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And Analytic Report

Executive Summary and Analytic Report

November

2010

Inland Empire Labor Market Survey Riverside County San Bernardino County

(c) 2010 ERISS, Inc. Version date 02.10.2011


Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................... 2 KEY FINDINGS .............................................................................................. 4 DETAILED SURVEY RESULTS........................................................................... 7 Region and Industry ................................................................................................................... 7 Occupational Analyses ............................................................................................................. 13 Business Specific Questions ...................................................................................................... 23

SECTION 2: LABOR MARKET CHALLENGES & POTENTIAL WITHIN THE INLAND EMPIRE: AN ERISS SUMMARY REPORT................................................................................. 34 Narrative Summary .................................................................................................................. 34 I.

Demographic Profile ....................................................................................................... 35

II.

Labor Market Analysis: The Demand Side ...................................................................... 37

III.

Labor Market Analysis: The Supply Side ..................................................................... 42

IV.

Recommendations ..................................................................................................... 45

APPENDIX A: SURVEY QUESTIONS .......................................................................... 46 APPENDIX B: INDUSTRY CLUSTER DEFINITIONS ....................................................... 54

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The following Executive Summary report details the findings of a region-wide business survey of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The survey took place September through November 2010. The project was jointly planned and sponsored by the County of Riverside Economic Development Agency, the Riverside County Workforce Investment Board, and the County of San Bernardino Economic Development Agency. The project was designed to provide an indepth analysis of current Workforce skill levels and Labor Market dynamics for Riverside and San Bernardino Counties with resulting data available through an interactive internet application. The analysis was further intended to gather workforce information that will assist the County of Riverside Economic Development Agency, the Riverside County Workforce Investment Board, and the County of San Bernardino Economic Development Agency in ongoing efforts to develop strategies and enhance linkages in the Inland Empire. The collected data will assist in providing services to job seekers, employers and residents that meet real time workforce needs. Specific Goals:         

Analyze workforce skills attainment levels and gaps in the Inland Empire region. Measure employer-staffing needs. Identify businesses at risk of downsizing and/or relocating. Create a detailed inventory of local businesses. Improve the understanding of the needs and perspectives of local businesses. Identify and address the immediate concerns of individuals businesses. Develop strategies that will support economic development and growth in local employment. Identify existing and potential niche opportunities in order to enhance linkages with workforce and economic development partners and initiatives. Recommend strategies and training necessary to create a sustainable workforce environment for Inland Empire residents and businesses.

The results of the survey are to be delivered in the following ways:

    

An interactive web application – USWorks for Professionals A confidential ACCESS database – contains the raw data and a variety of pre-set report filters A password-protected employer management and lead management system (BSM) An electronic Executive Summary and Detailed Report (this document) A PowerPoint Presentation of the Report

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

SURVEY SCOPE AND METHODOLOGY The survey targeted employers with 5 or more employees. ERISS Corporation conducted the survey using a proprietary Computer Aided Telephone Interviewing (CATI) system. A stratified census style survey methodology was employed whereby an attempt was made to contact every business within the survey parameters, with the final sample representative by size and industry cluster of the population of businesses in the local region. The final contact database was comprised of 14,558 employers. These employers were stratified according to NAICs code into pre-determined targeted industry clusters or geographic locations1 (see Table below). During the survey process 2,957 of these businesses were found to be out of scope2 of the survey, resulting in a net employer base of 11,601. Of these employers 3,358 participated in the survey resulting in a 29% response rate. Cluster/Region

Location

Number of Employers

Recession Resistant

Riverside and San Bernardino Counties

3,746

Renewable Energy San Bernardino (not including businesses in the above clusters)

Riverside and San Bernardino Counties

6,486

San Bernardino County

4,326

TOTAL

ALL

14,558

Approximately 29% (3,358) of the 11,601 eligible businesses participated in the survey. The survey questions collected information from local businesses regarding such areas as:3  Projected growth and general staffing plans  Occupational demand, turnover, hiring plans and wages  Plans to expand, downsize and/or relocate  Reasons for downsizing or relocating  Key issues, concerns and challenges to local businesses  Reasons for locating in the County  Participation in international trade  Knowledge and participation in energy rebate and incentive programs  Issues and concerns in the Healthcare industry  Issues and concerns in the Transportation industry 1

NAICS codes for each industry cluster and region are provide in Appendix B Employers with wrong phone number and no new number, no answer on repeated attempts, employers with less than 5 employees. 3 Complete survey questions are provided in Appendix A. 2

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

KEY FINDINGS REGION AND INDUSTRY 

The Renewable Energy and Recession Resistant clusters both projected moderate growth in the next 12 months at 6% and 5% respectively.

The projected growth rate for San Bernardino County was 2%, and the Inland Empire region as a whole was 5%.

Businesses in the Renewable Energy cluster reported a relatively high turnover rate (12% of employees replaced yearly) as compared to the Recession Resistant cluster (7%).

The County of San Bernardino exhibited approximately the same rate of turnover (10%) as the overall Inland Empire region.

Renewable Energy employers reported the highest demand (18%), about one third of which is accounted for by turnover. The Recession Resistant cluster had 10% demand, also largely driven by turnover.

Employers in the Renewable Energy and Recession Resistant industry clusters reported a fairly low 3% and 1% respectively of all surveyed occupations as currently open.

The median starting salary for experienced employees was similar for the Renewable Energy ($16/hour) and Recession Resistant ($15/hour) industry clusters.

Employers in the Recession Resistant industry cluster reported the longest time to fill open positions for non-experienced employees.

As compared to the overall Inland Empire region, employers in the two targeted industry clusters required more work experience on average than in the overall region, with the employers in the Recession Resistant cluster most commonly reporting a requirement of ‘1 to under 2 years,’ and the Renewable Energy cluster most commonly requiring ‘2 to under 4 years.’

The most commonly reported preferred education level for all regions and industry clusters was ‘High school/GED.’ The Renewable Energy cluster had the greatest proportion of surveyed occupations with this preferred education level (70%), almost doubling the proportion in the Recession Resistant cluster (36%).

The Recession Resistant cluster had the greatest proportion of occupations for which employers reported requiring a Bachelor’s Degree or higher (28%) or License/Certification (23%), indicating a higher proportion of occupations for which specialized training or education is seen as necessary.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

OCCUPATIONAL 

High-growth occupations for the Recession Resistant cluster were typified by health and social services occupations.

High-growth occupations for the Renewable Energy cluster were characterized by production and engineering occupations.

For the overall region, occupations with the highest turnover tended to be from the Services industry.

Employers in the Recession Resistant cluster reported high turnover rates for many vocational level occupations.

For the Recession Resistant cluster, many of the occupations with the highest proportion of current openings were those that could benefit from local certification or other types of vocational training programs.

BUSINESS SPECIFIC 

A similar proportion of employers for both industry clusters reported plans to expand or hire in the next 12 months (15% to 16%).

2% or less of employers reported plans to downsize, close, or relocate outside of the County.

The most commonly reported reason for anticipated relocating, downsizing or closing was ‘declining sales’ (41%), followed by ‘availability of capital or credit’ (14%), and ‘taxes’ (13%).

The most commonly reported possible aids to business expansion were ‘additional employees,’ and ‘new/expanded facilities.’

The most commonly reported key concern or challenge for businesses was ‘declining sales’ followed by ‘cost of employee benefits,’ and ‘taxes’.

20% of surveyed employers reported they had no concerns or challenges.

When asked to report why they brought their business to Riverside or San Bernardino County, the most common response was ‘location.’

10% of surveyed businesses reported they engaged in international trade, and 43% of those employers reported they both import and export materials internationally.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

15% of employers were ‘very familiar’ with energy rebate and/or incentive programs offered by their local utility company, and a further 36% of employers were ‘somewhat familiar’ with them.

Of a list of local utilities programs, employers most commonly reported participating in the ‘lighting’ program.

54% of employers reported they had not participated in any local utility program. A large proportion of these employers reported the reason as either ‘did not own their building,’ or ‘lacked information regarding program options.’

Businesses in the Health Care industry in San Bernardino County most commonly reported that ‘lack of information on the Health Care Bill and how it affects their company’ was an issue or concern.

Businesses in the Transportation industry in San Bernardino County most commonly reported that ‘AB32 requirements’ and ‘availability of qualified workers’ were issues or concerns.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

DETAILED SURVEY RESULTS REGION AND INDUSTRY GROWTH Surveyed businesses were asked to report their current number of employees, and the number of employees projected in 12 months. This information was used to calculate a relative projected growth rate4 for 12 months from the survey. As shown below, the Renewable Energy cluster projected the greatest growth at 6%, with the Recession Resistant cluster projected to grow 5%. The projected growth rate for San Bernardino County was 2%, and the region as a whole was 5%.

TURNOVER Surveyed businesses were asked to report the annual turnover for each occupation surveyed. This information aggregated by region and industry is presented below. As shown, businesses in the Renewable Energy cluster reported the highest overall level of annual turnover (12% of employees replaced yearly). Employers in the Recession Resistant cluster reported lower turnover at 7%. The County of San Bernardino exhibited approximately the same rate of turnover (10%) as the overall Inland Empire region.

4

Projected relative growth = (number of employees in 12 months – number of employees now)/number of employees now. Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

DEMAND A relevant indicator of the staffing challenges related to specific industries and occupations can be provided by Demand. Demand provides an estimate of the percentage of workers that will need to be hired during a 12-month period due to both growth AND turnover. Demand is calculated by starting with projected growth, adding in annual turnover, and dividing by the number currently employed. It essentially provides a projected growth rate modified by turnover rates. The figure below displays Demand split into growth and turnover components. For example, the overall Inland Empire region has a 15% demand rate, comprised of 5% growth and 10% turnover. Of the targeted clusters, Renewable Energy employers reported the highest demand (18%), about one third of which is accounted for by turnover. The Recession Resistant cluster had 10% demand, also largely driven by turnover.

OPENINGS Current openings are calculated by determining the percentage of staffed positions that are currently vacant for each surveyed employer. The total percentage of current openings aggregated over targeted regions and industries is displayed in the figure to left. As shown, the overall Inland Empire region has 5% of all surveyed occupations reported as currently open. Of the clusters, Renewable Energy and Recession Resistant reported 3% and 1% respectively of all surveyed occupations as currently open.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

MEDIAN WAGES Starting median hourly wage information by region and cluster is displayed in the figure below. As shown, the two targeted clusters and the overall Inland Empire region have similar median salaries for experienced and non-experienced newly hired employees. The County of San Bernardino has markedly lower median salaries for both categories, with the gap especially wide for experienced employees.

