Spring 2014 Issue

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SPRING 2014

FOUNDING FOCUS

SUPPORT SYSTEM

COLLEGE BOUND

A week of festivities

Students overcome obstacles to succeed

Reaching a new generation


AT A

GLANCE AS OF FALL 2013, BARRY IS HOME TO 9,030 UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS – 513 OF WHOM ARE INTERNATIONAL, REPRESENTING 80 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES. SAUDI ARABIA LEADS THE WAY WITH 94 STUDENTS, FOLLOWED BY THE BAHAMAS WITH 78, VENEZUELA WITH 35 AND FRANCE WITH 26.

SPRING 2014 *Departments

*Features

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AT A GLANCE

CAMPUS CURRENTS

News from across the university.

GAINING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Educational programs abroad increase awareness and expand horizons for Barry students.

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SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS On the move with Barry’s student-athletes.

BARRY BEAT Stay in tune with student happenings.

FACULTY FOCUS Highlights from Barry’s impressive faculty.

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BUCCANEER BOOKSHELF

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

Students from around the globe are drawn to Barry to pursue their dreams.

LEADING BY EXAMPLE International experiences shape Barry’s faculty.

THE MIDDLE OF THE WORLD A firsthand account of an international summit in Ecuador bringing world leaders together to discuss rights of nature.

Read up on the latest publications written by alumni and faculty.

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CLASS NOTES Alumni news and updates.

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PRESIDENT Sister Linda Bevilacqua, OP, PhD VICE PRESIDENT FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT AND EXTERNAL AFFAIRS Sara B. Herald, J.D. MANAGING EDITOR Emilie Wernick

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

c a m p u s

CURRENTS

NEWS EDITORS Jessica Alexandre Gladys Amador Jeff LaLiberte ART DIRECTOR Artis Design Group WRITERS Jessica Alexandre Gladys Amador Sara Pauline Burke David Carden Sean Foreman, PhD Sister Elíse Garcia Brett Klein Jeff LaLiberte Walter Villa Rebecca Wakefield Emilie Wernick

Dear Barry Community, Those of us who live in Florida take great delight in the glories of creation that abound in the magnificent diversity of our flora. Driving to campus one day I realized that the “trees of gold” (Tabebuia caraiba) have begun to bloom. I am already anticipating the flaming flowers of the showiest of all our Florida trees, the royal poinciana. My other favorites

PHOTOGRAPHY & ILLUSTRATION The School Superintendents Association CBS Broadcasting, Inc. Sara Pauline Burke Jeff LaLiberte Carlos Paillacar Bacheler Jean Pierre Bob Smith Emilie Wernick

are the jacaranda, the frangipani, the shaving brush tree, the pitch apple, the bald

PRINTER Bellak Color Graphics, Inc.

to embrace “a global world view.” We value and nurture cultural, social, and intellectual

Barry Magazine is published biannually for all current students and their parents, alumni, trustees, employees and other friends of Barry University.

delights from around the globe. We are a flavorful community that, in the end, enriches

cypress, and the shower trees (Cassia javanica of which there are 400 species). This diversity – size, color, and fragrance – lifts my spirit and often leads me to a prayer of thanksgiving for the Creator’s handiwork. I am also filled with great joy each day as I experience the magnificent diversity of our Barry University community of students, faculty, staff, and administration. As we stated in our Core Commitments, “we are a global, inclusive community” and we call ourselves diversity. We also have fun celebrating our various cultural traditions and enjoy culinary and energizes all of us, especially our students’ education and university experiences. We also are committed to serving local and global communities through collaborative and mutually productive relationships.

Communications may be addressed to: Barry Magazine Department of Marketing and Communications 12550 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite 900 Miami, Florida 33181 305.899.3188 • publications@barry.edu Unsolicited manuscripts and art must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Copyright© 2014 Barry University www.barry.edu

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SUPPORT SYSTEM Students overcome obstacles to succeed

essence. Whether you are near or far, you are always in our thoughts and prayers and we thank God for your connection to us, your support and affirmation of our Catholic identity and Adrian Dominican heritage.

Linda Bevilacqua, OP, PhD

BUCKY IS BACK! After a two-year hiatus, Barry welcomed back its beloved mascot, Bucky, with a packed gymnasium of students, faculty, and staff at the school’s annual Moonlight Madness event last winter.

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SPRING 2014

FOUNDING FOCUS A week of festivities

I hope you enjoy this issue of Barry Magazine as it highlights aspects of our international

COLLEGE BOUND Reaching a new generation

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ON THE COVER: Celebrating Barry's international reach BARRY MAG | 5


CAMPUS CURRENTS

CAMPUS CURRENTS

ON THE

M OV E

A S UPER

AFTERNOON

The superhero-themed Community Fest brought together the campus for an afternoon of student performances, games, and team competitions – including musical chairs, bed races, and back by popular demand, the treacherous and thrilling obstacle course.

The Gobble Wobble 5k Fitness Walk/Run, organized by students in the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, was a huge success. All proceeds from the event were donated to FLIPANY (Florida Introduces Physical Activity and Nutrition to Youth), a local nonprofit organization, which promotes the consumption of nutritious foods and physical activity to youth.

FOUNDERS’ WEEK

THIS PAST NOVEMBER, BARRY CELEBRATED FOUNDERS’ WEEK, COMMEMORATING THE

UNIVERSITY’S HISTORY, MISSION, CATHOLIC IDENTITY, AND DOMINICAN HERITAGE. DURING THE WEEK, THE UNIVERSITY REMEMBERS ITS FOUNDERS: MOTHER MARY GERALD BARRY, BISHOP PATRICK BARRY, MONSIGNOR WILLIAM

PLANT THE SEED

Arbor Day served as inspiration for Plant the Campus Red Day, which helped to beautify campus in the spirit of service to the university. Students, faculty, and staff planted sustainable foliage in various locations around campus, in addition to the community garden beds, located behind Cor Jesu Chapel. Orchids were also put around campus in memory of Sister John Karen Frei who served at Barry for more than 45 years.

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BARRY, JOHN THOMPSON, AND THE ADRIAN DOMINICAN SISTERS FOR WHOM BARRY IS A SPONSORED INSTITUTION. STUDENTS SHOWED THEIR BARRY PRIDE BY TAKING PART IN FESTIVE EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE WEEK, CULMINATING WITH THE DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS (READ MORE ON PAGE 41).

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CAMPUS CURRENTS

CAMPUS CURRENTS

T H E F I R ST

OF MANY

On Saturday, December 14, Barry University hosted its annual fall commencement ceremony and welcomed more than 1,200 graduates to its esteemed alumni base. Among those scholars were the first cohort of students from programs in The Bahamas and St. Croix.

THE AWARD

GET

EDUCATED

GOES TO…

The Adrian Dominican School of Education has added a minor in education to its current offerings, allowing students to explore teaching within subject areas, examine different facets of education, and gain experience working in a variety of settings. Completing the minor will give students a strong knowledge base in the area of education and prepare them for a graduate program or career in the field of education.

Florida Campus Compact, an organization of more than 50 college and university presidents committed to advancing the civic purposes of higher education, presented Barry University President Sister Linda Bevilacqua, OP, PhD, with its Founders’ Award at its Annual Awards Gala in November. Bevilacqua received the award for being a champion of Florida Campus Compact, fostering a culture of service and civic involvement for generations to come, and for her unyielding determination to make the world a better place for all.

Six Bahamian residents earned master’s degrees from the Ellen Whiteside McDonnell School of Social Work. Barry offered classes in both Nassau and Freeport, while students traveled to the Miami main campus for summer sessions. Students completed their fieldwork in various locations throughout South Florida, including the State Attorney’s Office in Broward County, Destination Hope, and Kids in Distress. The Honorable Melanie Griffin, Bahamian minster of social services, witnessed her countrymen’s graduation in Miami and served as the commencement ceremony’s guest of honor. St. Croix Inaugural Class of 2013 (left to right): Mackenzie Epler, Nicole Brandon, Adam Tulp, Erica Gyorfi, Jennifer Arizu, Salvatore Bonventre, Laura Wintsch, Arthurlyn Sullivan, Stephinie Horning, Kristen Perez, Jennifer Samuel, and Sophia Osmanzada

Social Work Graduates from The Bahamas (left to right): Jenny Laing, Julita Ingraham, The Honorable Melanie Griffin, Phyllis Scott, PhD, dean of Barry’s School of Social Work, Ettamae Jones, and Andrea Newbold

A commencement ceremony for 89 physician assistant students was also held on the same day via video conferencing between Miami Shores, Florida; St. Petersburg, Florida; and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The first 12 graduates of the Physician Assistant Program in St. Croix earned their Master of Clinical Medical Sciences degree and a physician assistant certificate. Barry first began offering classes in St. Croix in fall 2011 after receiving approval from the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The program helps close the gap in the island’s medical system by producing nationally certified health care professionals.

M I L I TA RY M AT T E R S

Barry was named a 2014 Military Friendly School

For the third consecutive year, Barry was named to the 2014 Military Friendly Schools list by Victory Media, the premier media entity for military personnel transitioning into civilian life. The 2014 list of Military Friendly Schools honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities, and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans, and spouses as students and to ensure their success on campus. The 1,868 (out of 10,000) colleges, universities, and trade schools on this year’s list exhibit leading practices in the recruitment and retention of students with military experience. These schools have world-class programs and policies for student support on campus, academic accreditation, credit policies, flexibility, and other services to those who served. Barry currently offers a Public Safety Scholarship to active-duty military and active reservists and their spouses.

