Page 1

THE CORNER GYM LIC Community Center

Bartosz Winsko Prof. Jason Hwang ID 0609199 Design 6


LIC Community Center

POINT OF INTERESTS = SCHOOLS AND YOUTH

INTERVIEWING LOCALS: There are a lot of busses that go over there. There are the R. and V. train Steinway street There Are a lot of shopping there on Steinway victoria secret star bucks clothing gnc jewelry. Liquor. There are bars, pubs in the area Specifically were the site is, residential Bryant high school , big football team There is pride in the neighborhood where flowers are. People were cleaning neighborhood Across the street had a roof top garden There is minimal parking Staying true to the neighborhood is only a few stories People do mostly shopping It is safe to walk around at night There are a lot of parks in the area There are gyms in the area More family Oriented, on the other side of Steinway its more artist. Going towards northern boulevard there are major shopping places Where my location is there are a lot of car dealers. Most people in the neighborhood walk. A lot of people go there from surrounding neighborhoods so they drive in. There is a younger crowd so there are people trying to stay in shape that's why there are gyms there. There are a lot of gyms on the other side of Steinway there are Gyms that have weight floor and a pool and cardio floor.

CONCLUSION: -ABUNDANCE OF SCHOOL -COMMUNITY LACKS YOUTH ACTIVITIES -OVER CROWDED / CONGESTED

Diagrammatic site explanation 41-05 34 AVENUE, LONG ISLAND CITY 1101

10

0‘

34TH AVE

RETAIL / COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

INDUSTRIAL

43 St.

42 St.

41 St.

STEINWAY st.

12

128.5’ X 100’ 12,850 Sq. Ft.

RESIDENTIAL

8.5

Precise Site Analysis


SITE IN YELLOW

QUEENS, NY.


EDUCATION FACILITIES PREFIXED IN COMMUNITY

34TH AND 41ST STREET COMMUNITY CENTER RESTRICTION

FRANK SINATRA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS HIGH SCHOOL 35-12 35TH Ave LIC, NY 11106 BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL OF GLOBAL EDUCATION 34-12 36th ave LIC, NY 11106 WILLIAM C BRYANT HIGH SCHOOL 4810 31st Ave LIC, NY 11103 P.S. 151 MARY D CARTER 5005 31st ave woodside, NY 11377 I.S. 10 HORACE GREELEY 4511 31st ave LIC, NY 11103 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 3718 34th street LIC, NY 11101 NYC DOE : P.S. 166 3309 35th ave LIC, NY 11106 P.S. 70 QUEENS 3045 42nd street LIC, NY. 11103

P.S.70

I.S. 10

P.S. 151 P. S. 166

Site

F.S.H.S.

B.S.G

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

SITE LOCATION IS IN CENTER LOCATION IS INCREDIBLE

THE LOCAL SCHOOLS MAKE THE COMMUNITY BOUNDARY


Health / Fitness In Community

1A. COMBINED MARTIAL ARTS FIGHTING 34-05 Steinway Street Long Island City, NY 11101 1B. Astoria Queens Kickboxing Classes | Kick Boxing Class 43-08 Broadway Astoria, NY 11103 1C. Lucille Roberts Health Club 3262 Steinway Street Long Island City, NY 11103-4006 1D. Yoga Room Inc 3232 Steinway Street Astoria, NY 11103-4053 1E. Bikram Yoga Astoria Queens 4th Floor 32-03 Steinway Street, Astoria, NY 11103 1F. Moon S Lee Taekwondo Karate 4308 Broadway Astoria, NY 11103-2364 1G. Evolution Sports Club -NYC 37-11 35th Avenue astoria, NY 111011 1H. Astoria Sports Complex 3438 38th Street Long Island City, NY 11101-1354 1I. Lotus Brizillan Jiu Jitsu 4513 34th Avenue Long Island City, NY 11101-1041

1E

1D

1F 1C

1A

1A Site 1H 1G

1I

THERE ARE MANY FITINESS / CONTACT SPORT CENTERS LOCATED IN THE AREA


FRANK SINATRA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS HIGH SCHOOL

35-12 35TH ave LIC, NY 11106

OPEN SPACE This high school has the top of the line dance equipment. From dance studios to theaters but what they lack is an outdoor space for the students to hangout and relax.

