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SPECIAL HOUSING EDITION FEBRUARY 2010

Vancouver’s 50+ Active Lifestyle Magazine

Staying Safe at Home Finding the Right Residence The Upside to Downsizing


BC EDITION

Published by Senior Living

JANUARY 2009

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To Move or Not to Move? A Helpful Guide for Seniors Considering Their Residential Options

If you are a senior who has been wondering lately whether you should consider moving - either because you find the maintenance of your current home more difficult due to diminishing ability or energy, or you simply want a lifestyle that allows you more freedom and less responsibility - then this is the book that can help you ask the right questions and find the solution that is right for you. • What residential options are available? • Define your current situation - What residential option is right for you? • How to research and assess Independent and Assisted Living residences. • What do Independent, Assisted Living and Complex Care facilities have to offer? • How much does it cost to live in an Assisted Living residence? What subsidies are available? • Thinking of moving in with family members? Questions to consider before making your decision. • Are there any other residential options besides Independent, Assisted Living and Complex Care facilities? • If you choose to stay in your own home, what are your options and what should you plan for? • Who can help you decide what you can or cannot afford? • Funding sources available to seniors - tax deductions, housing subsidies, home care subsidies, equipment loan programs, renovation grants, etc. • Selling your home - how to find the right realtor or relocation services to assist your move. • Downsizing - Where do you start? How do you proceed? • Adapting your home to meet your mobility needs - tips and suggestions • Hiring home care services; do it yourself or hire an agency? • Legal matters - how to make sure you receive the care you desire should you not be able to communicate due to some incapacitating condition • AND MUCH MORE Advice from professionals who are experts in the area of assisting seniors with their relocation

questions and concerns. A handy reference guide for seniors and their families wrestling with the issues around whether relocation is the best option. This 128-page book provides helpful, easy to read information and suggestions to help seniors and their families understand the decisions they need to make.

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FEBRUARY 2010 MAGAZINE

(Vancouver & Lower Mainland) is published by Stratis Publishing. Other publications by Stratis Publishing:

• Senior Living (Vancouver Island) Publisher Barbara Risto

SPECIAL HOUSING GUIDE

Editor Bobbie Jo Reid

editor@seniorlivingmag.com Contributors Jackie Asante, Doreen Barber, Giovanna Boniface, Goldie Carlow, Jane Cassie, Anne Danahy, Gipp Forster, Nadine Jones, Kevin McKay, Lynda Pasacreta, Barbara Small, Deddeda Stemler, William Thomas, Dr. Patricia Tway Proofreader Allyson Mantle

DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

27 Classifieds

4 The Entertainer

After a lifetime in the biz, Greg Hampson now brings the joy of music to seniors.

28 Crossword

8 Staying Safe at Home

Advertising Manager

Barry Risto 250-479-4705 Toll Free 1-877-479-4705 sales@seniorlivingmag.com

Protect yourself against the leading cause of injuries among seniors – falls.

Ad Sales Staff

Nadine Jones shares her experience of living in a 900-square-foot houseboat.

COLUMNS

12 The Float Home

RaeLeigh Buchanan 250-479-4705 Terry Cushing 250-479-4705 Ann Lester 250-390-1805 Mathieu Powell 250-589-7801 Barry Risto 250-479-4705

2 The Family Caregiver by Barbara Small

14 Six Steps to Staying Young at Heart

9 Between Friends

Everyone, regardless of age, can lower their chances of developing heart disease.

Contact Information – Head Office

Senior Living Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

15 Taking the Complexity out of Complex Care

Phone 250-479-4705 Toll-free 1-877-479-4705 Fax 250-479-4808 E-mail office@seniorlivingmag.com Website www.seniorlivingmag.com

31 BBB Scam Alert

by Doreen Barber

10 Forever Young by William Thomas

29 Ask Goldie

by Goldie Carlow

16 One Kool Cat

Author Rebecca Kool found inspiration for her first book in an unlikely muse.

32 Reflections: Then & Now by Gipp Forster

19 Finding the Right Residence for You

Subscriptions: $32 (includes GST,

postage and handling) for 12 issues. Canadian residents only.

22 The Upside to Downsizing

No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Senior Living is an indepdendent publication and its articles imply no endoresement of any products or services. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. Unsolicited articles are welcome and should be e-mailed to editor@seniorlivingmag.com Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland is distributed free in Vancouver, North & West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Delta, Twawwassen, White Rock, Surrey, Cloverdale and Ladner. ISSN 1911-6373 (Print) ISSN 1991-6381 (Online)

Change is an undeniable part of life. If you are planning a move, downsizing may be too.