Barry University Villa has been demolished. Built as a motel, Barry University Villa was purchased by Barry College in the 1950s to house sophomore students. Over the years, the facility served as a residence hall for undergraduate women, the Honors House, the first residence for men when Barry went coed at the undergraduate level in 1975 and a residence for active and retired Adrian Dominican sisters, student sisters from other communities, and graduate students. Even university President Sister Linda Bevilacqua fondly remembers living in Villa 19 during her sophomore year. After seeing that the building would not pass its 40-year recertification (required by Miami-Dade County), the university decided to demolish the facility. The university is acquiring properties on the same side of NE 2nd Avenue as the Villa and are envisioning new facilities to meet Barry’s strategic needs. Before the demolition, Sister Linda walked through the vacated rooms and thanked God for everyone who blessed that space with life, laughter and prayer.

FAREWELL BARRY UNIVERSITY VILLA BARRY MAG | 8

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CAMPUS CURRENTS

LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION! IN FEBRUARY, BARRY ROLLED OUT THE RED C A R P E T FO R A H O L LYWO O D-T H E M E D HOMECOMING CELEBRATION FIT FOR THE STARS. INTRODUCED LAST SPRING, BARRY’S HOMECOMING FESTIVITIES HAVE QUICKLY BECOME ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING EVENTS ON CAMPUS. THE WEEKLONG CELEBRATION FEATURED GAMES AND COMPETITIONS, BEAUTY AND FASHION SHOWS, A HOMECOMING DANCE, AND PLENTY OF SCHOOL SPIRIT.

PARTY, PARTY, PARTY School spirit was on full display during two Homecoming events this year. The celebration began with a bonfire where members of the Barry community relaxed, roasted marshmallows, and prepped for men’s and women’s basketball SSC foes Nova Southeastern and Rollins. Students and alumni then wrapped up the week with a tailgate party featuring food and refreshments.

A NIGHT IN HOLLYWOOD What Homecoming celebration would be complete without a dance? Barry rolled out the red carpet this year for “A Night in Hollywood,” an evening of dancing and socializing. The semiformal event featured an early cocktail hour and a midnight toast. Students came dressed to impress, taking home “People’s Choice Awards” for the title of best dressed, best celebrity look-alike, and cutest couple.

HOMECOMING A FA S H I O N B E AU T Y O R B E A ST Dating back to the 1970s, Barry Beauties is not your typical beauty pageant. To pay homage to Barry’s history as an all-women’s college, this comedic pageant features male contestants dressed as women. Participants were judged in four traditional beauty pageant categories: evening gown, swimsuit, talent, and an interview.

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EXTRAVAGANZA

The Behind the Scenes Fashion Show was the place to see and be seen during Homecoming Week. A one-of-a-kind experience, the show featured the fashion stylings of local and national artists. Designs were unveiled through a series of scenes from some of Hollywood’s biggest blockbusters, creating a distinctive cinematic experience.

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CAMPUS CURRENTS

UNITED

NATIONS

COLLEGEBOUND With a procession of bright flags and students in traditional dress, Barry University opened the 19th Annual Festival of Nations, a celebration of cultural diversity on campus, as part of Homecoming in February. Festival of Nations, sponsored by the Office of International and Multicultural Programs, offers international students a chance to share their cultural pride with peers, faculty, and staff. This year, 16 countries were represented, from The Bahamas to South Korea. International students sign up weeks in advance. They decorate booths with posters, artwork, textiles, and souvenirs, often enlisting the help of friends, parents, and tourism boards. The day also features a global blend of live music, dance, and cuisine. Saudi Arabian students won the “best booth” competition, wowing visitors with floor cushions, tea and sweets, incense, traditional dresses, and henna tattoos. Venezuelan students, who came in second, raised awareness about ongoing protests in their country. Snapping photos and using social media hashtags, they called for prayers for Venezuela and encouraged solidarity with college students back home.

Barry made a splash at the annual National Catholic Youth Conference in November. Held at the Indiana Convention Center and Lucas Oil Stadium, the three-day conference More than 22,000 people packed Lucas Oil Stadium welcomed more than 22,000 high school students, youth advisors, and chaperones from all over the nation – some even from as far as Alaska and Hawaii – for workshops, prayer, retreats, and an expo. Barry hosted two lively expo booths, complete with beach balls, a lifeguard station, serene photos of the ocean, a large brain, a huge canvas for students to graffiti, and Bucky (who made numerous appearances throughout the conference and caused a social media frenzy). Barry also sponsored the conference café. The university’s goal was to increase awareness for its mission, history, location, and Catholic identity to engaged students who are actively looking at colleges – and if feedback is any indication, the conference was a huge success for Barry!

“We are here to spread a world message,” said sophomore Maria Medina. “We are all nations united in one word: peace.”

16 countries were represented, from The Bahamas to South Korea.

Bucky stands guard at the lifeguard station BARRY MAG | 12

Barry representatives pose in front of Miami's scenic ocean views BARRY MAG | 13


IT’S AN HONOR

SPOTLIGHT ON

JUST FOR

Men's soccer celebrates a SSC championship win

KICKS

SPORTS

Forty Barry Buccaneers were named to the S u n s h i n e S t a t e C o n f e r e n c e ( S S C ) Fa l l Commissioner’s Honor Roll for the 2013 fall semester, joining a record number 468 studentathletes conference wide. The Bucs had four athletes with a perfect 4.00 GPA: Nico Gercke and Johnny Rodrigues from men’s soccer and Natalie Diaz and Lavinia Nkomo from women’s soccer. To be eligible for the fall SSC Commissioner’s Honor Roll, a student-athlete must post a minimum GPA of 3.20 on a scale of 4.00. Participants in the sports of men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s soccer, and volleyball were eligible for the fall honor roll.

The men’s and women’s soccer teams wrapped up successful seasons, with the men winning the Sunshine State Conference (SSC) tournament championship while the women placed second in the SSC tournament and nabbed the SSC regular season title with a 7-0-1 record. Off the field, the teams received exciting accolades. Two men’s players, Johnny Rodrigues and Thomas Coombes, were named to the 2013 All-SSC men’s soccer first team. Four women’s players, Becca Rogers, Ashley Harlan, Lauren Manna, and Lavinia Nkomo, made the 2013 AllSSC women’s first team. Rogers was also highlighted as the 2013 SSC Defensive Player of the Year and women’s coach Denise Brolly became the third Buccaneer coach to win a Coach of the Year honor.

Women's soccer team

ROCK THE BOAT

Hoops

HOPES Former Bucs men’s basketball standout, Filip Toric, signed with Illiabum, a second division European professional team in the Portugal-based Proliga league, after graduating in December. In just his first five games, he became the team’s leading scorer with 15.6 points per game while pulling down 7.2 rebounds. He’s scored in double figures in all five games, and has two double-doubles. Toric doesn’t know where the season will take him but hopes to continue his run in Europe.

Barry University rowing crew’s Varsity 4+ capped off their fall season by winning the Florida Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championships. The Buccaneers boat of coxswain Stephanie Dinkel, stroke Paola Giroto, Monika Kaminska, Rosie Boncheva, and bow Beth Desmond beat Nova Southeastern and Jacksonville to win the title. Filip Toric BARRY MAG | 14

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Baseball

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29 3

Men’s Basketball Women’s Basketball

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Men’s Golf

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Women’s Golf Softball alums pose before the game

ALUM ALL-STARS More than 20 former Buc softball players pitched in and played in the annual alumni game in January. The game, held at Buccaneer Field, brought together players from as far back as 1991 and served as a kick-off to the sport’s spring season. Players included Barry’s Vice President for Human Resources Jennifer Boyd-Pugh, an All-American who led the Bucs to its first national final in 1994. It was a family affair for former shortstop, Cindi Perantoni Rodgers ’01, whose sister, Ali Perantoni Bronis ’08, also played four seasons with the Bucs at shortstop. “It was great to be back on the Bucs softball field again with old teammates and fellow alums, especially my sister,” Rodgers said. “Coach Penner did a great job and I look forward to supporting Barry softball this season!”

Cindi Perantoni Rodgers and Ali Perantoni Bronis

"It was great to be back on the Bucs softball field again with old teammates and fellow alums, especially my sister."

Barry baseball got in the game with their alumni face-off. Forty former Buc baseball players suited up for the annual alumni game in January. The game, held at Feinbloom Field, brought together players from the entire span of Barry baseball, including Bill Gollemme from the first team in 1985. Several players who had played professionally, including Chris Stasio (1990-1993), Alex Meneses (2003-2006), Nick Corbeil (2003-2006), and Cesar Aranguren (2003-2006) came back for the action.

International

10 7

Rowing Total

15

10 8

Women’s Soccer

17

4

26

Men’s Soccer Softball

Global

PLAYERS

12 2

18

Men’s Tennis

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Women’s Tennis

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Volleyball

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STUDENT ATHLETES AT BARRY ARE DIVERSE, BRINGING INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE TO THE TEAMS THEY PLAY

ON. OF BARRY’S 197 STUDENT ATHLETES, 68 CALL A FOREIGN COUNTRY HOME.

SCORE

FOR THE STRIKERS

The Fort Lauderdale Strikers have picked up the option for former Buc Mark Anderson for the 2014 North American Soccer League (NASL) season. Anderson, a midfielder, signed with the club in 2012 and immediately made an impact, leading the team in goals with 11. He finished his rookie season with two NASL Offensive Player of the Week honors and earned a place on the NASL Best XI. He was plagued with injuries in 2013, but plans to return as a dominant force in 2014. Anderson enjoyed a successful college soccer career at Barry between 2008 and 2011.