FRAGMENT

Frank Sinatra School of the Arts moved to its permanent location, a brand-new building in Astoria, at the start of the 2009-2010 school year. Bard High School Early College II took its place in the Queens High School Educational Complex. In a telephone conversation, Principal Donna Finn said the new building boasts a full-size gym, an 800 seat concert hall, two dance studios, and two art studios. Other amenities include two black box theaters, an instrumental and vocal room with recording capacity and a soundproof practice room. There is a rooftop garden where students can go outside and eat lunch. The school also added a film and media arts major, she said. Although the official 2009 graduations have not yet been released, the principal said that about 97% of students graduated in four years. Of the graduates, 37% went on to conservatories or arts schools and 83% went to four year colleges, including many state universities such as SUNY Purchase, Stony Brook, or SUNY Albany, as well as the conservatories. Despite the many indoor features of the new building, Sinatra has no outdoor playing fields. Another downside for some: he school has a rather lopsided population of girls to boys: 68% of the students are female.


BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL OF GLOBAL EDUCATION 34-12 36th ave LIC, NY 11106

SEXUAL EDUCATION This high school is ranked 38th best in the country. It is one of best schools that our country has to offer but what they lack in is sexual education. If I offer this at my community center I can spread awareness thought all the schools in the community.

FRAGMENT

At the Baccalaureate School for Global Education, kids may learn geometry by shooting bank shots on a pool table and measuring the angles. They look at different points of view in history studying the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 by reading both an address by Fidel Castro as well as Robert F. Kennedy's memoirs. They may study Chinese, French or Spanish, and may have the chance to take class trips to Denmark, Senegal or Jordan. In a recent year, 20 students took part in a 2-week exchange program in Denmark, one students participated in an exchange program in Senegal, and half a dozen went to Jordan to help a school there set up a "Mouse squad" in which students repair computers. Baccalaureate is the first public school in New York City in which all students prepare for the International Baccalaureate (IB), a degree widely accepted at universities in more than 100 countries. Housed in a renovated factory in an industrial neighborhood, the facilities are basic but comfortable. There is no gym, but there is a "fitness room" and a dance studio. The atmosphere is relaxed. There are no bells, and classes last 75 minutes, with 5 minutes between classes slightly longer than the typical three minutes. The longer passing time is based on the notion that informal learning goes on between classes, when kids talk to one another or to teachers. Both the student body and the staff are racially mixed, and the tone is informal: You might see a teacher with dreadlocks in blue jeans. Students take a series of exams leading up to the IB diploma. One benefit of the IB: Because the curriculum is standardized, students who move from one country to another may transfer easily from one IB school to another. The school is accredited by the International Baccalaureate Organization, a non-profit group that includes 1,508 schools in 124 countries. Although a few other city schools offer an IB program, Global Baccalaureate is the only school to offer the IB curriculum to all students, not just those in a small honors program. The school uses very few textbooks, relying instead on primary source materials. Students are encouraged to look at history from different points of view. In one high school class, for example, students read a text of Fidel Castro's speech during the Cuban missile crisis, as well as an account by Robert F. Kennedy, who was attorney general at the time. In a 7th grade English class, students wrote their own "tall tales" modeled after stories about mythical lumberjack Paul Bunyan. In math class, students measure angles with an ancient Greek instrument called an alinometer, and go outside and use their knowledge of angles to estimated the height of buildings. Teachers and parents say the IB diploma gives kids a leg up in college admissions. The colleges are really interested in our transcripts," said a parent. "They know the kids are coming in better prepared for college-level writing, because an IB exam is not a multiple choice exam." Baccalaureate graduated its first class of about 50 students in 2006 and students were admitted to Yale, Mount Holyoke, Colby, Hampshire and Barnard. In 2007, one student was accepted early decision at Brown and another at the University of Chicago. The school underwent a change of leadership in early 2007, when founding principal William Stroud left to take a job with the central office of the Department of Education. Kelly Johnson, who had been assistant principal, became principal. Sports are limited. In 2007, the school had its first teams: girls softball and boys basketball.


