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A magazine for the friends of Barrow Neurological Institute of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

Tribute to a son

Valley philanthropists’ gift launches Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic

Rock on Bret Michaels returns to Barrow to announce music room

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2011


Opening thoughts

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eptember 23, 2012, marks the 50th anniversary of Barrow Neurological Institute. This milestone offers an opportunity to reflect upon our accomplishments and to chart our future course. As a benefactor of Barrow, you are key to that future. Indeed, the past year has demonstrated the difference philanthropy can make. Major gifts have enabled us to fast track several projects that would still be on the drawing board were it not for donor support. The Barrow Center for Neuromodulation, the Barrow Brain Tumor Research Center and the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic are taking their first steps well ahead of schedule because of charitable giving. In an environment where government support is waning and hospital budgets are stretched to the breaking point, programs such as these would not be possible without the generosity of people like you. And that is why Barrow Neurological Foundation recently announced plans to raise $50 million in honor of Barrow’s 50th anniversary. These funds are vital to a robust future for Barrow. I urge you to contribute. Our 50th anniversary celebration begins in January; pages 22-23 give a sneak preview of the festivities. I hope you will join us in recognizing Barrow’s inspiring past and in creating an amazing future for the institute. Sincerely,

Robert F. Spetzler, MD Director, Barrow Neurological Institute

P.S. This is a wonderful time of year to make a tax-deductible gift to Barrow Neurological Foundation in honor of our 50th anniversary. You can contribute online at SupportBarrow.org or call the Foundation office at 602-4063041. Or mail in your gift in the enclosed envelope. We appreciate your continued support.

On our cover: Ira Fulton and Shafeeq Lahda, MD, stand in shelled space slated to become the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic. Learn more starting on page 4 of this issue.


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4: Tribute to a son Mary Lou and Ira Fulton make $2.5million gift to launch the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic. 6: Patients in need New ALS clinic will focus on patients with what many consider the cruelest disease of all. 9: ALS research Gift to Barrow Neurological Foundation enables Barrow to recruit noted physician-researcher and his team. 12: Brainbook Arizona's high school athletes get a lesson in concussion awareness. 14: Parkinson’s fellows Benefactors enable young neurologists to receive advanced specialty training at MAPC. 16: Rock on Bret Michaels contributes music room to hospital.

Contents

18: Alumni news Former Barrow residents and fellows: where they are, what they’re doing. 20: A new perspective Women’s Board member shares her patient story. 22: 2012: Barrow’s 50th Inspiring past, amazing future. 24: St. Joseph’s Amazing Patient stories from the files of Barrow Neurological Institute. 26: Benefactor Briefs 28: Coming soon Mark your calendar for these events. 30: Disability etiquette How are your communication skills? 31: Barrow Foundation UK Extending Barrow’s reach.

Editor: Catherine Menor Catherine.Menor@chw.edu

Printer: Panoramic Press

Assistant editor: Lindsey Burke

Contributing writers: Sally Clasen, Melissa Morrison, Sarah Padilla

Art director/designer: Justin Detwiler

Photography: Brad Armstrong, Gary Armstrong, John Conaway, Jeff Noble

Robert F. Spetzler, MD, Director Barrow Neurological Institute® Linda Hunt, president and CEO St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

• How to Reach Us • Barrow is published twice a year. We welcome your comments, suggestions and requests to be added to or deleted from our mailing list. Call 602-406-1041, email cmenor@chw.edu or mail to Barrow, Office of Philanthropy, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix, AZ, 85013. Please include your name, address, email and phone number in all correspondence. Visit us online at www.SupportBarrow.org.


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tribute to a son Mary Lou and Ira Fulton make $2.5-million gift to launch Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic

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hile Mary Lou and Ira A. Fulton have given away hundreds of millions of dollars to organizations close to their hearts, none of their gifts has been as personal as one they made recently to Barrow Neurological Institute.

The Fultons’ gift of $2.5 million to the planned Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic was inspired by their son, Greg, who was diagnosed with ALS three years ago and passed away in November 2011. “It was so hard as his father to watch him deteriorate a little every day,” says Ira. “I couldn’t save my son’s life, but I can help other people with this disease, and that’s why I made this gift.” Greg was a patient of Shafeeq Ladha, MD, a Barrow neurologist who specializes in neuromuscular disorders and who will direct the clinical aspects of the new clinic.

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by Catherine Menor

“I often tell patients that this disease is as emotionally difficult as it is physically difficult,” says Dr. Ladha. “Watching how this disease takes an emotional toll on the entire family unit is very difficult, and it is one of the main aspects of treating ALS that drives me to look for an effective treatment.” Ira says that Greg went from specialist to specialist looking for an explanation of his stroke-like symptoms. Finally, he consulted Dr. Ladha at Barrow and learned that he had ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Ira was so impressed by Dr. Ladha that he agreed to join the Board of Trustees of Barrow Neurological Foundation (BNF). And when Dr. Ladha shared his dream of establishing an ALS clinic, Ira immediately knew he had found a project he could support. “I’m good at making money, and I’m good at getting people to step up and write a check,” says Ira. “I told Dr. Ladha, ‘You tell me what you need, and I’ll go out and beat the bushes for you.’” With the Fultons’ gift, Barrow recruited Robert Bowser, PhD, an internationally recognized ALS research scientist formerly at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He heads up research at the ALS clinic. “What we’re trying to build is a world-class integrated research and care center for ALS and other neuromuscular diseases,” explains Dr. Ladha. “We want patients to be able to come here and get education, exceptional care and access to cutting-edge research activities.” Since that first gift, the Fultons have made another major gift: $1.675 million for a second da Vinci Surgical System at St. Joseph’s. Again, it was a physician—this time Ivor Benjamin, MD—who inspired Ira to make a gift. “Dr. Benjamin and Dr. Ladha are two no-nonsense, dedicated physicians,” says Ira. “St. Joseph’s has great doctors.” Asking others to give is Ira’s way of sharing the joy of philanthropy. “I say to people, ‘When’s the last time you saw a Brinks truck in a funeral procession? You can’t take it with you, and you can’t leave your money to your kids or you’ll wreck them. Why not give it away now while you can still enjoy the fruits of your labor?’ “I’m excited about what we can do here.” ■

“I couldn’t save my son’s life, but I can help other people with this disease, and that’s why I made this gift.” Ira Fulton

Gregory Wayne Fulton, 53, passed away Nov. 26, 2011, at his home in Chandler after a three-year battle with ALS. Greg was born July 7, 1958, in Phoenix and grew up in Tempe, where he worked for his father at Eaglesons and Fulton Homes. From his early years, Greg was an avid fisherman and loved sports. He is survived by his parents, Mary Lou and Ira Fulton; his son, Michael Fulton; his brother, Douglas S. Fulton; and his sister, Lorie A. Nicholls. Contributions in Greg’s memory may be made to the Gregory W. Fulton Memorial Fund at Barrow Neurological Foundation. Visit SupportBarrowALS.org for more information or call 602-406-3041.