DIFFICULTY FINDING EMPLOYEES Median Hourly Wages San Bernardino

$10 $8.00

Renewable Energy

$16 $10.00

Recession Resistant

$15 $10.00

Inland Empire

$15 $10.00

Experienced Non-Experienced

An effective indicator of labor scarcity is the average time it takes an employer to fill an open position. The longer it takes a business to fill an open position (harder to find), the greater the relative labor scarcity. The figure below displays the average number of days to fill open positions with qualified employees by industry for both experienced, and nonexperienced employees (because labor scarcity is related to the amount of job experience required).

As shown, over all surveyed employers in the Inland Empire Days to Hire Qualified Employees region, it takes an average of 44 days to fill a vacancy for an experienced employee, and 32 San Bernardino 37 days for a non-experienced 30 employee. Of the targeted Renewable Energy 45 clusters, Renewable Energy Experienced 32 displays a profile similar to the Recession Resistant Non-Experienced 42 overall region. However, 43 Recession Resistant employers Inland Empire reported taking almost as long 44 to find a non-experienced new 32 worker as an experienced new hire. This is possibly due to inherent differences in the types of occupations (and associated skill levels), typically employed by the two industries. Higher average times to find and hire non-experienced employees is often indicative of a skill or labor shortage in key areas. Due to the wide variation of occupations employed by these industries, the analysis of scarcity at the occupational level (versus industry) in following sections will reveal further details of possible skill and/or labor shortages.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

REQUIRED WORK EXPERIENCE Surveyed employers were asked to report the work experience required for each surveyed occupation. The table below shows the most commonly reported responses aggregated by targeted industry and region. For the overall region, the most commonly required work experience level was ‘none.’ However, the two targeted industry clusters required more experience on average, with the employers in the Recession Resistant cluster most commonly reporting a requirement of ‘1 to under 2 years,’ and the Renewable Energy cluster requiring ‘2 to under 4 years.’ Most commonly required level of work experience by cluster/region

Cluster/Region Inland Empire Recession Resistant Renewable Energy San Bernardino

Required Work Experience None 1 to under 2 years 2 to under 4 years None

% of occupations with this response 30 42 33 54

The figure below displays the percentage of occupations for each industry that required no work experience. As compared to the overall Inland Empire region, employers in the County of San Bernardino had the greatest proportion of surveyed occupations requiring no previous experience (54%). The two targeted clusters had smaller proportions of surveyed occupations requiring no work experience, indicating higher skill jobs generally associated with commonly employed occupations.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

PREFERRED EDUCATION LEVEL Surveyed employers were asked to report the preferred education level required for each surveyed occupation. The table below shows the most commonly reported response aggregated by industry. The most commonly preferred education level for all regions and clusters was ‘High school/GED.’ The Renewable Energy cluster had the greatest proportion of surveyed occupations with this preferred education level (70%), almost doubling the proportion in the Recession Resistant cluster (36%). Most commonly required education level by cluster/region

Cluster/Region Inland Empire Recession Resistant Renewable Energy San Bernardino

Preferred Education Level High school/GED High school/GED High school/GED High school/GED

% of occupations with this response 30 36 70 64

The figure below displays the percent of occupations for each industry that required at least some college or license/certification or more (combined up through advanced degree). The Recession Resistant cluster had the greatest proportion of occupations for which employers reported requiring a Bachelor’s Degree or higher (28%), or License/Certification (23%), indicating a higher proportion of occupations for which specialized training or education is seen as necessary.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

HIRING METHOD Surveyed employers were asked to report the most common hiring method used to hire each surveyed occupation. The table below shows the most commonly reported response aggregated by industry. The most commonly reported hiring method for most industries was ‘Referrals/Word of Mouth.’ A higher than normal proportion of hiring through referrals or word of mouth can be indicative of a slower job economy and a buyer’s market for labor. Word of job openings quickly passes to unemployed friends and former co-workers providing a pool of qualified applicants without the need for outside advertising.

Most commonly reported hiring method by cluster/region

Cluster/Region Inland Empire Recession Resistant Renewable Energy San Bernardino

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Most Common Hiring Method Referrals/Word of Mouth Referrals/Word of Mouth Referrals/Word of Mouth Referrals/Word of Mouth

% of occupations with this response 62 55 75 44

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSES5 During the survey process, businesses were asked to report which occupations they currently staffed, and information was collected on as many of these occupations as possible. For each surveyed occupation, questions were asked regarding current and future staffing, wages, hiring, benefits, and other relevant occupation level information. The following analyses display the top occupations for each category for each targeted region and cluster. Further occupational information is available through the Interactive USWorks Web Application and the electronic database provided as deliverables to this project.

PROJECTED GROWTH Projected relative growth6 for occupations in the targeted regions and clusters are shown in the table to right. The growth occupations for the Recession Resistant cluster are typified by health and social services occupations. Growth occupations for the Renewable Energy cluster are characterized by production and engineering occupations.

5

For each occupation a minimum of 5 businesses were required to be surveyed in order to calculate growth trends. A total of 187 occupations fulfilled this criterion. 6 Projected relative growth = (number of employees in 12 months – number of employees now)/number of employees now. Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

ANNUAL TURNOVER The table to right shows the occupations with the highest reported turnover rates. For the overall region, occupations with the highest turnover tended to be from the Services industry. However, the targeted industry clusters have distinctly different occupational lists, characteristic of their varying compositions. For example, employers in the Recession Resistant cluster reported high turnover rates for many vocational level occupations. Surprising in the Renewable Energy list is the presence of numerous management positions.

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OCCUPATION

Turnover Rate

Inland Empire Property Managers Fast Food Cooks Engineering Managers Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Butchers and Meat Cutters Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers Route Sales Workers Room Service Servers Construction Managers Construction Heavy Equipment Operators Recession Resistant Personal and Home Care Aides Foremen of Production and Operating Workers Certified Nursing Assistants Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists Ambulance Drivers and Attendants (Except Emergency Medical Techs) Receptionists (and Information Clerks) Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants Computer Programmers Physician Assistants Home Health Aides Renewable Energy Engineering Managers Construction Heavy Equipment Operators Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Construction Managers Computer and Information Systems Managers Counter and Rental Clerks Sheet Metal Workers Industrial Machinery Mechanics Human Resources Managers Electrical Engineers San Bernardino Industry Cluster Route Sales Workers Property Managers Fast Food Cooks Butchers and Meat Cutters Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers Foremen of Helpers, Laborers, and Material Movers Vehicle Salespersons Food Cooking Machine Operators and Tenders Short Order Cooks Janitors and Cleaners (Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners)

49% 48% 46% 39% 38% 37% 30% 30% 29% 28% 20% 14% 14% 13% 13% 13% 12% 11% 11% 11% 50% 41% 40% 31% 31% 24% 23% 23% 23% 22% 63% 52% 48% 38% 37% 35% 26% 26% 26% 26%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

DEMAND Demand is a function of projected growth plus occupational turnover. The table below shows the occupations with the highest reported demand rates, and also provides growth and turnover rates as an indicator of the components of the demand. As shown, the demand for many of the highest demand occupations in the Inland Empire is largely driven by turnover. An exception to this is the occupation ‘Social Workers’ with largely growth driven demand. For both of the targeted industry clusters the list is characterized by occupations with growth-driven demand.

OCCUPATION

Demand

Growth Turnover

Inland Empire Social Workers Sheet Metal Workers Fast Food Cooks Engineering Managers Property Managers Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Electrical Engineers Construction Heavy Equipment Operators Butchers and Meat Cutters Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers Recession Resistant Social Workers Foremen of Production and Operating Workers Personal and Home Care Aides Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists Ambulance Drivers and Attendants (Except Emergency Medical Techs) Chiropractors Health Educators Social and Community Service Managers Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants Computer Programmers Renewable Energy Retail Sales Managers Engineering Managers Sheet Metal Workers Construction Heavy Equipment Operators Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Electrical Engineers Janitors and Cleaners (Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners) Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers Construction Managers San Bernardino Industry Cluster Social Workers Fast Food Cooks Engineering Managers Property Managers Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Construction Heavy Equipment Operators Butchers and Meat Cutters Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers Vehicle Salespersons Route Sales Workers

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113% 58% 55% 54% 50% 40% 40% 39% 38% 37%

110% 36% 7% 8% 1% 1% 19% 11% 0% 0%

3% 22% 48% 46% 49% 39% 21% 28% 38% 37%

176% 36% 28% 26% 25% 20% 18% 17% 15% 15%

174% 22% 8% 13% 12% 20% 14% 12% 3% 4%

2% 14% 20% 13% 13% 0% 4% 5% 12% 11%

67% 59% 59% 55% 41% 41% 39% 39% 35% 34%

50% 9% 36% 14% 1% 19% 35% 39% 23% 3%

17% 50% 23% 41% 40% 22% 4% 0% 12% 31%

113% 55% 54% 50% 40% 39% 38% 37% 34% 33%

110% 7% 8% 1% 1% 11% 0% 0% 8% 3%

3% 48% 46% 49% 39% 28% 38% 37% 26% 30%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

OPENINGS The table to right shows the occupations with the highest reported percentage of positions reported as currently open. As with the growth and demand projections, for both the overall region and the Recession Resistant cluster, the largest proportion of current openings was for the occupation ‘Social Workers’ with 52% of all currently staffed occupations reportedly as currently open in the Inland Empire region. It is notable that for the Recession Resistant cluster, many of the occupations with the highest proportion of current openings are those that can benefit from local certification or other types of vocational training programs. The Renewable Energy cluster has many open positions for many entry level positions.