WILLIAM C BRYANT HIGH SCHOOL 4810 31st Ave LIC, NY 11103

BLACK BOX THEATER Bryant High has a great queens football team but a outdated weight room. They are forced to go to paid gyms or workout in there basements without the supervision of a professional. Offering this school a gym at the community center will let the Bryant football team workout together and train under supervision.

FRAGMENT

William C. Bryant High School is a neighborhood school with an overcrowding problem that even overlapping sessions and classrooms in trailers have not solved. Nonetheless, a seasoned faculty and an amicable administration have created a welcoming atmosphere in the building. Student enrollment seems to increase every year despite limited facilities, perhaps an indication of the school's popularity. And teachers like the school so much, says Principal Chris Pellettieri, that only one of Bryant's 30 "teaching fellows"members of the city program that trains second-career professionals as teachers has left. With its long history, Bryant is a traditional school in many ways. Wooden plaques engraved with names of students who received highest honors throughout the years, including Schools Chancellor Joel Klein, line the walls. Announcements are made on the loudspeaker throughout the day. Although some students drift through this large institution, many find their niche in the arts or sports. The size allows it to assemble 27 sports teams, and, like most large schools, Bryant is able to give students a wide range of other extracurricular and academic offerings, too. For advanced students, there are honors programs and Advanced Placement classes in biology, chemistry, physics, Spanish, history, English, and calculus. Students may also take classes for CUNY college credits through a program called College Now. The majority of Bryant's graduates apply to four-year colleges, and some have been accepted to selective institutions, including New York University and Cornell. Guidance counselors visit classes once a month beginning in the 9th grade to speak to students about college. With close to 4,000 students, Bryant does, however, have some kids who lose their way. The 7-year graduation rate is 20 percentage points higher than the 4-year rate, which means a significant number of students take more than four years to graduate. The school's 2004-2005 "report card" from the city Department of Education suggests that many get stuck in the 10th grade. That less than one third of 9th graders arrive at Bryant meeting grade-level standards in both English and math increases the difficult challenge Pellettieri faces in helping students graduate on time. He says, however, that the 4-year rate has improved since he became principal, as have Regents exam passing rates. Tutoring is available for struggling students. Recent changes in the curriculum include the launch of double periods of English and math. This is also a place where immigrant students can thrive and excel. Bilingual classes are offered in Spanish, Chinese, and Greek, in addition to English as a Second Language instruction. Students also may go to Saturday school for extra ESL instruction. We noticed that the parent coordinator's door was covered with colorful handmade signs in many languages. Classes we saw reflected a mix of teaching styles, some lecture and some group work. Many were taught traditionally, with teachers lecturing from the blackboard. But students were also engaged in interactive projects. Students in an English class went on a field trip that trailed Holden Caulfield's journey around the city in the J.D. Salinger classic, The Catcher in the Rye. The science department has shepherded students to the school roof at 5 a.m. to view a meteor shower and held an event where students and their families participated in various science-related activities, such as dissecting owl pellets, making lip gloss and special effects make-up, and learning about the solar system in a star lab. On our visit, we met students who spoke well of their teachers but also wished that the school had more money for building repair. They complained about lockers that were often broken and in short supply, and that they had to run to the first floor to use the bathrooms. Pellettieri said he was aware of their complaints and that he had submitted repeated requests for a new locker room, among other things, but the process of modernizing a school building was usually slow. In some areas, the school is well equipped, thanks largely to corporate donations and to funds raised at arts events. Musical instruments abound; the athletic field underwent a privately-funded $2.6 million makeover; and some students take an English class in a laptop-equipped writing lab.


