The Bartlett School of Planning Expo Catalogue 2021

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THE BARTLETT SCHOOL OF PLANNING

EXPO CATALOGUE 2020–2021



THE BARTLETT SCHOOL OF PLANNING EXPO CATALOGUE 2020–2021



Contents 5 6 8

Introduction Staff, Visitors and Consultants Foreword

38 42 44

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Undergraduate Programmes BSc Year 1 Urban Lab 1: Graphic Skills Introducing Urban Design: Design Skills BSc Year 2 Urban Design Theory to Practice Cities and Social Change Strategic Planning Project BSc Year 3 Urban Design: Space and Place Real Estate Investment and Finance Real Estate Management Real Estate Development

46 48 50 52 54 56 58

14 16

18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 36

Student Awards Bartlett Urban Planning Society (BUPS)

62 64 66

Postgraduate Programmes Business Cases for Infrastructure Case Studies in Preparing Regeneration Projects International Planning: Project Major Research Project Plan Making Studio Plan Making Studio II Planning for Housing: Project Sustainable Futures by Design Urban Design: Guidance, Incentive and Control Urban Design: Layout, Density and Typology Urban Design: Place Making Urban Design Research Project Civic Design / Civic Design CPD

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MPhil/PhD Planning Studies

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Research at The Bartlett School of Planning Home Comforts During the Covid-19 Lockdown The Design Deficit Rural Places and Planning: Stories from the Global Countryside Urban Maestro

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74 76 78 80



Introduction The Bartlett School of Planning has an international reputation as a centre of academic excellence in research, teaching and policy and practice interaction. Located within the heart of one of the world’s greatest cities, the school’s research and teaching opportunities provide a unique laboratory for knowledge creation, rich in academic, cultural and social diversity. This catalogue is a small selection of the work produced by our students during the 2020/20201 academic year. To view this work in more details, visit our virtual exhibition at: https://issuu.com/bartlettschoolofplanning/stacks A word from the curators Since its launch in 2017, it has been a pleasure to organise the BSP Expo. Although the format of the exhibition has been adjusted in recent years, it has been gratifying to rise to the challenge of ensuring that this celebration of the school continues. At the core of the Expo is of course the innovative work and research of our staff and students whose drive to complete their programmes and create inspiring outputs has gone on unabated. We have our fingers crossed that next year we can celebrate in person. In the meantime, please enjoy perusing the multitude of projects we have undertaken this year. Victoria Howard, Communications Manager, Expo coordination and communications For the second year in a row since the first BSP Expo we have been once again unable to host our live event in the heart of UCL. The COVID-19 pandemic led to a sudden shift to online teaching and restricted campus access. Our student community rose to the many challenges caused by the sudden shift to digital teaching and we are incredibly proud of their academic and wider achievements. Having overseen collecting, organising, and displaying our student works over the past 5 years, I am delighted to be able to do so once again through the pages of this catalogue and its wider online repository. Valentina Giordano, Lecturer in Urban Design, Expo curator

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Staff, Visitors and Consultants Staff Dr Kwame Addae-Dapaah Dr Lauren Andres Dr Sonia Arbaci Dr Yasminah Beebeejaun Elena Besussi Professor Matthew Carmona Professor Elisabete Cidre Dr Ben Clifford Professor Claire Colomb Dr Marco Dean Professor Harry Dimitriou Dr Dan Durrant Professor Michael Edwards Dr Jessica Ferm Dr Daniel Fitzpatrick Dr Sonia Freire Trigo Dr Tommaso Gabrieli Professor Nick Gallent Valentina Giordano Dr Iqbal Hamiduddin Professor Robin Hickman Dr Nikos Karadimitriou Dr Katy Karampour

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Dr Qiulin Ke Dr Nicola Livingstone Professor Claudio De Magalhães Professor Stephen Marshall Dr Juliana Martins Dr Susan Moore Mr Peter McLennan Dr Lucy Natarajan Professor Mike Raco Professor Peter Rees Professor Yvonne Rydin Dr Danielle Sanderson Dr Pablo Sendra Dr Michael Short Dr Jung Won Sonn Dr Tse-Hui The Professor John Tomaney Dr Catalina Turcu Dr Jonas De Vos Dr John Ward Dr Jo Williams Professor Fulong Wu Dr Filipa Wunderlich Dr Fangzhu Zhang


Research Staff Dr Joao Bento Dr Frances Brill Dr Calum Ward Professional Services Lisa Fernand Eliza Fleming Judith Hillmore Dr Julie Hipperson Victoria Howard Nina Jasilek Naomi Jones Jackie Nelson Alkesh Patel Jenny Post Yvonne Sibblies

Honorary and Visiting Academics Faraz Baber Richard Barras Duncan Bowie Susan Brownhill David Cadman Patricia Canelas Lai Har (Rebecca) Chiu Jim Coleman Wulf Daseking Michele Dix Bill Dunster Tim Edmundson Jose Farina Brian Fields Stefania Fiorentino Yohance Harper Colin Haylock Michael Hebbert Kate Henderson Meri Juntti Charles King Klaus R. Kunzmann Jonathan Manns Niamh Moore-Cherry Janice Morphet Taner Oc John Parr Alan Peters Nick Phelps Richard Simmons Ann Skippers Tuna Tasan-Kok Simonetta Tunesi Anne Williams Arata Yamamoto

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Foreword The BSP Expo, now in its fifth year, is an annual celebration of student achievements across the Bartlett School of Planning at UCL. It is an opportunity for current and former staff members and students, alongside the school´s many friends and partners, to review some of the past year’s projects from undergraduate and postgraduate programmes and also examples of research being undertaken within the school’s PhD community and by members of staff and collaborators. This year as in the last, the BSP Expo has once again taken on important role of allowing our community of students and academics to communicate with our friends and partners all over the World in spite of the restrictions imposed by the global Covid-19 pandemic and share what we have been doing in the last 12 months. We hope to show that despite the constraints and difficulties to education and research that the pandemic has posed, we are here and still producing exciting, challenging and stimulating work. BSP is one of the largest and most diverse planning schools in the UK, with more than 50 members of staff (plus a similarly large group of honorary and visiting colleagues, as well as a great many contributing practitioners from a range of industry sectors) and more than 650 students from the UK and overseas. Undergraduates follow programmes in Urban Planning and Real Estate, Urban Planning, Design and Management or Urban Studies. Our post-graduate taught students are enrolled in our MSc, Mplan and MRes programmes on planning and related disciplines: spatial planning, city planning, international planning, urban regeneration, urban design, housing, transport, infrastructure, sustainable urbanism, and real estate. We also work with the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis on the RTPI ‘pathway’ through the MSc in Smart Cities and Urban Analytics. Most of our programmes are accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute and / or the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors – both of which are important partners for the School. 8


Students at BSP produce a range of outputs as part of their studies – from shorter essays and reviews to longer projects and dissertations. Team-based design and planning projects also form a core component of student work, and many examples of these are showcased in the Expo catalogue. Adding to the student output from our taught programmes is the work of our 60 plus PhD candidates, each of whom aims to make an original contribution to knowledge through individual research undertaken over at least 3 years. These students work closely with academic supervisors on projects that take them to different parts of the world or keep them here in London – studying the many urban challenges that the city will face in the decades ahead. A research degree is one of the first steps in what often evolves into a longer academic career. Research students frequently work closely with our full-time and visiting staff members, developing and delivering - as post-graduate teaching assistants - many of the modules showcased in the Expo catalogue. The aim of the catalogue is therefore to provide a more permanent record of this year’s work. It offers, however, just a glimpse of the vast array of work that students on our different programmes produce and our academics and contributors supervise. Despite challenging circumstances, our students continue to produce work that make us proud. We are also grateful for the many contributions of our friends and partners. The Expo provides an opportunity to celebrate all that and say thank you to everyone who works so hard to achieve BSP’s continuing success. Prof Claudio De Magalhães Head of The Bartlett School of Planning October 2021 9


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BSc Urban Planning, Design and Management BSc Urban Planning and Real Estate BSc Urban Studies

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Undergraduate Programmes The School of Planning has three undergraduate programmes: BSc Urban Planning, Design and Management, BSc Urban Planning and Real Estate and BSc Urban Studies. All of our programmes have a shared core curriculum in planning and urban management, with the option to specialise in urban design or in real estate. The first two programmes are fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and also have the option to follow a professional degree accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) if taken as part of the 3+1 professional route. The BSc Urban Studies offers greater flexibility in the second and third years, allowing students to tailor their degrees to their own interests and future career plans. In 2020-21, we had a larger than usual intake of first year undergraduate students due to the uncertainties surrounding A-levels and both staff and students have had to adapt to both larger cohorts and remote online teaching and learning. Our students stepped up to the challenge and produced some excellent work over the year, continuing with a mix of individual and group assignments, enabling them to foster links with other students. A selection of this work is available in the catalogue. We also introduced innovative new assignment formats, such as a Podcast in year 3, which enabled students to interview practitioners online despite not being able to visit them in person during their usual field trip. Dr Jessica Ferm Associate Professor in Planning and Urban Management Director of Undergraduate Programmes

To see all projects, visit: https://issuu.com/bartlettschoolofplanning/stacks

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BSc Urban Planning, Design and Management

The BSc Urban Planning, Design and Management programme offers students a broad-based education in the built environment with an opportunity to specialise in planning and urban design. BSc Urban Planning and Real Estate

The BSc Urban Planning and Real Estate programme examines current urban challenges with a focus on property markets, investment decisions and real estate economics. BSc Urban Studies

The BSc Urban Studies programme provides a broad-based education in urbanism and the built environment, offering flexibility to choose additional related modules across UCL and benefit from the wide educational offerings across the university.