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OCCUPATION Inland Empire Social Workers Sheet Metal Workers Materials Engineers Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers Financial Managers, Branch Or Department Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters Chiropractors Electrical Engineers Insulation Workers (Floor, Ceiling, and Wall) Civil Engineers Recession Resistant Social Workers Foremen of Production and Operating Workers Chiropractors Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists Health Educators Ambulance Drivers and Attendants (Except Emergency Medical Techs) Social and Community Service Managers Physical Therapists Social and Human Service Assistants Medical Records and Health Information Technicians Renewable Energy Retail Sales Managers Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers Sheet Metal Workers Janitors and Cleaners (Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners) Purchasing Agents and Buyers (Farm Products) Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters Electrical Engineers Order Clerks San Bernardino Industry Cluster Secretaries (Except Legal, Medical, and Executive) Financial Managers, Branch Or Department Team Assemblers Security Guards Sales Managers Tire Repairers and Changers Helpers of Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers Computer and Information Systems Managers Vehicle Salespersons Desk Clerks

% Openings 52% 26% 24% 23% 21% 17% 17% 16% 16% 16% 63% 18% 17% 12% 12% 11% 11% 9% 8% 8% 33% 28% 27% 26% 20% 19% 18% 17% 16% 16% 22% 21% 19% 15% 13% 13% 11% 9% 7% 7%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

TIME-TO-FILL OCCUPATIONAL OPENINGS The table below shows the average number of days to fill an opening for the hardest to find occupations for both experienced and non-experienced employees. For experienced employees for all regions and occupations the list is topped by occupations requiring more extensive training or experience. However, many of the hardest to find occupations for non-experienced employees required extensive training as well, providing evidence of possible training gaps. It is also notable many of the occupations appear on both lists which is indicative of possible skill shortages across the spectrum of experience levels. EXPERIENCED EMPLOYEES

OCCUPATION Inland Empire Cutters and Trimmers of Meat, Poultry, and Fish Occupational Therapists Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists Education Administrators (Postsecondary) School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) Butchers and Meat Cutters Electrical & Electronic Engineering Technicians Mechanical Engineers Management Analysts Sales Managers Recession Resistant Management Analysts Occupational Therapists Dental Laboratory Technicians Senior Executives (includes Vice Presidents and Chief Executives) Physicians and Surgeons Physical Therapists Human Resources Managers Health Educators General and Operations Managers Social and Community Service Managers Renewable Energy Purchasing Agents and Buyers (Farm Products) Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists Electrical & Electronic Engineering Technicians Mechanical Engineers Sales Managers First-Line Supervisors or Managers of Trans and Material-Moving Engineering Managers Senior Executives (includes Vice Presidents and Chief Executives) Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers Electronics Engineers (Except Computer) San Bernardino Industry Cluster Cutters and Trimmers of Meat, Poultry, and Fish Education Administrators (Postsecondary) School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) Butchers and Meat Cutters Mechanical Engineers Management Analysts Engineering Managers Foremen of Production and Operating Workers Dental Laboratory Technicians Industrial Machinery Mechanics

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NON-EXPERIENCED EMPLOYEES Avg time to fill openings in days OCCUPATION 124 118 116 113 112 112 108 102 95 91 120 118 77 77 77 73 71 67 66 65 120 113 108 100 94 93 87 84 80 79 124 113 112 112 109 99 96 92 92 92

Inland Empire Dietitians and Nutritionists Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists Treasurers, Controllers, And Chief Financial Officers Dental Laboratory Technicians Counselors Pharmacists First-Line Supervisors or Managers of Personal Service Workers Cutters and Trimmers of Meat, Poultry, and Fish Physicians and Surgeons Physical Therapists Recession Resistant Dietitians and Nutritionists Counselors Dental Laboratory Technicians Physicians and Surgeons Physical Therapists Foremen of Production and Operating Workers Optometrists Management Analysts Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Occupational Therapists Renewable Energy Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists Route Sales Workers Construction and Building Inspectors Shop Supervisors or Field Supervisors Mechanical Engineers Sales Engineers Customer Service / Call Center Representatives Industrial Machinery Mechanics Parts Salespersons Industrial Production Managers San Bernardino Industry Cluster Treasurers, Controllers, And Chief Financial Officers Physicians and Surgeons Dental Laboratory Technicians First-Line Supervisors or Managers of Personal Service Workers Pharmacists Cutters and Trimmers of Meat, Poultry, and Fish Optometrists Dentists Bill and Account Collectors Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks

Avg time to fill openings in days 205 170 150 120 120 116 104 102 99 87 205 170 120 99 87 86 86 85 73 69 279 88 82 81 69 62 62 62 56 53 279 143 120 120 116 102 95 85 84 83

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

WAGES The tables below display the occupations with the highest median starting salary for experienced and non-experienced employees. Many of the occupations listed for experienced employees require extensive education and/or experience. This is especially true for the two targeted clusters. However, it is notable that some of the relatively higher paying occupations for both experienced and non-experienced employees required only a technical degree or similar vocational training (or less). MEDIAN STARTING SALARY: EXPERIENCED EMPLOYEES

OCCUPATION

MEDIAN STARTING SALARY: NON-EXPERIENCED EMPLOYEES Hourly wage OCCUPATION

Inland Empire Occupational Therapists Dental Hygienists School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) Optometrists Foremen of Production and Operating Workers Construction and Building Inspectors Physical Therapists Civil Engineers Architectural and Civil Drafters Computer and Information Systems Managers Recession Resistant Occupational Therapists Foremen of Production and Operating Workers Dental Hygienists Optometrists Physical Therapists Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Computer Programmers Health Educators Legal Secretaries Accountants Renewable Energy Construction and Building Inspectors Accountants Civil Engineers Architectural and Civil Drafters Computer and Information Systems Managers Carpenters Mechanical Engineers Engineering Technicians (Except Drafters, Electrical, or Electronic) Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers Engineering Managers San Bernardino Industry Cluster Dental Hygienists School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) Engineering Managers Optometrists Physical Therapists Computer and Information Systems Managers Civil Engineers Electricians Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Computer Programmers

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$50.00 $43.75 $40.87 $38.46 $36.54 $36.06 $35.00 $33.65 $33.65 $32.33 $50.00 $48.08 $43.75 $38.46 $35.00 $32.00 $28.85 $28.75 $25.48 $24.04 $36.06 $33.65 $33.65 $33.65 $33.65 $33.65 $31.25 $31.25 $29.00 $28.85 $43.75 $40.87 $40.44 $37.50 $35.00 $33.65 $33.65 $30.00 $29.43 $28.85

Inland Empire School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) Dental Hygienists Physical Therapists Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Construction and Building Inspectors Engineering Managers Marketing Managers First-Line Supervisors or Managers of Non-Retail Sales Workers Carpenters Elementary and Middle School Teachers Recession Resistant Dental Hygienists Physical Therapists Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Social and Community Service Managers Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks General Office Clerks Administrative Services/Office Managers Secretaries (Except Legal, Medical, and Executive) Insurance Clerks (Claims and Policy Processing) Renewable Energy Construction and Building Inspectors Carpenters First-Line Supervisors or Managers of Non-Retail Sales Workers Construction Managers Civil Engineers Architects (Except Landscape and Naval) General and Operations Managers Purchasing Agents (Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products) Sales Representatives Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers San Bernardino Industry Cluster School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) General and Operations Managers Purchasing Agents (Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products) Elementary and Middle School Teachers Construction Managers Accountants Social and Community Service Managers Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Billing and Posting Clerks Advertising and Promotions Managers

Hourly wage $38.62 $37.50 $28.00 $28.00 $24.04 $24.04 $24.04 $20.00 $20.00 $19.33 $37.50 $28.00 $28.00 $19.50 $18.51 $14.42 $10.58 $10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $24.04 $20.00 $20.00 $19.23 $16.83 $16.83 $16.00 $15.00 $14.45 $14.00 $38.62 $20.00 $20.00 $19.33 $19.23 $19.23 $19.23 $18.50 $16.83 $14.42

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

MINIMUM REQUIRED WORK EXPERIENCE Surveyed employers were asked to report the minimum required work experience for each surveyed occupation. The available answer choices were: None; Under 3 months; 3 to under 6 months; 6 months to under 12 months; 1 to under 2 years; 2 to under 4 years; 4 to under 10 years; 10 years or more. The table to right lists the occupations with the greatest proportion of employers requiring ‘2 or more years of experience’ (last three answers combined), and those requiring ‘no work experience.’ For the Inland Empire, the occupation with the greatest proportion of surveyed employers reporting they required two or more years of experience was ‘Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists,’ with 84% of employers reporting they required this experience level when they staff the occupation. The list is heavily represented by occupations with skills acquired through work experience, such as supervisory roles where knowledge of skills and processes of supervised workers is essential. Other occupations for which employers prefer higher levels of work experience are those where specialized knowledge acquired through experience can be especially valuable.

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Minimum Required Work Experience: Percent Requiring 2 Years or More Experience

OCCUPATION Inland Empire Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics (Except Engines) Chiropractors Electronics Engineers (Except Computer) Education Administrators (Postsecondary) Architects (Except Landscape and Naval) Machinery Maintenance Worker Treasurers, Controllers, And Chief Financial Officers Senior Executives (includes Vice Presidents and Chief Executives) School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) Recession Resistant Senior Executives (includes Vice Presidents and Chief Executives) Chiropractors Health Educators Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists Counselors General and Operations Managers Paralegals and Legal Assistants Computer Programmers Human Resources Managers Physicians and Surgeons Renewable Energy Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics (Except Engines) Computer and Information Systems Managers Electronics Engineers (Except Computer) Treasurers, Controllers, And Chief Financial Officers Electrical & Electronic Engineering Technicians Machinery Maintenance Worker Industrial Production Managers Architects (Except Landscape and Naval) Marketing Managers San Bernardino Industry Cluster Education Administrators (Postsecondary) Machinery Maintenance Worker Treasurers, Controllers, And Chief Financial Officers Electronics Engineers (Except Computer) Engineering Managers Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics (Except Engines) School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) Computer and Information Systems Managers Mechanical Engineers Senior Executives (includes Vice Presidents and Chief Executives)

% 84 84 84 83 80 77 74 74 74 72 91 84 57 57 57 54 50 50 50 50 100 84 83 80 80 80 78 78 75 72 80 80 80 80 79 78 72 72 72 72

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

Occupations requiring no work experience (table to right) are typified by low skill/wage positions. They are heavily represented with jobs commonly found in the Retail and Services industries. The Recession Resistant cluster represents a notable exception to this general rule, with many Health Services occupations represented in the list. These occupations generally require a technical or vocational degree, and with no work experience often required, they represent promising post education employment opportunities.