24 Valentining in Victoria This Valentine’s Day, your romantic getaway may be a ferry ride away.

Senior Living Vancouver is available at most Recreation Centres and Libraries in the following municipalities: • VANCOUVER • BURNABY • NEW WESTMINSTER • WHITE ROCK • NORTH VANCOUVER • LADNER / TSAWWASSEN • PORT MOODY • COQUITLAM • PORT COQUITLAM • SURREY • RICHMOND • WEST VANCOUVER • LANGLEY • ABBOTSFORD • PHARMASAVE STORES THROUGHOUT BC

MAGAZINE

Call 1-877-479-4705 for other locations. FEBRUARY 2010

1


THE FAMILY CAREGIVER

Can You Prepare in Advance to be a Family Caregiver? BY BARBARA SMALL

A

Do a safety check on the home to pproximately 94,000 fam- that most caregivers don’t let go of ily caregivers of adults live other demands to fit new duties into help prevent falls and other accidents. in the Greater Victoria area their schedules – they just juggle care- (See page 8 for an article on Staying and over one million in British Colum- giving along with their job, spouse, Safe at Home). The November 2009 issue of the bia. If you are not already providing children, friends and own health and care in some form to a parent, spouse, well-being. Network News newsletter available Here are a few steps caregivers can at www.familycaregiversnetwork.org sibling or child, you likely will at some point in your life. take to better prepare themselves and includes an article on falls prevention strategies. I couldn’t have predicted that both reduce the immediate burden. of my otherwise healthy parents would Ensure that an up-to-date list of Early communication between famdevelop colon cancer within six months ily members is essential to reduce doctors, lawyers, bank, pharmacists, of each other, require care and pass stress and future conflict. insurance etc. is available and everyaway within two years folone knows its location. Make caregiving a responlowing their diagnosis. Just as others could not predict a sibility for the whole famEarly communication between husband would have a stroke, ily – “share the care.” Certain family members is essential to a mother would be permafamily members will be better at certain tasks (personal care, nently disabled in a car accireduce stress and future conflict. financial, household chores). dent or that an adult daughter Include everyone in the dewould develop Multiple Sclecision-making, respect each rosis. Even if an illness runs Be proactive and create a long-term person’s needs and keep the lines of in your family, you often don’t know care plan. What are your family mem- communication open. when, or if, it will develop. If possible, learn as much as you The need to provide care and sup- ber’s wishes? Who will do the caregivcan about your family member’s mediport usually happens suddenly and ing when the time comes? unexpectedly. It may start slowly with Ensure financial and legal issues are cal condition so you are more knowlaccompanying someone to an appoint- taken care of in advance, including an edgeable about what to expect and can ment or taking over the grocery shop- Enduring Power of Attorney, Repre- prepare in advance. Gather information about available ping. Alternately, it can happen in a sentation Agreement and Living Will. split second, as in the case of a stroke Have automatic bill paying and community resources and supports for or accident. Just like that, a completely direct deposit set-up in advance for both you and the person for whom you SL new set of demands can be placed on things such as pension cheques and will be caring. an already busy person. It is common utility bills. Next month: Advocating for your family member.

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Barbara Small is the Program Development Coordinator for Family Caregivers’ Network Society located in Victoria, BC. www.familycaregiversnetwork.org


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re you or a senior member of your family thinking about future housing options? If you are considering anything from a supportive living residence to an apartment or strata complex that is senior-oriented, you may find the right housing option for you on Senior Living’s newly launched online senior housing directory for British Columbia. While still in its infancy, the goal is to make this the most comprehensive, up-todate online BC senior housing resource available. Over the years Senior Living has stood out as one of the foremost resources for senior housing, especially for Vancouver Island, publishing a special housing edition twice a year containing the listings of all the senior residences on Vancouver Island. This publication is used by social workers, hospitals, care workers, and various

other professionals helping clients find housing alternatives. Acting upon the request of numerous BC-wide readers for relevant housing information in their area, Senior Living has created this provincial online Senior Living Housing Directory. This directory is a valuable online resource for seniors and family members looking for housing to match their desired lifestyle or medical/mobility needs. Types of housing include assisted living, complex care, independent or supportive living, respite, as well as a range of rental or purchasable housing options including senior-oriented apartments, condos and retirement communities. Using automated technology, the Senior Living housing directory will be updated at least twice a year. Residences can update their listings

anytime they like through a direct link they will be provided with. But to make updating routine, twice a year every residence or housing community will be emailed an electronic form to fill out. By simply clicking the “submit” button, their listing will be instantly updated on the Senior Living website. Not only is this site optimized for online searches, but it will be promoted in every issue of Senior Living, a marketing advantage that will keep the directory continually in the public eye. Developing this resource directory will take time, but the Senior Living publishers are confident it will become one of the best housing sites for seniors in BC. The directory can be found at www.FindSeniorHousing.ca or by visiting the Senior Living website at www.seniorlivingmag.com

