Cinema Night: "400 Blows"

Director François Truffaut | 1959 | French | 99mins "For young Parisian boy Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), life is one difficult situation after another. Surrounded by inconsiderate adults, including his neglectful parents (Claire Maurier, Albert Remy), Antoine spends his days with his best friend, Rene (Patrick Auffray), trying to plan for a better life. When one of their schemes goes awry, Antoine ends up in trouble with the law, leading to even more conflicts with unsympathetic authority figures." Google Wed, Mar. 25, 5-7PM


14

U.S. 2020 CEN

By Mark Mather & Paola Scommegna What is a census? A census is an official, complete count of a population. A census may also record details about each person such as age, sex, and living arrangement. Unlike a survey, which captures data for a sample of the population and uses that sample to infer characteristics for the larger population, a census aims to count each person. What is the purpose of the census? What is the census used for? The U.S. Constitution mandates that a census be taken every 10 years to count all people— both citizens and noncitizens— living in the United States. An accurate count of the population is required by law and serves as the basis for fair political representation. It plays a vital role in many areas of public life. State population counts from the census are used to reapportion seats in the U.S. House of Representatives across the 50 states. State and local officials use census results to help redraw congressional, state, and local district boundaries to meet the one-person, onevote rule. Governments and nonprofit organizations rely on census data to determine the need for new roads, hospitals, schools, and other public-sector investments. Census data are also vital to businesses as a key source of information about the changing needs of the U.S. population. Census data were used to distribute more than $675 billion in federal funds to

states and local communities for health, education, housing, and infrastructure programs during FY15. When does the 2020 Census start? While April 1, 2020 is officially Census Day, preparation for the population count starts nearly a decade in advance, and enumeration takes place over several months. The 2020 Census kicks off in January 2020 with the population count in remote parts of Alaska—while the area is frozen and traversable. Notices and forms will start arriving in the mail in March 2020. For households that don’t respond to the census, nonresponse followup begins in April 2020 and wraps up at the end of July 2020. The Census Bureau will publish apportionment population counts (used to redistribute the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives) within nine months of Census Day—by December 31, 2020. Is the 2020 Census mandatory? Am I required to fill out my 2020 Census form? Participation is mandatory, as described in Title 13 of the U.S. Code. Refusal to respond can result in a fine. However, no one has been prosecuted for failing to respond to the census since the 1970 Census. Can I refuse to answer a census question? While participation in the census—and answering all questions—is mandatory, people occasionally leave a question blank. The Census Bureau uses a statistical procedure to fill in any

missing responses. Will the Census Bureau keep coming to my door if I don’t fill out my 2020 Census form? If you don’t respond to the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau will send up to five mailings to your address and an enumerator to your door. For up to six days (with the possibility of more than one contact attempt per day), an enumerator will attempt to gather census information from someone in the household. After each contact attempt, the enumerator will leave a “Notice of Visit” form encouraging households to respond via mail, phone, or online. After three days of attempting to contact someone at the address, an enumerator may begin contacting neighbors to request a proxy response for the nonresponding household. What is an enumerator? An enumerator is a specially trained Census Bureau employee who collects census information from people in-person. Enumerators carry identification with their name and photograph, a Department of Commerce watermark, and an expiration date. They also carry materials such as a bag or laptop with the Census Bureau logo. Will I have to answer the 2020 Census online? The 2020 Census is designed to be easy, safe, and quick to complete online. However, in some places (such as remote Alaska) the count will be conducted by in-person enumerators. All households will have the option to complete and


NSUS FAQ mail back a paper form, complete the questionnaire over the phone, or provide responses to an inperson enumerator. Are census responses confidential? The confidentiality of census records is protected by Title 13 of the U.S. Code. No data or tabulation may be produced that could be used to identify an individual. Individual records may not be released for at least 72 years. How are census data collected? In 2020, households will have the option of responding online, by mail, or by phone. The Census Bureau expects many households to complete the questionnaire online using instructions received in the mail. These instructions will also include information about how to respond by phone. Some households will receive a printed questionnaire, which they can mail, postage-free, back to the Census Bureau. A small percentage of households, primarily located in remote areas of the country, will be visited by a census taker who will help collect the information needed to complete the form. Every address that doesn’t respond (via internet, mail, or phone) to initial mailings will be visited by a census taker. What information does the census collect? What questions does the census ask? The 2020 Census form will include just a handful of questions that are asked about every person in a household: Name.