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Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning Design & Management BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

BSc Year 1

Urban Lab 1: Graphic Skills

BSc Urban Studies

Coordinator Dr Katy Karampour Tutors Dr Isabel Sanchez Terpsi Laopoulou Dr Dimitris PanayotopoulosTsiros Xan Goetzee-Barral Paula Morais Elisabeta Ilie Bianca-Maria Nardella Azadeh Zaferani Monica Lopez

This module provides an Introduction to some of the basic drawing and presentational skills and techniques required in urban planning, combining free-hand sketching and technical drawing with digital graphic tools and software (Urban Skills Portal, Photoshop and InDesign). A selected route in a local area where the students live, is backdrop to the project work gathered for the urban analysis undertaken. The module also helps students to develop their creativity. The aim is to develop through practical application the ability to: — Present work using a variety of graphic techniques; — Use basic freehand sketching and technical drawing skills to communicate urban analysis; — Use basic photo manipulation and presentation skills to compose effective graphic layouts. On successful completion of the module, each student will have acquired skills in: — Analysing street composition and urban form through descriptive and observational analysis; — Collecting primary data specific to an urban environment and present this information graphically; — Understanding, reading and executing a variety of graphic techniques that complement each other to enable 2D and 3D representation of space and the urban environment; — Creative graphic communication, including effective layout composition.

Opposite: Inclusive Environment Proposal Julian Gooneratne 14



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning Design & Management BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

BSc Year 1

Introducing Urban Design: Design Skills

BSc Urban Studies

Coordinator Dr Katy Karampour Tutors James Chadwick Isabel Gutierrez Miguel Hincapie Elisabeta Ilie Terpsi Laopoulou Vafa Dianati

This module provides an introduction to the theory, techniques and appreciation of design within the context of town planning and urban design. It involves the development of technical and creative communication skills, both in oral and graphic 2D+3D presentation, that sustain the learning and developing of an iterative procedural approach to design problems. There is one ongoing project, focusing on Site 28, in London, which is developed in two tasks: Task 1 – (existing) Urban Places: urban design analysis, methods and techniques This systematic analysis explores issues of morphology/urban fabric, accessibility/mobility, and activity. In Task 1 students work in small teams of three/four to develop a comparative study of townscape(s) and site analysis looking at different urban design methods and techniques. The comparative analysis informs Task 2, whereby each student individually develops a proposal for the re-design of Site 28, sustained by a concept and vision for the future.

Opposite: (new) Urban Places: (re-)design of a London Public Space Yi-Fang Kuo 16



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning Design & Management BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

Coordinator Prof. Matthew Carmona Tutors Wendy Clarke (group A) Valentina Giordano (group B) Jingyi Zhu (group C)

BSc Year 2

Urban Design Theory to Practice This module draws on the extensive theoretical underpinning of urban design to: — Explore approaches to appraise the character of the built environment, and — Forward practical and even visionary proposals aimed influencing the quality, liveability and value of urban space as a key contribution to sustainable place making. The module illustrates the potential of design as a creative problem solving process, a process necessary to deliver the types of public and private investments in the built environment that will continue to return social and economic value to their users and investors over the long-term. In 2021 the focus was on Poplar and its interface with Canary Wharf. In the context of the transformative projects already occurring in the area (not least the coming of Crossrail) and the development pressures that the Poplar area is currently facing, the module sought to develop a new vision for this area to guide its successful transformation over the next 20 years. Groups were asked to develop a set of solutions that restore the integrity of the Poplar / Canary Wharf interface as a ‘place’ and not just a traffic / Infrastructure artery, whilst considering the opportunities within and beyond into its surrounding areas. The project provided an opportunity to rediscover the value and potential of one of London’s historic villages – Poplar – and to deal with the disconnection and inequity that followed redevelopment of Canary Wharf next door.

Opposite: Poplar Urban Design Vision B1: Chase Chu, Flynn Moeskops, Joseph Chan, Kei Putri, Ronan Barnes 18



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning Design & Management BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

BSc Year 2

Cities and Social Change

BSc Urban Studies

Coordinators Claire Colomb Susan Moore

This course is concerned with the interrelationships between society and space in contemporary cities. It explores key concepts and theories in urban studies, urban geography, and urban sociology to understand the link between social change and spatial processes, as well as the urban policies and planning interventions which have been set up to tackle important urban issues. An important underlying theme is the effect of economic, social and political restructuring on patterns of urban spatial change and social inequalities in cities. The objective of the course is to raise students’ awareness of their social responsibility as future professionals in the field of planning, urban regeneration and real estate development, and become reflective practitioners.

Opposite: Feature article on urban social change Tan Chloe, Yoshioka Yuya 20

One of the two assignments for the course is a ‘feature-style’, illustrated newspaper article of 1,500 words, done by groups of two students. Students were asked to investigate the contemporary urban social dynamics of a particular street, housing estate, public space or area of redevelopment/ regeneration in a city of their choice, focusing on the interactions between people and place - between social groups and the built environment. It tests students’ ability to identify in their urban surroundings the key socio-demographic trends, processes and sociological concepts introduced in the module, e.g. social segregation, ethnic segregation, gentrification, crime, antisocial behaviour, tensions between social groups and uses of space, poverty and homelessness, crisis of public space, neighbourhood effect, the social impacts of regeneration/ renewal, community mobilization and participation. During the academic year 2020/2021, due to the constraints of the COVID-19 pandemic, most of the research for this feature article was conducted online. In the cities/countries where this was allowed, on-site observation was conducted (respecting the local social distancing and public health rules).



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning Design & Management BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

BSc Year 2

Strategic Planning Project

BSc Urban Studies

Coordinator Daniel Fitzpatrick Tutors Elena Besussi Daniel Fitzpatrick Magdalena Jakubowska Lisa Juangbanich Marco Picardi

Opposite: New London Borough Plans for tackling climate emergency and dealing with post-pandemic socio-economy Group 10: Nicholas Gard, Yanran Huangfu, Vincent Ladanyi, Karen Liu, Ningna Song 22

Strategic Planning Project is a 2nd year undergraduate module which introduces students to strategic spatial planning at the sub-regional city scale and provides an opportunity for students to engage in the analysis of and planning for urban change in the context of a changing economy in the aftermath of pandemic, addressing social inequalities and of climate emergency. This year the two key themes were ‘Planning for a climate emergency’ and ‘Planning for the post-pandemic recovery’. Urban analysis of an outer London borough was followed by the preparation of a strategic spatial plan for the borough. The Strategic Plan aim to improve existing Local Plans through strategic assessment the three pillars of sustainability, as well as the Public Sector Equalities Duty framing community group analysis, and the expressed goals of tackling climate emergency and dealing with pandemic socio-economic impacts.



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning Design & Management BSc Urban Studies

Coordinator Dr Juliana Martins Tutors Dr Juliana Martins Neha Tayal Elisabeta Ilie Omar Sherif James Chadwick Irene Ceinar External collaborators Paul Reynolds Ketki Mudholkar

BSc Year 3

Urban Design: Space and Place This module aims to develop a range of skills and knowledge for carrying out large-scale, inner-city urban design investigations, masterplanning, and detailed design proposals. The term is organised around one project: the redevelopment of Holloway Prison site, in London. The module also aims to reflect on “Designing for a Post-Pandemic City”, and proposals were asked to engage with issues that were brought to the fore by the Covid-19 pandemic. The project comprises two tasks: — Task 1: Analysis and Masterplan proposal (group work, 6 weeks) consists of developing an alternative vision and scheme for the site; — Task 2: Detailed Urban Design proposal (individual work, 5 weeks) consists of refining and developing in greater detail the group masterplan. The design response should address the massing and character of the built form, and the character of the streets and open spaces. This project-based module combines lectures and weekly tutorials.