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Minimum Required Work Experience: Percent Requiring NO Work Experience % Inland Empire Fast Food Counter Workers 88 Hosts and Hostesses 82 Food Cooking Machine Operators and Tenders 80 Buspersons and Barbacks 80 Ambulance Drivers and Attendants (Except Emergency Medical Technicians) 75 Dishwashers 69 Janitors and Cleaners (Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners) 66 Cashiers 65 Vehicle and Equipment Cleaners 64 Freight, Stock, and Material Movers (Hand Laborers) 63 Recession Resistant Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners 100 Ambulance Drivers and Attendants (Except Emergency Medical Technicians) 75 Janitors and Cleaners (Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners) 70 Foremen of Production and Operating Workers 44 Physical Therapists 43 Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants 43 Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides 38 Receptionists (and Information Clerks) 36 Home Health Aides 33 Certified Nursing Assistants 33 Renewable Energy Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeepers 60 Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers 60 Vehicle and Equipment Cleaners 56 Freight, Stock, and Material Movers (Hand Laborers) 55 Hand Packers and Packagers 55 Team Assemblers 53 Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Operators (Metal) 50 Janitors and Cleaners (Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners) 50 Order Clerks 42 Counter and Rental Clerks 40 San Bernardino Industry Cluster Fast Food Counter Workers 88 Hosts and Hostesses 82 Food Cooking Machine Operators and Tenders 80 Buspersons and Barbacks 80 Vehicle and Equipment Cleaners 75 Freight, Stock, and Material Movers (Hand Laborers) 70 Janitors and Cleaners (Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners) 70 Cashiers 69 Dishwashers 69 Order Clerks 67

OCCUPATION

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

OCCUPATIONAL CERTIFICATION Surveyed employers were asked to report if they required an occupational license or certification for each surveyed occupation. The table to right displays the occupations with the highest percentage of surveyed employers who reported they required an occupational license or certification, and the occupations for which no license or certification was typically required. As would be expected, the list of those requiring a license or certification is heavily represented by occupations in the Health Services industry.

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Percent Requiring Occupational Certification or License

OCCUPATION

% Inland Empire

Pharmacy Technicians Elementary and Middle School Teachers Dental Hygienists Occupational Therapists Chiropractors Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Physical Therapists Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Health Educators Pharmacists Recession Resistant Dental Hygienists Occupational Therapists Chiropractors Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Physical Therapists Health Educators Optometrists Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Dietitians and Nutritionists Renewable Energy Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Cargo and Freight Agents Electricians Civil Engineers Electrical Engineers Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers Landscape Architects Truck Drivers, Light Or Delivery Services Construction and Building Inspectors San Bernardino Industry Cluster Pharmacy Technicians Elementary and Middle School Teachers Dental Hygienists Health Educators Registered Nurses (Nurse Practitioners) Dental Assistants Physical Therapists Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Civil Engineers Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

100 100 100 100 100 98 96 93 93 92 100 100 100 100 98 96 93 91 89 89 100 92 88 87 77 71 64 60 58 56 100 100 100 100 100 96 92 92 92 92

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

PREFERRED EDUCATION LEVEL For each surveyed occupation employers were asked what level of education was preferred. The available answer choices were: None; High school/GED; License / Certification; Some college; Associate degree; BS/BA; Graduate degree or above. The table to right lists the occupations with the greatest proportion of employers preferring at least some college up through graduate degree (not including license and certification programs). Not surprisingly, employers prefer higher education levels for teachers as well as health services occupations that require more than a vocational level education.

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Preferred Education Level: Percent Requiring at Least Some College (up through Graduate Degree) % OCCUPATION Inland Empire Optometrists 100 Education Administrators (Postsecondary) 100 Teacher Assistants 100 School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) 99 Counselors 99 Elementary and Middle School Teachers 93 Lawyers 91 Engineering Technicians (Except Drafters, Electrical, or Electronic) 90 Physicians and Surgeons 90 Civil Engineers 89 Recession Resistant Optometrists 100 Counselors 100 Accountants 92 Senior Executives (includes Vice Presidents and Chief Executives) 91 Lawyers 90 Physicians and Surgeons 90 Marketing Managers 88 Health Educators 85 Chiropractors 83 Management Analysts 80 Renewable Energy Marketing Managers 93 Engineering Technicians (Except Drafters, Electrical, or Electronic) 90 Treasurers, Controllers, And Chief Financial Officers 90 Civil Engineers 89 Engineering Managers 87 Architectural and Civil Drafters 87 Environmental and Health Scientists and Specialists 80 Landscape Architects 80 Architects (Except Landscape and Naval) 80 Electronics Engineers (Except Computer) 80 San Bernardino Industry Cluster Optometrists 100 Electronics Engineers (Except Computer) 100 Counselors 100 Education Administrators (Postsecondary) 100 Engineering Technicians (Except Drafters, Electrical, or Electronic) 100 Teacher Assistants 100 School Administrators (Elementary and Secondary) 99 Elementary and Middle School Teachers 93 Senior Executives (includes Vice Presidents and Chief Executives) 93 Lawyers 92

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

BUSINESS SPECIFIC QUESTIONS In order to gather the information necessary to make planning decisions and assist businesses, surveyed businesses were asked a series of questions designed to assess such areas as plans to expand or downsize (and reasons for doing so), concerns and challenges for doing business, barriers to growth, and knowledge of available energy programs. PLANS TO EXPAND/DOWNSIZE/RELOCATE As shown in the figure below, the great majority of surveyed businesses in all clusters and regions projected no changes in the next 12 months. A relatively small proportion of employers reported plans to downsize or relocate. At least 15% of employers reported plans to expand or hire.7

In the next twelve 12 months, does your company anticipate... Relocation outside of the Region

Downsizing

1% 2% 2% 4% 6%

Recession Resistant Renewable Energy

0%

15% 16% 18%

Expansion

Closing

Don’t know

1% 1% 2% 18% 15% 10%

None / No change

7

San Bernardino

61% 60%

67%

Businesses were permitted to choose more than one answer.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

REASONS FOR DOWNSIZING OR CLOSING Businesses that reported they anticipated relocating, downsizing or closing in the next 12 months (85 businesses) were asked to choose from a list of possible reasons for their anticipated action. As shown, the most commonly reported reasons were ‘declining sales’ (41%), followed by ‘availability of capital or credit’ (14%), and taxes, (13%)8.

.

8

Businesses were permitted to choose more than one answer.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

HELP WITH EXPANSION Businesses that stated they would be expanding in the next 12 months were asked to report what resources or aid would help with their expansion. Of the 469 surveyed businesses reporting plans to expand, 60% cited a need for ‘additional employees,’ and 36% reported a need for ‘new/expanded facilities’ or ‘equipment.’9

If expanding, which of the following do you expect to need? Additional employees

60%

New / Expanded Facilities

36%

Equipment

36%

Staff Development / Training

29%

Increased Visibility in the Marketplace

25%

Access to Capital or Credit

24%

New Technology

22%

Information on Tax Incentives for Hiring

None

9

16% 4%

Don’t know

5%

Other

5%

Businesses were permitted to choose more than one answer.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

KEY CONCERNS AND CHALLENGES KEY CONCERNS AND CHALLENGES Surveyed employers were asked which of a list of issues represented key concerns or challenges.10 The most commonly provided response was ‘declining sales’ with 31% of employers reporting this area as a concern. This was followed by ‘cost of employee benefits’ (26%), and ‘taxes’ (19%). 20% of surveyed businesses reported they had no concerns or challenges.

Which of the following business issues are currently key concerns or challenges for your business? Declining Sales

31%

Costs of Employee Benefits (Healthcare, etc.)

26%

Taxes

19%

High Worker Compensation

16%

Availability of Capital or Credit

13%

Utility Costs (Gas, Electricity, Water)

12%

Ability to Retain Employees

9%

Lack of Skilled or Qualified Workforce

8%

Availability of new Incentives

5%

Insufficient Room for Expansion

5%

Transportation Issues

4%

Expiring or Lack of Incentives

4%

Permitting and Zoning

4%

Business affected by Foreign Trade

4%

Access to Suppliers Other Don't Know

2% 7% 11%

None

10

20%

Businesses were permitted to choose more than one answer.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

REASONS FOR MOVING TO RIVERSIDE OR SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY Surveyed employers were asked to report the reasons they initially moved to Riverside or San Bernardino County. As shown in the figure below, ‘location’ was the most commonly provided answer, with employers in both Counties equally likely to report this reason. Employers in Riverside County were most likely to report moving to their County for ‘friends and family,’ or ‘quality of life’ than employers in San Bernardino County.

Which of the following reasons brought your business to (Riverside County) or (San Bernardino County)? 44% 44%

Location 17% 17%

Proximity to Customers 9%

Cost of Land/Facilities

11% 17%

Friends and Family

10% 11%

Quality of Life 6%

Business Incentives

4%

Proximity to Supplies

4% 4%

Ample Supply of Labor Quality Workforce

Proximity to Quality Universities and Education Utility Costs

3% 3% 3%

Riverside County

2% 3% 1% 2% 2%

San Bernardino County

2% Other Don’t Know

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9% 8% 19%

26%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

INTERNATIONAL TRADE Surveyed businesses were asked if their business engaged in international trade. As shown, 10% of surveyed businesses reported they did engage in this type of trade.

Is your business engaged in international trade? No, 80%

Not currently but plan to in the future, (>1%)

Yes, 10%

Don't know, 9%

Those 10% of businesses reporting they did engage in International Trade were asked a followup questions to determine the type. As shown, 43% of employers engaged in International Trade reported they both import and export materials internationally.

If yes, do you import goods and materials, export goods and materials, or both? Import goods and materials, 27%

Both, 43%

Export goods and materials, 28%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

KNOWLEDGE OF ENERGY REBATE AND/OR INCENTIVE PROGRAMS Surveyed businesses were asked to rate their knowledge of energy rebate and/or incentive programs offered by their local utility company. As shown, 15% of employers were ‘very familiar’ with these programs, and a further 36% of employers were ‘somewhat familiar’ with them.