Relationship to Person 1. Sex. Age. Date of birth. Hispanic origin. Race. Person 1, the individual filling out the form, is also asked a few additional questions such as whether the home is owned or rented and some clarifying questions about how many people should be counted at that address. What questions aren’t on the 2020 Census? The Census Bureau does not ask for a Social Security number, bank account information, or information about political party affiliation. The census form will not include any questions about a person’s religion or citizenship status. What’s the difference between the 2020 Census and the American Community Survey? The decennial census, conducted once every 10 years, is a complete count of the entire U.S. population. It asks just a few questions about every person and household. The American Community Survey (ACS), conducted continuously since the early 2000s, is an ongoing survey of just a portion of the population. The ACS asks dozens of questions on a wide variety of topics to gather information about the demographic, social, economic, and housing characteristics of the population. How will the 2020 Census count everyone? Through a process of contacting

every household, group quarters facility (such as college dormitory, barracks, or prison), and homeless support facility (such as shelter or soup kitchen) the Census Bureau will attempt to count the entire U.S. population in 2020. The contact process includes a series of mailings and advertisements. Nonresponding households will be visited by a specially trained employee, known as an enumerator, who can collect census information. The Census Bureau’s goal is to count everyone “once, only once, and in the right place.” But even with robust public outreach, advertising, and data collection processes, the 2020 Census, like previous censuses, will count some people more than once and miss others entirely. The net undercount rate—an important measure of the accuracy and completeness of the census— is calculated as the difference between the number of persons who were missed and the number who were counted more than once or included in the census erroneously, expressed as a percentage. How does the Census Bureau know where people live? To count every person, the Census Bureau relies on an accurate and up-to-date list of residential addresses. This list is known as the Master Address File, and includes addresses served by the U.S. Postal Service, information gathered from local governments, and information updated by Census Bureau employees in the field. Continued...


16 Where does the Census Bureau count people who have more than one home?

U.S. military personnel assigned

The Census Act of 1790 established—and every U.S. census has been based on—the concept of “usual residence,” which is the place where a person lives and sleeps most of the time. Identifying usual residence is straightforward for most people. But not everyone has a residential address, and some people live at more than one residence during different times of the year. To handle these kinds of special cases, the Census Bureau has established residency rules that provide guidance to respondents who may be unsure of how (or where) to record their residence on April 1. For example:

are counted at the onshore

College students who live in college/university student housing are counted at the student housing rather than at their parents’ or guardians’ homes.

The U.S. Constitution mandates

Newborn babies who are not yet discharged from the hospital are counted at the residence where they will live and sleep most of the time.

living in the United States if, at

People who are living at a shelter (such as domestic violence and homeless shelters) are counted at the shelter.

includes legal permanent

People in temporary group living quarters established for victims of natural disasters are counted at the residence where they live and sleep most of the time. If they don’t have a usual home elsewhere, they’re counted at the facility.

to military vessels with a U.S. homeport on Census Day residence where they live and sleep most of the time. If they have no onshore residence, they’re counted at their vessel’s homeport. People with seasonal homes or who have transitory living arrangements (such as RV parks, carnivals) are counted at the residence where they live and sleep most of the time. If they have no usual residence, they’re counted at their location on Census Day. Are foreign citizens counted in the Census? that a census be taken every 10 years to count all people—both citizens and noncitizens—living in the United States. Foreign citizens are considered to be the time of the census, they’re living and sleeping most of the time at a U.S. residence. The foreign resident population residents, foreign students in the United States on student visas, foreign diplomats and embassy staff, and other foreign citizens who reside in the United States on Census Day. However, citizens of foreign countries visiting the United States (such as on a vacation or business trip) are not counted in the census.