Opposite: Masterplan for Holloway Prison Bryan Goh, Claudia Zheng, Olivia Panayi, Oveis Rezazadeh, Rachel Chiam 24



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

Coordinator Dr Nicola Livingstone

BSc Year 3

Real Estate Investment and Finance The aim of the module is to introduce and develop knowledge of the key concepts and fundamental principles of commercial real estate investment. This module considers the application of investment theories to both the general investment markets and the property market specifically – where and how does property fit in? The module begins by considering the unique characteristics of property as an asset class and considers the ‘value’ of an investment: who invests in property and why? The risk and return potential of direct and indirect property will be considered in relation to other investment media, such as stocks and bonds. Diverse ways in which property can be invested will be considered, as well as how such vehicles are managed by investors as an integral aspect of international and multi-asset portfolios. Market performance, cycles and trends are considered, and relevant models and theories examined. Market forecasting, modelling, indices and the efficiency of the market are introduced, combining to offer a solid introduction to property as an international investment medium. The coursework element of the module is a report on each student’s stock portfolio, which runs throughout the term for three months. The students are provided with a £1m hypothetical investment pot to trade under real life market conditions and adopt their own approach to risk.

Opposite: Investment Portfolio Cynthia Wong 26



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

Coordinator Dr Danielle Sanderson

BSc Year 3

Real Estate Management This module explores the management of real estate assets from the perspective of the various stakeholders (owners, tenants and occupiers). It examines how managers can enhance the value of real estate as an investment asset, and how occupiers can maximise the benefits of the space they occupy - considering property as a factor of production. It aims to provide the student with an understanding of the role, responsibilities and skills required of asset managers, property managers and corporate real estate managers. The module will also cover aspects such as corporate social responsibility in property management, environmental issues and facilities management. The module aims to enable students to: — Apply management concepts to the business of real estate; — Critically assess how real estate management can add value; — Describe key issues facing real estate managers; — Evaluate how these issues affect the various sectors of real estate, from different perspectives; — Enhance oral and communication skills through discussions; and — Develop report/essay writing skills through the coursework.

Opposite: Shopping Centre Management Report Christopher Wong 28



Undergraduate Programmes BSc Urban Planning Design & Management BSc Urban Planning & Real Estate

BSc Year 3

Real Estate Development

BSc Urban Studies

Coordinator Dr Danielle Sanderson Tutors Dr Danielle Sanderson Dr Peter McLennan

This module considers Real Estate Development from the perspectives of various stakeholders including Planners, Developers, and those affected by development. It examines models of the development process and factors that affect land development. Development appraisal methods are discussed, and simple spreadsheet modelling of development viability is carried out. The aims of the module are to enable students to: — Understand and evaluate developments from various standpoints, including economic, political and social; — Understand market forces and interactions between planners, real estate developers and other stakeholders. By the end of the module, students should have acquired skills in: — Mapping the roles played by a wide range of actors and social and economic institutions in the development of land and property at different times and in different places; — Describing the interaction of land ownership, construction, development and investment finance, planning, and other aspects of regulation; — Critically evaluating real estate developments; — Carrying out simple development appraisals.

Opposite: Case Study analysing a Development Claudia Zheng 30



Student Awards

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Yuerong Zhang awarded Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship

MPlan students win 2nd place in Penang Bay Competition

PhD candidate, Yuerong Zhang, has been awarded a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship to carry out her research on “A dynamic network approach to measuring railway resilience in Great Britain”.

The competition is part of a wider Penang Bay programme, which aims to rehabilitate, regenerate, and rejuvenate the water-based assets of George Town and Butterworth into a seamless and dynamic space. Penang plans to become one of the first UN Sustainable Development Goals cities.

The project will introduce a dynamic network model based on percolation and brokerage theories to study Great Britain railway resilience against varying disturbances at different timescales. The research will open avenues for understanding transport resilience from temporal and network perspectives and have broader implications for resilience and network studies in other contexts and disciplines.

The brief asked entrants to help craft the future of a city, reimagining the Penang Bay Waterfront over the next 20 years to build social, economic, and environmental resilience. Each entry had to address the relevant Sustainable Development Goals (3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 and 14) and three project components: 1) Butterworth Waterfront, 2) Georgetown Waterfront and 3) The Penang Strait. Entrants had to respond to disruptions and transform Penang’s core urban areas and waterbased assets into an integrated and resilient new economic zone. The brief encouraged solutions where culture, nature, businesses, and technology were organised symbiotically. 36 groups were shortlisted. The judges then chose eight finalists from this shortlist, from which the MPlan team came 2nd. The marking criteria looked for originality and innovation of ideas, the consideration of the key Sustainable Development Goals, the economic potential of the proposal, and the clarity of ideas.

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BSP students win People’s Choice Award at Sudbury 2050

Two BSP graduates commended in RTPI’s APC process

Sudbury 2050 is a competition organised by the McEwen School of Architecture (MSoA) in collaboration with the local community. It draws focus on the urban core of the city and invites entrants to explore various options and opportunities to evolve the city’s downtown through the formulation of urban design principles to guide Sudbury’s development till the 2050s and beyond.

Each year RTPI assessors nominate the best submissions for Chartered membership. The Membership Assessment Advisory Panel then judge the nominated submissions and award commendations to the best ones. Over 400 candidates submitted their application for Chartered membership of the Royal Town Planning Institute via the Assessment of Professional Competence. The candidates produced a written submission to demonstrate that they have obtained the skills and competencies of a professional planner.

Evidence-based approach and community engagement strategies formed the foundation of our planning and design. Our project ‘Bold and Beautiful’ under Team #4245 managed to emerge as finalists. We had the opportunity to present our work to an international jury and the local community, and ultimately won the People’s Choice Award. In our work, we envision a biophilic, age-friendly Sudbury which promotes diverse arts and culture. Our work draws on familiar planning concepts of the Compact City, Public Transport Integration, Liveable Neighbourhoods, Greenways and the Cultural Economy. Ultimately, it builds upon Sudbury’s historic industrial strength while encouraging innovation and excellence moving forward.

Six candidates were awarded commendations by the Membership Assessment Advisory Panel (MAAP) for submitting high quality APC submissions in 2020. Among those awarded are BSP graduate Chloe Staddon (MSc Spatial Planning) and Helen Stocks (MSc Planning Design and Development, now MSc Urban Design and City Planning). The RTPI share these impressive young planners’ tips with the next generation of Chartered Members. You can read their tips on the RTPI website.

The participating group members are: Bryan Jian Hao Goh (Singapore, UPDM), Rachel Yi En Chiam (Singapore, UPDM), Charmaine Chua Wei Ying (Singapore, exchange student from Yale-NUS College), Nabhatsorn (Ploy) Na Thalang (Thailand, UPRE), Tessa Hui Zhi Tan (Singapore, UPDM), Chun Ho Christopher Wong (Hong Kong, UPRE)

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IJURR Foundation Grants Paul Moawad is an architect and an urban designer. Currently he is a PhD candidate at The Bartlett School of Planning (UCL) expecting to graduate in Spring 2022. He is the founder of BeBeirut Architects, a pro-bono initiative launched after the Beirut Port blast rebuilding damaged residences and children’s playgrounds in partnership with local organizations. His PhD research focuses on temporary urbanism, borderland studies, informal settlements, Syrian refugees’ migration, and modalities of power and waiting in contested urban spaces. He lectured at Imperial College London and taught at Columbia University and University College London.

UG Students Awarded UCL Faculty Undergraduate Scholarships for Excellence and Faculty Medal Prize Winners of the UCL Faculty Undergraduate Scholarships for Excellence 2019/20: Sean Kian How Lee (first year) Folabomi Frances Olaleye (second year) UCL Faculty Undergraduate Scholarships for Excellence are awarded to students who have demonstrated substantive and compelling examples of ‘stand out’ activities and achievements. Winner of the Faculty Medal Prize 2019/20: Anastassia Gusseinova Faculty Medals are awarded to students who have taken the final examination for an undergraduate degree at UCL in the year for which the awards are made, and who are reported by the appropriate Faculties to be the most distinguished of such students.

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Bartlett Urban Planning Society (BUPS) Established in 2012, the Bartlett Urban Planning Society (BUPS) is a student-run organisation, subsumed under the Bartlett School of Planning (BSP). BUPS aims to inspire and support planning students academically and professionally while fostering a sense of community. The society provides students with access to high-quality content in the form of blogs, academic resources and careers assistance. Membership for BUPS is granted automatically to all BSP students. The COVID-19 pandemic posed an immense challenge. With students spread across the world, our goals to inspire, mentor and celebrate have been more important than ever. We took advantage of our various social media channels and monthly newsletters to update students on our events and blog posts. We also shared regular insights from other organisations, keeping the student community up-to-date with constantly evolving trends in the planning, real estate and built environment arenas. The circumstances also prevented us from carrying out our staple series of seminars, workshops and socials. However, we took this in our stride and instead focused on virtual opportunities. This year, we managed to organise various virtual coffee sessions and online parties to help students network and rally together. Notwithstanding the disrupted careers environment, we furthered our collaborative relationship with the BSP Careers team. Together we hosted 7 Careers Labs and provided advice and information regarding careers opportunities. We are thankful for the support of speakers from companies and organisations based in the UK and beyond. Finally, as a silver lining, BUPS managed to form new partnerships with planning societies of various universities. Together, we hosted ‘The World in Planning’ – an international planning event, and ‘The Future of Planning’ – exploring planning’s past, present and future role in the UK. We are immensely grateful for the support of the BSP community, and we look forward to another great year ahead!