How would you rate your knowledge of energy rebate and / or incentive programs offered by your local utility companies? Very Familiar, 15%

Not Familiar at All, 47%

Somewhat Familiar, 36%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

PARTICIPATION IN PUBLIC UTILITIES PROGRAMS Surveyed businesses were asked which of a list of local utility programs they had participated in. Overall, the ‘lighting’ program was the most commonly reported (23% of employers participating) followed by ‘energy efficient management’ programs (14%). 54% of employers reported they had not participated in any program. Which of the following local utility programs have you participated in ? I have not participated in any local utility programs

54%

Lighting

23%

Energy Efficiency Management

14%

Other

12%

HVAC New Construction Power Generation

7% 4% 3%

Those 54% of surveyed businesses that had not participated in any programs were asked to report what reasons kept them from doing so. A large proportion of these employers reported they either ‘did not own their building,’ or ‘lacked information regarding program options.’ Which of the following have kept you from participating in any of the local utility programs? Don’t Know

33%

Do Not Own the Building

27%

Lack of Information regarding programs or options

26%

Other

Financial Concerns

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8%

5%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

ISSUES AND CONCERNS IN THE HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY Businesses in the Health Care industry in San Bernardino County were asked to report what they felt were the issues and concerns in their industry. The most commonly reported issue was ‘lack of information on the Health Care Bill and how it affects the company’ (26%). Other concerns were ‘unclear of the Government guidelines’ (22%), and ‘availability of experienced workers’ (14%).

Which of the following would you say are the issues or concerns in the Healthcare Industry today? Lack of information on the Health Care Bill and How it Affects your Company

26%

Unclear of the Government Guidelines

22%

Availability of Experienced Workers

14%

Implementation of Electronic Medical Records Systems

11%

Availability of Certified Workers

11%

Local Training Programs that provided Certified Workers Other

None Don’t know

Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

9%

5% 20% 21%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

ISSUES AND CONCERNS IN THE TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY Businesses in the Transportation industry in San Bernardino County were asked to report what they felt were the issues and concerns in their industry. The most commonly reported issues were ‘AB32 requirements’ (21%) and ‘availability of qualified workers’ (15%).

Which of the following would you say are the issues or concerns in the Transportation Industry today? AB32 Requirements

21%

Availability of Qualified Workers

15%

Public Awareness of Transportation Programs Local Infrastructure

Other

None

Don’t Know

Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

9%

7%

11%

17%

29%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

RENEWABLE ENERGY CLUSTER Surveyed businesses were asked if they considered their business to be a part of the renewable energy cluster. As shown, 18% of employers reported they were a part of the cluster. As further shown, 23% of those employers who considered themselves a part of the renewable energy cluster were interested in participating in a focus group to better understand the issues and concerns facing the industry.

Would you consider your business as part of the Renewable Energy Cluster? Yes 18%

Don’t Know 20%

No 61%

Would you be interested in participating in a Focus Group, hosted by the County, to better understand the issues and concerns facing your industry today? Don’t Know 10% No 66%

Yes 23%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

SECTION 2: LABOR MARKET CHALLENGES & POTENTIAL WITHIN THE INLAND EMPIRE: AN ERISS SUMMARY REPORT NARRATIVE SUMMARY The Inland Empire region, which is geographically defined by Riverside and San Bernardino counties in California, would be larger than nine other states including, New Jersey, Massachusetts or Maryland. With a population of 4,142,113 persons, the region makes up 11.2 percent of California’s population of nearly 37 million persons. The region is becoming more diverse than the state as the Inland Empire with 37.9 percent of the region identifying as White, compared to 41.5 percent in the state, with U.S. Census data pointing to 46.3 percent of the population identifying themselves as Latino in the region compared to 37 percent in the state overall. While this diversity reflects a multicultural mosaic, it also poses a long-term workforce challenge as 38.8 percent of the population in Riverside County and 39.6 percent of the population in San Bernardino County constitutes nonnative speakers of English speakers, based on the same U.S. Census data. Like the rest of the nation, the Inland Empire region has been hit hard by the recession with an unadjusted September unemployment rate of 14.8 percent that is higher than the national 9.6 percent average and the state of California’s 12.4 percent rate. These unemployment figures, out of a total regional labor supply of approximately 1,768,200 workers, are likely to continue to rise with consolidations and reductions in the financial activities and hospitality industries. A survey of 11,601 employers within the Inland Empire region was conducted, with 3,358 employers (or 29%) responding. This survey points to a more pessimistic trend toward expansion as 31 percent of employers noted that declining sales were a current challenge in their business environment and 41 percent of all employers anticipated downsizing or closing as a result of the poor business climate in the next twelve months. The financial activities and hospitality industries constitute nearly 25 percent of the region’s largest 50 employers, though healthcare employers constitute the largest share of recession resistant jobs. Per capital income hovers at $23,539 and median household income is at $57,372, based on 2009 U.S. Census projections, compared statewide per capita income at $29,405 and median household income at $61,154. Overall, 12.9 percent of individuals live below the poverty line that is on par with the statewide average. Despite the high growth potential in the healthcare industry with State labor market projections suggesting a 40.5 percent increase in the total number of jobs by 2018, there are difficulties in meeting these labor market demands. First, many of the high growth jobs in healthcare require post-secondary education (often a minimum of an Associate’s degree or higher) and U.S Census data point to a 16.3 percent educational attainment rate for a Bachelor’s degree compared to the state rate of 22.4 percent. To complicate matters even more, the pipeline of candidates for healthcare industry jobs is diminished in the 22.4 percent high school dropout rate in the two counties. Second, there is an exodus of workers out of the region where U.S. Census data point to only 55.7 percent of the region’s workforce working within Riverside or San Bernardino counties and less than 10 percent of

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

those employed within the county commuting to the Inland Empire from nearby Los Angeles or Orange counties. There is potential to make up the shortage, however, with active engagement and deployment of the 192 training providers in the Inland Empire. While the region is anchored by the University of California, Riverside and California State University, San Bernardino as well as the Riverside and San Bernardino Community College districts and other private educational institutions and proprietary schools who deliver high-quality adult and continuing/workforce education, more work must be done to expand the number of WIA-eligible training providers as only 64 of these trainers to benefit dislocated and under-employed workers who benefit from core and intensive services at the region’s One-Stop Centers. Further, the capacities of these institutions will require upgrades of classroom space and additional faculty to reduce the backlog of students who wish to enter training programs for the future high-growth jobs. This capacity expansion will narrow the gap between labor supply and labor demand within the growing Inland Empire region to create the area’s long-run workforce competitiveness.

I.

DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE Table 1: Breakdown of Population by Race Category

White African-American Latino Asian Total

Inland Empire

%

California

%

1,568,229 292,158 1,920,133 230,910 4,143,113

38% 7% 46% 6%

15,325,751 2,159,978 13,681,370 4,559,739 36,961,664

41% 6% 37% 12%

The 2009 U.S. Census estimated 4,143,113 persons or approximately 11 percent of California’s population of nearly 37 million persons lived within the region’s 27,269 square miles11. Demographically, the Inland Empire is more diverse than the state, with Whites representing 38 percent of the population in the region, as compared to 41 percent in the state. Yet the Inland Empire is significantly more of Latino origin with 46 percent of the population, using the same 2009 U.S. Census data, compared to the 37 percent in the state overall. At the same time, the diversity of the region’s population is reflected by 7 percent identifying as African-American, compared to 6 percent statewide and a smaller proportion of Asian-Americans at 6 percent in the region which is 6 percentage points under the statewide profile of 12 percent.12 Greater than one in three persons over 5 years old in the two counties is a non-native English speaker, with 38.8 percent non-native English speakers in Riverside County and 39.6 11

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06065.html (Riverside County); http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06071.html (San Bernardino County). Aggregate calculations made by author. 12 Ibid. Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

percent non-native speakers in San Bernardino. 13 These percentages, which are about double the level of non-native English speakers nationally (19.6 percent in the U.S.)

Table 2: Labor Force Populations Category

Employed Unemployed Total

Region

Riverside

San Bernardino

1,506,900 261,400 1,768,200

772,200 139,400 911,500

734,700 122,000 856,700

(Totals may not add up due to rounding errors) Like the rest of the nation, the Inland Empire region has been hit hard by the recession with an unadjusted September unemployment rate of 14.8 percent that is higher than the national 9.6 percent average and the state of California’s 12.4 percent rate.14 These unemployment figures, out of a total regional labor supply of approximately 1,768,200 workers, are likely to continue to rise with consolidations and reductions in the financial activities and hospitality industries.15

Per capita hovers at $23,539 and median household income is at $57,372, based on 2008 U.S. Census projections, compared statewide per capita income at $29,405 and median household income at $61,154.16 Overall, 12.9 percent of individuals live below the poverty line that is on par with the statewide average.

Table 3: Income Levels Category

Median Household Per Capita Poverty Rate

13

Riverside

San Bernardino

California

58,168 24,836 12.2%

56,575 22,243 13.4%

61,154 29,405 12.9%

Ibid.

14

http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/cgi/databrowsing/localAreaProfileQSResults.asp?selectedarea =Riverside+County&selectedindex=33&menuChoice=localAreaPro&state=true&geogArea=06040000 65&countyName= (Riverside County); http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/cgi/databrowsing/localAreaProfileQSResults.asp?selectedarea =San+Bernardino+County&selectedindex=36&menuChoice=localAreaPro&state=true&geogArea=06 04000071&countyName= (San Bernardino County) 15 Ibid. 16 http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06065.html (Riverside County); http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06071.html (San Bernardino County). Aggregate calculations made by author. Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

II.

LABOR MARKET ANALYSIS: THE DEMAND SIDE

Labor market projections suggest that healthcare is a high-growth industry with 19 of the 30 fastest growing occupations falling within that sector. State labor market projections suggesting a 40.5 percent increase in the number of jobs by 2018.17 In part, the expanded need for healthcare jobs reflects the overall aging population in the region and nationally. Concurrently, recent policy trends (such as expansion of federal healthcare insurance coverage under healthcare reform) might potentially add more jobs in this industry as newly insured persons might now seek out preventive and long-term medical care within an overburdened system. Moreover, seven of the region’s largest employers are healthcare providers and constitute 18 of the top 20 most recession-resistant employers.