P.S. 151 MARY D CARTER

5005 31st ave woodside, NY 11377

BLACK BOX THEATER A black box theater would be a good choice for the community center because it is a open square space with black walls or curtains that plays, musicals, dances are preformed. The chairs are all movable and the stage is also so the user can manipulate the room any way he wants. This is a good choice because this school lacks in music and art and also it Frank sinatra school does not have a room like this. This would help out all the schools and tie the community together for events like town meetings.

FRAGMENT

PS 151 is a school in transition. Jason Goldner, who became principal in 2008, is committed to changing the school culture, bringing in new technology, new teaching methods and curriculums, and leaving its lackluster reputation behind. Building and Location: PS 151's four-story beige brick building sits in the northwestern corner of Woodside, Queens. The student body reflects the socio-economic diversity of the neighborhood, where housing projects sit beside large cooperative apartment complexes, and are surrounded by one- and two-family homes. In 2005, the Robin Hood Foundation gutted first-floor classroom space to create a brand-new, modern school library with $100,000 worth of new books. As part of his campaign to bring in the new, the principal is steadily replacing much of the dilapidated classroom furniture in the school. Goldner has also brought in Smartboards, but an administrator said not all teachers have embraced the new technology. There is a small playground at the back of the schoolyard; the rest of the yard is home to portable classrooms, which house several of PS 151's classes, as well as a District 75 program. Goldner said there is a $250,000 playground renovation in the works. The new playground will be open to the community after school, and will include a track, basketball courts, a small garden, trees, and seating. School Environment and Culture: Unfortunately, on the day of our visit, the main office of PS 151 did not reflect the positive, inviting tone that Goldner is trying to foster. Although new parents lined the counter of the main office to fill out kindergarten registration materials, school secretaries squabbled over protocol. A school administrator took a brusque tone with a woman waiting to meet with the principal, demanding that she disclose the reason for her visit. Several teachers we observed were strict in their approach to classroom discipline, and some used curt tones with their students. Upon entering the building, one teacher could be heard shouting loudly, "Go over there by yourself!" As we walked into a classroom, another teacher rebuked one student, "who never seems to do her homework." The same teacher spoke angrily at the class, and shouted at one student to sit down. In another class, the teacher called on one student at a time to move from their tables to the rug, and reprimanded a boy who was still writing in his marble notebook: "Close it whether you're done or not." Bulletin boards in the hallways are sparsely decorated. Classroom libraries are not large, and student work is sparingly displayed in classrooms. One 3rd-grade classroom, however, stood out among the rest with an abundance of books, and a reading area at the back of the classroom. PS 151 has a dean of students, who handles problematic student behavior. An administrator told us, "The reason we have her is we need her." The day of our visit, a few 5th-graders were in the dean's office, missing their class trip as punishment for stealing fish from the science lab.


I.S. 10 HORACE GREELEY

4511 31st ave LIC, NY 11103

WoodShop / Workshop An idea this school is focusing on is renewing its look. There test scores aren't so high but they have after school and in school programs to help the current students attending. This woodshop / workshop class might interest students to decide what direction in high school they want to approach. This will benefit this school because they do not have a workshop / woodshop or any hands on program in there school.