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by Melissa Frederick Morrison

in need New ALS clinic will focus on patients with what many consider the cruelest disease of all

“My jaw dropped. I knew what it meant. I’ve always, ironically, idealized Lou Gehrig—I just didn’t idolize him that much.” Brett Booge

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Shafeeq Ladha, MD

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he first thing Brett Booge noticed was the twitching in his upper arms. He was fit—a triathlete who was no stranger to the gym—so colleagues thought he was flexing. Then he noticed that instead of being able to lift more weight, he was lifting less. He lost his balance in the shower a few times. But it wasn’t until he went bowling in the spring of 2010 with his niece and nephew—and he staggered down the alley to toss the now too-heavy ball—that he was moved to see a doctor. When the neurologist said “amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,” he was puzzled. When she said “Lou Gehrig’s disease,” he wasn’t. “My jaw dropped,” Booge, 44, says. “I knew what it meant. I’ve always, ironically, idealized Lou Gehrig—I just didn’t idolize him that much.” Booge sought treatment at several venues, near and far (even traveling to China for a mushroom paste that was reputed to help). Eventually, Booge (rhymes with “vogue”) landed at Barrow, where he became a patient of Shafeeq Ladha, MD. “All of them, except Barrow, when I asked, ‘Is there anything I can do for myself?’ said, ‘Go have fun. Enjoy life,’” Booge says. “I’m already doing that. I understand they can’t give an answer to this particular disease, but [Barrow] is giving me some answers that nobody else was.”

A devastating disease Dr. Ladha has seen ALS patients throughout his career as a neuromuscular specialist. But plans for a clinic dedicated specifically to the disease will put the spotlight on patients

who, until recently, have not seen many significant advances in treatment. Fundraising is ongoing; Dr. Ladha hopes to break ground within 12 months. “This disease is devastating in so many ways,” says Dr. Ladha, director of Barrow’s new Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic. “We forget it’s a whole family that has to deal with this disease. That has always struck a chord with me. They’re the most in-need group of people I come across in my sub-speciality.” By combining the forces of the various medical specialties that collaborate to maintain ALS patients’ quality of life for as long as possible, the clinic will likely extend their lifespan as well. And by linking the clinic to a powerful research engine in the form of University of Pittsburgh import Robert Bowser, PhD, it will connect patients to advances made in the lab sooner, rather than later, when time is precious.

Linking the clinic to the lab “It’s hard for me to separate the clinic from the research,” Dr. Ladha says. “We want a seamless program that’s best both for future discoveries and current patients.” For example, ALS’s symptoms can mimic other diseases, delaying diagnosis and, thus, treatment. (Life expectancy from diagnosis is currently two to five years.) Dr. Bowser’s lab has devised a highly promising blood test that could identify ALS earlier. “Our clinic will probably be the first to start using it in a mainstream fashion,” Dr. Ladha says. “That’s a good example of how research in the lab will be brought into the clinic.” The clinic will also funnel the region’s ALS sufferers into clinical drug trials, if they’re willing.

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Booge, for one, is. “I tell anybody and everybody I’m willing to be a guinea pig. It’s one of those things you consider not for yourself but for future people.” Booge still walks, assisted by a wheeled walker. His Paradise Valley home, whose front rooms are wall-to-wall with sports memorabilia, is outfitted with ramps, button-operated freezer drawers and other equipment to ease access. Since April, he has had a full-time assistant—long-time friend Steve Hassenger (nicknamed “24-7”)—to help him, as well as a squad of family members. Though he no longer goes to the office, Booge continues to work part-time from home as a commodities broker.

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“It’s really kind of a one-stop shopping experience for the patient, so they don’t have to go to a million places for care,” Dr. Ladha says. That is good news to Booge and his sister Shawn O’Connor, who helps with his care. The physical logistics of bouncing from one appointment to the next has taken a toll. At one point, early in his treatment, O’Connor says, “He said, ‘Screw it, I’m done with this. I’m done with all these appointments.’” With the establishment of the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic, Booge will be able to spend less time traveling for treatment and more time living his life. ■

Improved quality of life, survival Studies show an ALS patient will do better if cared for at the type of all-in-one clinic Barrow is creating, adding months to their lives. “It’s clear that quality of life and survival are better if someone goes to an experienced multidisciplinary clinic,” Dr. Ladha says. Part of the effect may be attributed to the expertise the team has with neuromuscular patients. For example, now, Dr. Ladha’s patients have to go elsewhere for physical therapy. “They find a physical therapist contracted to their insurance, and those usually have never seen an ALS patient,” he says. “Most physical therapists are used to orthopedic problems, not neuromuscular disorders.” Not so at Barrow’s clinic, where everyone—physical, speech, respiratory, nutritional and occupational therapists and social workers—will specialize in neuromuscular patients. The new facility will house these specialties under one roof, streamlining care. It will also feature an on-site diagnostic lab that will allow clinicians to track the disease’s progress more closely.

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Photos: Above left, Brett Booge is supported by family and friends, including sister Michelle Booge,longtime friend Steve Hassenger, mother Mary Booge and sister Shawn O’Connor. Above right, Barrow neurologists Saraj Muley, MD, and Erik Ortega, MD, specialize in neuromuscular disorders.


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by Melissa Frederick Morrison

“This is a tremendous opportunity to help facilitate new and improved treatments” Robert Bowser, PhD

als research Gift to Barrow Neurological Foundation enables Barrow to recruit noted physician-researcher and his team

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LS, a.k.a. Lou Gehrig’s disease, is the quicksand of diseases. It often starts as weakness in a limb. Then over a few dreadful years, it works its way towards the center of the body, extinguishing function as it goes, until it reaches the lungs. Death follows soon after. Cruelly, ALS leaves most patients’ brains untouched, so they are all too aware of the disease’s deadly progress. It can strike anyone at any time. There is no cure, and only one drug is currently approved to treat it.

Despite the attention the legendary New York Yankee brought to the affliction with his decline and death in 1941, little progress has been made towards understanding who is at risk for ALS or how to slow its progression, much less cure it. “It probably is about the worst disease you might get,” says Robert Bowser, PhD, an expert in ALS research. “It’s a rapidly progressive fatal disease for which there’s only one FDA-approved drug that doesn’t work very well.”

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That is changing with the establishment of the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic. Mary Lou and Ira Fulton’s $2.5-million gift helped lure Dr. Bowser from the University of Pittsburgh, where he oversaw a research program to uncover the causes of the disease and participated in clinical research studies. It’s also where he started a biotech company that has a drug in clinical trials that shows promise in slowing ALS’s progression. As director of ALS research at Barrow, he will translate discoveries in the lab directly to patients in the clinic. “Can we identify patients earlier? Can we then determine what types of treatments might work best?” he asks from his new Barrow office, where the walls are still bare. “ALS is a very heterogeneous disease, and if we can identify patient subpopulations, we might be able to treat them a little better.”

The ABCs of ALS In ALS (which stands for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), neurons start to die and can no longer send the brain’s messages to the muscles, which leads to atrophy and, ultimately, paralysis. Early symptoms—increased clumsiness, hoarseness, muscle twitching—can be mistaken for something else. It’s not uncommon for a patient to be treated for another problem while ALS develops unchecked. Currently, no definitive diagnostic test exists. Only after scans, lab tests and muscle studies rule out other conditions can ALS be positively identified. Dr. Bowser’s lab is poised to change that. It is developing a test to identify ALS early in its onset. The lab has identified two proteins in ALS patients’ spinal fluid that occur in a higher concentration than in a healthy person. After spotlighting this disease signature, the lab tested it on 130 samples from patients at clinics around the country. The test was 93 percent accurate, Dr. Bowser says. “These are patients who came into the clinic early in their disease, and many hadn’t been diagnosed yet,” he says. Early diagnosis means early treatment. Currently, treatment is focused on minimizing symptoms, such as muscle spasticity, and providing physical therapy to prolong the patient’s independence. Later, a feeding tube and breathing machine might be required. One drug, riluzole, is FDA-approved to slow the disease’s progression.