Bryan Goh Jian Hao Chair, Bartlett Urban Planning Society, 2020-2021 Sean Lee Kian How Vice-Chair, Bartlett Urban Planning Society, 2020-2021 Sebastian Szekely Secretary, Bartlett Urban Planning Society, 2020-2021 Mahomed Ridhwan Omar Treasurer, Bartlett Urban Planning Society, 2020-2021 Ronan Barnes Careers Officer, Bartlett Urban Planning Society, 2020-2021 Karen Hanyang Liu Communications Officer, Bartlett Urban Planning Society, 2020-2021 Joey Cheuk Yi Li Marketing Officer, Bartlett Urban Planning Society, 2020-2021 36


Building Blocks: bridging big data and urban design

Why data analytics should be taught to all planners

By Isabel Syrek

By Sean Lee

During my time at The Bartlett School of Planning, I observed that in the analysis of any urban design project, students frequently integrate findings of transport data to snapshots of social media to portray the everyday workings of a particular place.

I had a fruitful summer at Singapore’s JTC Corporation. A government-linked company (think QUANGO), it owns and manages the nation’s industrial land. My time at the company’s Land Planning Division opened my eyes to the many compromises and deliberations government policymakers need to make in producing a landscape not only for industry to thrive, but one that safeguards the national interest in the long-run.

Often absent from these portrayals is further critical debate due to the lack of time which is spent on researching available data sets. Being able to access options for data sets at the beginning of a project would spare much valuable time spent on researching options and free up time for critical engagement and the design process.

Read more

Given that there is so much knowledge present across The Bartlett, I saw this as an opportunity to build a new resource. Read more

The ‘Bi-polar’ English Housing Market By Alex Talbot The DSM-5 describes bipolar disorders as a group of brain disorders characterised by their tendency to cause extreme fluctuations to a person’s mood, energy and ability to function. Periods of manic high and crushing low typify the portrayal of the condition in popular culture. It is this dichotomy; the tale of two utterly different experiences that I want to argue characterises the current state of the British housing market. Split neatly between its most prominent cleavage of ownership and renting, the experience of both, while always comparatively stark in a nation ‘obsessed’ with ownership, has seldom been as stark as now. Read more

Cars and equ(al)ity: A look at transportation and social justice since the 20th Century By Fola Olaleye The car played an important role in reshaping modern cities and offered a degree of freedom to people (as long as you could afford one). There is no conversation about urbanisation or industrialisation that does not involve transportation. Transport plays a key role in the distribution of socio-economic benefits and can either make society fairer or increase economic disparity. From access to services and opportunities to mobility, transportation systems are at the heart of cities, affecting how a city functions and how people live. Read more

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MPlan City Planning MSc Infrastructure Planning Appraisal and Development MSc Urban Design and City Planning MSc Spatial Planning MSc Housing and City Planning MSc/DIP International Planning MSc/DIP Urban Regeneration MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design 39


Postgraduate Programmes We have twelve taught postgraduate programmes in the Bartlett School of Planning, each of which has been established on the basis of the expertise of staff in the School, reflecting UCL’s connected curriculum approach that brings together research and teaching. The latest addition to our set of postgraduate programmes, which launched in September 2020, is the MSc Spatial Planning Degree Apprenticeship. Delivering against the chartered town planner apprenticeship standard, the programme combines an MSc qualification with workplace based learning to, in partnership with employers, take the student apprentices through to become fully chartered professional planners. We’re delighted to have been able to offer this new programme and further develop our tradition of vocationally relevant but research informed education and the close relations between the School, employers and the Royal Town Planning Institute. 2020-21 has seen a strong cohort with high numbers of new students joining us across all our postgraduate programmes. Clearly this year has been different due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Our traditional field trips and site visits have not been possible this year, and the vast majority of teaching through the year was delivered online, but staff have worked hard to shift to remote delivery and try to replicate our range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, seminars, studios and workshops through virtual means. As some of the work in this catalogue shows, we have seen an impressive performance by our students despite the challenges of the pandemic. Dr Ben Clifford Associate Professor in Spatial Planning and Government Director of Postgraduate Programmes

To see all projects, visit: https://issuu.com/bartlettschoolofplanning/stacks

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MPlan City Planning

A two-year programme that offers an in-depth, academically informed introduction to the professional practice of city planning and explores both domestic and international planning practice and culture. Programme Director: Dr Michael Short MSc Infrastructure Planning Appraisal and Development

A modular/flexible programme, aiming to provide a critical review of mega infrastructure theory and practice both globally and in the UK. Programme Director: Dr John Ward MSc Urban Design and City Planning

A programme offerering a unique focus on urban design as a creative planning tool and the interface between urban design and city planning. Programme Director: Dr Pablo Sendra MSc Spatial Planning

A programme provideing a general introduction to planning theories, systems and cultures with a focus on the importance of taking a spatial perspective. Programme Director: Dr Ben Clifford MSc Housing and City Planning

A programme for urban professionals and graduates from the fields of planning, property, architecture and project management who are looking to specialise in the area of housing development. Programme Director: Dr Iqbal Hamiduddin MSc/DIP International Planning

A programme intended for students who want an international perspective on planning systems and cultures, or are likely to work outside the UK after their studies. It is open to graduates of any discipline who wish to make a career in planning or related fields. Programme Director: Dr Sonia Arbaci MSc/DIP Urban Regeneration

A programme created in response to a great challenge facing urban professionals in Britain and around the world: the decay and deterioration of our cities and their planned renaissance. Programme Director: Dr Sonia Freire Trigo MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design

A programme that allows students to construct their study in a cross-disciplinary manner and explore urban design as a critical arena for advanced research and practice. Programme Director: Dr Filipa Wunderlich 41


Postgraduate Core Programme MSc Infrastructure Planning Appraisal and Development

Coordinator Dr John Ward

Opposite: Infrastructure Business Case Evaluation Top, Group 2, High Speed 2: Yuhan Zhou, Siqi Ye, Anzi Cai, Bojun Li, Zezheng Wang, Zhongyun Sun. Bottom, Group 5, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital: Diana Alferez E., Mounia Benredjem, Mao Tinghao, Zhang Ruohao, Sutan A. Mufti, Pan Ziyang 42

Business Cases for Infrastructure This introductory module presents a framework for developing business cases for infrastructure projects both in the UK and elsewhere. It critically reviews the theory and practice in the field drawing from the experiences of the UK’s HM Treasury/ Department for Transport, the European Investment Bank (EIB), the World Bank and OMEGA Centre international case study research. For this task, representing 40% of the module credits, student teams have been asked to critically evaluate the business case of a recently approved infrastructure project against the 5-case business model, a best practice framework developed by HM Treasury. The model strives for better decision making and project outcomes through the consideration of: — Strategic case – is the proposed project supported by a compelling case for change that fits within the strategic context and meets development needs? — Economic case – does the preferred project option represent value for money? — Commercial case – is the proposed project commercially viable? — Financial case – is the proposed project affordable and how can it be funded? — Management case – is the proposal achievable and can it be delivered successfully? Students presented their posters in class, highlighting performance of their chosen project against this framework, and discussed the relative strengths and weaknesses of such models, and their adequacy for guiding project ‘successes’ fit for the multiple demands of infrastructure development in the C21st.


Diana Alferez E. | Mounia Benredjem | Ruohao Zhang | Sutan A. Mufti | Tinghao Mao | Ziyang Pan - 2020 | BPLN0025 Business Cases for Infrastructure - MSc IPAD, UCL

Queen Elizabeth University Hospital

A Five Case Business Model Analysis

Diana Alferez | Mounia Benredjem | Sutan A. Mufti | Tinghao Mao | Ziyang Pan | Ruohao Zhang - 2020 | BPLN0025 Business Cases for Infrastructure - MSc IPAD, UCL

Project Overview

Project Objectives

Queen Elizabeth University Hospital (QEUH), previously known as New South Glasgow Hospitals, is a complex located in Glasgow, Scotland that cost £841.7 million. The construction of the project started in 2011 and was delivered on time and on budget by 2015. In 2016, the hospital received the MIPIM award for best, outstanding healthcare project.