Table 4: 30 Fastest Growing Occupations (Long-Term) Occupational Title

Personal & Home Care Aides Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists Network Systems & Data Analysts Physician Assistants Separating & Filtering Machine Workers Home Health Aides Fitness Trainers & Aerobic Instructors Other Personal Care Workers Physical Therapist Aides Radiation Therapists Cardiovascular Technologists Surgical Technologists Biochemists Life Scientists Compliance Officers Occupational/Physical Therapist Assistant Gaming Dealers Medical Assistants Computer Software Engineers Emergency Medical Technicians Respiratory Therapists Physical Therapists Assistants Electrical Repairers Physical Therapists Pharmacy Technicians Health Technologists Computer Software Engineers Loan Counselors Nursing, Psychiatric and Home Health Aides Registered Nurses 17

2008

2018

24,560 850 1,250 770 220 3,720 1,940 40,250 510 160 330 620 130 1,560 2,010 1,270 1,600 6,810 1,350 1,870 1,510 550 110 1,100 3,020 1,000 1,460 210 13,260 21,380

35,520 1,210 1,750 1,060 300 5,060 2,580 53,010 670 210 420 810 170 2,020 2,600 1,640 2,070 8,720 1,720 2,360 1,910 710 140 1,380 3,790 1,250 1,830 260 16,480 26,550

www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

Table 5: Top 20 Largest Employers in Inland Empire (Healthcare Employers in Bold Face)

Employer

Location

Abbott Vascular Anchor Blue Retail Group Big Bear Mountain Resorts Bourns Chaffey College Colton Joint Unified School District Community Hospital-San Bernardino Crossroads Truck Dismantling Desert Valley Hospital Environmental Systems Research Ginger Masonry Jacuzzi Brands Corp. Kaiser Permanente Mercy Air Service Mountain High Ski Resort Northstar Systems Inc. Ontario International Airport Professional Hospital Supply Redlands Community Hospital Riverside Community Hospital

Temecula Ontario Big Bear Lake Riverside Rancho Cucamonga Colton San Bernardino Mira Loma Victorville Redlands Riverside Chino Hills Riverside Rialto Wrightwood Rancho Cucamonga Ontario Temecula Redlands Riverside

Size

1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+ 1000+

Table 6: Largest 20 Recession-Resistant Employers (Healthcare Employers in Bold Face)

Employer

Location

Size

Temecula 1000+ Community Hospital-San Bernardino San Bernardino 1000+ Desert Valley Hospital Victorville 1000+ Environmental Systems Research Redlands 1000+ Kaiser Permanente Riverside 1000+ Mercy Air Service Rialto 1000+ Redlands Community Hospital Redlands 1000+ Riverside Community Hospital Riverside 1000+ Southern Calif Permanente Hospital Grp Redlands 1000+ San Antonio Community Hospital Upland 1000+ St. Mary Medical Center Apple Valley 1000+ VA Medical Center-Loma Linda Loma Linda 1000+ Chino Valley Medical Center Chino 500-999 Inland Valley Medical Center Wildomar 500-999 John F Kennedy Memorial Hospital Indio 500-999 Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms 500-999 Parkview Community Hospital Riverside 500-999 Rancho Spring Medical Center Murrieta 500-999 Addus Health Care Hermet 250-499 Addus Health Care Cathedral City 250-499 (For more detail, please refer to USWorks database for the Inland Empire) Abbott Vascular

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

As part of the labor market analysis, ERISS conducted a survey of 11,601 employers (with a firm size of five or more employees for each employment cluster and 20 or more employees surveyed within San Bernardino County). The survey was able to attain a statistical significant set of findings as 3,358 employers (or 29 percent) responded. This survey points to a more pessimistic trend toward expansion as 31 percent of the region’s employers noted that declining sales were a current challenge in their business environment and 41 percent of all employers who anticipated downsizing or closing indicate that the poor business climate is the key factor in that decision. Yet optimistically, labor quality remains high as only 8 percent of growing employers indicated that the lack of a qualified workforce was a challenge at their company and, for those who plan to downsize in the next 12 months, 2 percent of these employers felt that the region did not have the skilled workforce they need to remain competitive. The survey results also identify that short-term employment gains are expected within manufacturing and ‘”green” construction jobs, even as this industry is less recessionresistant than the stability within healthcare. Perhaps, the construction industry is best poised to expand in the near future as these jobs have relatively short-waiting times to fill vacancies compared to higher-end healthcare jobs. Turnover, as typical in other communities, remains high in retail and the hospitality industry.

Table 7: Key Concerns or Challenges of Regional Employers Reason Declining Sales

Costs of Employee Benefits None Taxes High Wages for Workers Availability of Capital or Credit Utility Costs Don't Know Ability to Retain Employees Lack of Skilled or Qualified Workforce Other Availability of New Incentives Insufficient Room for Expansion Business Affected by Foreign Trade Permitting or Zoning Expiring or Lack of Incentives Transportation Issues Access to Suppliers

Percent

31% 26% 20% 19% 16% 13% 12% 11% 9% 8% 7% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 2%

(Note: Survey results do not equal 100% as multiple answers were allowed; for more information, please refer to USWorks database for the Inland Empire)

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

Table 8: Reasons for Relocation, Downsizing or Closing (Regional Employers)

Reason Declining Sales

Other Availability of Capital or Credit Taxes Costs of Employee Benefits Insufficient Room to Expand High Wages for Workers Utility Costs Difficulty to Retain Employees Business Affected by Foreign Trade None Don't Know Expiring or Lack of Incentives Transportation Issues Availability of Incentives Elsewhere Lack of Skilled or Qualified Workforce Permitting or Zoning Access to Suppliers

Percent

41% 28% 14% 13% 10% 10% 9% 5% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1%

Table 9: Fastest Projected Growth Occupations (over next 12 months) (Construction and Manufacturing Jobs in Boldface)

Occupation Social Workers

Sheet Metal Workers Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers Financial Managers Plumbers, Pipefitters and Steamfitters Insulation Workers Electrical Engineers Civil Engineers Weighers, Measurers, Checkers Foreman of Production Workers Team Assemblers Electronics Engineers Packaging and Filling Machine Operators Landscaping and Groundskeepers Foreman, Construction, Drilling Work Tire Repairers and Changers Security Guards HVAC Mechanics and Installers Construction and Building Inspectors Health Educators Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

Next 12 Month Projected Growth

110% 36% 30% 26% 20% 20% 19% 19% 17% 17% 16% 16% 16% 16% 15% 15% 15% 15% 15% 14%

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

Table 10: Occupations with Most Current Openings Number of Current Openings, Divided by Total Number on the Job = Openings)

Occupation

Openings

52% 26% 23% 21% 17% 16% 16% 16% 15% 15% 14% 14% 14% 14% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13% 12%

Social Workers

Sheet Metal Workers Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers Financial Managers Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters Electrical Engineers Insulation Workers Civil Engineers Weighers, Measurers and Checkers Foremen of Production Workers Team Assemblers Packaging and Filling Machine Operators Electronics Engineers Landscaping and Groundskeepers Tire Repairers and Changers Security Guards Foremen, Construction, Drilling Work Construction and Building Inspectors HVAC Mechanics and Inspectors Shop Supervisors or Field Supervisors Table 11: Occupations with Highest Annual Turnover Occupation Property Managers

Fast Food Cooks Engineering Managers Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Butchers and Meat Cutters Merchandise Displayers Room Service Servers Route Sales Workers Construction Managers Construction-Heavy Equipment Operators Vehicle Salespersons Short Order Cooks Food Cooking Machine Operators Switchboard Operators Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks Sheet Metal Workers Electrical Engineers Hosts and Hostesses Personal and Home Care Aides Cashiers

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Turnover Rate

49% 48% 46% 39% 38% 37% 30% 30% 29% 28% 26% 26% 26% 25% 22% 22% 21% 20% 19% 19%

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III.

LABOR MARKET ANALYSIS: THE SUPPLY SIDE

U.S. Census data also point to a 16.3 percent educational attainment rate for a Bachelor’s degree in the region compared to the state rate of 26.6 percent.18 In the longer-term, there is the correlated shortfall and labor shortage crisis with the high school dropout rate for the two counties at 22.4 percent, compared to the 19.6 percent in California, based on California Department of Education data.19 The short-term horizon is somewhat brighter as most of the fastest growing occupations in the region are those that require on-the-job training or more rapid training that can be delivered within the work environment. Yet these sub-par educational attainment rates do not bode for an optimistic outlook for the Inland Empire as many of the future jobs, particularly in the high-growth healthcare sector, will require some measure of postsecondary education. The other key element in identifying the resources for addressing labor supply quality is the capacity of training within the region. Overall, there are 192 training providers in the inland Empire, ranging from small proprietary vendors (with enrollments of under 20 students per cohort) to large four-year educational institutions (e.g., University of California, Riverside, Loma Linda University, or California State University, San Bernardino) with the Riverside and San Bernardino Community College Districts as anchors. Yet for all the depth of these resources, only 64 of these vendors are either accredited or WIA-eligible. The WIA-eligibility is also a key factor in sponsoring the ability of underemployed (incumbent) and currently dislocated workers, who receive either core and/or intensive services at the region’s eight One Stop Centers, to receive the re-skilling and training they need to assume these jobs. In the healthcare field, capacity is even further constrained as only 43 training providers offer coursework in healthcare-related areas, most of whom only award short-term certificates rather than the degree-based credentials that employers seek in this sector. Only 13 programs offer degrees at an Associates or higher level in a health-related area (or offer pre-requisite courses in basic sciences that can transfer into the same or other four-year institutions.) (Capacity is also, undoubtedly, affected by limited laboratory and classroom space, faculty recruitment issues, and longer waiting lists periods for entry into degree programs.) Hence, time to fill openings in some healthcare jobs fall within the 70+ days range. “Green” construction job training is available by 32 training providers. This type of training, however, is much easily ramped up as some of the instruction involves re-tooling of basic techniques in construction and/or building trades. This training also can lead to short-term certification that can be applied to employment in the available jobs in the field.