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On the trail of biomarkers Dr. Bowser and his team of research scientists hope that their identification of biomarkers will not only aid the neurologist in diagnosing ALS more quickly, but will also allow doctors to follow the disease’s progression more closely and determine how effective a drug is in a clinical trial. A pharmaceutical research company Dr. Bowser cofounded, Knopp Biosciences, currently has a drug in Phase III clinical trials. The drug, dexpramipexole, has been shown to be protective of the motor neurons affected by ALS. If FDA approval is timely, the drug could be available to patients within two to three years, Dr. Bowser says. He sees dexpramipexole as one in an arsenal of drugs in the research pipeline that, in the right combination, might extend the life of ALS patients. “Will it be the cure? No,” he says. “But it could be a much improved treatment for ALS patients.” Barrow’s clinic will be a gateway for enrolling the region’s ALS patients into clinical drug trials. ALS is categorized as an “orphan disease,” meaning fewer than 200,000 Americans suffer from it at any given time. An estimated 30,000 currently have it, according to the Washington, DC-based ALS Association. Dr. Bowser estimates the clinic currently serves 120 or so regional patients. He expects the number to rise as more clinical trials and research studies are made available to participants.

Broader implications The lab’s discoveries may have resonance beyond ALS patients. While ALS does not touch the brains of 70 percent of its victims, those whose brains are affected experience nervous-system dementia, a category that includes Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. It was the similarities in genetic mutations between Alzheimer’s and ALS patients that initially drew Dr. Bowser to focusing on the latter disease. These similarities hint that advances made towards identifying and treating ALS dementia may also apply to other dementias. “We feel like insights we make into ALS will also be beneficial to those other diseases,” he says. “With respect to knowing the hows and the whys, there’s a lot to be learned. This is a tremendous opportunity to help facilitate new and improved treatments.” ■


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Help us build the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic Plans call for the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic to be located in what is now shelled space on the third floor of the Lonnie and Muhammad Ali Pavilion on St. Joseph’s campus. This location will allow the ALS Clinic and the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center to share services of benefit to both. To learn how you can help, call Barrow Neurological Foundation at 602-406-3041 or email Kathleen.Norton@chw.edu. Online giving is available at SupportBarrowALS.org. Be sure to check out the videos of Drs. Ladha and Bowser talking about the new clinic. Your contribution will help patients like Brett Booge receive better care for neuromuscular diseases.

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brainbook

Arizona’s high school athletes get a lesson in concussion awareness

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ate Calles’ goal for the current football season is to lead with his shoulders, not his head. As the starting quarterback for Sandra Day O’Connor High School’s junior varsity squad, it’s a winning game strategy but also a way to prevent another concussion. Calles didn’t know anything about traumatic brain injuries (concussions) until his last game of the 2010 season when he hit a defensive opponent head on during a pass play and was knocked unconscious for a few seconds. He was quickly transported to Barrow Neurological Institute where he was diagnosed with a concussion and an injury to the spine. “It felt like my neck popped,” explains the high school sophomore, who experienced classic concussion symptoms such as problems sleeping, fuzzy vision, headaches, neck pain and problems concentrating on schoolwork.

Required e-reading Because of the football injury he sustained, Calles is now better prepared to prevent and recognize a concussion on the field when it happens. He and his teammates also have gotten an added lesson this fall through a new education program that makes it mandatory for all high school athletes in Arizona to complete an online concussion awareness program and pass a sports eligibility test. Called Brainbook, the e-learning module is designed like a social media site and takes students through a number of educational activities, videos and a final exam they must complete before being cleared to play. The concussion awareness initiative is a partnership between Barrow, the Arizona Interscholastic Association and the Arizona Cardinals.

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While 28 states, including Arizona, have existing concussion laws that require student-athletes to participate in some form of concussion education, Brainbook represents the first program in the country to formalize and test student-athletes’ knowledge about brain injuries. The interactive concussion module takes 50 minutes to complete, and student-athletes must score 80 percent or higher to pass. Brainbook was created by the Barrow staff and doctoral students from Arizona State University’s College of Education. It was designed to help raise awareness and reduce the number of sports-related concussions in Arizona, according to neurologist Javier Cardenas, MD, director of the BRAINS (Barrow Resource for Acquired Injury to the Nervous System) Clinic. The state of Arizona ranks second in the country for traumatic brain injury, but through Brainbook, 100,000 student-athletes will learn about concussion and the dangerous side effects associated with the brain injury. “Concussions are rampant in professional sports and at the NCAA level, but there is a trickle-down effect among younger athletes. In Arizona, 7,000 high school students suffer concussions each year,” explains Dr. Cardenas, who has been instrumental in building the statewide concussion and prevention awareness effort. The goal of Brainbook, he says, is to reduce the injuries and complications associated with concussion by providing primary prevention education—such as wearing the right equipment properly—and educating athletes about the signs and symptoms of concussion.


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As part of Brainbook’s program, Barrow received a $250,000 grant from the Maddock Foundation to develop a research registry that will track concussed student-athletes. Such data will help neurologists and researchers get a more accurate picture of the long-term effects of concussion.

Concussions: myths versus facts From an immediate sports safety perspective, Brainbook is a powerful tool to help dispel concussion myths. “There are several misunderstandings about concussions,” says Dr. Cardenas. “For example, many believe a concussion is not a brain injury or that you have to be knocked out to have one, but only 10 percent of concussions result in people losing consciousness.” Most concussion symptoms resolve within a few weeks— 95 percent of people with a brain injury have complete recovery— but some effects don’t appear immediately, and others can last months or longer, according to Dr. Cardenas. In fact, Calles still has headaches and neck tension one year later. Another concern is that athletes who return to play too soon after suffering a concussion increase their risk for having another brain injury. Calles, for one, doesn’t need to be convinced about the importance of requiring high school athletes to take a lesson in concussion education. “Brainbook is a great idea. In the past, many of my teammates thought they were strong enough that they couldn’t get a concussion. Or if they had been hit, wouldn’t know if they had one. It just makes the entire team more aware about the seriousness of concussions. It took a hit to the head, but now I get it—I’d recognize one immediately.” ■

Test your concussion IQ True or false? 1.You have to lose consciousness to have a concussion. 2. Concussion is a serious brain injury where the brain moves rapidly within the skull. 3. Symptoms of a concussion can appear weeks after an injury. 4. First concussions are typically more serious than second concussions. 5. One of the most important things you can do after a concussion is rest. How did you do? The answers are below, and you can learn more by visiting Brainbook online at TheBarrow.org/brains. On the Brainbook website, you’ll hear what Ken Whisenhunt and Ron Wolfley of the Arizona Cardinals, Diana Taurasi and Penny Taylor of the Phoenix Mercury, and other experts have to say about this important topic. 1-F, 2-T, 3-T, 4-F, 5-T

by Sally Clasen

Far left, Javier Cardenas, MD. Left, Barrow, the Arizona Cardinals and the Arizona Interscholastic Association announced the Brainbook program during a news conference held in August at Barrow.