It is currently operated by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHS GG&C - the Board) and has the capacity to accommodate 700,000 patients annually. OBC Accepted

Design/Contract

2008

FBC published

2009

What is the case for change, including the rationale for intervention?

The Case for Change

In 2002, the Board faced significant challenges in the sustainability of services. Fragmented services with outdated buildings, pressures on the workforce and the increasing need to move toward larger teams were the main issues. Healthcare facilities were spread in 10 hospitals across the region, so patients and healthcare workers had to move across several hospitals. Moreover, outdated buildings prevented new medical technology to be implemented.

Western Inf.

Southern General

Stobhill

RHSC

Glasgow

Policy Integration

The project considered national policies to ensure a synergy, which included the “National Delivery Plan” and the “Healthcare Quality Strategy for NHS Scotland”. The bed modelling was conducted by doing a benchmarking exercise to peer hospitals and considered national policy adjustments.

Key Findings and Critique

Children Hospital 256 beds

Analysis Method

Hospital projects involve variables that are nonmonetisable. Although popular in other fields, Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is not commonly used in health assessment due to difficulty of associating monetary values with health outcomes (YHEC, 2016). Other hospital projects were analysed. Based on this, it is assumed that the project used Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA) to examine nonmonetisable economic factors.

Benefits • • • •

Clinical quality Performance Staff and workforce Sustainability of service • Economic and community

• Accessibility to hospital • Physical environment • Environmental considerations • University

Extension site options Risk Adjusted NPV Risk adjusted NPV

CAPM 1

£795,524 £795,524

Can a realistic and credible commercial deal be struck?

Procurement Strategy

Traditional procurement (Design & Build contract): competitive dialogue with a prequalification process. The strategy incentivised efficiencies to manage costs within target, key to delivering the project on time and on budget. The FBC shows detailed development stages and deadlines.

Charging Mechanism

Target & maximum Price: ‘You delay, You Pay’ If costs were less than the target, the Board and Contractor would have shared the savings and if costs exceeded the Maximum Price, then the Contractor would have absorbed 100% of the overrun. Construction D&B Contract

O&M

Risks

Extension Site Options

MIPIM Award

2015

Commercial Case

Planning Requirements

The Full Business Case is overall persuasive, despite the lack of public transparency which may have decreased accountability of the official documents. The scheme was supported by a robust case for change that clearly fits with wider public policy objectives and demonstrated value for money. It also reflects that the preferred option was both commercially viable and financially affordable and resulted in the delivery of the strategic outcomes. Nonetheless, our findings suggest that governance and risk management gaps occurred throughout the project lifecycle. Infection prevention and control is an area where there is significant room for improvement.

Inauguration

2011

What is the net social value of the intervention to society?

Victoria Inf

In response, the Board proposed a strategy to consolidate the services in a hospital complex, reducing the number of sites from six to three. This included the extension of an existing site with the construction of two new buildings.

Adult Hospital 1,109 beds

Economic Case

Procurement Procurement

5km Esri UK, Esri, HERE Garmin, FAO, METI/NASA, USGS

Glasgow

Construction Started

2010

Strategic Case

Key Findings & Conclusion

• Consolidate fragmented services • Increase efficiency and productivity • Ensure a quality workspace for healthcare workers • Flexible facility use for future uses, including the case of pandemic • Provide gold standard healthcare service

Planning

Cost and Funding

The total capital requirement of the project was £841.7m, from which £551.7m were fully funded by the Scottish government. The remainder came from the Board’s ten-year capital plan allocation. Cost savings required an average annual generation of £35m to meet the funding requirements.

Capital Funding

148 148 129 129

£914,386 £914,386

NPD 3

£916,359 £916,359

Conventionally Procured Asset Model Private Finance Initiative 3 Not for Profit Distribution Model 1

2

Key Findings and Critique

NHS GG&C considered extension options to ensure optimum value for money. However, there is a lack of assessment of social benefits and costs using NPSV, so the FBC does not reflect the net value to society in terms of CBA. Since the benefit appraisal appendix was inaccessible, it is not clear whether MCA was conducted or not.

The FBC explained the imperativeness of intervention at the time and demonstrated the strategic fit to the Board’s needs. Nonetheless, the FBC could have presented a clear linkage to Failures occured in the ventilation system for national health policies and SMART objectives, inpatients (Daily Record, 2019). This indicates that e.g. some benefit measurement indicators were the hospital failed to achieve part of the benefits binary. of clinical quality. Icon Attributions: Linker, Fuse Studio, SBTS, Kmg Design, Trevor Dsouza from the Noun Project (CC 3.0)

Handover O&M

Key Findings and Critique

The preferred option resulted in a viable procurement and a well-structured deal. However, in 2019, the Board instructed legal action against the Contractor following concerns for water contamination related to the design, suggesting the risk analysis and supply chain analysis could have been better assessed (The Guardian, 2019). The risk registers of the FBC were removed due to commercial sensitivity, making it less transparent.

110 107 107 107 110 107 107 107 107 107

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

The financial approach considered net overall recurring savings of £18.2m through enhanced efficiencies. As a result, the Board considered the project to be self-funding.

Overall Affordability Total revenue savings (£ thousands) 43,674

Design

Ground Conditions Construction Subcontractor Procurement Inflation

(£ millions)

111 111

Gross revenue Total Revenue Savings 43,674 (23,323)

Net savings

18,251

Gross Revenue

(23,323)

Gross savings before

Gross Savings before depreciation Depreciation onon enabling 20,321 costs Costs Enabling

20,321

Depreciation Charge Associated with Depreciation charge(2,100) Enabling Costs

associated with enabling

costs Key Findings and Critique (2,100)

Covid 19 Pandemic

2019

What is the impact of the proposal on the public sector budget?

Requirements

PFI 2

Legal Action

2016

Financial Case

Cost savings were an important funding source for the Board. However, financial analysis could not be fully evaluated, especially the viability of the saving goal, because the appendix of Full Breakdown of Capital Cost was inaccessible. One of the advantages of selecting public sector funding is that the NHS GG&C has greater flexibility over maintenance costs by retaining control of the asset.

2020

Management Case

Are there realistic and robust delivery plans?

Delivery Strategy

Brookfield Construction UK Limited (BCL) was responsible for the design and construction of the QEUH complex, in line with the phased construction contract signed between NHS GG&C and BCL in December 2009.

Project Governance

NHS GG&C Procurement & Finance Group was responsible of managing the project with the help of technical advisors (Currie & Brown) and external specialist advisers (PwC Board Auditors and Atkins Consulting). In addition, representatives from Partnerships UK and the Scottish Government were fully engaged in the development and implementation of the Procurement Strategy at all stages in the process.

Change Management Programme

The NHS GG&C HI&T Strategy delivered core programmes that underpinned the move to the new hospitals. The core programmes identified and delivered requirements that are specific to the new hospitals and acted as a catalyst for health services in 4 key areas: technical infrastructure, equipment, standardised systems and transition. The new hospitals also benefited from new strategic HI&T priorities that were developed over the next 5 years.

Key Findings and Critique

The project benefited from strong governmental support and political oversight regarding direction and progress. There was a strict change control mechanism in place, the success of which was demonstrated by the cost of the project remaining stable since contract award. However, deficiencies in the quality and availability of management relating to the build and commissioning of water and air ventilation systems suggests that the level of independent scrutiny and assurance throughout the design, build and commissioning phases was not sufficient.


Postgraduate Core Programme MSc/DIP Urban Regeneration Optional Programme MSc Housing and City Planning

Coordinator Dr Sonia Freire Trigo Tutors Dr Lauren Andres

Case Studies in Preparing Regeneration Projects This module takes a project-based learning approach and requires students to develop a diagnostic account of the problems of a chosen locality in London and generate their own proposals for policy or intervention. It challenges students to apply and extend the knowledge they have gained in other modules and apply it to a regeneration project. Working in teams, students will have to identify the key ‘problems’ of the selected area; the reasons why those issues are taking place; propose a vision and/or strategies to tackle those problems; and explain how such vision and strategies will be delivered. The key output of the module is a group project for an urban regeneration intervention in one of the two selected study areas within the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, in the east of London. The delivery of this group work is facilitated through weekly tutorials, in which students and tutors critically analyze the existing regeneration proposals for the area; the gaps between their own analysis and that of the existing projects; and the ways in which their alternative proposals could better address the needs of the study areas.

Opposite: Hackney Wick Group 5: Aleksandra Brzozka, Maddison Driver, Eleanor Hulm, Alice Loizides, Nirali Vekaria, Jack Waite, Zahin Rahemi 44

The best examples of this year’s cohort look at the Hackney Wick-Fish Island area, characterized by its significant industrial heritage, a well-established artistic community, high levels of deprivation, and poor connectivity with its immediate surroundings. Both group portfolios provide an insightful analysis of the current context and offer two different proposals that nevertheless share a strong focus on affordability of housing and employment space as well as pedestrian connectivity.