FRAGMENT

Located near one of the entrances to IS 10 is a display, known as the Horace Greeley Museum, that helps track the long history of the school. Mementos dating back to the 1930s yearbooks, class pictures, and sports awards are shown off in a glass case. In the auditorium, antique chandeliers still hang from the ceiling, and plaques listing honor students from the 1940s onward line the walls. There's beauty in all this antiquity, but the building shows its age in some less attractive ways, too. Lamps on the first floor cast a diseased yellow light on everything; the cage-like stairwells are simply too dark; and graffiti mar a section of the school. While Principal Clemente Lopes is careful to preserve the splendor of the building, he has taken steps to update and reenergize it. "Ninety eight percent of the graffiti has been removed," he says, and security cameras have been installed. On our visit, we saw that all student desks were being replaced with new ones. Lopes is also planning to fix the lighting and give the school a paint job. A high-energy principal, Lopes arrived in March 2005 geared to change the tone of the school by both beautifying the building and establishing a new sense of purpose among students. Test scores are not high, and IS 10 is on New York State's list of "schools in need of improvement." When asked what changes had occurred since his arrival one month before our visit, Lopes replied, "The kids are in the classrooms, and they're learning." As he walked briskly from one room to another, Lopes told us more. "I make it a point to visit [all the classes] every morning," he said. He seemed to be a magnetic presence in some rooms, particularly in the 8th grade honors class. Students there, some of whom are involved in the student government, clamored for his attention and wanted to discuss ideas for improving the school. Lopes said that students are also "very close to the assistant principals and deans." The school is grouped into three academies, and an assistant principal, dean, and guidance counselor is responsible for the operation of each one. IS 10 in 2004 had started using the "America's Choice" curriculum, which encourages student participation and group work and requires teachers to follow specific classroom methods, such as modeling activities that students will subsequently work on. In a 6th grade class, students gave structured oral presentations of book reports. They were careful to identify the genre of the book they had read, summarize it, read an excerpt from it, and offer reasons for recommending it.


NYC DOE : P.S. 1663309 35th ave LIC, NY 11106

BILINGUAL LIBRARY This is one of the only elementary schools that has a program for bilingual learning. It starts in kindergarten and ends in 2nd grade. One day the class is taught in Spanish and the next its taught in English. This is a Prestigious program that only certain students get accepted to. The program has good results but there library is lacking in curriculum. If the community were to design a bilingual library it would benefit many Students because queens is the most diverse place in the world.

FRAGMENT

PS 166 now has a Spanish/English dual language program, which prepares students to be proficient in both languages. The program starts in kindergarten, and children learn in Spanish one day, and English the next. The program is open to all students but there is a selection process. About half of the students in the classes are native Spanish speakers, the other half, native English. In the 2006-07 school year, there were dual language classes in grades K-2. The program will grow to by one grade each year. 2004 REVIEW: On the top of a file cabinet in the office of Janet Farrell, principal of PS 166, sits a copy of Dr. Seuss's Oh, The Places You'll Go. That could be the theme of this high performing Long Island City school, which has an immigrant population so large that two-thirds of kindergartners and 1st graders receive English language instruction. Because of its success, the school was one of the few in the city exempted from using the chancellor's mandated program, but it employs many progressive teaching methods promoted by the Department of Education. Farrell who became principal in fall, 2003, but was an assistant principal and member of the school leadership team for the three years prior told us that in her new role she has had to make few changes to the program, just a little tweaking. To teach reading and writing, the school follows a "balanced literacy" program that combines both phonics and whole language instruction. (Farrell believes strongly that students need to get a strong grasp of phonics in the early grades.) The school uses a program from the Houghton-Mifflin textbook publishing company, because, Farrell says, the materials are so complete that they save teachers a lot of time that would otherwise be spent in planning. The school also has the children read "real" books as is favored by the Department of Education. While, in general, the school uses a more traditional approach to the teaching of math, which, for example, includes more drilling in basic math skills, it supplements this in the early grades with "Everyday Counts", a more progressive program. Clearly one of the keys to school's success is the intense help given to students in both academic and non-academic matters. When we toured the school we saw many examples of teachers and other staff members working with individual children or in small groups. The school benefits from experienced literacy and math coaches as well as a math instructor who floats from classroom to classroom to give extra help to kids who need it. The school has both a guidance counselor and a director of the Project Share anti-drug program, which in this school also covers such issues as family disruption and grieving. In a number of English language classes, we saw kids with an impressive command of the language, even though, we were told, they had spoken little or no English only six months before. And throughout the school, classes we toured were headed by confident and capable teachers, and inhabited by well-behaved and interested students. PS 166 believes in the value of the arts. Each month, the school chooses an artist and a composer for teachers to work into the curriculum. Kids also learn to play the recorder and to read music, a skill woven into math class. Both the 4th and 5th grades have choruses. Parent association meetings draw more than 100 attendees, an indication of strong parent support for the school. This may stem in part from the school's open door policy, which encourages parents to visit classes. The school is a beneficiary of a young partnership between Infinity Broadcasting and the Department of Education. So far this has resulted in a commitment by Infinity to provide a rubberized covering and basketball hoops for the interior concrete courtyard that serves as the school's only playground. In addition, an employee of WFAN, one of Infinity's stations and a neighbor of the school, is working with a 3rd grade class in a program on politics, government and citizen involvement.