MEN’S TENNIS A D D S AS S I STA N T COAC H Barry’s acclaimed men’s tennis team has added Fred Bonal as assistant coach. Bonal, who served as a volunteer coach on last year’s NCAA Division II National Championship team that went 29-0, is in his second year at Barry. He will be responsible for player development, on-court coaching, recruiting, and administrative duties. A native of Bordeaux, France, Bonal coached 20 years at Bordeaux Club, followed by positions coaching professional players in the United States. Frederic Bonal BARRY MAG | 16

Mark Anderson BARRY MAG | 17

SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS

Former Buc baseball players take the field


BARRY BEAT

SUPPORT

SYSTEM

BY REBECCA WAKEFIELD William McDonald was a typical Barry student in many ways. Born and raised in Miami, he dreamed of getting a degree that would lead to a career in occupational therapy. But having struggled through high school with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and severe test anxiety, he knew that college was not going to be easy for him.

BARRY’S INNOVATIVE CENTER FOR ADVANCED LEARNING IS HELPING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES AND ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDERS SUCCEED.

So McDonald b ecame proactive. When he registered at Barry, he also signed up with Barry’s groundbreaking Center for Advanced Learning (CAL), which assists students with learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders. “I wouldn’t have graduated without this program,” McDonald says without hesitation. “I felt like I had the space to mature in my own time. It was a tool to make myself better, not a crutch.” The idea is to help students develop skills and strategies that will allow them to successfully navigate through college, regardless of their personal challenges. The program carries a fee per semester and requires a significant commitment of time and effort. McDonald, who graduated in December 2013 with a Bachelor of Science, is “the poster child” for CAL success stories, says the center’s director, Madalay Fleming. He is currently working at a medical supply company and saving to get his master’s degree in occupational therapy. “William is a work horse,” Fleming effuses. “He was the first one to get here in the morning and the last one to leave. He liked to joke, ‘I’m just milking it for all it’s worth.’ He made complete use of the program.” The 17-year-old program is robust and nearly unique to Barry University, Fleming says. Although colleges typically have an office of disability services that ensures basic compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, the CAL program goes far beyond.

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CAL Director Madalay Fleming with William McDonald

Students are taught to recognize their learning profiles and to develop the best strategies for getting what they need out of every situation. They must spend a minimum of four hours a week with professional tutors who have higher educational degrees in specific areas.

“We chase them a little. If they aren’t coming in, we call, we text, we email,” acknowledges Fleming. “I have checking-in appointments with ones who are in trouble or on the way to being in trouble. I arrange for extra support.”

They also learn skills such as time management, organization, note-taking, effective test preparation, stress management, and study skills. Students have nearly unlimited use of CAL’s computers and assistive technology. Beyond that, they learn how to ask for help when they need it and how to communicate effectively with their professors.

Fleming recalls a student who was reading at a third-grade level, for whom she arranged private reading tutoring sessions. For another student struggling in a physics course, she set up a meeting with the professor to find solutions to the student's issues.

An important element of the program is that CAL students are just like everyone else. They take the same classes as other degree seekers. They just have to work harder to overcome their personal variety of challenges, generally one or more learning disabilities, sometimes coupled with mental health issues such as anxiety or a depressive disorder. Fleming is responsible for the 40 to 50 CAL students present in a given semester. She’s an advisor, helping them select professors and strategies that best match their learning style. She’s an advocate, setting up meetings to resolve issues ranging from academics to housing or student life. And when necessary, she’s the whip, riding those who aren’t putting in the necessary effort. But in all her roles, her main goal is to simply phase herself out. One measure of success is for students to gain the skills and confidence to eventually transition to independent learning.

Fleming recalls one dyslexic student from the Virgin Islands who broke down and cried on registration day at Barry because she couldn’t believe she’d made it to college. “‘I was told I was never going to finish high school and here I am in college,’” Fleming recalls the student telling her through tears. “She evolved from a timid, not-confident young woman to belonging to two honor societies and graduating with honors. And she is now very successful in public relations.” For McDonald, who lost his mother during his academic journey, Fleming and the CAL program became even more critical. “Maddy was like a second mother,” he says softly. “The program was all I had pushing and supporting me, keeping me going. I didn’t have to feel like [learning] was a brick wall. It was a blessing.”

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TO

BARRY BEAT

REMEMBER

Supporters walk through Barry's campus

For some attendees a day of simple service or curiosity turned into something more meaningful and educational. Lauren Lorence said she was touched by the stories she heard. “I wanted to participate to help a good cause and I learned that just by participating I made a difference.”

FEATURES

A WALK

BY SARA PAULINE BURKE, Barry University graduate student For many, Valentine’s Day is divided between the taken and the singles; a day of elation or frustration. However, on or around the past four Valentine’s Days, Barry has chosen to celebrate love, turning its attention to the important social issue of domestic violence by hosting the annual College Bride’s Walk. This event includes a full day of seminars and speeches on various related topics and a 6-mile walk to partner Johnson and Wales University and back. This year, about 1,000 people participated, including more than 600 local high school students who received important education about healthy relationships. The College Bride’s Walk emerged from the Bride’s March, which started 13 years ago after Josie Ashton marched in her wedding dress from New Jersey to Miami to raise awareness about the murder of Gladys Ricart by her abusive ex-boyfriend on her wedding day in 1999.

“I wanted to participate to help a good cause and I learned that just by participating I made a difference.”

Other attendees went for more personal reasons, such as student Travis Hogue, who had experienced abuse in the past and felt it important to “make sure this event runs smoothly and helps save the lives of the youth in our community.” Hogue found comfort hearing the stories of others. “Even though I was a victim and went through it alone, I really wasn’t alone.”

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS ABROAD INCREASE AWARENESS AND EXPAND HORIZONS FOR BARRY STUDENTS. Study abroad programs have been popular for decades, but their focus has changed from the classic academic values of picking up a foreign language and a new perspective on course content to something much broader – cross-cultural communication skills and global awareness.

Nearly every school offers a program or two aimed at enhancing their degrees. Students can also get Barry credit by completing an approved study abroad program offered by an international university. For that, they must go to Dr. Katherine Nelson, an associate professor of communication and the university’s director of study abroad. Nelson is the den mother/spirit guide you’ve always wanted in a study abroad coordinator. “No, honey, don’t go to France. You’ve been to France. Go to Australia. Go to New Zealand. Go to Greece,” she advises. Powerful T-shirts are made to increase awareness

The editorial staff would like to acknowledge Chelsea Baker for her text contributions and Sambra Zaoui for her photograph in the article, "A Peaceful Protest Brings Awareness to Human Trafficking," featured in the Barry Beat section of the fall 2013 issue of Barry Magazine.

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BY REBECCA WAKEFIELD

For Barry, based in culturally-diverse Florida, a growing roster of international programs aim to broaden student experiences in the world, whether for a few days or more than a year. They range from hands-on social service programs to courses in international law, business, medicine, history, and religion.

Another student who attended and was also a victim of violence said, “I was shocked to hear about the stories where children were affected. I also never thought maleon-male, female-on-male, or even teenage domestic violence occurred.” By hosting the College Bride’s Walk on Valentine’s Day, Barry is not only in keeping with its commitment to social justice and collaborative service, but turned an otherwise typical holiday into a more meaningful, commemorative, educational, and deeply empowering experience for the people who attended.

GAINING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

Nelson admits that students’ reactions to going abroad are often similar–“It changed my life!”–but no less relevant for being predictable. There really is nothing like travel for personal growth. “It broadens their mind, forces them out of whatever box they existed in,” Nelson reflects. “They have finally really experienced culture shock. They realize that they’ve lived in a vacuum and they come back with a bigger perspective on the greater good. They come back a lot more mission oriented.”

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FEATURES

FEATURES

A FOCUS ON

SERVICE

Coming home mission oriented was certainly the case for Dr. Luis Rodriquez, who received his Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree from Barry and is currently a third-year resident at Mercy Hospital in Miami. His participated in the Yucatan Crippled Children's Project, a program started and run by the School of Podiatric Medicine’s Dr. Charles Southerland. Several times a year, Southerland takes a handful of medical residents to Mexico to perform surgeries on dozens of impoverished children suffering from various injuries or deformities in their feet.

up to be seen Patients lined the Yucatan th wi by podiatrists n's Project re ild Ch ed Crippl

Dr. Charles Sout herland with a patient in Mexico

“It’s one thing to hear what doctors say or read about it, but once you’re there it changes your life.”

“It’s one thing to hear what doctors say or read about it, but once you’re there it changes your life,” Rodriguez says. “What you learn from the surgical aspect is great. But once you see those kids, you put a face to what you’re doing – that makes a difference.” That feeling has kept Rodriguez going back, six times in all, for grueling three-day stints. The group, usually a handful of students and residents from Barry-affiliated hospital programs around South Florida and a few participating doctors from elsewhere in the U.S., load up the plane with as many medical supplies as they can carry. “We get there Saturday morning and people are lined up around the block,” says Southerland. “Recently we were down and we saw 135 patients between 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. We come home pretty worn out but feeling good about it.” Southerland started the project after he participated in humanitarian relief to the Yucatan in 1988 in the wake of devastating Hurricane Gilbert. The first surgery was conducted in the Yucatan city of Progreso in 1996. Since then thousands of children have been served, with more 1,400 receiving corrective surgeries.

M A K I N G T H E WO R L D

A BETTER PLACE

THE DIVISION OF NURSING IN THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES OFFERS A STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE TO SENIOR NURSING STUDENTS THAT ALLOWS THEM TO EXPLORE COMMUNITY HEALTH ISSUES IN ANOTHER COUNTRY.