Will the 2020 Census be available in languages other than English? By eliminating the guesswork in how many translated forms to print and mail, the internet response option makes it easier to provide census materials in multiple languages. The 2020 Census Internet Self-Response Instrument and questionnaire assistance will be available in 12 non-English languages (Arabic, Chinese, French, Haitian Creole, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese). Bilingual (English and Spanish) materials will include enumerator instruments, paper questionnaires, mailings, and field enumeration. In addition, language guides, language glossaries, and language identification cards will be available in 59 non-English languages. When will 2020 Census results be released? The Census Bureau will publish the first results from the 2020 Census—the total population for each state—by December 31, 2020. Redistricting files, which contain data by block on the total population by race and Hispanic origin and the population ages 18 years and older by race and Hispanic origin, must be provided to the states no later than March 31, 2021. Additional tables, reports, and data products will be released on an ongoing basis, with all files scheduled to be released by September 2023. Reprinted from https://www.prb.org/u-s2020-census-faq/


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Teens Dungeons and Dragons

Play the iconic game Dungeons and Dragons. Some experience with D&D is necessary. Grades 5+. Mon, Mar. 2 & 16, 4:30-7PM

Teen Movies After School: "Now & Then"

A screening of the 1995 coming-of-age girl-gang classic, Now and Then. Set in 1970s small-town America, four teenage girls spend their summer avoiding the neighborhood boys, speaking frankly about their changing lives and bodies, and attempting to solve a murder. Rated PG-13. Tues, Mar. 3, 3:30-5:15PM

Drop In Chess Club

Stop by the library for a friendly game of chess. Players of all ages and abilities are welcome. Thurs, 3:30-5:30PM

Retro Video Games: N64 Mario Kart Tournament *

Our first vintage video game event - a Nintendo 64 Mario Kart tournament! Face off against your friends with this classic 1997 racing video game - be careful to avoid the turtle shells and banana peels! Snacks provided and prizes awarded. To ensure your spot in the tournament, pre-register by stopping by the library or calling Teen Services Coordinator, Kristen Doyle, at 970-927-4311 ext 1004. Open slots will be filled the day-of on a first-come, first-served basis. Wed, Mar. 18, 2:30-4:30PM

SAT Prep Workshop

Looking to improve your score before taking the SAT? Look no further! With over 25 years of education experience, Philip Kalfas will guide students through official practice tests, cover commonly missed questions, and provide strategies, tips, and insights to improve your SAT score. While this workshop is free, registration is required as space is limited. As junior students will be taking the SAT in April, registration will be open to juniors only until one week before the program. On March 14, other high school students can register if open spots remain. Register in person at the library or by calling Teen Services Coordinator, Kristen Doyle, at 970-927-4311 ext 1004. Sat, Mar. 21, 9AM-1PM

SAT PREP WORKSHOP Sat, Mar. 21, 9AM-1PM


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Grades 1st-4th Paws to Read * Children in grades 1st - 4th are invited to read to a lovable dog for 15 minutes! This relaxed and stress-free

Children's Programs Ages 0-5

environment lets kids practice their reading without any pressure. Who wouldn't love reading to a sweet and cuddly

Mother Goose on the Loose

pooch?

An interactive, engaging storytime primarily for babies and

Tues, Mar. 3 & 17,

toddlers up to 24 months. This program includes repetition and surprise with stories, fingerplays, songs, and nursery rhymes, and

3:30-4:30PM

finishes with a short social playtime.

Kids' Learning Lab

Mondays, 10:30-11AM (no storytime Mar. 23)

Children are introduced

Toddler Tales Two-year olds (with a favorite adult) have the opportunity to practice their emerging language skills through interactive stories,

to the fascinating fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

songs and games.