P.S. 70 QUEENS 3045 42nd street LIC, NY. 11103

GYMNASIUM This elementary school is doing good in its math reading and writing scores but one thing it lacks is a gym. They use there cafeteria as a place to run around. They fold the tables then hold physical education classes in it. This school is asking for funds to design a gym on the roof but if the community center can offer this school a gym there fund money can be used for other important programs.

FRAGMENT

Although PS 70 has performed well enough that it is exempt from the city's progressive curriculum in reading, writing and math, Principal Donna Geller decided to introduce some aspects of it beginning in fall 2003. Previously, according to Geller, who was named principal in 2003 after serving as assistant principal for eight years, the school had followed very traditional teaching methods. Given that, what she and her staff accomplished in less than one school year was impressive. According to the new approach, teachers work with small groups of children while the others work independently. This has been a challenge for many schools, but the students we saw at PS 70 were engaged and interested in their studies even when working independently. As she introduced the changes, Geller permitted teachers to organize classrooms in the way that worked best for them. Some classrooms had separate areas for reading/ writing and for math, while others had one large open area with reading taught at one end and math at the other. This flexibility, complemented by much teacher training, seems to have won over many teachers to the changes. Geller has introduced classroom libraries, organized according to the reading levels of students. In the fall of 2004, she planned to introduce the progressive math program favored by the city's new curriculum. PS 70 is housed somewhat awkwardly in a main building, a smaller structure and several trailers containing portable classrooms. The school has two computer labs, but lacks a gymnasium, so kids take physical education in a lunchroom where tables have been moved aside. Geller is seeking funding from the City Council to construct a building addition that would include a new gymnasium and put the whole school under one roof. Geller took advantage of funds for 3rd grade class reduction to hire more teachers and bring her average class size for that grade down to 20 students. She hoped to get funding to expand the program to the 4th and 5th grades in fall 2004. The school clearly values student writing. Geller purchased hard-covered blank books for "publishing" student work, and the students apparently noticed; one teacher told us of a student who was on her eighth publication. Parent support, we were told, is strong. Parent Association meetings typically attract about 50 parents, and the school seeks to provide simultaneous translations for parents whose English is not strong, either through a volunteer translator or by pairing them with another parent who speaks their language. The energetic and dedicated parent coordinator, a former PTA president at the school, is significantly boosting parent involvement, according to Geller. The arts play an important role in the curriculum. The staff includes two visual arts teachers and a full-time movement/dance teacher responsible for an annual music festival in which each class participates. The day we visited, 4th graders were performing a piece that combined dance, music and drama and that tried to illustrate points about rules of conduct and conflict resolution. The school also has an audio-visual squad so the students learn to work behind the scenes. A 1st grade class we visited was excited that butterfly chrysalises they had been raising were beginning to hatch. In this same class the teacher had students visit a nearby park, adopt a tree and then write about how it changed over the year. One 3rd grade class busily wrote fables while sitting on the floor at special lapboards purchased by the school to facilitate such activity. In a kindergarten class learning about dinosaurs, kids were anxious to explain which of the creatures were their favorites. The teacher had also taught her students to count to 10 in a various languages, including Swahili.