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parkinson’s fellows Benefactors enable young neurologists to receive advanced specialty training at MAPC

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by Sarah Padilla

velyn Kossak and Jean Grossman know firsthand the “We encourage our fellows to take the initiative and to take value of a having a good neurologist. Their late hus- a stronger role in caring for our patients.” bands, John Kossak and Harold Grossman, were both Barrow has employed DBS as a treatment for Parkinson’s, treated for Parkinson’s disease for many years by Barrow’s dystonia and tremor for several years and has developed a Abraham Lieberman, MD, a movement disorder specialist. national reputation for its use. And the recent establishment The care that the families received led the two women of the Barrow Center for Neuromodulation will allow the to give back in honor of their husbands. In 1994, Evelyn made hospital to further apply the treatment to depression, obsesa large gift to the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center (MAPC) sive compulsive disorders and perhaps even dementia. Barat Barrow to establish the John and Evelyn Kossak Fellow- row is also exploring the use of gene transfer therapy as a treatship to provide further training to neurologists interested in ment for patients with intractable Parkinson’s disease. specializing in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disThe surgical approach to movement disorders is, in part, orders. Seven years later, the initial endowment of $200,000 what drew Drs. Dhanani and Husain to the Barrow fellowhas doubled. In 2007, Jean donated significant funds to ship. “There’s so much variability in patient care. We’re seeestablish the Harold and Jean Grossman Fellowship, which ing patients with both hypo- and hyperkinetic movement diswill bring a prominent Israeli professor to lecture and teach orders, and we’re learning there are so many treatment at the MAPC in 2012. options. You can really be excited Today, the two endowments have about what you do because it’s always been supplemented by additional different,” says Dr. Husain. funding from Lynn Diamond, the Sy A typical day for the fellows might Syms Foundation and Mark Freiberg. include both clinic and operating The Medtronic Foundation also suproom experiences. In the OR, they ports training in deep-brain stimulalearn to conduct physical exams (most tion (DBS). procedures are performed while the Currently, three fellows are in trainpatient is awake), properly place and ing at the MAPC. Sameea Husain, read electrodes, and make the necesDO, and Naomi Salins, MD, are secsary adjustments for voltage and freond-year fellows, while Sara Dhanani, quency. They are also involved in the MD, recently began her first year. BarMAPC’s multiple research studies Guillermo Moguel-Cobos, MD row’s fellowships are among a few and extensive community outreach. nationally that last longer than a year. Dr. Salins was drawn to the The Center also provides training to neurology residents and MAPC’s comprehensive approach to patient care, which fourth-year medical students. includes balance, speech, occupational and physical thera“During their first year, the fellows concentrate on see- py. “It’s an outlook on Parkinson’s disease and movement dising patients and learning about the diversity of movement orders that I haven’t seen anywhere else, having all of the ancildisorders. They learn to recognize, diagnose and treat these lary services in one setting,” she says. disorders, and they learn to counsel patients and families,” Last year, the MAPC saw 1,300 new patients and expesays Ina Lieberman, MD, managing director of the MAPC. rienced 7,200 return visits, making it one of the busiest “In the second year, they learn about advanced treatments movement disorder centers in the United States. The fellows for these conditions, including botulinum toxin and deep- agree that their training is enhanced by the fact that the brain stimulation.” MAPC sees such a high number of patients with such diverse The MAPC has graduated several fellows through the conditions. Additionally, they value the opportunity to work years, including Arshia Sadreddin, MD, and Guillermo alongside so many established neurologists. Moguel-Cobos, MD, both of whom are now attending neu“Everyone has a different perspective, and everyone rologists at the center. teaches a little differently,” says Dr. Husain. “It’s like we’re get“The clinical exposure you get from seeing patients here ting a niche education within a niche.” ■ is very strong,” says Dr. Moguel-Cobos, who also completed his residency at Barrow and now specializes in dystonia.

“The clinical exposure you get from seeing patients here is very strong.”

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Sara Dhanani, MD

Sameea Husain, DO

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Naomi Salins, MD

Special thanks to these donors The Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center is grateful for the many supporters who have helped it achieve an international reputation for the research and treatment of movement disorders. • Lonnie and Muhammad Ali • The Celebrity Fight Night Foundation, Jimmy Walker and Sean Currie • Lynn Diamond • Mark Frieberg • Jean Grossman • Evelyn Kossak • Medtronic Foundation • The Sy Syms Foundation

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Bret Michaels contributes music room to hospital

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“I want to give something back to the hospital that helped save my life.” Bret Michaels

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ret Michaels, rock star and former patient at St. Joseph’s Barrow Neurological Institute, announced plans to create the Bret Michaels Hospitality and Music Room inside the hospital during a recent press conference. “I want to give something back to the hospital that helped save my life,” said Michaels. “Phoenix is my home, and I’m proud to be a part of this community.” In April 2010, Michaels was rushed to Barrow suffering from a subarachnoid hemorrhage, a life-threatening type of stroke that causes bleeding in the fluidfilled spaces around the base of the brain. After being released from Barrow, Michaels made a rapid recovery and went on to win Celebrity Apprentice in 2010 and enjoy a successful national concert tour. Earlier this year, he returned to St. Joseph’s to undergo a heart procedure to close a hole in his heart. Michaels’ new music room, located near patient rooms in the Barrow Neuroscience Tower, will be designed to include music listening stations and relaxation areas for patients’ families. “It will be warm and hip,” says Michaels. The room is expected to be completed in 2012. “This room will be a very welcome addition for the families of our patients,” said St. Joseph’s President and CEO Linda Hunt. “Bret has demonstrated that he is a good friend to this hospital in several ways, and we thank him.” Michaels performed at the star-studded Celebrity Fight Night in Phoenix last March. He donated a dinner in his home to Celebrity Fight Night’s live auction, an item that raised $200,000, including $20,000 from the rock star. TheMuhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Barrow is the main beneficiary of Celebrity Fight Night. ■


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alumni news

Former Barrow residents: where they are, what they’re doing David Levy, MD Neurosurgery, 1995 David Levy, a Barrow Neurological Institute alumnus, recently published Gray Matter about his experiences as a neurosurgeon. Dr. Levy finished his neurosurgery training at Barrow in 1995 and now practices in San Diego, Calif. Here’s what Amazon.com has to say about Dr. Levy’s book: A blend of medical drama and spiritual insight, Gray Matter is a fascinating account of Dr. David Levy’s decision to begin asking his patients if he could pray for them before surgery. Some are thrilled.

Some are skeptical. Some are hostile, and some are quite literally transformed by the request. Each chapter focuses on a specific case, opening with a detailed description of the patient’s diagnosis and the procedure that will need to be performed, followed by the prayer “request.” From there, readers get to look over Dr. Levy’s shoulder as he performs the operation, and then we wait—right alongside Dr. Levy, the patients, and their families—to see the final results. Dr. Levy’s musings on what successful and unsuccessful surgical results imply about God, faith, and the power of prayer are honest and insightful. As we watch him come to his ultimate conclusion that no matter what the results of the procedure are, “God is good,” we cannot help but be truly moved and inspired.

Alumni: Send us your news Email your information to cmenor@chw.edu. Please include your name, the residency program you completed, the year you graduated and where you currently practice/your title. Deadline for our next issue is March 31, 2012.

Sandipan Pati, MD Neurology, 2011 Sandipan Pati, MD, who completed his Neurology residency at Barrow Neurological Institute this year, is one of the authors of an article recently published in Nature Protocol. The article describes research into noninvasive brain stimulation using ultrasound. Since publication of the article, news of the research has been highlighted in various scientific and news media. Dr. Pati’s co-authors are Yusuf Tufail, Anna Yoshihiro and Monica M. Li, all of Arizona State University, and William J. Tyler of Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Roanoke, Virg.

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P A V I L I O N

sonntag pavilion Donor-funded educational space to open in 2012

Thank you, donors! A complete list of people who contributed to the Sonntag Pavilion is available online at SupportBarrow.org. Look for the Sonntag Academic Pavilion section under “Events & Campaigns.”