Postgraduate Core Programme MSc/DIP International Planning Optional Programme MRes Interdisciplinary

International Planning: Project

Urban Design MSc Housing and City Planning Coordinator Dr Sonia Arbaci Tutors Alexandra Gomes Elisabeta Ilie Joseph Ward

This module provides an opportunity to engage in a strategic planning exercise in a wider metropolitan context in the UK. It aims to develop an appreciation of plan-making to foster changes that are socially, economically, and environmentally just and sustainable. Students apply creative problem-solving, critical thinking, and analytical skills and knowledge acquired in other modules of the MSc International Planning. The Project “Thamesmead for all” considers a scenario whereby the Peabody Group has commissioned an international competition for a Strategic Plan for the Thamesmead Waterfront 2050, considered “the biggest regeneration project in London” that could benefit from a (new) town centre, the arrival of the Crossrail (2022) and a proposed DLR station (2026). Teams of students, acting as planning consultants, respond to this call and develop a Strategic Plan in stages: “Broader context analyses” of the project site in relation to national, and regional/ city contexts; “Analysis-Plan exercise” and initial strategic vision informed by site observations; “Strategic Vision-Concept Plan exercise” translating the strategic vision into a spatial concept plan, informed by thematic analyses, site observations, theories/ concepts, and examples. Finally, the “Strategic Plan” for the project site. The various stages are integrated into the final output (2xA0 posters) advancing a visual narrative that runs through a set of spatial plans, sectoral policies and implementation.

Opposite: Thamesmead for all (2050) Group B6, Minerva: Ross Mayger, Jonathan Adcock-Shepherd, Lauren Annison, Caitlin Robinson, Yair Shapiro 46

This module operates as an urban laboratory where the teams share their work and build collective knowledge through interim presentations, class discussions, and show&tell sessions. When possible, the Neighbourhood Manager of Peabody Regeneration Team participates in the final presentations acting as the client.



Postgraduate Core Programme MSc Urban Design and City Planning

Major Research Project

MSc Sustainable Urbanism

Coordinator Dr Filipa Wunderlich Supervisors Principals at Urban Initiatives Studio, Urban Architecture, Place Profile, Urban Movement, East Urban Design Landscape Architects, Haylock Planning and Design, Clarion Housing Group, London Borough of Havering

To complete the MSc Urban Design and City Planning and MSc in Sustainable Urbanism, students are given the option to submit a Major Research Project. This project should typically focus on a key area of knowledge covered in the course, e.g. urban design, urban design guidance and control, housing and development, sustainable urban design, sustainable transport, or other. A Major Research Project represents an in-depth exploration of a complex topic / problem. It is a demonstration of knowledge, a critique, and the application of this knowledge and critique into a project. The project will focus on a particular site, method or process and will be propositional, delivering a vision, and working it out in depth so as to exhibit its potential, but also reflect upon its limitations. The major project should embrace the complexity of the chosen topic and apply knowledge in a critical and reflective manner. Students will be assigned a practice-based supervisor from amongst consultants working within the Urban Design and Planning fields. All students have 4 individual face-to-face supervision meetings to discuss their project with their practice-based supervisors, and 2 workshops, in which students will need to present their project and will receive feedback from across the team of supervisors and students involved in this Major Projects route.

Opposite: Sustainable Remote Working Neighbourhood Jeong Cho 48



Postgraduate Core Programme MPlan City Planning Optional Programme

Plan Making Studio

MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design MSc Housing and City Planning

Coordinator Michael Short Tutors Fabrizio Matillana (London Borough of Enfield) Fernando GutierrezHernandez

Opposite: PlanMaking Studio: Masterplan Ed Leahy 50

This module is the first in a two-part Plan-Making studio module (the other is in term 1 year 2 with Dr. Sonia Arbaci) which seeks to explore conceptions of densification in a studio environment. The aim of this module is to provide a studio environment for students to explore both conceptions of densification, and seek to develop appropriate city planning solutions through the production of a masterplan and/or associated policy. The module aims to develop students’ critical awareness of the topic in a collaborative and critical environment. The module is undertaken as a collaboration with the London Borough of Enfield.



Postgraduate Core Programme MPlan City Planning Optional Programme

Plan Making Studio II

MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design MSc Housing and City Planning

Coordinator Dr Sonia Arbaci Tutors Alexandra Gomes Antonio Rovira

This module provides an opportunity to engage in a strategic planning exercise in a wider metropolitan context in the UK. It aims to develop an appreciation of plan-making to foster changes that are socially, economically, and environmentally just and sustainable. Students apply creative problem-solving, critical thinking, and analytical skills and knowledge acquired in other modules of the MPlan City Planning. The Project “Thamesmead for all” considers a scenario whereby the Peabody Group has commissioned an international competition for a Strategic Plan for the Thamesmead Waterfront, considered “the biggest regeneration project in London” that could benefit from a (new) town centre, the arrival of the Crossrail (2022) and a proposed DLR station (2026). Teams of students, acting as planning consultants, respond to this call and develop a Strategic Plan in stages: “Broader context analyses” of the project site in relation to national, and regional/ city contexts; “Analysis-Plan exercise” and initial strategic vision informed by site observations; “Strategic Vision-Concept Plan exercise” translating the strategic vision into a spatial concept plan, informed by thematic analyses, site observations, theories/ concepts, and examples. Finally, the “Strategic Plan” for the project site. The various stages are integrated into the final output (2xA0 posters) advancing a visual narrative that runs through a set of spatial plans, sectoral policies and implementation.

Opposite: Thamesmead for all (2050) Group 2, Blossoming Urbanists: Helen Carter, Junyan Jia, Kinari Tsuchida, Kulkiran Bedi, Lili Pandolfi, Zixuan Xiong 52

This module operates as an urban laboratory where the teams share their work and build collective knowledge through interim presentations, class discussions, and show&tell sessions. When possible, the Neighbourhood Manager of Peabody Regeneration Team participates in the final presentations acting as the client.



Postgraduate Core Programme MSc Housing and City Planning Optional Programme MRes Interdisciplinary

Planning for Housing: Project

Urban Design

Coordinator Bianca-Maria Nardella

This is a project-based module that builds on the conceptual and policy-orientated foundation of its prerequisite module, Planning for Housing: Process. It challenges students, working in small groups, to apply and extend their knowledge of development actors, practices and constraints to real-life residential development projects and opportunity areas in Greater London. The module consists of two parts: a group housing-led development proposal (presented here) and an individual reflection on the lessons learnt from their group work about housing delivery in London. The module is taught over ten sessions and combines weekly presentations from practitioners and experts in the field, and group tutorials to discuss the practical implications of those talks for their sites and their proposals. This year’s guest speakers has included representatives from GLA Housing and Land Directorate, Be First (Barking and Dagenham regeneration company) and Savills among others.

Opposite: Cook Road Site, Dagenham Group 2: Ksenia Mironenko, Sophia Robertson, Rosie Cavalier, Wasin Choksunthornphot 54

For the housing-led development proposal, groups were allocated a selected development site in the London borough of Barking and Dagenham. The four selected sites represent two different contexts (i.e. town centre location; former industrial site) that forced students to critically assess the policy framework, consider competing interests and/or differing perspectives of key actors, and arrive to well-justified and creative proposals. The outcome of this hard work has been eight different outline scheme proposals (two proposals per selected site) in a portfolio format that demonstrate the groups’ deep understanding of housing delivery in London as well as their design and communication skills. This programme is intended for students who want an international perspective on planning systems and cultures or are likely to work outside the UK after their studies. It is open to graduates of any discipline who wish to make a career in planning or related fields.



Postgraduate Core Programme MSc Urban Design and City Planning Optional Programme MRes Interdisciplinary

Sustainable Futures by Design

Urban Design MSc Housing and City Planning Coordinator Dr Pablo Sendra Tutors Dr Pablo Sendra Dr Michael Short Marco Picardi Ruth Sepulveda Marquez Becky Mumfor Dr John Bingham-Hall

The aim of the course is to provide the student with a holistic approach to all the aspects of sustainability: social, cultural, economic and environmental. It seeks to make the student reflect on possible sustainable future cities by addressing issues that are currently at the forefront of the debate on urban design and city planning: how to make cities more inclusive, collaborative, consume less resources, interact with nature and, at the same time, strengthen its design and maintain and reuse its heritage. The module combines design and theoretical reflection through a series of lectures, workshops and a design proposal. This year, we have been working on the Wandle Valley. Students first developed proposals related to the workshops on the key topics of sustainability. After completing the workshops, they developed a “Sustainable Vision” for the Wandle Valley, which is presented through a poster and a creative piece of writing. The key topics of sustainability that the module addresses are: — City and nature: interaction between humans, non-humans, city and nature. Land use, food, waste, urban metabolism, urban fauna and flora. — Urban character and heritage: what makes a place, townscape, urban conservation. — Collaborative urbanism: participation, co-production, co-design, collaborative economy. — Inclusive cities: social justice, culture, gender, age, democracy and welfare delivery.