Since 2011, the school has maintained a relationship with St. George’s University School of Nursing in Grenada. Eight to 10 Barry students travel with two faculty members and undertake community health projects. It’s a two-week immersive program in which students live with host families and work with local service providers. “It’s an excellent strategy for nursing programs to use as a way for students to develop cultural competence,” says Dr. Paula Delpech, who coordinates the nursing study abroad program. This year, the students helped to produce television and radio programs on topics such as drug abuse and teen pregnancy. They also worked at two health fairs, spent a day with residents in a nursing home, and presented a talk on elder abuse to the staff of the nursing home. Delpech says that many students who’ve been through the program say that getting a more global perspective on the interaction of culture and health helps them find direction in their careers, particularly in public health. That sentiment rings true t o M o n i c a N i ch o l s , a registered nurse and Bachelor of Science in Nursing-Doctor of Nursing Practice student at Barry who works in the field of mental and behavioral health.

A patient in Grenada

“It’s an excellent strategy for nursing programs to use as a way for students to develop cultural competence."

“Seeing the work nurses did in Grenada inspired me to become an active participant in advocacy and policy, as well as pursue a career path in community health,” Nichols says. “The study abroad program allowed me to bring my new sense of cultural awareness to the workplace, where I was able to treat patients from a more holistic point of view and integrate their cultural beliefs into their plans of care.”

“The experience has been amazing,” Rodriguez says. “I was able to see a patient who wasn’t walking before and is now walking.” BARRY MAG | 22

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EXPANDING

BARRY’S MISSION I N T E R N AT I O N A L LY Other schools at Barry take a different approach – offering students living elsewhere the opportunity to get a Barry-quality education. The Adrian Dominican School of Education (ADSOE) offers several master's degree programs in Nassau, Bahamas, while the Physician Assistant (PA) Program is now offered in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The programs, developed in 2011 and 2010, respectively, allow working professionals living in those countries to get a higher level of education without having to move to Florida for a year or more. In all cases, Barry's commitment to community service and health are critical components. One of the main goals is to leave behind a cadre of highly-trained professionals who will help those countries build their educational or health care infrastructure from the ground up. ADSOE offers master's degrees in curriculum and instruction, exceptional student education and organizational learning and leadership. Courses are designed to fit into the lifestyle of working teachers during weekend and summer sessions. The PA Program in St. Croix focuses on students who plan to stay on the islands to practice medicine upon graduation to serve a population that is vastly underserved medically. The PA students get hands-on hospital experience and actually get a wider scope of practice than they would have because Barry was instrumental in changing the laws governing PAs in the Virgin Islands. The School of Social Work also features two master's degree programs in cohort format in The Bahamas, making it convenient for island residents to attend graduate school. The courses are taught in Nassau or Freeport and students receive personal attention and experience in Barry's new trauma-informed advanced clinical program from faculty in small class settings. BARRY MAG | 24

UNIVERSAL

The Andreas School of Business has begun a double-degree Master of Business Administration program that enables business students in Ecuador, Colombia, Spain and Germany to also earn their master’s degree at Barry. “It makes sense for us because Barry is global and international and the School of Business is also,” says Assistant Dean Paola Moreno, who runs the program. “It’s a good opportunity to collaborate and expand and partner with our universities abroad, bringing diversity and flavor to the program.”

The program is set up so that either an international leadership and business in the United States versus Colombia, which was perfect. I didn’t student from a partner institution can come to come here to repeat what I learned there. It was important for me to add knowledge.” Barry, or vice versa. Students complete two semesters of approved coursework at each university and are awarded degrees from each institution for about the same amount of time and money they would spend earning one degree from either.

“What I learned here complemented what I learned in Colombia. It gave me an idea of

International students also have access to an optional practical training, which comes with a one-year work permit after graduation that allows them to live and work in the U.S. The first student to go through the program, Zuleima Bustamante, earned her dual degree from Barry and Universidad del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia. An industrial engineer with a minor in computer science, she specialized in international business at Barry. After graduating, she started a small consulting company with former classmates that helps companies in South America do business in Miami and Colombia. “The program was very good,” Bustamante says. “What I learned here complemented what I learned in Colombia. It gave me an idea of leadership and business in the United States versus Colombia, which was perfect. I didn’t come here to repeat what I learned there. It was important for me to add knowledge.” Meanwhile, at the School of Law, students have the opportunity to study various types of international and civil law during a summer in Spain through a program partnership with St. Thomas University School of Law. The program prepares students for practicing law in this increasingly interconnected world. The College of Arts and Sciences offers numerous opportunities for students getting a Bachelor of Arts in International Studies through the Department of History and Political Science. Students have studied in Europe and Latin America and have completed internships in numerous government agencies, international businesses, foreign consulates, embassies, and international service agencies.

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FEATURES

BUSINESS IS


FEATURES

A RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE: THE BIRTHPLACE OF BARRY’S VISION

Perhaps one of the more unique study abroad experiences offered at Barry is the Fanjeaux Summer Program for Dominican Colleges and Universities. One student and one faculty member from Barry are chosen to join students, faculty, and staff from Dominican Colleges and Universities throughout the country. The group lives and studies in Fanjeaux, the medieval French town where St. Dominic’s vision of an order devoted to seeking and sharing the truth took shape from 1206 to 1216. “It’s an amazing experience,” says Greta Moncayo, corporate sponsorships coordinator at Barry. “Walking in the footsteps of St. Dominic and really sharing the vision of the Dominicans about community, study, prayer, teaching, and ministry. It all correlates to the mission of Barry and it was incredible to literally walk through it from the beginning.” Mornings are spent working and studying, while the group explores historic sites significant in the early history of the Order of Preachers. As a community of learners, participants enjoy simple living at a Dominican guest house and also a few days in Paris. “It was really nice to get in touch with my spirituality, even though I’m not Catholic,” recalls Nicole Ogando, an international business and finance major who attended in 2011. “I learned to appreciate our Dominican heritage. It was a diverse group of Buddhists, Catholics, Christians, and Jews, but we were able to communicate in our own spiritual ways and experience what we learned.”

Participants of the Fanjeaux experience at the gardens of the Abbey of Fontfroide

Croix du Sicaire in Fanjeaux, where would-be murderers waited to kill St. Dominic before running away at his sight

St. Dominic's statue at the Signadou, Fanjeaux BARRY MAG | 26

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FEATURES

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS BY WALTER VILLA

STUDENTS FROM AROUND THE GLOBE ARE DRAWN TO BARRY TO PURSUE THEIR DREAMS.

BARRY TAKES GREAT PRIDE IN ITS INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS, WHO INVIGORATE THE CAMPUS WITH THEIR WORLD VIEWS AND EXPERIENCES. TWO STUDENTS, JOHN POWELL AND DANIELLA MURRAY, SHARE SEVERAL THINGS IN COMMON BESIDES THEIR OVERSEAS ORIGINS–KEEN INTELLECTS, IMPRESSIVE WORK ETHIC, AND A GREAT APPRECIATION FOR THE OPPORTUNITIES AFFORDED TO THEM BY THEIR UNIVERSITY.

I N T E R N AT I O N AL A FFA IR S He is only a freshman, but Jamaican native John Powell, 20, has already accomplished a great deal at Barry University. He arrived at Barry as a recipient of the prestigious Stamps Leadership Scholarship – the first international student to earn the scholarship. While at Barry, Powell has compiled a 3.74 G PA and has immersed himself in campus life.

“As a citizen of the world, it’s not only what I can do for myself but also for the people with whom I interact."

Among the causes he has championed was to re-start the Model United Nations, a service club that had been dormant until Powell helped register 10 members. He is now the president of the organization, which is the youth arm of the United Nations. Powell said Barack Obama’s election to the U.S. presidency in 2008 helped convince him to apply for the Stamps scholarship, which recognizes the most promising future leaders and demonstrates Barry’s commitment to attracting and cultivating top students from around the world. “It showed me that if you work hard and are dedicated, you can achieve anything you put your mind to,” Powell said. “Meritocracy is not dead.”

The Stamps scholarship provides Powell with tuition for four years, room and board, and funds for study abroad, undergraduate research, and other learning experiences. Powell is majoring in international studies with a minor in French. This summer, he plans to extend his education by attending Yale University for several weeks to serve as a resident advisor and program assistant. “I’ve always had an interest in global affairs,” said Powell, who has been to a number of United Nations-affiliated conferences in places such as Paris, France, and Vienna, Austria. Powell, who wants to become an international commercial lawyer, has made it his mission to promote equality throughout the world. He admits he has an affinity for languages and is fluent in English, French, and Spanish. He is conversational in Italian and speaks the dialect of Jamaican Creole. He is interested in becoming a translator and appreciates the diversity he has found at Barry. “As a citizen of the world, it’s not only what I can do for myself but also for the people with whom I interact,” he said. “I don’t believe one should go to school just to succeed academically but also to develop and learn life skills that will help one to compete globally. To me, education is about teaching character more than it is what one is able to read off a piece of paper.” Powell said Barry is the perfect place for someone with his world view. “I love the environment at Barry,” he said. “The professors are so helpful and dedicated. “Because it’s a relatively small school, I’ve had the chance to interact with our diverse enrollment. That has helped me to develop intercultural dialogues.”

John Powell BARRY MAG | 28

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FEATURES

Murray, who has a 3.9 GPA, is majoring in sport management with a minor in business. The junior is also a standout on Barry’s golf team, helping the Buccaneers finish third in the 2013 NCAA Division II National Championships. Murray was also named a Scholar All-American. Murray’s dual citizenship comes from the fact that her mother, Elisabeth, was born in Austria and her father, David, hails from Ireland. Because of her father’s job as a finance director, the family moved to Brazil when Murray was two years old and then to Mexico when she was eight. For her ninth birthday, her father bought her golf clubs, which was perfect since they lived adjacent to a course in Mexico.

PAR FOR

T H E CO U R S E

A year later, the family moved back to Brazil, where Murray began playing junior tournaments. She got so serious about golf that she decided to move – on her own – to Austria, where she spent four years of high school living in a dorm and playing her favorite sport.