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he new Sonntag Pavilion is under construction and scheduled to be completed in early 2012. Named in honor of retired Barrow neurosurgeon Volker Sonntag, MD, the 3,000square-foot facility is being built next to the Marley Lobby on Third Avenue north of Thomas Road. The facility will be used for lectures, exhibits, demonstrations and meetings. It will include seating for up to 200 people and the latest electronic audio and video equipment. The state-of-the-art building was made possible by contributions from Barrow alumni, physicians, staff and benefactors. The new structure will be the site of a donor recognition dinner in April and of the Marian Rochelle Lecture, which is the kick-off event of the the 38th Annual Neurosurgery Symposium in May 2012. ■

Dr. Sonntag honored by alma mater Volker K.H. Sonntag, MD, Barrow Vice Chairman Emeritus, was named University of Arizona Alumnus of the Year during the university’s recent homecoming festivities. Dr. Sonntag was president of the first class to graduate from the University of Arizona College of Medicine (Class of 1971).

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a new perspective Women’s Board member shares her patient story by Catherine Menor

“When I saw my dog in a kennel on the airplane, I knew I was going home. I knew I was going to a good place.” Marilyn Parke

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arilyn Parke has been a member of the Women’s Board of Barrow Neurological Foundation for 17 years. As the member of a group that supports Barrow through fund- and friend-raising, Parke has listened to many presentations about Barrow, served as the board’s chair, co-chaired the Barrow Grand Ball and worked on various committees. After all these years, Parke thought she knew Barrow inside and out. But recently, Parke has come to know Barrow in a different way: as a patient undergoing rehabilitation for a traumatic brain injury. That experience left her eager to tell her friends on the Women’s Board about the life-changing services she has received, particularly in the Center for Transitional Neurorehabilitation (CTN). Parke and the medical director of CTN, Pamela Klonoff, PhD, were the featured speakers at a Nov. 3 meeting of the Women’s Board. “I would like to say thank you,” Parke said after Dr. Klonoff ’s presentation about CTN. “I’m so happy you have shared this knowledge with my friends.” On July 29, 2011, Parke was driving back from a market near her summer home in British Columbia, Canada, when her car was t-boned by a large pick-up truck. Emergency personnel transported Parke to a local hospital. Hours later, a Mountie knocked on the door of the Parkes’ home to tell her husband, Robin, what had happened. Twelve days later, Parke was flown to Barrow Neurological Institute. She has no memories from the week before the accident until the day of her trip back to Phoenix. “The first thing I remembered was being on the airevac plane. When I saw my dog in a kennel on the airplane, I knew

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I was going home. I knew I was going to a good place,” she says. The injury to the left side of Parke’s brain left her confused and unable to recognize even some of her closest family members. When the plane arrived in Phoenix, Parke’s daughter, Julie, was there to meet her, “but I did not recognize her. I thought she was another nurse,” Parke says. Parke spent about a month in the Neurorehabilitation Center where she gradually came to understand her brain injury and to regain some lost memories. She entered CTN on Sept. 12 to continue her recovery. CTN is an outpatient program that helps participants understand and accept their strengths and limitations so they can transition successfully back into work, school and relationships. Participants, who stay in the program anywhere from six months to a year, learn to compensate for deficits through re-training of old activities and/or introduction to new ones. After attending CTN five days a week for six weeks, Parke could see many improvements in her condition. And she says that she has much to be thankful for: her Women’s Board friends who sent dozens of notes and cards, the fact that two grandchildren stayed behind at their home in Canada instead of accompanying her to the market that fateful day and Barrow neurosurgeon Nicholas Theodore, MD, who facilitated her transfer to Barrow. With the help of CTN, she hopes to reach at least one more milestone. “I hope to be able to drive again,” says this energetic and determined woman. “My goal is to regain the lifestyle I had just a year ago.” ■


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Center for Transitional Neurorehabilitation Mission To provide supportive rehabilitative services and education to patients with brain injuries and their families; improve independent functioning in the home and community; and facilitate the return to productive work or school.

Pamela Klonoff, PhD, describes the services of the Center for Transitional Neurorehabilitation at a meeting of the Women’s Board.

Facts • In operation since 1986 • Last step in Barrow continuum of care • Serves older adolescents to older adults with moderate to severe brain injuries - traumatic brain injury (60%), stroke (25%) and others (brain tumors, anoxia, etc.) • Length of time in program: 6-12 months • Comprised of two main programs: Home Independence Program and Work/School Re-Entry Program • Treats about 60 patients a year, 737 since it opened • Employs 27 staff members, including neuropsychologists, speech-language pathologists, dietician, psychiatrist, and physical, occupational and recreational therapists

Marilyn and Robin Parke celebrated their 53rd anniversary on June 15, 2011.

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2012: barrow’s 50th Inspiring past, amazing future

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ext year marks the 50th Anniversary of Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. We are using this milestone as an opportunity to take a quick look over our shoulder and celebrate our inspiring past. But mostly we are looking ahead to Barrow’s AMAZING future. And to secure that future, Barrow Neurological Foundation has committed to raising $50 million in honor of Barrow’s 50th. This 50th anniversary marks the beginning of the “golden age” of Barrow. With the best clinical and research staff in the nation, Barrow is and will be at the forefront of finding answers to some of the most devastating medical con-

Fast Facts: Barrow Neurological Institute • Barrow opened its doors in September 1962. • In the past five decades, Barrow has grown from a community neurological center to a world-renowned leader, consistently recognized as one of the top 10 in the nation. • More than 10,000 patients come to Barrow each year from around the world. • Barrow’s patients have come from more than 100 countries. • Barrow performs more brain surgeries than any other facility in the world. • Barrow trains more neurosurgeons than any other hospital in the world. • The Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Barrow is the most comprehensive Parkinson facility in the nation. • Barrow’s new Center for Neuromodulation, Brain Tumor Research Center, and Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic are expected to dramatically change neurological treatments in the next decade. • In 2011, Barrow expanded to include a presence at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. • The 50th anniversary is only the beginning for Barrow. This is the start of Barrow’s "Golden Age."

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ditions like Parkinson’s, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, ALS, strokes, clinical depression and, of course, brain tumors. In the next 50 years, we will see advances unlike anything we have witnessed before. The words “you will never walk again” will NOT be in Barrow’s vocabulary. Barrow has a rich and bold legacy that comes to life every day in patients who come from all over the world for a miracle…and get one. This is Barrow’s 50th birthday, and we could spend a lot of time celebrating our remarkable legacy, but instead we are using it as a challenge to take medicine beyond its current frontier…to do the impossible everyday. The Barrow story has only just begun. ■


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SNEAK PREVIEW BARROW 50TH EVENTS 2012 will be a big year for Barrow Neurological Institute. Between January 1 and September 23, Barrow’s official 50th anniversary, look for lots of hoopla. Here are a few of the activities being planned: • Barrow50.org, a special website dedicated to Barrow’s 50th anniversary. Here you’ll find patient videos, a timeline of Barrow milestones, future directions for the institute and how you can contribute to Barrow’s future. The website will launch Jan. 1. • The Barrow Grand Ball on Jan. 21. The Women’s Board is pulling out all the stops to make this year’s ball a dazzling event. Benefactors are stepping up with “Gifts of Gold” to help secure a bright future for Barrow. • A special announcement in late January from Barrow researchers and physicians. It’s a secret, so we can’t say anymore. • Sonntag Academic Pavilion grand opening in April. The pavilion, named in honor of Volker Sonntag, MD, provides additional educational and display space for the many professional conferences and meetings that occur in the Marley Lobby and Goldman Auditorium. • The Barrow Neurosurgery Symposium, May 16-17, for brainy doctors from around the world. Barrow docs are planning to hike the Grand Canyon from rim to rim to rim after the symposium. We’re told this will be Dr. Robert Spetzler’s final superhuman GC feat. • Magic and the Brain on Sept. 17 at Phoenix Theatre. Make plans to attend this dazzling display of wizardry and help raise funds for Barrow. You’ll get a behind-the-scenes look at how magicians trick us, thanks to magicians Mac King and the Amazing Randy, and Barrow vision researchers Stephen Macknik, PhD, and Susana Martinez-Conde, PhD.