Senior Living Housing Directory �����������������������

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Senior Living Housing Directory is a valuable online resource for seniors and family members looking for alternative housing to match their desired lifestyle, or medical/mobility needs. Senior residences and housing communities throughout BC are listed in this comprehensive directory. This directory is published by Senior Living, and promoted in all its magazines distributed monthly to over 900 locations across BC. We hope you will find our online Senior Living Housing Directory useful and easy to navigate.

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3


THE ENTERTAINER T

o say that Greg Hampson gets a great deal of satisfaction from bringing his gift of music to people would be an understatement. Though a musician and songwriter for much of his life, it is only in the last decade that he’s discovered his knack for bringing joy to seniors. “Shortly after I started performing for seniors, a gentleman who worked at the Legion told me how much they appreciated me coming in and breaking up the monotony of institutional life,” says Greg. “Sooner or later, most of us lose mobility... so when dancers or musicians come in to perform, it is really a bright spot in their day.” Greg came to this realization after many years of performing across the country and locally, mostly as a rock musician. The journey began on February 9, 1964 when an 11-year-old Greg watched, along with millions of others, as the Beatles were introduced to North America on the Ed Sullivan television show. He was transfixed and, from that moment, Greg had no doubt about what he wanted to do. “After seeing The Beatles, I decided this is the life for me,” he says. “There was no doubt about it.” What followed was an internal debate as to whether he would like to play guitar or drums. Guitar won out and so he launched his attack, endlessly pestering his parents to buy him an electric guitar – an attack they resisted until 1965. That year, while visiting a friend’s home, he started fooling around on a piano. “I was playing around on it for a while when I looked behind it and noticed a guitar case,” says Greg. “I pulled out this old, broken-down guitar that couldn’t have had more than three strings left on it, and just plunked 4

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

STORY AND PHOTO BY KEVIN MCKAY


away until it was time for us to leave. Shortly thereafter, my parents bought me my first guitar from the Sears catalogue for $29.95. My dad made me an amplifier out of an old 1940s stand-up radio.” From there, Greg never looked back. Though he didn’t take lessons, Greg studied the Mel Bay Method guitar book for a few months to learn how to play. “After that, it was time to get into an actual band with my friends and start playing the popular music of the day. Badly.” This continued through his high-school years in Chilliwack, until each of the band members graduated. In 1967, the year he turned 15, Greg persuaded his parents to buy him a second guitar, an acoustic folk one this time. “I was into the folk scene and wanted to become Bob Dylan or Gordon Lightfoot,” he recalls. “They called me ‘Bob Lightfoot.’ I played both folk and rock, playing guitar with some older guys on the weekend. I didn’t think they were all that good, but it allowed me to talk to the trumpet player’s wife, Pernelia, who was extremely pretty and way nicer to me than girls my own age.” Girls were another influence. Greg was an avid reader of both comics and novels. He clearly remembers an advertisement on the back cover of a comic showing a young man playing the guitar with pretty girls surrounding him. He credits a television show with being yet one more inspiration: “The Monkees were a huge influence on me and many other musicians,” he says. “We didn’t know it was a made-for-television band. I had their records along with the Beatles and many more.” In addition to his bands, Greg learned to perform in front of people by singing in choirs and landing roles in his school’s musical plays. In 1968, his school’s one-act play won first place at the BC Drama Festival. He was part of the last Grade 13 class in the province, and then started studying at Douglas College aiming to be a social worker

or a psychologist. But something was not right. “I decided, instead, I wanted to be a rock star. I knew I would get true fulfillment from playing music, and I needed to find a way to make a living doing it,” he says. From 1974 until 1981, Greg was part of full-time nightclub rock bands, going on the road across Canada playing gigs and gaining experience. In nightclubs and pubs, Greg served as lead guitarist, lead vocalist,