CONFERENCE ROOM 500 SF

ENTRENCE 750 SF

STAFF OFFICE 500 SF

OFFICE SPACE 1000 SF

BOXING GYM 4928 SF

TRAINING ROOM 1500 SF

LOCKER ROOM 1 750 SF

LOCKER ROOM 2 750 SF

EXERCISE ROOM 1500 SF

BLACK BOX THEATER 1500 SF

CLASSROOMS 2000 SF

SITE 12,850 SF BATHROOM 2 500 SF

BILINGUAL LIBRARY 2000 SF

BATHROOM 1 500 SF

MECHANICAL 2500 SF

COMMUNITY GYMNASIUM 2000 SF

OUTDOOR SPACE 4928 SF KITCHEN 500 SF

PPROGRAM DIAGRAM


“The objective of a community center is to serve its community”

Objective: To Design a Community Center for the Local Students. This is who I want to Attract: Local schools lack in much needed programs that the center can offer to a geared youth.. This is How I going to Do it: Design a building to accommodate the needs for much needed school programs.

EDUCATION FACILITIES PREFIXED IN COMMUNITY

FRANK SINATRA SCHOOL OF THE ARTS HIGH SCHOOL 35-12 35TH ave LIC, NY 11106 BACCALAUREATE SCHOOL OF GLOBAL EDUCATION 34-12 36th ave LIC, NY 11106 WILLIAM C BRYANT HIGH SCHOOL 4810 31st Ave LIC, NY 11103 P.S. 151 MARY D CARTER 5005 31st ave woodside, NY 11377 I.S. 10 HORACE GREELEY 4511 31st ave LIC, NY 11103 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 3718 34th street LIC, NY 11101 NYC DOE : P.S. 166 3309 35th ave LIC, NY 11106 P.S. 70 QUEENS 3045 42nd street LIC, NY. 11103

EDUCATION FACILITIES PREFIXED IN COMMUNITY Concept: The Community Center has to accommodate the much needed school programs

DOES NOT HAVE A OPEN SPACE FOR STUDENTS THIS HIGH SCHOOL DOESN'T HAVE SEXUAL EDUCATION CLASSES THIS HIGH SCHOOL DOESN'T HAVE A PROPER FITNESS CENTER LACKS ART AND MUSIC WORKSHOP / WOODSHOP COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 3718 34th street LIC, NY 11101 DOES NOT HAVE ADEQUATE BILINGUAL LIBRARY DOES NOT HAVE A GYMNASIUM

OPEN SPACE

BILINGUAL LIBRARY SEXUAL EDUCATION

ART AND MUSIC WORKSHOP / WOODSHOP

FITNESS CENTER

GYMNASIUM


OLD PROGRAM

COMMUNITY PROGRAM

NEW PROGRAM

Entrance Lobby 750. sf

Entrance Lobby 750. sf

Boxing Gym 4,928. sf (56’ x 88’) (see attached plan - includes space for three boxing rings & spectator seating) (Boxing Gym is a long span space - no columns - must be double height or higher)

Boxing Gym 4,928. sf (56’ x 88’) (see attached plan - includes space for three boxing rings & spectator seating) (Boxing Gym is a long span space - no columns - must be double height or higher)

Exercise/Training Rooms (4 @ 750sf ) 3,000. sf Classrooms (computer lab, art, etc.) (4 @ 500 sf ) 2,000. sf Library / Reading Room 2,500. sf Community Room 1,500. sf

FITNESS CENTER WITH TRAINERS WORKSHOP / WOODSHOP SEXUAL EDUCATION BILINGUAL LIBRARY GYMNASIUM

Exercise room 1 @ 1,500 SF / TRAINING ROOM 1 @ 1,500 SF 1 Sex Education Classroom @ 500 SF 1 WORKSHOP ROOM @ 750 SF 1 WOODSHOP ROOM @ 750 SF BILINGUAL LIBRARY / READING ROOM 2,500 SF Community Gymnasium 2,250 SF

Kitchen for Community Room 500. sf

Kitchen Student cooking / Community Room 500. sf

Administrative Offices 2,000. sf total (2 staff offices @ 250 sf = 500 sf ) (1 open office space @ 1,000 sf ) (1 conference room @ 500 sf )

Administrative Offices 2,000. sf total (2 staff offices @ 250 sf = 500 sf ) (1 open office space @ 1,000 sf ) (1 conference room @ 500 sf )