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st. joseph’s amazing Patient stories from the files of Barrow Neurological Institute by Lindsey Burke

Fertiss Overton

“We are so blessed that Dr. Nakaji was on call in the ER that day." Pat Overton

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Quintuple bypass heart surgery is a big deal. Follow that up with a brain aneurysm, a secondary brain bleed and a mini stroke, and it’s a wonder Fertiss Overton survived. It was just three weeks into recovery from quintuplebypass surgery that Overton was diagnosed with an aneurysm—a bulge in the weakened wall of a blood vessel in the brain. Left untreated, aneurysms often rupture and can result in disability or death. Overton, then 58, was taken to a local hospital and then quickly transferred to St. Joseph’s Del E. Webb Emergency Department. There he was seen by Barrow physician Peter Nakaji, MD, director of Minimally Invasive Neurosurgery. Overton’s aneurysm required surgery, but because of blood thinners prescribed following heart surgery, the procedure had to be pushed back 10 days to avoid the risk of a major hemorrhage. Overton spent the 10-day waiting period in a Barrow ICU. “Those days were stressful,” says Pat Overton, Fertiss’s wife. “We had to rely on strength and prayer and just watch as they drained fluid build-up from his brain.” On day 10, Dr. Nakaji successfully clipped the aneurysm. But recovery was erratic. Two weeks after returning home, Overton’s brain began to bleed again. He was rushed to a local hospital where they opened the other side of his head to drain the subdural hemorrhage. A week after that, he was stricken with a trans-ischemic attack, a mini stroke. “Although it was scary, all of this was just part of him stabilizing after the surgery,” Pat recalled. “We are so blessed that Dr. Nakaji was on call in the ER that day. We can’t thank him enough. From the day we got there, Dr. Nakaji told me it was going to be a long haul, but if we were up for it, we would pull through—and I remember just knowing that we would make it through. We were at the hospital for about five weeks, and through everything, Dr. Nakaji and the staff at Barrow were unbelievable, just remarkable.” Luckily, perhaps, Overton doesn’t recall much of the ordeal. “When you look at me, you would never imagine what I’ve gone through—with my heart and then my brain. It is God’s blessing, the blessing of a full recovery. I’m so satisfied with Barrow and so satisfied with my outcome.” ■


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Barbara Conaway Seemingly out of nowhere, Barbara Conaway experienced the onset of a bizarre headache and garbled speech—uncharacteristic of the normally well-spoken and healthy then 53-year-old. Barbara immediately went to see her primary care physician who ordered an MRI. The images revealed a meningioma—a benign brain tumor. After researching neurosurgeons in Tucson, Conaway instead decided to call Barrow Neurological Institute, where she met with Robert Spetzler, MD. “The fear and anxiety I was going through after being diagnosed, once I met Dr. Spetzler, I had absolutely no doubt that he was the doctor for me,” she says. “He told me my treatment options were ‘surgery, surgery or surgery,’ so I chose surgery.” Her tumor was removed in September of 2010. “Going in was scary, but as soon as I woke up, I had such a euphoric feeling. I was surrounded by family, and it was wonderful to have that behind me.” Back home in Tucson just a couple weeks later, Conaway found it difficult to read, and her speech was garbled again. She went to a local hospital where an infection was misdiagnosed; doctors there encouraged her to return to Barrow. “Once back at Barrow, my treatment was phenomenal. Honestly, I should have just gone back there in the first place,” she said. Conaway’s recovery has been steady, but there have been challenges along the way, including a seizure three months ago that has led her to quit driving temporarily. “But more than anything, I wake up every morning happy to be alive, and I attribute that to Barrow,” she says. “Knowing what could have happened if I hadn’t come here just makes me so incredibly grateful.” ■

Artist Barbara Conaway donated a painting of sunflowers to Barrow to thank the institute for her care.

“He told me my treatment options were ‘surgery, surgery or surgery,’ so I chose surgery.” Barbara Conaway

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benefactor briefs BRAINS Clinic gets face lift, thanks to Arizona sports teams In August, the BRAINS (Barrow Resource for Acquired Injury to the Nervous System) program showed off its newly remodeled space at an open house for St. Joseph’s employees. Sports items donated by the Arizona Cardinals, the Phoenix Mercury and the Phoenix Suns now decorate the clinic, brightening the space and reinforcing the concussionprevention messages of the clinic.

Right, Mercury players Nakia Sanford and Temeka Johnson with Javier Cardenas, MD, and Christina Kwasnica, MD, in the remodeled BRAINS Clinic.

Beer for Brains holds RAREaffair On Nov. 4, nearly 800 beer lovers gathered to enjoy rare craft beers and raise funds for brain tumor research at Barrow Neurological Institute. The RAREaffair, a fundraiser thrown by the Beer for Brains Foundation, was held at Talking Stick Resort. The no-limit food-and-drink-tasting event featured more than 75 beers for sipping, along with wine and gourmet food. Proceeds benefit the Barrow Brain Tumor Research Center. The Beer for Brains Foundation was established by Louis Dolgoff who lost his beloved wife Laurie to a glioblastoma in 2009. Laurie was a patient at Barrow. For more information, visit TheBeerForBrainsFoundation.org.

Louis Dolgoff (far left) and friends at the RAREaffair.

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Spirit of Giving winners named Shelby and Stephen Butterfield, and Mary Lou and Ira Fulton received Spirit of Philanthropy Awards during the 27th Annual Philanthropy Leadership Awards Dinner sponsored by the Association of Fundraising Professionals-Greater Arizona Chapter on Nov. 16 at the Downtown Sheraton Hotel. The Butterfields have made major contributions to the hospital through their support of women’s services and the Barrow Children’s Cleft and Craniofacial Center. Shelby is the secretary of the Board of Directors for St. Joseph’s Foundation (SJF). The couple received the award on behalf of SJF.

The Fultons recently made major gifts to the hospital to create the Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disorders Clinic and to acquire a second da Vinci Surgical System robot. Ira is a member of the Barrow Neurological Foundation (BNF) Board of Trustees. BNF presented the award to the Fultons.

Construction of aquatic center begins, to be completed in 2012 Construction began on the Ashlyn Dyer Aquatic Center at St. Joseph's on Oct. 24, Ashlyn’s birthday. Ashlyn passed away in 2006 as a result of severe traumatic brain injury. The new aquatic therapy center for patients undergoing rehabilitation has been funded entirely through gifts to Barrow Neurological Foundation. The indoor pool will be completed in 2012. It is located just east of Merrill Street and Third Avenue on the St. Joseph’s campus.

National Parkinson Foundation contributes to MAPC at Barrow

Brain Tumor Research Center meets goals, receives award

The National Parkinson Foundation, Inc. made a gift of $60,000 to Barrow Neurological Foundation in support of the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center.