Opposite: Sustainable vision for the Wandle Valley Shalini Datta 56



Postgraduate Core Programme MSc Urban Design and City Planning Optional Programme MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design MSc Housing and

Urban Design: Guidance, Incentive and Control

City Planning Coordinator Colin Haylock

The module is focused on the purpose, scope, character and effectiveness of indirect urban design processes as a means to deliver better quality development through the planning and development process. Indirect Urban Design is something which most students will encounter extensively in practice – either as producers of policies and guidance or in having to work within policies and guidance produced by others. A series of lectures review aspects of indirect urban design in theory and practice. These lectures support group work which explores indirect urban design as applied to parts of London. The module therefore aims to: — Explore design as a tool of public policy, and debates around when and when not to intervene in design quality. — Develop skills in the preparation of design guidance informed by local environmental and socio-economic circumstances. — Consider allied means to incentivise and control the delivery of high-quality design outcomes. — Develop understanding and experience in group working. The module runs in two distinct but related stages. In Stage 1 Students will develop a critical understanding of the use and potential use of indirect urban design processes to guide and shape development and change in urban environments. In Stage 2 Students will develop skills in establishing realistic and deliverable visions for the future of their area with clear outcomes.

Opposite: Hackbridge & Beddington Corner Revised Neighbourhood Plan 2021 Group 11: Louisa Chang, Shalini Datta, Danyu Liu, Yiming Xia 58

In both stages students will develop skills in group working – including the development of a group strategy for the work, the establishment of group work programmes to deliver this, the subdivision of the work required and its allocation between group members making the most of varied skills within the group and the reassembly of these individual or sub-group inputs into coherent reports at the end of each stage.



Postgraduate Core Programme MSc Urban Design and City Planning Specialism MSc Spatial Planning

Urban Design: Layout, Density and Typology

MSc/DIP International Planning Open Elective MSc Sustainable Urbanism MSc Housing and City Planning MSc International Real Estate and Planning MSc/DIP Urban Regeneration MSc Infrastructure Planning Appraisal and Development MSc Transport and City Planning MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design MPlan City Planning Coordinator Dr Juliana Martins Tutors Dr Juliana Martins Prof Stephen Marshall Colin Haylock Neha Tayal Ming Cheng Isabel Sanchez Kathryn Firth

Opposite: Urban Design Proposal for Holloway Prison Yonghoon Lee, Christina Lyons, Marco Mancini, Elisavet Skordili, Gabriela Spangenthal 60

This module is the first part of the Urban Design Specialism. It provides an opportunity to critically investigate the spatial characteristics and qualities of the built environment, with a focus on layout, density, and typology, and explore the use of different typologies in the development of design proposals. It aims to develop knowledge and a range of skills for carrying out urban design investigations and proposals. Considering a hypothetical scenario in which the Mayor of London wants to consider possible approaches to the development of site of the former Holloway Prison, students are asked to undertake two interrelated tasks: — Task 1: Comparative analysis of two urban building types from the surrounding area (individual work, 4 weeks) is an introduction to the concepts of density and typology and aims to develop both an understanding of the spatial structure and scale of the built environment, and how these characteristics relate to the qualities and perceived character of place, as well as analytical and graphic skills; — Task 2: Urban design proposal (group work, 6 weeks) consists of developing an alternative vision and masterplan for the Holloway Prison site by exploring and testing different typologies. This exercise aims to foster the ability to engage with design as an iterative process and includes: an analysis of the urban context; the development of an overall strategy and two options that explore alternatives for redevelopment; a final masterplan; a statement on how the scheme optimises density and design quality. This project-based module combines lectures and weekly tutorials. Students are encouraged to explore relevant theory to inform the analytical and design work.



Postgraduate Core Programme MSc Spatial Planning MSc/DIP International Planning MSc/DIP Urban

Urban Design: Place Making

Regeneration MPlan City Planning MSc Urban Design and City Planning Optional Programmes MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design MSc Housing and City Planning Coordinator Prof. Matthew Carmona Tutors Wendy Clarke Melissa Trinane Pablo Sendra Mat Proctor Paula Morais Valentina Giordano Fernando Gutierrez Kathryn Firth Monica Lopez Franco Leo Hammond Karla Chaves

Opposite: Poplar Urban Design Vision Group I4: Eleanor Gooch, Anna Shaikly, Tongchun Qiu, Zhenbang Bao, Ziyu Zhou 62

This module draws on the extensive theoretical underpinning of urban design to: — Explore approaches to appraise the character of the built environment, and — Forward practical and even visionary proposals aimed influencing the quality, liveability and value of urban space as a key contribution to sustainable place making. The module illustrates the potential of design as a creative problem solving process, a process necessary to deliver the types of public and private investments in the built environment that will continue to return social and economic value to their users and investors over the long-term. In 2021 the focus was on Poplar and its interface with Canary Wharf. In the context of the transformative projects already occurring in the area (not least the coming of Crossrail) and the development pressures that the Poplar area is currently facing, the module sought to develop a new vision for this area to guide its successful transformation over the next 20 years. Groups were asked to develop a set of solutions that restore the integrity of the Poplar / Canary Wharf interface as a ‘place’ and not just a traffic / Infrastructure artery, whilst considering the opportunities within and beyond into its surrounding areas. The project provided an opportunity to rediscover the value and potential of one of London’s historic villages – Poplar – and to deal with the disconnection and inequity that followed redevelopment of Canary Wharf next door.



Postgraduate Core Programme MRes Interdisciplinary Urban Design

Coordinator Dr Filipa Wunderlich

Urban Design Research Project This is the final module of the MRes Inter-disciplinary Urban Design programme, providing students with the opportunity to conduct a major individual research project that explores the nature of urban design as an inter-disciplinary research subject, and as a key dimension of understanding and unlocking complex urban problems. The Urban Design Research Project represents an in-depth exploration of a complex topic / problem. It should provide a demonstration of theoretical knowledge and rigorous and incisive analysis. The study should embrace the complexity of the chosen topic and apply knowledge in a critical and reflective manner. The work takes the form of a 15,000 word dissertation or a 10,000 research report and major research based design proposal. Given the cross-Faculty nature of the programme, students are assigned a supervisor amongst academics from all parts of The Bartlett and beyond, including The Bartlett Schools of Architecture, Planning, and Graduate Studies, and the Development Planning Unit.

Opposite: Urban Design Research Project James Delaney 64



CPD Core Programme MRes Interdisciplinary

Civic Design Civic Design CPD

Urban Design

Module coordinator Pablo Sendra Other teaching staff Marco Picardi, Domenico Di Siena Guest speakers Nicolas Fonty (pre-recorded), Toby Laurent Belson, Michael Edwards (Just Space) Collaborators Alton Action, CivicWise

Opposite: Alton Estate Community Gardens Agnes Marsden Jeeves, David Gösta Dawson, Luis Barraza Cárdenas, Lukman Oesman, Saffron Mustafa, Sarah Goldzweig 66

The Civic Design module is a blended module that equip students with the skills to facilitate co-design processes, better enable civic engagement and involve communities in decision-making. Students will learn the skills through (online) lectures and apply these skills to practice through the collaboration with community groups in London. The digital course consists of 10 sessions of online pre-recorded lectures followed by live discussion sessions moderated by the teaching team. This is followed by an intensive four-day workshop (three days morning and afternoon and a fourth day of presentations to the community), where students will develop the project work in collaboration with community organisations and with the support of the tutors. This intensive workshop will be carried out face-to-face and will have the possibility to be taken online. During intensive course, students have lectures from community activists, guided visits to the neighbourhood under study, field work and collection of evidence, and project work in a studio supported by tutorials. Delivered in collaboration with community groups across London and with members of the CivicWise network, the Civic Design module will: — Equip you with methods and tools to facilitate co-design processes, enable civic engagement and involve communities in decision-making. — Expose you to the direct experience of working in collaboration with community groups. — Undertake a group project together with a London community group. The brief for the module will be previously agreed with the community groups and it will address some of the current needs of the community. The project is guided by tutors and offers you the opportunity to learn through direct experience of including communities in the decision-making process. — Connect with current debates in professional practice about civic engagement. The Civic Design course can also be taken as part of the UCL Summer School CPD programme. For more info see www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/planning/cpd-civic-design