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rhythm guitar, roadie and truck driver. Among many other adventures Greg recalls, “Our drummer had saved to buy a new shiny chrome snare drum. He didn’t have a case for it yet and placed it on top of the other equipment in our van. We got a flat tire on the Hope-Princeton [Highway] and had to unload a lot of equipment to get the spare tire out. The drum was placed on the gravel shoulder of the highway in a little

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depression, so it wouldn’t move, but suddenly we noticed it rolling towards the edge of a cliff that dropped to the river below. Everyone jumped, but it flew over the edge. We all watched the snare drum roll and fly down the slope until it made one final leap and plunged into the river. You could see the chrome glinting beneath the water. I always imagined some hunter passing by and seeing a rusty Ludwig snare drum in the water and wondering how in heck it got there!” By the early ’80s, Greg was growing weary of being on the road all the

time, so he found a job with a house band at the Wooden Barrel Cabaret in Burnaby. It was a rowdy place, at times, but the lifestyle suited him. “I loved it,” he says. “I enjoyed being able to sleep in my own bed every night.” After having that gig for a couple of years, he teamed up with another musician and performed as a duet, mostly around the Lower Mainland. The 1990s would see several significant changes in Greg’s life. In the very early part of the decade, he became involved in charity work, something he continues to this day, though with a

A Great Gift Idea! Reflections, Rejections, and Other Breakfast Foods Reflection��s,��������

st Foods

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Limited Edition

Limited Edition!!

A collection of Gipp Forster’s published columns in Senior Living magazine, with other unpublished writings thrown in for good measure. A unique blend of humor and nostalgia, Gipp’s writings touch your heart in such an irresistible way, you will want to buy not only a copy for yourself, but as a wonderful gift for friends and family members. 128 pages Softcover • Published by Senior Living

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“Reflections” MAIL-IN ORDER FORM Name___________________________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________ City____________________________________________ Prov ___________ Postal Code_______________ Phone _________________________________ Email ___________________________________________________________ = $____________ = $____________

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Please allow two weeks for shipping.

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smaller role. Throughout the decade, he was involved with musical events to benefit the food bank at Christmas, both performing and stage managing. In 1993, he was asked to volunteer his time as executive producer for a Christmas CD called A Christmas Wish, to benefit the Children’s Hospital. The CD featured all original music by various West Coast Canadian recording artists. “I got to contribute one song to another Christmas CD for the BC Lions Society for Children with Disabilities – A Timmy’s Christmas telethon special project,” he recalls. “I was asked to write a song for Bobbi Smith, which was the lead-off song on the album, and she did an incredible job. It was very exciting to be part of that. Knowing that you are helping people is a very good feeling, even though I never met one person I helped.” Greg also started a family in the ’90s, after successfully wooing a woman who told him she would not go out with a musician! His only son was born in 1995 and plays the clarinet in his school band. In the middle of the decade, Greg started performing solo, and let his booking agent convince him to try playing for seniors, a move he is happy he made. “I was encouraged to sing for seniors, and I found I really enjoy it, especially hospitals and residential care homes, where the people cannot get out as much as they used to,” he says. “It is very rewarding. I find I am very appreciated and it is a joyous feeling seeing them smile.” In addition to songs he has recorded for himself, Greg has written songs for several artists including Marcus Mosely and Lori Paull. “I’m quite a prolific composer,” he confesses, “though I am so busy with live performances that I don’t have time to write much now. I won’t just sit down and write a song. I hear it in my head first until pieces of it start coming together. When it’s there, I sit down with my guitar and plenty of paper. It usually takes me about 20 minutes,


then I go back and edit and tighten it up. I think if you open yourself up, the songs almost write themselves. When I do the song in the fashion of an artist, I try to let their spirit come through and influence me. It never hurts to have them on your side. If your intent is good, then I believe good things will happen.”

“No, I’m not famous, but it’s a stellar achievement, if you are an artist, ballerina or musician who can make a living from what you do. It’s not a job, but a calling... There is nothing I would rather do.” –Greg Hampson

Greg’s latest project is a song he wrote to honour the fallen Canadian soldiers returning home. He plans to release it shortly and donate all the royalties to the families who have been left behind by these brave men and women. The song is called “Highway of Heroes – Another Angel’s Coming Home.” Greg considers himself fortunate to be able to make a living by doing what he loves. He says, “No, I’m not famous, but it’s a stellar achievement, if you are an artist, ballerina or musician who can make a living from what you do. It’s not a job, but a calling... There is nothing I would rather do. “I like to see people smile, dance and enjoy themselves. That is totally what I strive for – the warm feeling in the room. People forget about their troubles for a while or the music brings them in. An entertainer is interested in the whole experience, while a musician just likes to play music. There is a big difference between the two.” Greg Hampson is a talented and creative singer, musician and songwriter, but first and foremost, he is an entertainer. SL

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Are you a Care Giver or expect to be one?