The Barrow Brain Tumor Research Center, headed by Nader Sanai, MD, recently received a second award from philanthropist Ray Thurston—this one for $360,000. Thurston pledged a total of $3 million to Barrow Neurological Foundation to be paid as the BBTRC reaches goals established by Dr. Sanai and Thurston.

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coming soon Knock-Out Parkinson’s Charity Golf Tournament Friday, Dec. 9 Gainey Ranch Golf Club This is the inaugural event for this fundraiser for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Barrow. It is sponsored by the National Parkinson Foundation-Arizona Chapter. The tournament includes a reception, dinner and dancing. Information: Kris Watts, 602-406-4921

2012 Barrow Grand Ball Saturday, January 21 Arizona Biltmore The Barrow Grand Ball, now in its 47th year, is one of Arizona’s premier black-tie fundraisers. Proceeds benefit Barrow Neurological Institute. Chairmen: Nita Francis and Nancy Gaintner Reservation information: Sally Guenther, 602-840-4542

Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf Thursday evening and Friday, April 19-20 Scottsdale Plaza Resort (Thursday dinner and auction) McCormick Ranch Golf Club (tournament) This annual tournament is Lou Grubb’s way of thanking Barrow for the care he received in 1986 for a ruptured aneurysm. The fundraiser includes dinner and live and silent auctions on Thursday night; and lunch, an 18-hole tournament and awards dinner on Friday. Co-chairmen: Mike Medici and Dennis Sage Information: Barrow Neurological Foundation, 602-4063041.

SSBTR Phoenix/Scottsdale Walk-a-Thon Saturday, February 23 Saguaro High School, 6250 N. 82nd St., Scottsdale Students Supporting Brain Tumor Research sponsors an annual walk in the Valley to raise funds for brain tumor research at Barrow, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, the Translational Genomic Research Institute and the National Brain Tumor Society. Information: SSBTR.org

Celebrity Fight Night Saturday, March 24 JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa With guest of honor Muhammad Ali celebrating his 70th birthday this year, Celebrity Fight Night XVIII promises to be an especially memorable evening. Celebrities and professional athletes from across the US will come together to enjoy entertainment, dinner and auctions and to raise money for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center and other charities. Reservations: 602-956-1121 More information: CelebrityFightNight.org

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High jinks on the links at Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf.


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disability etiquette Barrow Connection asks: How are your communication skills?

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f you’re like most people, you’ve probably felt unsure about how to communicate or interact with a person who has a disability. Barrow Connection—a new program that helps people with disabilities live healthy, active, productive lives after discharge from the hospital— offered an insider’s look at the topic on Oct. 13 at St. Joseph’s. Scott Hogsett and Tony DeReinzi spoke frankly about the frustrations of living in a world where many people view them as different. They shared some of their biggest pet peeves— being referred to as “wheelchair bound,” being given that “it sucks to be you” smile or being patted on the back and told, “It’s great to to see you out here.” So how can you improve your communications with and about people with disabilities? Here are a few tips from the US Department of Labor: • Offer common courtesies to people with disabilities. Extend your hand to shake hands or hand over a business card. If the individual cannot shake your hand or grasp the card, he or she will tell you and direct you where to place the card. • If the person has a speech impairment or you’re having difficulty understanding what he or she is saying, ask him or her to repeat, rather than pretend to understand. Listen carefully and repeat back what you think you heard. • If you believe that an individual with a disability needs assistance, offer the assistance, but wait for your offer to be accepted before you try to help. • If you wish to get the attention of a person who is deaf, tap the person gently on the shoulder or arm. Look directly at the person, and speak clearly in a normal tone of voice. Keep your hands away from your face, and use short, simple sentences. If the person uses a sign language interpreter, speak directly to the person, not the interpreter. • If you are speaking to a person who is blind, be sure to identify yourself at the beginning of the conversation and announce when you are leaving. Don’t be afraid to use common expressions that refer to sight, such as “See you later.”

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Tony DeReinzi demonstrates what the term “wheelchair bound” means to him. “My wheelchair gives me liberty. It is not a prison,” he says. DeReinzi prefers the phrase “uses a wheelchair.” Jo Crawford assists DeReinzi, while Scott Hogsett looks on. • If you encounter a person with a service animal, such as a dog, do not touch or distract the animal. Service animals are working, and it breaks their training to interact with others. When the animal is not working, some owners allow interaction, but ask first. • During a conversation with a person who uses a wheelchair, if at all possible, put yourself at the person’s eye level. Never lean on or touch a person’s wheelchair or any other assistive device—it is an invasion of the person’s personal space. • If you are speaking to a person with a cognitive disability, you may need to repeat or rephrase what you say. If you are giving instructions on how to perform a task, you may also need to give the instructions in writing. ■


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barrow foundation uk Extending Barrow’s reach overseas

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arrow’s home is Phoenix, but its reputation for excellence is becoming truly international. Its first formal outreach is in London, England, where the Barrow Foundation UK is based. We hope to build on this presence to support Barrow’s efforts in neuroscience excellence. The Barrow Foundation UK is a non-profit organization that raises funds for education and research in the neurosciences. It was set up as a result of a gift from Marjorie Newsome. Newsome suffered from epilepsy and was referred to John Green, MD, Arizona’s first neurosurgeon and Barrow’s first director. After successful treatment at Barrow, she was able to practice psychotherapy in England, and she and Dr. Green remained friends throughout her life. When she died in 1996, she left her estate to Barrow to further the neurosciences; Barrow Foundation UK was set up to administer the gift. Our Board of Trustees has established and endowed three academic chairs at Barrow in Neuropsychology, Clinical Neuropsychology and Epilepsy. These chairs are held by world-class physician-scientists whose research is designed to improve patient outcomes and care. In addition to creating these endowed chairs, the Barrow Foundation UK established the Marjorie Newsome Travelling Fellowship in 2003 to enable the winner of one of the premier prizes in UK neurosurgery to come to Barrow for training and observation. This fosters the sharing of knowledge and techniques between the UK and the US, improving care standards and physician relationships.

by Judith Beresford

“I could not have anticipated the volume, breadth and quality of clinical work to which I was exposed. It was an excellent opportunity to learn not only due to the breadth of cases but the sheer scale of the institute. I cannot recommend the experience I had too highly,” said one of our UK-based trainees. Barrow Foundation UK also provides a grant to the Neuroscience Nurses Association. UK nurses selected for the Expert Exchange Program spend several weeks at Barrow observing and, upon their return, present research papers to share what they have learned to their colleagues. The more established Barrow becomes in the UK—and it is becoming easier and equally tax efficient even for US residents to donate overseas—the more chairs and exchange programs the Barrow Foundation UK can fund. So, what’s next? At the Barrow Foundation UK we believe we can do much more to expand the global reach of Barrow. First and foremost—in conjunction with the new Barrow Brain Tumor Research Center and Barrow Center for Neuromodulation—we are exploring ways to partner with top medical institutions in the UK and, potentially, with key centers of excellence around the world, such as in Israel. We are also working on ways to make London a pathway for international referrals to Barrow. We believe that in this way the generous spirit of Newsome’s gift and what it has achieved so far will be amplified many times over in the future, contributing to an international bridge that can only make Barrow stronger. ■

Barrow Foundation UK has funded three endowed chairs at Barrow (left to right): the Newsome Chair in Epileptology, held by David M. Treiman, MD; the Newsome Chair of Neuropsychology, held by George Prigatano, PhD; and the Newsome Chair in Neurosurgery Research, held by Mark Preul, MD.