MPhil/PhD Planning Studies The MPhil/PhD in Planning Studies is designed for graduates of any discipline who wish to make a career in planning or in related fields in teaching or research. The BSP Research Student Community is diverse, coming together from across the globe to study a variety of topics relevant to planning and the built environment. As well as working with their own supervisors, the research students usually interact socially and intellectually in a variety of fora and initiatives. The pandemic put a strain on this, as use of Central House was restricted for long periods of time. However, the research students showed their resilience. Upgrades and final viva voce examinations were conducted online and students continued to progress through to completion and award of their PhD degree. Training was offered throughout the year and students, with their supervisors and peers, worked out how to conduct their fieldwork in new and challenging circumstances. We were able to showcase some of our research students’ work in an online conference at the end of the year. We now look forward to welcoming students back to Central House and reinvigorating the sense of community that is essential to the sixth floor PhD Lab. Yvonne Rydin Professor of Planning, Environment and Public Policy Director of MPhil/PhD Planning Studies

To see all projects, visit: https://issuu.com/bartlettschoolofplanning/stacks

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MPhil/PhD Planning Studies The Bartlett School of Planning (BSP) encourages a lively research culture, and this has been reflected in a range of events and activities brought about by members of the PhD community. These events and activities aim to stimulate dialogue among BSP staff, students, alumni, as well as the wider academic community. The restrictions on social contact and the requirement for remote working during the 2020-21 academic year were particularly challenging for our PhD community. At the time, many of our members were not physically present at UCL, and opportunities to meet in person were scarce. Still, we were adamant about finding alternative ways to support each other and grow virtually as an international network of researchers navigating unprecedented challenges and changing times. For example, we set up a WhatsApp group to remain in contact and social channels on Microsoft Teams to organize regular chats and online coffee mornings. We discussed how a global health crisis like the Covid-19 pandemic impacted the function of our cities and required us, students, to quickly adapt our data collection methods and research techniques to online platforms. Professor Yvonne Rydin, who initiated several online activities, was also helpful in facilitating the online engagement of the PhD community.

Photos (clockwise from top left): Manqi Wang; Karla Barrantes Chaves; Abir Eltayeb; San Lorenzo Resguardo in the Coffee Cultural Landscape (Miguel Hincapié, 2018); Lin-Fang Hsu; E. G. Ilie; Monica Lopez Franco; Ruth Sepulveda Marquez 70

The Paper Writing Circle that she convened between October 2020 and May 2021 was particularly beneficial in reflecting on each other’s ongoing publications and engaging in some insightful debates. We had the opportunity to debate a variety of timely topics, from land rights and rent control in the UK, the Europeanisation of spatial planning, housing mobility in Chile, to sustainability and human health in the Global South. Marjan Marjanovic Candidate for a PhD in Planning Studies and PGTA, Bartlett School of Planning, 2019-2023 Abir Eltayeb Candidate for a PhD in Planning Studies, Bartlett School of Planning, 2019-2023 Cristobal Diaz Martinez Candidate for a PhD in Planning Studies and PGTA, Bartlett School of Planning, 2019-2023




Research at The Bartlett School of Planning The Bartlett School of Planning is a world-leading centre for research, impact and innovation. We are one of the UK’s major centres for research into the built environment and planning, and one of the leaders internationally in the field. Our research is motivated by an ambitious intellectual and practice-oriented mission and underpinned by external funding from a variety of sources. We collaborate on projects and initiatives with governmental and civil society organisations in a range of countries and cities and have a breadth of activity that spans four key inter-disciplinary fields: governance and planning; real estate and development; sustainable infrastructure; and urban design. We are world-leaders in the development of broader intellectual agendas, methodologies, and techniques for the study of planning and planning systems. We strive to generate new cross-disciplinary knowledge and insights to inform policy-making and help tackle pressing contemporary planning challenges faced by governments, communities, citizens, and business groups. Research Groups — Cities, Governance and Planning This research group focuses on the governance of urban and regional processes and the role of planning and public policy in the mediation of space. — Cities, Real Estate and Economic Development The aim of the group is to research the whole value chain in and by cities from policy to impact, through urban regeneration, local and regional economic development initiatives and real estate market practices. — Sustainable Transport, Infrastructure & Cities The research group focuses on delivering sustainable transformations within urban systems exploring the role of institutions, policy instruments, spatial planning, urban design and infrastructures in shaping and governing these processes. — Urban Design The urban design research group’s work ranges from fundamental theoretical questions about the nature of urban design to direct engagement in the practice, policy and teaching of urban design.

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Research

Home Comforts During the Covid-19 Lockdown This report summarises findings of a national survey of 2,500 households (representing 7,200 people) aimed at understanding how well or how poorly the design of our homes and their immediate neighbourhoods supported us during the period of coronavirus lockdown. The intention was to understand what we can learn from this period of unprecedented stress on our home environments. The findings offer insights into how we should be designing or adapting them in the future in order that they are more resilient and better able to support happy and healthy lifestyles. Findings are grouped according to the following themes: 1. About you during lockdown 2. Your home during lockdown 3. Your neighbourhood during lockdown 4. Your community during lockdown To see more, visit https://placealliance.org.uk/research/research-home-comforts/

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Research

The Design Deficit

This report summarises the findings of a short survey of urban design skills and approaches within England’s local planning authorities, and how they have changed over time. A response rate of 71% was achieved. Reviewing the evidence, it is possible to conclude that whilst urban design and related skills in local authorities have stabilised, they remain at a low ebb and far below where they need to be in order to address the ambitious national agenda on raising the design quality of new development. Signs of the growing use of design review and design codes are positive, but recruitment of design officers into local government remains challenging, proactive community engagement in design is minimal, and design related training remains basic. At the current rate of change it will take until 2077 to have at least one urban design officer in every local planning authority in England. This is the critical public sector design deficit.

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Research

Rural Places and Planning: Stories from the Global Countryside Principle Researcher Nick Gallent Research Team Professor Mark Scott (co-author) Dr Menelaos Gkartzios (lead author)

Rural Places and Planning provides a compact analysis, for students and early-career practitioners, of the critical connections between place capitals and the broader ideas and practices of planning, seeded within rural communities. It looks across twelve international cases, examining the values that guide the pursuit of the ‘good countryside’. The book presents rural planning – rooted in imagination and reflecting key values - as being embedded in the life of particular places, dealing with critical challenges across housing, services, economy, natural systems, climate action and community wellbeing in ways that are integrated and recognise broader place-making needs. It introduces the breadth of the discipline, presenting examples of what planning means and what it can achieve in different rural places.

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Research

Urban Maestro

Principle Researcher Matthew Carmona Research Team Joao Bento Tommaso Gabrieli

The quality of the urban environment derives from various interventions and policy decisions over time and reflects the collective work of multiple stakeholders – public, private and community. While European cities have developed sophisticated laws and regulations (‘hard power’) to secure diverse public interest objectives through the governance of urban design, the quality of the resulting urban places can be disappointing. Often outcomes are not aligned with commonly shared objectives such as creating environmental sustainability, human scale, land use mix, conviviality, inclusivity, or supporting cultural meaning. At its core Urban Maestro aimed to understand and encourage innovation in the field of urban design governance through a better understanding of alternative non-regulatory (‘soft power’) approaches and their contribution to the quality of the built environment. Far from limiting themselves to be simple regulators or even direct investors, many European countries and cities have developed these alternative approaches in order to enhance their ability to intervene as enablers or brokers in urban development. Through these means, they have initiated strategies to promote a high-quality built environment, often combining different formal and more innovative informal tools to guide, encourage, and enable better design. Urban Maestro aimed to capture and highlight knowledge about how such initiatives are used in practice, with what purpose, and with what impact on delivering better-designed places. Ultimately, Urban Maestro contributed to the global urban debate and the realisation of United Nations Sustainable Development Goals by enhancing practices of urban design governance within Europe and beyond. Urban Maestro was launched in 2019 and completed in 2021 by three partners: the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), the Brussels Bouwmeester Maître Architecte (BMA) and the University College London (UCL).

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The Bartlett School of Planning Expo Catalogue 2020/2021 Publisher The Bartlett School of Planning, UCL

ISSN 2516-5666 © Copyright 2021 The Bartlett School of Planning, UCL. © Copyright of all images and texts belong to their authors.

The Bartlett School of Planning Expo organisers Valentina Giordano Victoria Howard

For more information on research and teaching at The Bartlett School of Planning, visit https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/planning/

Expo curator Valentina Giordano

Visit our virtual Bartlett School of Planning Expo here: https://issuu.com/bartlettschoolofplanning/stacks

Expo coordination and communications Victoria Howard

The Bartlett School of Planning, UCL Central House, 14 Upper Woburn Place WC1H 0NN London

Catalogue Coordination Valentina Giordano, Victoria Howard Catalogue design Patrick Morrissey, Unlimited Head of The Bartlett School of Planning Claudio De Magalhães

Printed in the UK London, 2021