FEATURES

It would be hard to find a student who embodies Barry University’s international identity more than Daniela Murray, who was born in Germany, has dual citizenship from Ireland and Austria and lived in Brazil and Mexico before coming to the U.S.

LEADING BY

EXAMPLE BY WALTER VILLA

INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCES SHAPE BARRY’S FACULTY.

THE MORE PROFESSORS KNOW FIRSTHAND, THE MORE WISDOM THEY CAN IMPART TO THEIR STUDENTS. BARRY’S DISTINGUISHED FACULTY COME FROM A VARIETY OF BACKGROUNDS AND HAVE UNIQUE INTERESTS, PROVIDING STUDENTS AN EXCITING OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES, ESPECIALLY FROM THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY TRAVELED OVERSEAS IN AN ONGOING PURSUIT OF KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING.

“There were about 40 kids there who were also golfers,” Murray said.

When it came time for college, Murray sought out the advice of two golfers she knew from Brazil – Daniel Stapf and his sister Isadora, highly decorated golfers at Barry. Both recommended Barry and she came to the school, in part, because of its diversity. “In Miami, you have people from all over the world come together,” Murray said. “I also wanted a school that was small enough that I could get to know the professors and students. The professors at Barry have shown a real curiosity to know their students and let us know them.” Murray soon made a recommendation of her own – to her younger brother Patrick, who is now a freshman on Barry’s men’s golf team. At 23, Murray is the oldest golfer on the women’s team, but she feels it’s an advantage. “This is my seventh year living on my own,” she said. “I have better time-management skills, which helps me focus more on my studies.” As proof of that, Murray is working on her master’s degree at the same time she is earning credits for her bachelor’s. When her playing career is over, Murray ultimately wants to own a company that helps organize events on a pro golf tour such as the PGA or LPGA. “I want to work on tournament operations,” she said, “and stay as close as possible to the sport I love.”

Daniela Murray

And, since the golf tours have stops all over the world, Murray will feel right at home with international travel.

COMICS CRUSADE

Participants in Dr.

Greenbaum's Co mi

ject • View of Ha ifa

For two weeks in December 2012, Dr. Andrea Greenbaum traveled to Haifa – the third-largest city in Israel – on what she calls the Comic Book Peace Project. Greenbaum, a professor and director of the Professional Writing Program at Barry, teaches “Graphic Novel as Literature” through the English department’s humanities course offerings. “I thought it would be interesting to take that on the road,” Greenbaum said. “And I thought Israel would be great, because I’m interested in coexistence.” In Haifa, Greenbaum worked with a wide range of students, from elementary to high school, and taught them to use the comic book software program, Comic Life. She found the children motivated and excited as they put together their own comics based on their lives and their imaginations. The project was made possible by Barry’s Ambassador Jean Wilkowski International Fellowship Award, and through a grant from the United States Embassy-Tel Aviv.

Greenbaum discovered that Haifa does a great job of peaceful coexistence, and Mahamid explained why. “We are not going to talk about politics because then we are not going to be friends,” Mahamid said. “In Haifa, there is a peaceful life. Maybe it’s because Moses wasn’t here; Jesus wasn’t here; Muhammad wasn’t here.” In Haifa, economics seem to trump politics.

Greenbaum created a film that documents the project and the spirit of Haifa, including an interview with Maher Mahamid, the director of the Clore Children’s Library and Cultural Center. Mahamid said he wants his library to be the center of kids’ culture in Haifa, with books in Arabic, Hebrew, and English. BARRY MAG | 30

c Book Peace Pro

“We can meet each other,” Mahamid said, “about the things we have in common – music, culture, dancing.” And comic books. BARRY MAG | 31


Davis, David Carden, and Noid (Davis’ friend) at Entebbe Airport

BY DAVID CARDEN, BARRY UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

Old Havana

WORLD’S STAGE Dr. Darlene Kluka, a professor in the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences and the dean of the School of Human Performance and Leisure Sciences, went to Cuba last year and came back with huge news for her university.

Old Havana prison, now a police station

Dr. Rosa d’Amico Lopez (Venezuela–current president–2013-17); Dr. Tansin Benn (England–immediate past president–2009-13); Dr. Darlene Kluka (USA–past president–2005-09)

Barry has been selected as the host site for the next World Congress of the International Association of Physical Education and Sport for Girls and Women (IAPESGW), which will be held in May 2017. Kluka served as the nonprofit’s president from 2005 to 2009. She said 2017 will mark the first time since 1961 that the world congress will be held in the United States. “This is huge,” said Kluka, who attended last year’s conference in Havana and spearheaded Barry’s bid for 2017. “This is the first time in the history of Barry University that we will be hosting a research-based world congress of scholars.” The IAPESGW was founded in 1949 and has members in nearly 50 countries worldwide. “The organization started because there was a need for women to come together and try to establish a grass-roots network in a variety of countries,” Kluka said.

“It’s very exciting to see what’s happening.” BARRY MAG | 32

In the fall of 2012, I received an email from Dr. Foreman inviting me to a lecture he was giving to a collection of young, African political activists. I was amazed to find out how interested these aspiring politicians and advocates were about the process of U.S. democracy, which is why they were in town. I sat with these remarkable individuals and shared contact information with men and women from Nigeria, Liberia, Ghana, and Uganda. A young man named Akampurira Davis talked to me extensively about the Uganda Youth Council and his experience motivating young people to become politically aware. This conversation had such an impact on me that I knew right then that I needed to go to Uganda and see Davis' work with the Council. I kept in contact with Davis (he prefers to be known by his English name to Westerners) through email and finally saved enough money to buy myself a trip to Central Africa during this past winter break. My trip began with an eight-hour bus ride from Kigali, Rwanda to Kampala, Uganda which was interrupted by

the driver crashing in a remote western Ugandan village. The accident resulted in me meeting another passenger from Burundi who happened to speak English, and we continued to Kampala together by hitchhiking our way through the beautiful countryside. In Kampala, I spent three days learning from Davis about Ugandan culture and politics, including his plans to run for a seat in Parliament in 2016. I left Davis in Uganda to spend the last part of my trip in eastern Congo, which has always been my original passion and place I wanted to visit. I (literally) ran around eastern Congo with Enough Projects, an organization that works to end genocide and crimes against humanity. I traveled with a field research team, which introduced me to members of the United Nations and took me to speak with high level intelligence officers in the Congolese military. We drove outside of Goma to one of the largest displacement camps in Congo – Mugunga 3 – where I heard firsthand testimony of people who experienced some of the most recent violence in the region. This entire experience was life altering. I thank Dr. Foreman for being an advocate for his students and providing platforms for us to begin experiencing our goals.

OUT OF AFRICA

By far, the biggest impact that Barry University has had on me has been through one of my political science professors, Dr. Sean Foreman.

EXCHANGE EXPERIENCES ON CAMPUS BY SEAN FOREMAN, PHD, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

I have been fortunate enough to be called upon several times by the Miami Council for International Visitors to host political and civic leaders from around the globe at Barry’s Miami campus. The visits are enriching both for guests and for students who get to interact with them. Two such visits occurred leading up to and following the 2012 presidential election. First, a group of five visitors from Argentina with experience in media-related businesses came to hear me discuss the presidential campaign, Florida politics more generally, and the role of the Barry radio station in covering elections. This led to a lively discussion about campaign coverage in the United States and South America. Two days after Barack Obama won a second term as president, we hosted 16 visitors from 13 African countries for the “Young African Leaders: Grassroots Democracy and the U.S. Elections” program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State. I answered questions about why President Obama won reelection and what it meant for the U.S. and the world moving forward. The opportunity led to students and staff making meaningful connections for other project interests they have in Africa. Additionally, I was interviewed live on election night by the BBC to talk about the results and the vote in Florida – an interview seen internationally.

We also hosted four young political leaders from Brazil for a program on governmental affairs that included meetings with different organizations to discuss the collaboration between governments and other stakeholders in administration and planning. These emerging leaders wanted to discuss the impact that South Florida has on overall U.S foreign policy, especially toward Latin America. The Brazilians engaged in a panel discussion with one of our American Government classes, first telling about their own political experiences and their impressions of the U.S. government, and then answering students’ questions about Brazil and broader global issues. The opportunities for Barry students to interact with program participants from abroad are an invaluable addition to their educational experiences that cannot be gained simply from textbooks.

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SPORTS FOR THE

SIGHTLESS

Last summer, Dr. Tal Amasay, coordinator of Barry’s physical education and coaching program, found himself in Israel, in pitch-black darkness.

En route we stopped at a roadside marker, noting Latitude 0°0’0” — La Mitad del Mundo (the middle of the world). This seemingly far-flung venue — for an urgent conversation about the precarious state of earth and our ill-considered relationship as humans to the very source of our being — could not have been better placed.

How he got there is a bit of a story. But, in essence, Amasay had a colleague who was coaching Israel’s goalball team with the hopes of making the 2016 Paralympics. Goalball is a team sport designed for blind athletes, and Amasay’s colleague wanted help in learning how best to train them.

Other key leaders attending the summit, in addition to Sister Pat, included Indian physicist Vandana Shiva, South African lawyer and author Cormac Cullinan, North American indigenous environmental justice leader Tom Goldtooth, former Bolivian U.N. ambassador Pablo Solón, and U.S. community and environmental rights attorney Thomas Linzey.

Intrigued, Amasay researched the subject and eventually earned a grant – the Ambassador Jean Wilkowski International Fellowship Award – to travel to Israel to help with the training.

Over the next few days, summit leaders exchanged ideas and strategies for shifting the current legal and economic construct that treats the natural world as property for human use to one that reflects the reality of our interconnectedness and interdependence with the natural world. They concluded the summit by framing a plan of action to focus global attention on recognizing rights of nature as a solution in an order of magnitude equal to the problem we face — the ravaging of our planet.