18

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06065.html (Riverside County); http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06071.html (San Bernardino County). Aggregate calculations made by author. 19 http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/SearchName.asp?rbTimeFrame=oneyear&rYear=200708&cCounty=33+RIVERSIDE&Topic=Graduates&Level=County&submit1=Submit http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/SearchName.asp?rbTimeFrame=oneyear&rYear=200708&cCounty=36+SAN+BERNARDINO&Topic=Graduates&Level=County&submit1=Submit Aggregate data calculated by author Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

20

Table 12: Educational/Training Requirements for Top 30 Future Occupations 20

Occupational Title Personal & Home Care Aides

Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists Network Systems & Data Analysts Physician Assistants Separating & Filtering Machine Workers Home Health Aides Fitness Trainers & Aerobic Instructors Other Personal Care Workers Physical Therapist Aides Radiation Therapists Cardiovascular Technologists Surgical Technologists Biochemists Life Scientists Compliance Officers Occupational/Physical Therapist Assistant Gaming Dealers Medical Assistants Computer Software Engineers Emergency Medical Technicians Respiratory Therapists Physical Therapists Assistants Electrical Repairers Physical Therapists Pharmacy Technicians Health Technologists Computer Software Engineers Loan Counselors Nursing, Psychiatric and Home Health Aides Registered Nurses

20

Education/Training Needed

Short-term on-the-job training Doctoral degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Moderate-term on-the-job training Short-term on-the-job training Some post-secondary education Short-term on-the job training Short-term on-the-job training Associate's degree Associate's degree Some post-secondary education Doctoral degree Bachelor's degree Long-term on-the-job training Some post-secondary education Some post-secondary education Moderate-term on-the-job training Bachelor's degree Some post-secondary education Associate's degree Associate's degree Some post-secondary education Master's degree Moderate-term on-the-job training Some post-secondary education Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Some post-secondary education Associate's degree

America’s Career InfoNet; online.onetcenter.org

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Table 13: WIA-Eligible and Accredited Training Providers in Healthcare County

Provider Name

RIVERSIDE

Academy of Holistic Health Arts All About Massage Banning Massage School California Nurses Educational Institute Center for Employment Training Goodwill Industries of the Inland Counties La Sierra University Mt. San Jacinto Community College North West College Palo Verde College Riverside Community College Riverside County Regional Occupational Program Universal Schools & Colleges of Health & Human Services University of California, Riverside

American Red Cross-Upland Empire Chapter Barstow Community College Barstow Regional Occupational Program Bear Valley Regional Occupational Program California State University, San Bernardino Chaffey Adult School Chaffey Community College SAN BERNARDINO Chapman University Chino Valley Adult School Colton-Redlands-Yucaipa Regional Occupational Program Copper Mountain Community College Crafton Hills College Fontana Unified School District Health Care Innovations, Inc. Loma Linda University (For more detail, please refer to USWorks database for the Inland Empire)

In sum, the labor market analysis of the demand and supply sides, conducted by ERISS, illustrates a disconnection in the workforce system to bolster the region’s human capital potential to meet the widening gaps and future employer demands in healthcare and short-term needs in “green” construction jobs. Addressing this mismatch will, in part, narrow by broadening existing training capacities at all institutional levels. Additionally, pipelines need to be extended into the K-12 system with career awareness programs to bolster interest in healthcare and “green” job occupations and expanding the worker population to incorporate non-traditional groups into the field, including immigrants, returning Veterans, ex-offenders (with surety bonding) with seamless career pathways for entry and upward employment mobility. These same groups will also benefit from an accelerated process to increase the number of WIA-eligible and accredited training providers who can offer coursework and other skill enhancements to participants at a costefficient, yet high quality level. Copyright ERISS Corporation 2010

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

IV.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Like many areas across the country, the Inland Empire region's existing labor supply is not compatible against the current and future labor demand. This mismatch is largely exacerbated by an educational attainment (Bachelor's degree or higher) that is substantively lower than the rest of California against double-digit employment growth in health care and IT sectors which require this higher skill capacity. Remedying this skill gap is also compromised by insufficient training capacity within the region's educational providers that either have limited classroom space, long waiting lists for admissions/entry into degree- or certificate-based programs, or aging and retiring faculty to meet student/trainee interests. As the Inland Empire's demographics point to an increasingly more diverse population among non-native English speakers, this educational attainment gap is forecasted to expand which effectively will diminish the region's economic and workforce competitiveness. With growing dislocated populations from the financial services and hospitality industries, the Inland Empire, however, does have a potential pipeline of candidates to fill these growing needs, provided that these candidates can be readily retooled for the future high growth jobs in either healthcare or green construction jobs. Healthcare, however, should be a targeted industry as it constitutes the region’s largest employer base and is the most recession-resistant field for job seekers to enter and retain employment. These dynamics point to the following policy recommendations: 1. As the region’s population constitutes a disproportionate share of non-native English speakers, with 38.8 percent of the Riverside County and 39.6 percent of the San Bernardino County requiring some ESL as a point of entry into employment, it may also be important to create and implement contextual learning programs for these entrants to the workforce. In part these programs might help participants gain technical and skill competencies in entrylevel health care and green construction positions. Some of these contextual learning programs offered by the region's community colleges have begun to have impact but they need to be sustained at large to include coursework for medical transcriptionists and pharmacy technicians as well as other allied health professionals. 2. Develop pipelines with K-12 districts to create career awareness programs for youth to consider high-growth industries and to establish articulation agreements where students can have dual enrollments to rapidly accelerate educational attainment rate for future jobs. 3. With an exodus of workers in San Bernardino and Riverside counties outside the Inland Empire, there is need for employers to establish incentives (e.g., employer-sponsored van pools, hiring bonuses) for them to expand candidate pools and advertise job vacancies to local residents to compete for existing job vacancies. 4. Pipelines of new hires in healthcare and “green” construction jobs can be potentially drawn from dislocated workers drawn non-traditional populations. One Stop Centers can be a venue of integrating immigrants, returning Veterans, hiring ex-offenders (with surety bonds) back into the workforce. Existing WIA dislocated funds might be allocated to these populations to provide pre-hire training for these industries.

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

APPENDIX A: SURVEY QUESTIONS Survey Questions Contact Verification 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.)

Currently, how many employees do you have at this location? How many do you expect to have at this time next year? May I have your name? May I have your title? Email collection

Staffing Questions 6.) 7.) 8.) 9.) 10.)

How many <occupation> do you have? How many will you need to hire in the next 90 days? How many do you expect to have at this time next year? What is the annual turnover for this occupation? Have I missed any occupations you employ?

Occupational Specific Questions 11.)

      

12.)

      

How long does it take to fill a vacancy for experienced <occupation>? Less than 2 weeks Two to 4 weeks 1-3 months 3-6 months More than 6 months Don’t know Don't hire experienced How long does it take to fill a vacancy for a non-experienced <occupation>? Less than 2 weeks Two to 4 weeks 1-3 months 3-6 months More than 6 months Don’t know Don't hire non-experienced

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

13.)         

14.)

  

15.)        

16.)

How much work experience do you require for this occupation? None Under 3 months 3 to under 6 months 6 months to under 12 months 1 to under 2 years 2 to under 4 years 4 to under 10 years 10 years or more Don’t know Do you require an occupational license or certification for this occupation? Yes No Don’t know What is the PREFERRED education level for this occupation? None High school/GED License / Certification Some college Associate degree BS/BA Graduate degree or above Don’t know For this occupation, do you employ?

Temporary workers: High school students: Seasonal: Interns/apprentice: Welfare-to-Work participants: Workers ages 14-21

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Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No No

Don’t Don’t Don’t Don’t Don’t Don’t

know know know know know know

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

17.)

          

18.)

          

19.)   

Which of the following recruitment methods have been effective for <occupation>? Newspaper Hire from within Referrals/word-of-mouth Unsolicited walk-ins Local One-Stop Centers /State employment services School placement offices Recruiters Internet Other None Don’t know What standard employee benefits do you provide for this occupation? Choose ALL that apply… Medical Dental Pension program 401k SAR/SEP (401K program for small businesses) Stock options Paid Vacations and Holidays Tuition reimbursement Child care Other None Don’t Know Do employees in all your occupations get similar benefits? Yes No Don’t know

20.)

What is the starting salary range for a NON-EXPERIENCED <occupation>?

21.)

What is the starting salary range for EXPERIENCED <occupation>?

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

Supplemental Survey Questions NON-OCCUPATION Specific 1. In the next twelve (12) months, does your company anticipate any of the following…      

Expansion Downsizing Relocation outside of the Region Closing None / No change Don’t know

2. If the employer stated that they are anticipating Relocating, Downsizing, or Closing, we will ask: You stated that your company anticipates Relocating, Downsizing, or Closing would that be because? (Select all that apply)                  

Ability to Retain Employees Availability of Capital or Credit Business affected by Foreign Trade Costs of Employee Benefits (Healthcare, etc.) High Worker Compensation Insufficient Room for Expansion Lack of Skilled or Qualified Workforce Permitting and Zoning Access to Suppliers Taxes Expiring or Lack of Incentives Availability of Incentives Elsewhere Declining Sales Transportation Issues Utility Costs (Gas, Electricity, Water) Other None Don't Know

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

3. If the employer stated that they are anticipating Expanding, we will ask: You stated that your company anticipates Expanding, which of the following do you expect to need? (Select all that apply)           

New / Expanded Facilities Equipment Access to Capital or Credit Increased Visibility in the Marketplace Additional employees Staff Development / Training New Technology Information on Tax Incentives for Hiring Other None Don’t know

4. Which of the following business issues are currently key concerns or challenges for your business? (select all that apply)                  

Ability to Retain Employees Availability of Capital or Credit Business affected by Foreign Trade Costs of Employee Benefits (Healthcare, etc.) High Worker Compensation Insufficient Room for Expansion Lack of Skilled or Qualified Workforce Permitting and Zoning Access to Suppliers Taxes Expiring or Lack of Incentives Availability of Incentives Elsewhere Declining Sales Transportation Issues Utility Costs (Gas, Electricity, Water) Other None Don't Know

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

5. Which of the following reasons brought your business to (Riverside County) or (San Bernardino County)? (Select all that apply)             

Utility Costs Cost of Land/Facilities Quality of Life Friends and Family Location Business Incentives Quality Workforce Ample Supply of Labor Proximity to Customers Proximity to Quality Universities and Education Proximity to Supplies Other Don’t Know

6. Is your business engaged in international trade?    

Yes No Not currently but plan to in the future Don’t Know

7. If YES to question number 6, we will ask: Do you…   

Import goods and materials Export goods and materials Both

8. How would you rate your knowledge of energy rebate and / or incentive programs offered by your local utilities companies?   

Very Familiar Somewhat Familiar Not Familiar at All

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

9. Which of the following local Utility programs have you participated in (Select all that apply)?       

Lighting HVAC Energy Efficiency Management Power Generation New Construction Other I have not participated in any local utility programs

Note: Question number 10 below, will only be asked if the response to question number 9 above is “I have not participated in any local utility programs. 10. Which of the following have kept you from participating in any of the local utility programs?     

Financial Concerns Lack of Information regarding programs or options Do Not Own the Building Other Don’t Know

Note: For question 11 below, this question would be asked of Businesses in the Health Care Industry in San Bernardino County only. 11. Which of the following would you say are the issues or concerns in the Healthcare Industry today?     

