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The Armed Man !

First World War Memorial Concert Souvenir Programme 50p

! ! ! ! ! ! !BARCLAYS HOUSE CHOIR !Chairman: Dave Cooke !! ST. PETER’S ORCHESTRA Leader: Andrew Foot

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Sarah Rickett Soprano

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David Beeby Organist

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JAMES EATON Conductor

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at St Peter’s Church, Parkstone

by kind permission of the Rector & PCC

!! in the presence of ! Mr Richard Dimbleby DL

Deputy Lord Lieutenant of Dorset

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together with

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His Worshipful the Mayor of Poole and Consort !

Councillor Mr Peter Adams and Mrs Brenda Adams !

and

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The Sheriff of Poole

Councillor Jo Clements!

! ! ! !Proudly supported by ! !

bhchoir.org.uk


PROGRAMME !

Please hold your applause until the very end of each work. Thank you.

! The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace

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1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

The Armed Man Kyrie Save Me from Bloody Men Sanctus Hymn Before Action Charge! Angry Flames Torches Agnus Dei Now the Guns have Stopped Benedictus Better is Peace

1 2 3 4 5

Karl Jenkins

Bob Chilcott

C.V. Stanford

John Rutter

Kyrie Gloria Sanctus Benedictus Agnus Dei

Postlude in D

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Interval

A Little Jazz Mass

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Performed by David Beeby

Gloria 1 2 3

Gloria in excelsis Deo Domine Deus, Rex caelestis Quoniam tu solus sanctus


! Sarah Rickett ﹣ Soprano !

At the end of tonight’s concert a retiring collection will be taken in ! support of the Royal British Legion. ! !The Legion provides practical, ! emotional and financial support to all of the British Armed Forces ! members past and present, and their families. ! They actively campaign to improve lives and safeguard the Military ! their Covenant between the nation and its ! armed forces. Their mission is to welfare , comr adeship, ! provide  representation and Remembrance for ! the armed forces community. !

Sarah has been performing for a number of years across the region with a variety of chamber choirs and as a soloist. She has a long-standing relationship with St Peter's, having been Head of Music in the church's middle school and part of the community, including getting married here. She now lives and works in Salisbury where she is Director of Learning and Outreach at the cathedral.

! David Beeby ﹣ Organist !

David is Head of Music at Poole Grammar School, where he leads the class teaching, instrumental tuition and extra-curricular music provision. He is also a freelance organist and choir director and is an active composer, with several choral works and arrangements for choir, orchestra and jazz band to his credit.

! James Eaton ﹣ Conductor !

James has held posts as Assistant Organist at Romsey Abbey, Leeds Parish Church, Rochester Cathedral and Cardiff Metropolitan Cathedral. He holds a degree in music and is also a qualified teacher. He has toured extensively as an accompanist and soloist, has been broadcast on BBC radio and television, and performed for Her Majesty The Queen. James works as a freelance musician, teaching, giving recitals, and holding the post of Director of Music at St Michael and All Angels Church, Southampton. He succeeded Jim Grocott as Musical Director of the Barclays House Choir in January 2012.


ABOUT THE WORKS ! !

The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace

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Commissioned by the Royal Armouries Museum for the celebration of the millennium, Karl Jenkins' The Armed Man has rapidly become a hugely popular modern choral work. Jenkins intermingles settings of Latin Mass with texts from the bible and from poetry by Rudyard Kipling and others.

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The first movement is a re-working of the 15th century song L'Homme Armé, from which the work takes its name, and upon which many Renaissance Mass settings were based. It begins with the beat of military drums, to accompany a marching army. Tonight that army is represented by standard bearers from the Royal British Legion.

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The work’s second movement is a Moslem Call to Prayer, which we omit tonight in deference to the Christian building we are in.

! Guy Wilson, former Master of the Armouries, writes: !

“After the martial scene is set, the style and pace changes and we are prepared for reflection by the Kyrie, which pays homage to the past by quoting (in the Christe Eleison section) from Palestrina’s setting of L’Homme Armé. Next, to a plainsong setting, we hear words from the Psalms asking for God’s help against our enemies. The Sanctus that follows is full of menace, and has a primeval, tribal character that adds to its power. The menace grows in the next movement as Kipling’s Hymn Before Action builds to its final devastating line ‘Lord grant us strength to die.’