(STEM) for a chance to play,

Tuesdays, 10:30-11AM (no storytime Mar. 24)

explore, and problem solve

Bolsitas Rojas/Little Red Bag Club A Spanish Reading Club for caregivers and children under 5. Participants will read stories and create an activity based on that story. We will also provide weekly book bags, and focus on literacy education for parents to practice at home. Presented in Spanish.

in an unstructured setting. Every week offers a new opportunity to build, learn and create! Wednesdays, 3:30-4:30PM (no Learning Lab Mar. 25)

Wednesdays, 10:30-11:30AM (no storytime Mar. 25)

After School Adventures

Preschool Adventures

Learn about rainbow science

Stories, games, and fun. Recommended for children ages 3-5.

as we create rainbow pony

Mar. 5: Little Artist with the Art Base

bead and prism sun catchers!

Mar. 12: Little Scientists

The beads are strung in a

Mar. 19 Storytelling with Merrilee

rainbow of colors and the

Mar. 26: No storytime

prism will cast beautiful

Thursdays, 10:30-11AM

Baby Storytime

rainbows all over the room when the sun hits it.

Babies from birth to 24 months will enjoy songs, action rhymes,

Recommended for 1st-4th

playtime, and books.

grade.

Fridays, 10:30-11AM (no storytime Mar. 27)

Tues, Mar. 10, 4-5PM


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Art Explorers

Create your own kaleidoscope and learn how reflection and geometry transform ordinary objects into fantastic colors and patterns! Recommended for grades K-4. Tues, Mar. 31, 4-5PM

All Ages Free Lunch at the Library A free bag lunch is provided each Wednesday throughout the school year for anyone under 18. No sign-up or registration is required. Offered in partnership with Food Bank of the Rockies. Wednesdays, 2-3PM (No lunch Mar. 25)

Couples Parenting Class Lauren Raymond and her husband from Daily Joy are back to help guide partners with children in their couples parenting class. This will be a three part series continuing on April 6th and 13th. The intent of this workshop is to bring people together who wish to employ better communication skill sets and have more tools for conflict resolution, creating a more joyful partnership. We will deal with real life challenges, break up negative behaviors, and create new positive behaviors. Note: This is not a therapy session. Contact Caroline Cares at ccares@basaltlibrary.org or call 970927-4311 ext. 1021 for more information. Mon, Mar. 30, 5:30-7PM

CrafterDay

Drop in for a new craft project Where K-3 Students Go every week. You never know what we’ll have planned, but to Find Answers it’s always fun! Saturdays, 10AM-12PM We are excited to announce the possibility of a new school resource, PebbleGo. PebbleGo can be (No craft Mar. 21)

Dear Families:

basaltlibrary.org/kids

accessed from school, home, or even on the go—anywhere with an internet connection.

PebbleGo is a database specifically geared toward the needs of K-2 learners. It helps your student learn foundational research skills plus provides critical early-reader supports like audio voice overs and text highlighting.

Go exploring

But best of all, students love using PebbleGo. The easy navigation makes it inviting for students to discover new information. Features like videos and games keep them engaged and learning. And you can feel comfortable knowing that they are exploring and ad-free website bursting with resources to help your student master many skills and learn fun facts they will be so proud to share.

together.

This is an amazing opportunity for our students to be engaged and excited about accessing learning content in a new way. It would be wonderful if you could support our students through an investment in this fundraiser. Any investment, regardless of size, would make a huge difference in Read your on Libby, bringing thiswith resource to kids our students. Even if you are one-tap reading appsharing the below unable tothe contribute, please consider from yourThank localyou library. link on social media. so much in advance on behalf of our library and classroom community for your continued support.

basaltlibrary.org/digital-media-library To access the PledgeCents fundraising webpage


Library Hours: Mon-Thurs 10AM-7PM Fri & Sat 10AM-5PM Sun 12-5PM

EVENTS, DATES AND TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. Check basaltlibrary.org/event-calendar for up to date info.

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Profile for Basalt Regional Library

March 2020  

Basalt Regional Library's Magazine and Program Brochure for March 2020, featuring info on the 2020 census.

March 2020  

Basalt Regional Library's Magazine and Program Brochure for March 2020, featuring info on the 2020 census.

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