In his quest to fully understand these athletes, he took part in an exhibition in the Israeli city of Holon in which he experienced – for 90 minutes – what it feels like to live in complete darkness.

The plan calls for the establishment of a permanent World Tribunal on rights of nature, which was initiated the last day of the summit, and a week of global acts of Satyagraha — nonviolent resistance — beginning on October 2, Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday. It also calls for a commitment to sow the concept of rights of nature throughout the world among ecological, social justice, faith-based, farming, and other affinity groups.

“We went around from room to room and also out on the street, at a market, buying food,” Amasay said. “Everywhere I went felt dangerous.” During his five weeks in Israel, Amasay also visited with an Israeli folk-dance instructor who teaches folk dancing to the visually impaired. “It was intriguing to see the methods she used to teach them–a loud voice and very descriptive instructions,” Amasay said. “I talked to the participants, and they said dancing made them feel free.” Amasay took all that information and developed a program to train the goalball athletes. The training worked – Israel recently finished third in the European Championships and is on track to qualify for the Paralympics. “When we talk about strength and conditioning, we rarely talk about the disabled,” Amasay said. “But to work with them and see how much they appreciate it was an amazing experience.” Dr. Amasay (third from right) with the goalball team

FEATURES

Visiting Barry School of Law professor and Adrian Dominican Sister Patricia (Pat) Siemen, OP, J.D., and I traveled three hours by bus northeast from Quito, Ecuador, climbing winding roads up the highlands of the Andes mountains, past craggy canyons, hillside farms, and village settlements to reach Otavalo, joining other leaders of the emergent global “rights of nature” movement for a four-day summit. For the 50 participants, this was the last leg of a journey that began in Australia, India, the United Kingdom, South Africa, the United States, Switzerland, Spain, Canada, Romania, Argentina, Bolivia, or other parts of Ecuador.

THE MIDDLE OF THE

WORLD BY SISTER ELISE GARCÍA, OP

A FIRSTHAND ACCOUNT OF AN INTERNATIONAL SUMMIT IN ECUADOR

llustration by Bob Smith from Siemen's presentation at the Silver Springs Alliance Forum on January 28 in Ocala, Florida

Within days of returning from Ecuador, Sister Pat put the global message to work locally in a keynote speech before 300 people attending a forum at the College of Central Florida in Ocala’s Silver Springs. Until recently, Silver Springs was Florida’s largest first-magnitude spring, but its flow has fallen by a third while polluting nitrates have risen. Her talk was summed up in a headline in the next day’s Ocala Star Banner: “‘Earth needs new laws,’ 300 told at Silver Springs forum” (January 28, 2014). Sister Pat is among the global movement’s earliest proponents. Alarmed by unrelenting ecological devastation and inspired by the late Passionist priest Thomas Berry’s writings on Earth jurisprudence, Sister Pat led the effort in the United States to introduce the concept of rights of nature to U.S. law schools.

BRINGING WORLD LEADERS TOGETHER TO DISCUSS RIGHTS OF NATURE.

In 2006, she founded the Center for Earth Jurisprudence — the first of its kind in the nation — at Barry University and St. Thomas University. In 2008, she founded the California-based Earth Law Center, whose director, Linda Sheehan, teaches summer classes in earth jurisprudence at Vermont Law School. Sister Pat believes the concept is a natural one for Catholics and other people of faith to embrace. “Rights of nature language may not yet be widely known or adopted among Catholics, but it is premised on an idea with deep roots in our tradition — honoring creation,” Sister Pat said. “Mystics and theologians like Thomas Aquinas recognized creation as a sacred revelation of God — as God’s primordial Scripture. We have lost that sense of the sacred over the centuries,” Sister Pat said, “but it is being reclaimed — in our spirituality and our jurisprudence.” Sister Elise D. García, OP, was sent to the summit by the leadership of the Adrian Dominican Sisters to find ways of engaging the congregation more deeply and broadly in the rights of nature movement that Sister Pat has helped lead. Sister Elise serves as the director of communication and technology for the Adrian Dominican Sisters.

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BARRY MAG | 35


TOP HONORS

SCHOOL OF HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND LEISURE SCIENCES Tal Amasay, PhD, Israel Henry Apaloo, England Fred Bonal, France Denise Brolly, Scotland Gualberto Cremades, EdD, PhD, Spain Clare Egret, PhD, France Emer Foley, England Avi Kigel, Israel Maria Lopez, Venezuela Danielle Penner, Canada Boban Radikovic, Serbia Duncan Simpson, PhD, England Megan Timpf, Canada Yi Tsu Kuo, PhD, Taiwan COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES Sumera Ackbarali, Trinidad and Tobago Ferrona Beason, PhD, ARNP, Jamaica Tan Fung Chan, China Claudette Chin, PhD, ARNP, Jamaica Jessie Colin, PhD, RN, FRE, FAAN, Haiti Paula DelPeche, PhD, Grenada Dr. Antonio Fernandez, Cuba Indra Hershorin, PhD, RN, CNE, Trinidad Belkis Landa-Gonzalez, EdD, Cuba Delia Leal, MSN, ARNP, ACNP-BC, CCRN, Cuba Rebecca Lee, DNP, CRNA, Hong Kong, ROC Jorge Lopez, PhD, Cuba Yi Lu, PhD, China Jacquie Marshall, CNE, England Debbie McGregor, EdD, Jamaica Jamelah Morton, ARNP, ACNP-BC, CCRN, CNRN, U.S. Virgin Islands Clarie Owen, RN, CCRN-CSC, TNCC, England Gerhild Packert, PhD, Germany Edward Punzalon, MSN, CRNA, Philippines Graham Shaw, PhD, England Mureen Shaw, DNP-MSN, Family-BC, Jamaica Tony Umadhay, PhD, CRNA, Philippines Dr. Evelio Velis, Cuba BARRY MAG | 36

Leticia M. Diaz, School of Law dean, was named the 2013 Professional of the Year at the 16th Annual Don Quijote Awards, which celebrate the achievements and entrepreneurial spirit of individuals in the Central Florida business community. The Professional of the Year award recognizes Hispanic men and women who have achieved distinction in their profession, demonstrated leadership or community involvement, and made innovations or notable contributions to their field. Dean Diaz is the first Cuban-American woman to hold the position of dean at an ABA-accredited law school in the United States.

RESEARCH GRANTED Assistant professor of education Heidi Whitford, PhD, was honored for her research efforts by being named a recipient of a Channing Briggs Small Research Grant by NASPA, the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. The NASPA foundation is the leading association for the advancement, health, and sustainability of the student affairs profession. Whitford received the grant for her proposal, “Contextualizing the Higher Education Opportunity of Undocumented Students in Florida: Perspectives of Student Services Administrators.”

IN COORDINATION

around the

WORLD BARRY’S DIVERSE FACULTY AND COACHING STAFF HAIL FROM 42 COUNTRIES AROUND THE WORLD.

ELLEN WHITESIDE MCDONNELL SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK Tisa McGhee, PhD, Trinidad and Tobago SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL AND CAREER EDUCATION Andrea Allen, PhD, Germany Al Carreras, PhD, Cuba Khaled Deeb, PhD, Lebanon Anita Zvodska, PhD, Czech Republic, Guyana

SCHOOL OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE Sanjay Sesodia, PhD, England Graham Shaw, PhD, England ANDREAS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Selima BenMrad, PhD, Tunisia Adnan Daghestani, PhD, Syria Hugo J. Faria, PhD, Venezuela Ingeborg Nickerson, DBA, Germany Tomislav Mandakovic, PhD, Chile Ye “Shirley” Sheng, PhD, China Roman Wong, PhD, CPA, China ADRIAN DOMINICAN SCHOOL OF EDUCATION M. Sylvia Fernandez, PhD, India Karen Shatz, PhD, Canada Luis Conde, PhD, Angola Raul Machuca, PhD, Colombia Yvonne Campbell, PhD, South Africa Katya Matusevich, PhD, Belarus Jennie Ricketts-Duncun, PhD, Barbados Mehmet Turegun, PhD, Turkey Clara Wolman, PhD, Argentina Judy Harris-Looby, PhD, Netherlands Antilles

Dr. Debra P. Malina, DNSC, MBA, CRNA, ARNP, was elected lead coordinator for the Nursing Organizations Alliance (NOA). NOA, formed in 2001, represents more than 60 specialty nursing organizations across the United States. Its purpose is to promote a strong voice and cohesive action to address issues of concern to the nursing community. Membership in the alliance is open to any nursing organization whose focus is to address current and emerging nursing and health care issues. Malina is the assistant director of clinical education and assistant professor in the Barry University Master of Science program in anesthesiology.

ON BOARD The National Council of State Boards of Nursing appointed Dr. Jessie Colin to the board of directors for the 2014 Institute of Regulatory Excellence (IRE) Committee. The IRE is a fouryear educational and professional development program designed to enhance knowledge of and leadership in nursing regulation. The program was started in 2004 to provide nursing boards with quality regulation education. Colin is professor and director of the PhD, nursing executive leadership, and nursing education programs within the Division of Nursing at the College of Health Sciences at Barry University.

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FACULTY FOCUS

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Laura Alonso-Gallo, PhD, Spain Olena Drozd, Ukraine Mary Caravelis, PhD, Greece Maurizio Giannotti, PhD, Italy Tamara Hamilton, PhD, Canada James Haralambides, PhD, Greece Silvia Lizama, Cuba Alicia Marill, PhD, Cuba Adina Oprisan, PhD, Romania Victor (Guoquan) Pan, PhD, China Teresa Petrino-Lin, PhD, Argentina Flona Redway, PhD, Jamaica Sara Rytteke, Sweden Ricardo Sanchez, Cuba Mara Tsesarskaia, PhD, Russia Zuzana Zajickova, PhD, Slovakia Sanja Zivanovic, PhD, Serbia


scientist and chemist for ExxonMobil. Jeffrey L. Sain and Maria D. Ellul Sain, who still live in Silver Lake, place a high priority on supporting educational institutions, and they hope their gift will inspire others to consider philanthropic giving at Barry.