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War is now inevitable. Charge opens with a seductive paean to martial glory which is followed by the inevitable consequence – war, in all its uncontrolled cacophony of destruction, then the eerie silence of the battlefield after the battle and, finally, the burial of the dead. Surely nothing can be worse than this? But think again. At the very centre of the work is Angry Flames, an excerpt from a poem about the horrors of the atom bomb attack on Hiroshima written by a poet who was there at the time and died in 1953 of leukaemia brought on by exposure to radiation. But if we think that the obscenity of this mass destruction is new to our consciousness, we must reconsider as we listen to the eerily similar passage from the ancient Indian epic ‘The Mahàbharàta’, told in Torches.

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From the horror of mass destruction the work turns to remember that one death is one too many, that each human life is sacred and unique. First the Agnus Dei, with its lyrical chorale theme, reminds us of Christ’s ultimate sacrifice. This is followed by an elegiac setting of some lines I wrote (to accompany one of the dramatic interpretations we use in the museum) about the feelings of loss and guilt that so many of the survivors of the First World War felt when they came home but their friends did not. Even the survivors can be hurt to destruction by war. The Benedictus heals those wounds in its slow and stately affirmation of faith and leads us to the final, positive, climax of the work.”

The final movement is in two parts. It begins back where we started, with the theme from L'Homme Armé this time set to English words from Lancelot and Guinevere’s declaration, born of bitter experience, that peace is better than war. The reference to the ‘thousand years of old’ poses the question of whether we want this new millennium (new at the time that the work was written) to be like the last? Or do we join with Tennyson to ‘Ring in the thousand years of peace’?

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The second part of the final movement is a quiet hymn setting of words from the Book of Revelation, affirming that change is possible, that sorrow, pain and death can be overcome. Dona nobis pacem.

! ! ! A Little Jazz Mass !

Bob Chilcott is one of the busiest and most popular choral composers and conductors in Britain today. He has been involved in choral music for most of his life. He was a chorister and then a choral scholar in the choir of King’s College, Cambridge, and later sang with, composed and arranged for the celebrated King’s Singers. Since 1997 he has worked as a full-time composer. Today, Bob is in great demand internationally as composer, conductor and choral consultant. He has been invited to appear at many important international festivals, and has worked with some of the world’s leading choirs. At home, he is currently Principal Guest Conductor of the BBC Singers.

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During his time with the King’s Singers, Chilcott had the good fortune to work with such jazz luminaries as George Shearing, Richard Rodney Bennett and John Dankworth. His wonderful setting of the Latin Missa Brevis, A Little Jazz Mass, was composed for the 2004 Crescent City Choral Festival in New Orleans. A relaxed, easy tempo Kyrie is followed by a Gloria with driving, upbeat outer sections enclosing a lyrical central section. The music of the Sanctus could be described as a ‘jazz lullaby’; the Benedictus ups the tempo a little, building to a strong forte for


the ‘Hosanna’. Clearly inspired by the blues, the Agnus Dei reaches a powerful climax at ‘Dona nobis pacem’ before arriving at a peaceful conclusion. It says much for Chilcott’s skill that he has successfully brought together two very diverse traditions - the Latin mass and the jazz idiom - in such an expressive and natural way.

! ! ! Postlude in D !

John Bawden

Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924) was an Irish composer, teacher, organist and conductor. He was one of the founding professors of the Royal College of Music, teaching composition there for most of his life. His pupils there included Gustav Holst and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Stanford composed a substantial number of concert works, including seven symphonies, but he is best known for his church music. The Postlude in D was composed in February 1908, published as part of his second set of ‘Six Short Preludes and Postludes’.

! ! ! Gloria !

Though he is perhaps best known for his carols and other short pieces, John Rutter also has a number of large-scale works for chorus and orchestra to his name. Most of these received their first performances in the United States, where he is a frequent visitor, writing regularly for American choirs and conducting performances of his own music.

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The Gloria was commissioned by the ‘Voices of Mel Olson’, and first performed on May 5th 1974 in Omaha, Nebraska, conducted by the composer. It was originally scored for brass, percussion and organ, with the edition for full orchestra, used tonight, made later by the composer. The piece is a setting in three movements of the Latin text of the liturgical Gloria in Excelsis Deo. The first movement establishes the festive nature of the piece, with exuberant writing for both choir and instruments. The second movement, ‘Domine Deus, Rex caelestis’, is by contrast reflective in nature, with florid decorations from the woodwind accompaniment. The third and final movement - ‘Quoniam tu solus sanctus’ opens with a syncopated theme, followed by a lively fugal section which leads to a triumphant conclusion.