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news Bravo! • Scientists Susana Martinez-Conde, PhD, and Stephen Macknik, PhD, have been selected by Scientific American Mind magazine to co-author the publication’s popular column about illusions. • Virginia Prendergast, NP-C, CNRN, nurse manager of Advanced Practice Nurses at Barrow, has been recognized as a Neuro Nurse Hero by the Arizona Nurses Association. • Once again U.S. News & World Report has recognized Barrow Neurological Institute as one of the top 10 neuroscience centers in the country. • Fourteen of the neurosurgeons recognized by U.S. News & World Report as among the nation’s top one percent are graduates of a Barrow residency or fellowship program. Another 15 are ranked in the top 10 percent of all neurosurgeons. ��� Barrow neurosurgeon William White, MD, was featured in the June 2011 issue of the Pituitary Network Association e-newsletter. In the article, he discusses surgical practice, medical education and research at the Barrow Pituitary Center. Dr. White, who has practiced at Barrow since 1976, is among three percent of neurosurgeons nationwide who have completed more than 1,000 pituitary surgery cases. He is the medical director of the Barrow Pituitary Center, which he developed. • Nader Sanai, MD, director of the Barrow Brain Tumor Research Center, led a study that identified a new pathway of stem cell activity in the brain that represents potential targets of brain injuries affecting newborns. The study was published in Nature.

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Barrow Connection offers Day at Bondurant Individuals with disabilities got the rare opportunity to race cars during an event sponsored Nov. 5 by Barrow Connection and the Bob Bondurant School of High Performance Driving in Chandler. About 75 people, many in wheelchairs, participated; 25 received specialized instruction along with the opportunity to experience adapted high performance driving, while another 50 experienced hot laps up to 110 mph with professional Bondurant drivers.

New foundation CEO named Kathy X. Kramer has been named president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Foundation (SJF) and Barrow Neurological Foundation (BNF). She was formerly vice president, leadership gifts for SJF and BNF. Throughout her three decades in fundraising, Kramer has successfully served in nearly every capacity of fund development, including strategic planning, annual drives, major gift solicitations, board development and capital campaigns. Before joining St. Joseph’s in 2004, Kramer worked at Mayo Foundation, the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff and Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. Kramer has served as president of both the Greater Arizona and Northern Arizona chapters of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and the Association of Health Care Professionals. She is the current president of the Arizona Planned Giving Round Table. Kramer was named the 2003 Fund Raising Executive of the Year by the Greater Arizona Chapter of AFP. She has a degree in journalism from Northern Arizona University. In addition, Diane Abraham, president of the CHW Foundation – East Valley and vice president of philanthropy for Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical Centers, has been named the CHW Arizona service area leader of philanthropy. As service area leader, she will be responsible for developing, monitoring and managing a comprehensive philanthropic resource program and for integrating the development efforts for CHW’s Arizona Foundations.


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Barrow Neurological Foundation adds board members Six community members recently joined the Board of Trustees at Barrow Neurological Foundation. Angela Cesal serves as auditor of the execuitive committee of Ruentex, a publicly traded company with real estate holdings in Taipei and China and one of the country’s largest textile manufacturing companies. Michael Haenel has more than 26 years experience in the sale and leasing of industrial and back-office buildings and land with BRE Commercial. He is a member of the Thunderbirds and a board member of Brophy College Preparatory, the Crossroads and Lodestar Day Resource Center. Michael R. King is a founding partner of Gammage and Burnham Attorneys at Law. His practice emphasizes creditors’ rights and construction issues and includes consulting and supervising in all areas of business for the firm. Larry Mayhew owned and operated Professional

Pharmacy from 1971 to 2005 when he sold the business and retired. He has been a member of the Arizona Pharmacy Association since 1970, serving as president from 1984-1985. He is a board member at Hospice of the Valley and serves on the national alumni advisory council for Drake University’s College of Pharmacy. Dan Pierce, senior vice president at Kitchell, has been involved in the construction of hundreds of hospitals and healthcare facilities throughout the Southwest. Dan is involved in the American Society for Healthcare Engineering, Healthcare Forum, Healthcare Administrators Forum and the American Hospital and Health Association. Robert Ramsey pioneered, designed and implemented the EMS/public private partnership and EMS model for dedicated 911 emergency and hospital ambulance services. He founded Southwest Ambulance and Air Med, Inc., a transcontinental medical air service.

Brain aneurysm support group meets at Barrow

Imaging Center reports on research

Members of the Joe Niekro Foundation Brain Aneurysm Support Group watched an aneurysm surgery in the Eller TelePresence @ The BARROW conference room during their July meeting. The group meets the third Wednesday of the month at Barrow Neurological Institute. The Joe Niekro Foundation was established by Natalie Niekro in 2007 in honor of her father, Joe Niekro, who lost his life from a sudden ruptured brain aneurysm in October 2006. The foundation’s goal is to increase awareness of aneurysms and raise funds for education, patient/family support, and research. For more information about this 501(c)(3) organization, visit JoeNiekroFoundation.org.

Researchers in the Keller Center for Imaging and Innovation are conducting a number of studies: • In one study, scientists examined the changes in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease. Changes in the brain structure as the mice aged were correlated to deficits in spatial learning, similar to what is seen in humans with Alzheimer’s. The study was conducted by Gregory H. Turner, PhD, and Jiong Shi, PhD. Results were published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. • In a current project, Dr. Turner and Vinodh Narayanan, MD, are investigating the use of diffusion imaging to differentiate between cortical neuronal density in normal mice and in a genetic mouse model of Rett’s syndrome. The scientists expect any differences detected between the mice to lead to a biomarker for Rett’s syndrome in children. • Dr. Narayanan and Kevin Bennett, PhD, at Arizona State University are examining axonal transport in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis. This method can be used in drug discovery for evaluating the efficacy of different therapies. Their research has been presented at an international imaging meeting.

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year-end giving Contribute to Barrow Neurological Foundation by Dec. 31 and get a nice income-tax deduction for 2011 by Kathy Kramer President and CEO St. Joseph’s Foundation and Barrow Neurological Foundation

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hroughout America’s history, the philanthropic spirit has changed the face of neighborhoods and entire communities. Americans seem to have cultivated and nurtured a brand of generosity that leverages resources and results in an impact that is lasting. Thanks to this heritage, a bit of careful planning makes it possible to maximize the impact of charitable intent and multiply your resources at work. This is especially true when you consider tax benefits that can result from gifts that you make during this calendar year. One of the constants in our changing tax laws is the recognition of the vital role charitable organizations play in the building of strong communities. For this reason, our tax laws continue to leverage every dollar given to a qualified charitable organization by providing a charitable income-tax deduction. And while most Americans may be familiar with the terminology, it is easy to overlook the bottom-line impact of a simple gift. In fact, when an individual or family chooses to write a check to charity, Uncle Sam actually picks up a portion of the amount given in the form of an income-tax deduction. So, let’s look at an example of how Uncle Sam covers part of the gift. Mrs. Sample wants to make a $1,000 gift to her favorite charity this year. Therefore, she gives her favorite charity a $1,000 check. As a result of her gift, she receives a $1,000

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income-tax deduction. Assuming a 30 percent tax bracket, Mrs. Sample may save $300 in taxes. In other words, Uncle Sam “pays” for $300 of the $1,000 gift! So please consider making your year-end gift to Barrow Neurological Foundation and utilizing the charitable tax deduction on your 2011 tax return. For more information, please contact Kathy Kramer at 602-406-1042. ■

“When an individual or family chooses to write a check to charity, Uncle Sam actually picks up a portion of the amount given in the form of an income-tax deduction.”


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Barrow magazine Volume 23, Issue 2, 2011