Locker Rooms (2 @ 750 sf ) 1,500. sf (each with changing areas, 25 lockers, showers, and restrooms)

Locker Rooms (2 @ 750 sf ) 1,500. sf (each with changing areas, 25 lockers, showers, and restrooms)

Café/Juice Bar Concession 750. sf Retail Concession 1,500. sf

ART AND MUSIC

Black Box Theater 1500 sf

Restrooms for General Public (2 @ 250 sf ) 500. sf (must meet ADA requirements)

Restrooms for General Public (2 @ 250 sf ) 500. sf (must meet ADA requirements)

Mechanical - total combined 2,500. sf (sf may vary depending on type of building system)

Mechanical - total combined 2,500. sf (sf may vary depending on type of building system)

Subtotal 23,928. sf Circulation (approx.15%) 3,590. sf Total PROJECT 27,518. sf Outdoor Spaces Landscape/Courtyard/Garden 4,928. sf minimum (same as boxing gym) (exterior space, accessible from building, may be at grade or above grade) Covered Bicycle Parking (for 25 bikes, adjacent to building entrance) Total PROJECT including Outdoor Spaces 32,446. sf total sf SF = 32,446

OPEN PUBLIC SPACE

Student lounge / Outdoor Spaces Landscape/Courtyard/Garden 4,928. sf minimum (same as boxing gym) (exterior space, accessible from building, may be at grade or above grade) Covered Bicycle Parking (for 25 bikes, adjacent to building entrance) Total PROJECT including Outdoor Spaces 32,446. sf total sf

SF = 32,446


Pink = Fragmented program Steel = Circulation

As Circulation wraps around the program it makes interesting shapes and spaces. After making dozens of options this massing provided a 50 percent building space and a 50 percent open space to the public on the ground floor. I wanted the Boxing gym to be placed on top of the building and the black box theater in the back corner of the site for privacy. The chip board model was a redesign with adequate square footage while staying true to the concept and program.


Study Models

Circulation design

Structure and circulation mixing

Final Structure design with Study of circulation as structure


SITE PLAN


mechanical room

BASEMENT


juice bar

juice bar

sex ed classroom

library

library

1 staff office

work shop / woodshop

gymnasium

gymnasium

public bike rack / outdoor space public bike rack / outdoor space

GROUND LEVEL


confrence room confrence room

mechanical room

Black box theater

Black box theater 1 staff office

1 staff office

Open office space Open office space

SECOND LEVEL


sex ed classroom

1 staff office

work shop / woodshop

THIRD LEVEL


FOURTH LEVEL


34th ave

FIFTH LEVEL


EAST ELEVATION


WEST SECTION


Pitched roof with truss 64' - 8"

Lighting and spectator floor 46' - 0"

Boxing Gym and outdoor space 34' - 0"

Fitness Level 23' - 6"

Fitness and Black Box Theater 13' - 0"

34th ave

Entrance level 0' - 0"

Changing room -12' - 4"

SOUTH SECTION


41st street

SOUTH ELEVATION


LOW IRON GLASS

PROTECTION BOARD DRAINAGE COURSE INSULATION ADHESIVE

CONCRETE MULLION EXTENTION

GAUGE FRAMING

HORIZONTAL MULLION ANGLE ARCHOR

TRUSS

CONCRETE STAIRS GLASS TOP SEALANT METAL FLASHING

PERMANENT METAL DECKING STEEL BEAM

TIE 1’ FOUNDATION

2 X 8 MARBLE PANELING (FACADE)

MOTHER NATURE

2 X 2 Tiles STEEL PEDESTALS (RAISED FLOOR SYSTEM) VERTICAL MULLION

CONCRETE STEEL BEAM STRUCTURAL SILICONE

DETAIL SECTION


DETAIL ELEVATION


juice bar

PASSIVE SYSTEM Concrete

sex ed classroom

Grass

Glass 1 staff office

work shop / woodshop

Steel

Wood

Marble

CODE DIAGRAM: EXIT PATHS & EGRESS

MATERIAL PALLET


Design 6  

The corner gym