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John Bawden


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THE TEXTS

The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace

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1 The Armed Man L’homme armé doit on douter. On a fait partout crier, que chacun se viegne armer d‘un haubregon de fer. Translation: The armed man must be feared. Everywhere it has been decreed that every man should arm himself with an iron coat of mail.

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3 Kyrie Kyrie eleison. Christe eleison. Kyrie eleison. Translation: Lord have mercy. Christ have mercy. Lord have mercy.

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4 Save me from Bloody Men Be merciful unto me, O God for man would swallow me up; he fighting daily opresseth me. Mine enemies would daily swallow me up; for they be many that fight against me, o thou most high. Defend me from them that rise up against me. Deliver me from the workers of iniquity and save me from bloody men.

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5 Sanctus Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth. Pleni sunt coeli et terra gloria tua. Hosanna in excelsis. Translation: Holy, holy, holy Lord God of hosts. Heaven and earth are full of thy glory. Hosanna in the highest.

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6 Hymn before Action Text: Rudyard Kipling The Earth is full of anger, the Seas are dark with wrath, the Nations in their harness, go up, against our path. Ere yet, we lose the Legions, ere yet, we draw the blade, Jehova of the thunders, Lord God of battles, aid! High lust and froward bearing, proud heart, rebellious brow – deaf ear and soul uncaring, we seek Thy mercy now! The sinner that forswore Thee, the fool that passed Thee by, our times are known before Thee, Lord, grant us strength to die!

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7 Charge! Text: John Dryden and Jonathan Swift The trumpets loud clangour excites us to arms with shrill notes of anger and mortal alarms. How blest is he who for his country dies. The double, double beat of the thundering drum cries, ‘Hark the Foes come’; charge, charge, tis too late to retreat. How blest is he who for his country dies. Charge, charge!


Silence, followed by the Last Post.

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8 Angry Flames Text: Toge Sankichi (tr.) Pushing up through smoke from a world half darkened by overhanging cloud, the shroud that mushroomed out and struck the dome of the sky. Black, red, blue dance in the air. Merge, scatter glittering sparks, already tower over the whole city. Quivering like seaweed, the mass of flames spurts forward. Popping up in the dense smoke, crawling out wreathed in fire; countless human beings on all fours. In a heap of embers that erupt and subside. Hair rent, rigid in death. There smoulders a curse.

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9 Torches Text: Mahàbharàta The animals scattered in all directions, screaming terrible screams. Many were burning, others were burnt. All were shattered and scattered mindlessly, their eyes bulging. Some hugged their sons, others their fathers and mothers, unable to let them go, and so they died. Others leapt up in their thousands, faces disfigured and were consumed by the fire. Everywhere were bodies squirming on the ground, wings eyes and paws all burning they breathed their last as living torches.

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10 Agnus Dei Agnus dei, qui tollis peccata mundi: dona nobis pacem. Translation: Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world: grant us peace.

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11 Now the Guns have Stopped Text: Guy Wilson Silent, so silent now, now the guns have stopped. I have survived all, I, who knew I would not. But now you are not here. I shall go home alone; and must try to live life as before, and hide my grief. For you, my dearest friend, who should be with me now, not cold, too soon, and in your grave. Alone.

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12 Benedictus Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini. Hosanna in excelsis. Translation: Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest.

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13 Better is Peace Text: Thomas Malory and Alfred Lord Tennyson Better is peace than always war. And better is peace than evermore war. L’homme armé doit on douter, doit on douter? On a fait partout crier, que chacun se viegne armer d‘un haubregon de fer. Ring out the thousand wars of old. Ring in the thousand years of peace. Ring out the old, ring in the new. Ring, happy bells across the snow. The year is going let him go; ring out the false ring in the true. Ring out the old shapes and foul disease, ring out the narrowing lust of gold; ring out the thousand years of old, ring in the thousand years of peace, ring


in the valiant man and free, the larger heart, the kindlier hand; ring out the darkness of the land; ring in the Christ that is to be. God shall wipe away all tears And there shall be no more death. Neither sorrow nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain. Praise the Lord.

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A Little Jazz Mass

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Kyrie

See Armed Man No. 3.

Gloria

See below.

Sanctus

See Armed Man No. 5.

Benedictus

See Armed Man No. 12.

Agnus Dei

See Armed Man No. 10.