BUCCANEER BOOKSHELF

“My husband and I believe that an education is the best gift you can give your children,” Maria said.

A GIFT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING

BY WALTER VILLA Jeffrey L. Sain and Maria D. Ellul Sain know first-hand the value of a great education. Now, with an endowment they have set up at Barry in the name of their eldest daughter, Victoria, they want other bright, young students to know and appreciate that value as well. Victoria, 26, graduated from Barry this spring with a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree, and she wants to ensure that others get the same great opportunity that she received. “The goal of the endowment is to make sure that anyone who would want to go on this path and pursue podiatric medicine would have some financial assistance,” said Victoria. “My parents set up the endowment, but as I achieve success [as a doctor], I will contribute as well.” Victoria said the scholarship won’t be awarded only on the basis of need. “I believe in the podiatric medicine program at Barry,” said Victoria, who had a 3.5 GPA at the school. “And I believe that students appreciate when they are rewarded for their accomplishments, their success, and their talents.” Victoria grew up in Silver Lake, Ohio and completed her undergraduate work at The Ohio State University. Her sister Elizabeth is majoring in dietetics at the University of Akron. Both sisters attended Our Lady of the Elms High School in Akron, Ohio, an all-girls college preparatory school run by Dominican nuns, which gave them an excellent foundation in becoming scholars and leaders. Her father, Jeffrey, has a master’s degree and is a teacher. Her mother, Maria, has a doctorate degree and is a principal BARRY MAG | 38

The family put a lot of thought into why they wanted to create the endowment at Barry. “Some parents give their children an expensive car,” Maria said. “But we thought this would be a more lasting and enduring gift. When Victoria decided she was going to study medicine and chose Barry, we were very supportive. She is getting a quality degree, and we wanted to establish this endowed scholarship to help the school and to encourage others – including our daughters – to embrace philanthropy.”

LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL: THE BIRTH OF ROCK ’N’ ROLL, 1955 – 1963 Darryl L. Gentry ’72 introduces readers to artists such as Elvis Presley, Fats Domino, and the Platters; songwriters Carole King, Neil Sedaka, and Leiber and Stroller; personality deejays Alan Freed, Dick Clark, and John R; and many more faces who made the birth of rock ’n’ roll happen. He examines how rhythm and blues became the first music teenagers called their own and the psychology behind why teenagers in the ’50s gravitated toward this music. For more information, visit www.darrylbook.com.

It is evident that she has carried forth those same principles. “Not a single person who achieves gets to where they are without help, whether it’s advice, mentorship, or scholarship,” Victoria said. Victoria enjoyed a special f e e l i n g a t B a r r y. “ Th e administrators and professors were wonderful,” she said. “It was such a welcoming atmosphere – a tight-knit community where I made lifelong friends. Medical school is a very arduous process and it can be highly competitive and cutthroat. But at Barry, we all banded together. I don’t think I would have gotten through it all without my friends and vice versa.” Victoria’s spirit of helping others and giving back will not end with the endowment. Her career choice of becoming a doctor was specifically chosen for that same selfless reason. “When you see a patient who can’t walk, and you relieve their pain, it’s very gratifying,” she said. “You see the looks on their faces, and it’s amazing.” For more information on creating an endowed scholarship, contact Sara B. Herald, vice president for institutional advancement and external affairs, at sherald@barry.edu or 305-899-3070.

LA HABANA:

CARTOGRAFÍAS CULTURALES

Raúl Rubio ’95 examines the worldwide fascination with Cuba and things Cuban during the last century, particularly envisioning how the city of Havana is more than a scenic backdrop, having become the nation’s most visible protagonist and its foremost player, perhaps second only to Fidel Castro. Rubio’s book offers a cutting-edge approach to the intersections between Cuban politics, ideology, national identity, and artistic production, both on and off the island. Organized through studies on a wide range of artistic mediums, including literature, film, photography and material products that are manufactured in Cuba and globally, Rubio’s book offers an alternative take on the complex state of contemporary Cuban national identity. To learn more, visit www.raulrubio.us.

QUESTIONS FOR ANIMALS Peggy Hamilton ’96 writes of the unspeakable, both as it is at the heart of Buddhist question practice and as it occurs in the circumstances of incest. The unspeakable complicates the unspeakable. Does Buddhist practice encourage the erasure of the self much as poetic practice encourages the erasure of a poet’s reading and narrative self from a poem, or as an act of rape teaches its child victim self-erasure? Hamilton’s exploration often takes the form of the sonnet, a word that Paul Oppenheimer has suggested has its origin in sonitus, the music of the spheres perceived as deafening; multiple meanings emerge and dissipate in the poems, giving the reader space to have a circular and visceral experience of this moving work. Hamilton would like to thank Dr. Lillian Schanfield, the late Phyllis Laszlo, Sister Dorothy Jehle, the late Fr. Tom Clifford, Dr. Laura Armesto, Dr. Ann Swaner, and Dr. Daniel Alvarez, her Barry mentors when she started her degree in 1980 and finished in 1996 through the School of Adult and Continuing Education.

BARRY MAG | 39


CAMPUS CLASSCURRENTS NOTES

CLASS NOTES

OFF TO THE RACES Amy Diaz, BA ’04, MBA/MS ’07, made Barry proud when she, along with boyfriend Jason Case, won CBS’ reality show “The Amazing Race” last December. To win the million-dollar prize, Diaz and Case traveled through four continents, nine countries (from Chile to Japan), and more than 35,000 miles in just 23 days. Her favorite spot was Curug Cimahi, the cascades in Bandung, Indonesia “because it was absolutely breathtaking.” Diaz said her time at Barry prepared her for the journey. “Barry is an international, multicultural institution and during my years there I learned a lot about other countries, cultures, and foods from my classmates, residents, and peers.” Her advice to other graduates is to take on projects that play to their strengths because it will enable you to succeed. She says, “When Jason and I selected tasks on the show, it was ones we knew we would be the best at. I learned that at Barry – I always wanted to do my best,

whether it was winning Hall of the Year award with my fellow resident advisors or receiving the Graduate Assistant Award, the drive I learned at Barry has gotten me where I am today.” Now that her amazing race is over, Diaz has settled back into everyday life in Southern New England and is preparing to kick off the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Man & Woman of the Year campaign, with a goal of raising $200,000 in a 10-week period. Even though her schedule is full, Diaz always makes time to visit her Phi Sigma Sigma sorority sisters (she was a founding sister of the Iota Theta Chapter) in South Florida a few times a year – and her family connection keeps her close to Barry (her brother graduated in 2008).

Diaz and Case traveled through four continents, nine countries (from Chile to Japan), and more than 35,000 miles in just 23 days. Photo Courtesy of AASA, The School Superintendents Association Cliff Lipson CBS ©2013 CBS Broadcasting, Inc

SUPER AC H I E V E M E N T Alberto Carvalho ’90 was named Superintendent of the Year by the American Association of School Administrators (AASA). Carvalho was one of four finalists for the award and was selected on evaluation of his leadership, communication, professionalism, and community involvement. A nationally recognized expert on school reform and finance, Carvalho successfully transformed Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ business operations and financial systems with the implementation of a streamlined strategic framework. BARRY MAG | 40

LaCriscia Fowlkes, Erbi Blanco-True, Lourdes Cowgill, Sister Linda Bevilacqua, Dr. Michael Vaardahl, The Honorable Adam McGinnis

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS Barry’s 2013 Distinguished Alumni Awards gala was held on November 16 as part of the university’s Founders’ Week celebration. The awards honor Barry alumni who are locally, nationally and/or internationally recognized for their preeminent contributions to excellence in their professions and for their service to the community. The 2013 honorees were Erbi Blanco-True, Senior Vice President and Director of Community Development at Great Florida Bank; Lourdes Cowgill, President Emerita of Pine Crest School; and Dr. Michael Vaardahl, owner of the Foot & Ankle Center of Northern Colorado. LaCriscia Fowlkes, Program Director at PACE Center for Girls in Miami, and The Honorable Adam McGinnis, Orange County Judge for the Ninth Judicial Circuit Court of Florida, received the 2013 Rising Star Award.

BARRY MAG | 41 Monty Brinton CBS ©2013 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved


CAMPUS CLASSCURRENTS NOTES

Larita Nottis Kaspar’s dear husband Jim passed away on January 25, 2014. Larita says Jim, whom she was married to for more than 40 years, was a special blessing and her family now celebrates his life.

1962

Diane Balconis Quinn and Gerry are back in Indiana after spending the winter in Florida.

1963

Marie Louden founded a Giving Circle in her "over 55 community," which just distributed $12,000 to non-profit organizations in Prince William County, Virginia. This is their sixth year and they have grown from four members to 40.

1965

Lucille “Ann” Williams (Moss) and husband Richard are very proud that their daughter, Dr. Valerie Williams, thoracic surgeon at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, was named as one of Cincinnati’s Top Docs. Ann is a voiceover performer working in New York as well as recording commercials and narrations from her home studio in New Jersey. Richard has retired as Director of Corporate Quality Assurance for Becton Dickinson Co. and plays a lot of golf. In her personal time, Ann takes piano lessons and enjoys writing for children. One of her stories, “Ring of Trouble” will be published in the spring issue of St. Mary’s Messenger, a Catholic magazine for children. She would love to hear from her classmates ... “the best of ’65.”

