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Water

World, Now-

The resilient concept of floating communities, and life on the open ocean. by Kelli Sroka

I must admit; although I find myself deeply troubled by the current state of affairs, I also find I am mesmerized by daydreams of a world yet to come. With the drastic environmental changes taking place and with the rapid expansion of technological capabilities, we sit at the forefront of a powerful time of transformation. I remind myself often that I incarnated here and now to witness and participate in the shift that is currently taking place, and the emergence of a new paradigm we are preparing to step into. With technology ten years ahead of where it was predicted to be at this time, my hope lies in the overlap of advancements and global intolerances. While environmental devastation and degradation are happening more quickly than leading scientists had anticipated, there are parts of me that feel the irony is in the hopes that appropriate technology will be the fundamental driving force which may save the human population from extinction.

Flashbacks take me into early memories of the film Water World. This movie was released in 1995, but took place in a post apocalyptic world in the distant future, around 2500. The polar ice caps had melted and sea levels had risen to cover all solid land. The remains of human civilization were now isolated to floating communities, and soil was a rare and beautiful commodity. I first watched this when I was very young, but the thought has intrigued me throughout my entire adult life. Over the years, the idea of floating communities has fascinated me and the analytics of such a concept have now sprung into fruition. What if we were able to create islands of paradise on the sea? Inside beautiful little coves and inlets, close to the shore yet far enough away to give the earth some time and space to heal and regenerate. What if we took a break from manipulating landscapes to suit our materialistic desires? Mega towers are predicted to be

the housing structures of the future, and for some of the same reasoning. If we lived vertically in massive buildings, we would have much less impact on the land and we may be able to mitigate, repair and rectify the damage that we have done. As a human who has always been inspired by alternate ways of existing, I began researching the possibilities of floating communities while I was living in an eco-village in Tofino, British Columbia. What I found blew my mind. One of the most beautiful and functional floating islands in the entire world was located just a short 30 minute boat ride away in an area called Freedom Cove. Both offshore and off grid, Wayne Adams and Catherine King have been living on an artificial island they created 25 years ago in an isolated cove. They are floating a million pounds, and are virtually indestructible. Functional at a small scale, I began to wonder what this may look like on a much larger scale, and what the pros and cons of this type of design would entail.

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Barnacle Babes Vol 3 Issue 2 - Ocean Appreciation  

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