Gloria

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1 Gloria in excelsis Gloria in excelsis Deo et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis. Laudamus te, benedicimus te, adoramus te, glorificamus te, gratias agimus tibi propter magnam gloriam tuam. Translation: Glory to God on high, and on earth peace, good will towards men. We praise thee, we bless thee, we worship thee, we glorify thee, we give thanks to thee for thy great glory.

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2 Domine Deus Domine Deus, Rex cælestis, Deus Pater omnípotens. Domine Fili Unigenite, Jesu Christe, Domine Deus, Agnus Dei, Filius Patris, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis; qui tollis peccata mundi, suscipe deprecationem nostram. Qui sedes ad déxteram Patris, miserére nobis.

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Translation: O Lord God, heavenly King, God the Father Almighty. O Lord, the onlybegotten Son, Jesus Christ; O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us; Thou that takest away the sins of the world, receive our prayer. Thou that sittest at the right hand of God the Father, have mercy upon us.


3 Quaniam tu solus Sanctus Quoniam tu solus Sanctus; tu solus Dominus; tu solus Altissimus, Jesu Christe, cum Sancto Spiritu: in gloria Dei Patris. Amen.

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Translation: For thou only art holy; thou only art the Lord; thou only, O Christ, with the Holy Ghost, art most high in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

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! !Violin 1 !Andrew Foot

Barbara Hooper Peter Castle Dorothea McCabe

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Violin 2 Kathy Bocking Cathy Beeby Martin Briggs Liz O’Connell

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Viola Martin Tompkins Andrew Bellis Graham Hancock Michael Oliver

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Cello Kathy Jackson Mary Apperley Harriet Goody

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Double Bass Barry Glynn

ST PETER’S ORCHESTRA Flute Alastair Hume Elspeth Cole !

Horn Mike Hall Ann Thornton

Oboe Christopher Edwards Sam Priest

Trumpets Winston Leese Dennis Curlett Martin Ings

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Cor Anglais / Oboe Helen Simpson

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Clarinet Gwenda Malpass-Stocks Ruth Parry

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Bass Clarinet Dugald Clark

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Bassoon Miles Nipper Robert Child

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Contra Bassoon Alison Marwick

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Trombone Colin Francis Bobi Francis Colin Williams

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Tuba Adam Glynn

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Percussion Dan Priest Dafydd Thomas-Hillman Jack Witton Andy Poole

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Organ & Piano David Beeby


! !Soprano !Debbie Cooke !Carol Eaton !Sylvia Elkins !Ann Hitchcoe !Marilyn Jones !Sarah King !Judith Lancaster !Margaret Lewis !Mary Norrish !Siobhan Pauley !Marian Pearce !Pam Spencer !Hilary Spillard !Sally Tagg !Sue Verrall !Sue Whitney !Joan Willis ! ! ! ! !

BARCLAYS HOUSE CHOIR Alto Pat Baker Gillian Blake Isabel Broom Pam Brown Peggy Brown Joy Chiari Hilary Forrest Gill Goreham Joan Hawkins Isabel McConville Heather Moloney Beth Moore Diana Peel Elaine Porter Michele Smyth Olwen Reeve Vickie Thomas Marian White Yvonne Young

Tenor Tony Benson Dave Cooke Keith Hollis Tom Moore Adrian Purkiss

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Bass Tony Gatward Tony Hartle Dick Keslake David Eaton

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Rehearsal Accompanist Louise Dukes

Barclays House Choir was founded in 1976, with ten founder members who all worked for the bank. Under the direction of James Grocott, who would be Musical Director for some 35 years, the choir’s membership grew steadily and was extended to others outside of the bank who wanted to sing in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere. Today, the choir is a combined workplace and community choir open to all, having performed many major works and worked with soloists including Kate Royal, Gareth Malone and cellist Natalie Clein, all of whom are now in great international demand. The choir continues to receive generous financial support from Barclays PLC, to whom we are immensely grateful.

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We are always keen to hear from potential new members. We pride ourselves on running a happy and friendly choir, so we look forward to being able to welcome you. Further information about joining the choir is available on our website.

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BARCLAYS HOUSE CHOIR

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ST. PETER’S ORCHESTRA

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JAMES EATON Conductor

A feast of Christmas music, featuring

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Carols for Choir & Audience ! SUNDAY 14TH DECEMBER, 7.30PM Advanced booking recommended

Profile for Adrian Purkiss

2014 Spring Concert  

Barclays House Choir Spring Concert 2014 Programme

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Barclays House Choir Spring Concert 2014 Programme

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