   

Availability of Experienced Workers Availability of Certified Workers Local Training Programs that provided Certified Workers Implementation of Electronic Medical Records Systems Lack of Information Regarding the new Health Care Bill and How it Affects your Company Unclear of the Government Guidelines Other None Don’t know

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

Note: For Question 12 below… this question would be asked of Businesses in the Transportation Industry in San Bernardino County only. 12. Which of the following would you say are the issues or concerns in the Transportation Industry today?        

Availability of Qualified Workers AB32 Requirements Local Infrastructure Public Awareness of Transportation Programs Cost of Fuel Other None Don’t Know

Note: For question 13 below, this question would be asked of Businesses in the Renewable Energy Cluster. 13. The Renewable Energy Cluster is defined as businesses that produce renewable energy and businesses that provide products and services to those businesses. Would you consider your business as part of the Renewable Energy Cluster?   

Yes No Don’t Know

14. Would you be interested in participating in a Focus Group, hosted by the County, to better understand the issues and concerns facing your industry today?   

Yes No Don’t Know

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

APPENDIX B: INDUSTRY CLUSTER DEFINITIONS RENEWABLE ENERGY NAICS CODE DESCRIPTION

221112 221119 221122 236115 236116 236117 236118 236210 236220 237110 237120 237130 238110 238120 238130 238140 238150 238160 238190 238210 238220 238290 238990 325211 325212 325222 326112 326113 326121 326122 326130 326140 326150 326191 326192 326199 332311 332312 332313 332321 332322 332911 332912 332913

Fossil Fuel Electric Power Generation Other Electric Power Generation Electric Power Distribution New Single-Family Housing Construction (except Operative Builders) New Multifamily Housing Construction (except Operative Builders) New Housing Operative Builders Residential Remodelers Industrial Building Construction Commercial and Institutional Building Construction Water and Sewer Line and Related Structures Construction Oil and Gas Pipeline and Related Structures Construction Power and Communication Line and Related Structures Construction Poured Concrete Foundation and Structure Contractors Structural Steel and Precast Concrete Contractors Framing Contractors Masonry Contractors Glass and Glazing Contractors Roofing Contractors Other Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors Electrical Contractors Plumbing, Heating, and Air-Conditioning Contractors Other Building Equipment Contractors All Other Specialty Trade Contractors Plastics Material and Resin Manufacturing Synthetic Rubber Manufacturing Noncellulosic Organic Fiber Manufacturing Plastics Packaging Film and Sheet (including Laminated) Manufacturing Unlaminated Plastics Film and Sheet (except Packaging) Manufacturing Unlaminated Plastics Profile Shape Manufacturing Plastics Pipe and Pipe Fitting Manufacturing Laminated Plastics Plate, Sheet (except Packaging), and Shape Manufacturing Polystyrene Foam Product Manufacturing Urethane and Other Foam Product (except Polystyrene) Manufacturing Plastics Plumbing Fixture Manufacturing Resilient Floor Covering Manufacturing All Other Plastics Product Manufacturing Prefabricated Metal Building and Component Manufacturing Fabricated Structural Metal Manufacturing Plate Work Manufacturing Metal Window and Door Manufacturing Sheet Metal Work Manufacturing Industrial Valve Manufacturing Fluid Power Valve and Hose Fitting Manufacturing Plumbing Fixture Fitting and Trim Manufacturing

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey RENEWABLE ENERGY NAICS CODE DESCRIPTION

332919 332991 332996 332997 332999 333411 333412 333414 333415 333611 333612 333613 333618 334411 334412 334413 334415 334416 334417 334418 334419 334512 334513 334514 334515 334519 335311 335313 335999 423310 423320 423330 423390 423610 423690 423720 423730 423740 541310 541320 541330 541350 541611 541618 541690 541712 561730 562211 562219

Other Metal Valve and Pipe Fitting Manufacturing Ball and Roller Bearing Manufacturing Fabricated Pipe and Pipe Fitting Manufacturing Industrial Pattern Manufacturing All Other Miscellaneous Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing Air Purification Equipment Manufacturing Industrial and Commercial Fan and Blower Manufacturing Heating Equipment (except Warm Air Furnaces) Manufacturing Air-Conditioning and Warm Air Heating Equip and Indus Refrig Equip Manuf Turbine and Turbine Generator Set Units Manufacturing Speed Changer, Industrial High-Speed Drive, and Gear Manufacturing Mechanical Power Transmission Equipment Manufacturing Other Engine Equipment Manufacturing Electron Tube Manufacturing Bare Printed Circuit Board Manufacturing Semiconductor and Related Device Manufacturing Electronic Resistor Manufacturing Electronic Coil, Transformer, and Other Inductor Manufacturing Electronic Connector Manufacturing Printed Circuit Assembly (Electronic Assembly) Manufacturing Other Electronic Component Manufacturing Automatic Environmental Control Manuf for Residential, Commercial, and Appliance Instruments and Rel Products Manuf for Measuring, DisplayIndus Process Variables Totalizing Fluid Meter and Counting Device Manufacturing Instrument Manufacturing for Measuring and Testing Electricity and Electrical Signals Other Measuring and Controlling Device Manufacturing Power, Distribution, and Specialty Transformer Manufacturing Switchgear and Switchboard Apparatus Manufacturing All Other Miscellaneous Electrical Equipment and Component Manufacturing Lumber, Plywood, Millwork, and Wood Panel Merchant Wholesalers Brick, Stone, and Related Construction Material Merchant Wholesalers Roofing, Siding, and Insulation Material Merchant Wholesalers Other Construction Material Merchant Wholesalers Electrical Apparatus and Equipment, Wiring Supplies, and Rel Equip Wholesalers Other Electronic Parts and Equipment Merchant Wholesalers Plumbing and Heating Equipment and Supplies (Hydronics) Merchant Wholesalers Warm Air Heating and Air-Condit Equip and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers Refrigeration Equipment and Supplies Merchant Wholesalers Architects Offices, Except Landscape Landscape Architectural Services Engineering Services Building Inspection Services Administrative Management and General Management Consulting Services Other Management Consulting Services Other Scientific and Technical Consulting Services Research & Development in Physical, Engineering & Life Sciences Landscaping Services Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal Other Nonhazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey RECESSION RESISTANT NAICS CODE DESCRIPTION

423450 423460 484110 484121 484122 493110 493120 493190 541110 541199 541211 541380 541511 541513 541519 541611 541612 541613 541614 541618 541620 541690 621111 621112 621210 621310 621320 621330 621340 621391 621399 621410 621420 621491 621492 621493 621498 621511 621512 621610 621910 621991 621999 622110 622210 622310 623110 623210 623220 623311 623312 623990 624310

Medical Equipment Merchant Wholesalers Ophthalmic Goods Merchant Wholesalers General Freight Trucking, Local General Freight Trucking, Long Distance TL General Freight Trucking, Long Distance LTL General Warehousing and Storage Refrigerated Warehousing and Storage Other Warehousing and Storage Offices of Lawyers All Other Legal Services Offices of Certified Public Accountants Testing Laboratories Custom Computer Programming Services Computer Facilities Management Services Other Computer Related Services Administrative Management Consulting Svcs Human Resource Consulting Services Marketing Consulting Services Process & Logistics Consulting Services Other Management Consulting Services Environmental Consulting Services Other Technical Consulting Services Offices of Physicians, ex Mental Health Offices of Mental Health Physicians Offices of Dentists Offices of Chiropractors Offices of Optometrists Offices of Mental Health Practitioners Offices of Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapists, and Audiologists Offices of Podiatrists Offices of all Other Misc. Health Practitioners Family Planning Centers Outpatient Mental Health Centers Other Outpatient Care Centers Kidney Dialysis Centers Freestanding Emergency Medical Centers All Other Outpatient Care Centers Medical Laboratories Diagnostic Imaging Centers Home Health Care Services Ambulance Services Blood and Organ Banks All Other Misc. Ambulatory Health Care Services General Medical and Surgical Hospitals Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Hospitals Speciality Hospitals Nursing Care Facilities Residential Mental Retardation Facilities Residential Mental Health & Substance Abuse Facilities Continuing Care Retirement Communities Homes for the Elderly Other Residential Care Facilities Vocational Rehabilitation Services

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY CLUSTER NAICS CODE DESCRIPTION

111 112 115 212 221 236 237 238 311 312 314 315 321 322 323 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 423 424 425 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 451 452 453 454 481 482

Crop production Animal production Support activities for agriculture & forestry Mining, except oil and gas Utilities Construction of buildings Heavy and civil engineering construction Specialty trade contractors Food mfg Beverage & tobacco product mfg Textile product mills Apparel mfg Wood product mfg Paper mfg Printing & related support activities Chemical mfg Plastics & rubber products mfg Nonmetallic mineral product mfg Primary metal mfg Fabricated metal product mfg Machinery mfg Computer & electronic product mfg Electrical equipment, appliance, & component mfg Transportation equipment mfg Furniture & related product mfg Miscellaneous mfg Durable goods merchant wholesalers Nondurable goods merchant wholesalers Wholesale electronic markets and agents and brokers Motor vehicle & parts dealers Furniture & home furnishings stores Electronics & appliance stores Building material & garden equipment & supplies dealers Food & beverage stores Health & personal care stores Gasoline stations Clothing & clothing accessories stores Sporting goods, hobby, book, & music stores General merchandise stores Miscellaneous store retailers Nonstore retailers Air transportation Rail transportation

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Inland Empire 2010 Labor Market Survey

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY CLUSTER NAICS CODE DESCRIPTION

484 485 488 492 493 511 512 515 517 519 522 523 524 531 532 541 551 561 562 611 621 622 623 624 711 712 713 721 722 811 812 813

Truck transportation Transit & ground passenger transportation Support activities for transportation Couriers & messengers Warehousing & storage Publishing industries (except Internet) Motion picture & sound recording industries Broadcasting (except Internet) Telecommunications Other information services Credit intermediation & related activities Securities intermediation & related activities Insurance carriers & related activities Real estate Rental & leasing services Professional, scientific, & technical services Management of companies & enterprises Administrative & support services Waste management & remediation services Educational services Ambulatory health care services Hospitals Nursing & residential care facilities Social assistance Performing arts, spectator sports, & related industries Museums, historical sites, & similar institutions Amusement, gambling, & recreation industries Accommodation Food services & drinking places Repair & maintenance Personal & laundry services Religious/grantmaking/civic/professional & similar org

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Inland Empire CA Labor Market Report 2011  

The latest data covering Riverside and San Bernardino counties in Southern California. Find out current wages for occupations, jobs in deman...

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