1968

June Terry (Rawls) has retired (twice). After 32 years of teaching elementary school, she retired in January 2001. In March 2005, she helped open a ballroom dance studio and then retired from that activity on December 31, 2012. Now she is basking in the leisure time afforded her, via traveling and visiting her beautiful grandchildren in Tennessee. As a Miami native, she loves to visit other places, but returns home to Miami every time.

1972

Darryl L. Gentry retired in 2003. Prior to retirement, Gentry was a licensed clinical psychotherapist for over 31 years, a graduate school instructor, medical school instructor, and published author of brief psychotherapy. Gentry’s passion for the history of early rock ’n’ roll led to teaching courses in 2010. His teaching inspired him to become a non-fiction author at age 72.

BARRY MAG | 42

1984

B o b by Pe a r c e was nominated for a Tony Award and an Outer Critics Circle Award for costume design for Broadway’s “Taboo.” Most recently, his work could be seen in the new musical “Summer of Love” at The Ogunquit Playhouse in Maine. Design highlights include “Falling for Eve” at the York Theatre and “The Marvelous Wonderettes” (New York City and Albany, New York; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Long Beach, San Jose, and Sacramento, California). Pearce also designed for the films “Let It Snow” starring Bernadette Peters, “Chita & All That Jazz” starring Chita Rivera, and “Behind the Beat” starring Vicki Sue Robinson.

1989

Dawn Vassil is the clinical microbiology supervisor at Blanchard Valley Hospital in Findlay, Ohio. This hospital was the third hospital in the nation to achieve ISO 15189 certification and the second in the nation to achieve recertification. Vassil has been married for 23 years to her best friend, retired Sgt. 1st Class Black R. Horse, and they have four children: Theodore (22), Alexander (17), Zachary (13), and Danielle (8). After living around the world, they have happily retired to Ada, Ohio, to raise their children, put down roots, and restore a Victorian manor house that is lovingly called Blackhorse Manor.

1991

Vanessa Gilyard will start as an adjunct humanities/history professor at Strayer University.

1994

Lorna Johnson’s son, William Noel III, is graduating from Barry in May 2014. He will be receiving a bachelor’s degree in sport management. He has an internship with the Miami Marlins and is also a recipient of the Barry Legacy Scholarship.

1998

Dr. Donavan Outten was named director of distance education at Unity College. Dr. Outten will lead the environmental college in Unity, Maine, in its first ever expansion into the creation and delivery of online academic programming that is mission driven, effective, and embodies Unity College’s first in the nation focus on sustainability science, the leading-edge of 21st century transdisciplinary (collaborative) environmental problem solving. Dr. Outten holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Bethune-Cookman University, a Master of Science in Human Resource Development and Administration from Barry University and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Nova Southeastern University.

1998 & 1999

Anthony DeSantis, MS ’99, and Michelle DeSantis ’98 will be celebrating their 14th wedding anniversary in November. Anthony completed his PhD in conflict resolution and analysis from Nova Southeastern University in 2011. After working for 10 years at Nova Southeastern, Anthony was hired as the associate dean of students at the University of Florida. Michelle completed her Master of Business Administration in accounting from Saint Leo University in 2012 and is working as an accounting manager for Haven Hospice. They moved to Gainesville, Florida, in 2010 but always stay connected to the friends they made during their time at Barry University.

2001

Jeffrey Cohen has been working for Holland America Line since 2006 in several capacities, both onboard and shore side. Since joining the company, Cohen has visited more than 60 countries on six continents. He was recently promoted to manager of port operations. In his new role, he will oversee the port and shore operations in the Mediterranean and East Asia.

Christopher Hill has joined the Southwest Florida Community Foundation’s board of trustees. Hill is a vice president and banker of J.P. Morgan Private Bank, where he advises high net worth families, senior executives, and foundations and endowments. Hill received his Master of Business Administration from the Wharton School and Master of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Arts and Sciences. Hill is a member of the Barry University Student Managed Investment Fund advisory board.

1996

2002

1995

Jesus F. Jara earned his doctorate from the University of MassachusettsAmherst in 2010 in educational leadership and policy and now serves as deputy superintendent

Anna Preston, in the role of artistic producer, collaborated with Artists for a Cause for a four-part contemporary dance series, “Dance for Food 2013.” Audience

members were asked to bring non-perishable food donations as admission to the concert. Artist for a Cause partnered with local food banks for distribution. The concerts, presented in Palm Beach, Martin, and St. Lucie counties, featured her company, Preston Contemporary Dance Theatre (PCDT), along with YOW dance (Orlando), Downtown Dance (Lake Worth), Vanya Allen (West Palm Beach) and others. PCDT has a mission to create cultural awareness of social issues through dance, “connecting passion to purpose.”

2003

Rev. Jim Mayfield received his Master of Arts in Theology and specializes in Christian counseling, marriage and family issues. Rev. Mayfield provides counseling for pastors and pastors’ wives.

2004

Carmen Welsh Jr. worked as a supervisor over note takers (a person hired to take notes for a student with a documented disability) from 2009 to 2013 at Miami Dade College (MDC). She then stepped down to pursue her dream of a master’s in fine arts. Welsh had her first short story published in 2000 and has had short fiction and art pieces published in various fanzines, magazines, and e-zines. Her fantasy fiction has appeared on podcasts, and a story and nonfiction piece has been published in two literary journals. She is now a graduate student in the University of Tampa’s creative writing program. She is a member of a genre fiction writers’ guild and a new member of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs. She is still with MDC and part of the academic tutoring staff. Diane Amado-Tate, has been named chief nursing officer at Doctors Hospital in Coral Gables, Florida. An accomplished leader with 22 years of nursing experience, Amado-Tate most recently served as assistant vice president of nursing at South Miami Hospital, where she oversaw nursing staff and patient care in the South Miami Hospital Heart Center, emergency center, critical care unit, and respiratory and pulmonary departments. She also helped lead the development and construction of South Miami Hospital’s new Emergency Center, which opened in December 2012. She holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing, graduating cum laude from Hunter College in New York, where she began her nursing career at NYU Medical Center. She earned a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Phoenix and a master’s degree in health services administration from Barry University.

2005

Zachary M. Gill has been named partner in the law firm of Goldstein, Buckley, Cechman, Rice & Purtz, PA. Gill has worked at the firm since 2010 where he concentrates his practice in the area of personal injury law, criminal defense, and general civil litigation. Gill was born and raised in Fort Myers, Florida. He obtained his Bachelor of Arts from Florida State University and his Juris Doctor from Barry University School of Law. While at Barry, he was an active member of the Student Bar Association, moot court, and trial team. For the past two years, Gill has been recognized by Florida Super Lawyers magazine as a “Rising Star” in the field of personal injury litigation.

2008

Ruth Studstill acquired two master’s degrees since graduating from Barry in 2008. She now has a Master of Business Administration (2012) and a Master of Science in Leadership (2013). Studstill also started a new position last December as the staff assistant to the director of patient care services at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Miami VA Healthcare Systems. She celebrated 10 years of federal service on November 16. Studstill also joined the National Association for Professional Women (June 2013).

2009

Robyn Braun accepted a position at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin as assistant professor of sport psychology. Jarin Straatsma, a former member of the Young Alumni Association’s Leadership Committee, achieved his dream of working for Google only a few years after graduating from Barry. Farley Ashby, George Harrington, and Casey Johnson returned to Barry in September to serve as panelists as part of the 2013 Men in Leadership event, “Man Up: Real Talk.”

2010

Julie Tyk is now a part of Gray Robinson’s Orlando medical malpractice defense group. She joined the firm as an associate attorney this past December. Tyk focuses on medical malpractice, transportation litigation, property insurance defense, and insurance defense. Tyk earned her law degree from Barry University School of Law, where she graduated cum laude. While in law school, she was a law clerk for in-house counsel at one of Orlando’s largest hospital systems.

2011

Derek W. Eisemann, J.D. has joined the Sarasota law firm of Syprett Meshad as an associate attorney. Eisemann's practice is focused on representing plaintiffs in all aspects of personal injury matters, as well as other areas of civil litigation, including real estate. A member of the Sarasota County Bar Association, Eisemann serves on various committees in the Young Lawyers Division. He was born and raised in Sarasota and is a 2001 graduate of Sarasota High School.

2013

Deborah Winton considers herself a “senior student,” with fewer working years in front of her than behind her. Her position with Barry University’s Physician Assistant Program began in 2004, which enabled her to complete her undergraduate and master’s degrees at no cost. With the progression of courses, her duties and responsibilities on the job also increased. The financial struggles she endured as a single mother was the ideal conduit for her daughters to excel scholastically. Her daughter Janene holds a degree in finance and works as a client manager for a third-party Medicare billing company, while her other daughter Samantha is completing her internship at Stanford University. Winton is a proud mother and notes that she pushed her kids to perform and they pushed back harder. Samantha Eve Morris is a registered marriage and family therapist intern in the state of Florida. She received her Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Barry University and graduated with honors from St. Thomas University with her Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy. Aft er graduation, Morris started her own company, Family Psych Central, LLC, and joined the private practice of Psychotherapy Associates of Broward. While working in private practice, she is currently pursuing a doctorate of behavioral health from Arizona State University.

IN MEMORIAM: Sharon Marlene Katz, MSW ’01 Anna “Huber” Kreider ’62 Charles Thomas “Chase” Smith, BPA ’10 Elizabeth “Betty” Waddell ’62 Virginia “Jackie” Waters ’53

BARRY MAG | 43

CLASS NOTES

1960

of Orange County Public Schools in Orlando, the 11th largest school district in the country. Jara is married to his wife, Lourdes, and has three children, Carlos, Alexander, and Jacqueline. All three children attend Orange County public schools.


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