You are not alone! Embrace the Journey - A Care Giver’s Story

96 pages Softcover 5.5” x 8.5” Price $14.95

Valerie Green’s personal story as a care giver to her elderly parents is the most relevant book on “aging in place” I have read to date. It provides a powerful insight into the challenges faced by every care giver. It unveils the challenges, heartaches, struggles and agonizing decisions that often need to be made along the way. If you are currently a care giver, or anticipate being one in the near future, this book is a must-read. - Publisher Barbara Risto, Senior Living magazine

To order, please send cheque for $19.84 ($14.95 plus $3.95 S&H & GST) payable to Senior Living. Please include your clearly written shipping address and phone number. MAIL TO: Embrace Book Offer c/o Senior Living 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

Allow two weeks for shipping.

FEBRUARY 2010

7


Staying Safe at Home

F

alls are the leading cause of injury among seniors in Canada. In fact, more than half of all injuries among seniors are a result of falls and most of those occur in the home or surrounding area. The bad news is that a fall can result in a serious injury such as a hip fracture, as well as a loss of independence. The good news is that falls can be prevented and there are steps seniors can take to make sure they stay safe and self-sufficient at home. Fall prevention starts with knowledge. As the body ages, normal changes occur, such as the reduction of vision, hearing and sense of touch, which can increase the risk of falls. Other risk factors include reduced balance, physical fitness, side-effects from medications and unsafe conditions around the home. There are many way to reduce the risk, for example, keeping physically fit can prevent a decline in mobility, strength, balance, and flexibility and keep muscles toned. People who cannot hear or see properly are at a greater risk of falling. Check hearing and vision regularly and wear appropriate glasses and hearing aids. Be aware of the side-effects of medications that may cause dizziness or weakness and can affect balance and perception. One of the greatest risk factors is unsafe conditions around the home, espe-

8

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

BY GIOVANNA BONIFACE, OT

cially in the kitchen, bathroom and on stairways. Here are a few tips to help “fall proof” your home: • Remove throw rugs or scatter mats; their edges are treacherous hazards. Another option: secure them to the floor or ensure they have non-skid backing to keep them from slipping

A senior who takes action to prevent a fall at home can live safely and independently for many years to come. • Have handrails installed on the stairs • Ensure stairways are well lit and free of clutter • Keep walkways free of telephone and electrical cords and other clutter • Install grab bar(s) and non-slip surfaces in the bathtub or shower • Use a bath seat, if standing up in a shower is difficult • For those who have trouble getting on and off the toilet, use a raised toilet seat

or grab bar • Improve lighting in the bathroom or hallway by installing a nightlight • Wipe up any spills immediately to prevent slipping • Keep items in the kitchen in easy-toreach locations • Only use a short, stable step stool with a handrail • Keep an easy-to-read list of emergency numbers near the telephone • Keep outside walkways free of leaves, ice, snow and debris • Wear supportive shoes when gardening or walking around the home • For those that require one, use a walking aid (e.g. cane or walker) • Remove your reading glasses when mobile • Take care not to trip by always checking the floor • Get help for heavier work around the house or garden A senior who takes action to prevent a fall at home can live safely and independently for many years to come. SL Giovanna Boniface, BSc (Bio), BSc, (OT), is an occupational therapist with over 12 years experience.


Between Friends P

Faith, Hope and Charity

BY DOREEN BARBER

erhaps you are approximately the same age as guidance require my performance to qualify? And I am and remember a parent, acquaintance or is there any authority on earth, be it a pastor, parent, grandparent singing or humming these words: teacher, rabbi, friend, spiritual leader or acquaintance “Faith, hope and charity, that’s the way to live success- who can answer it? There are, of course, those who asfully, how do I know the Bible tells me so. Don’t worry sert that they have divinely-given authority over those about tomorrow, just be real who submit to them. good today, the Lord will surely guide you and lead “Nor shall derision Being good or doing good you on your way.” prove powerful against As a young person, I ofthose who listen to humanworks have their rewards, but I ten pondered that song. If I ity or those who follow in am persuaded that divine help is were good, would I be guidthe footsteps of divinity, for they shall live forever. ed? And if I wasn’t, would I not conditional on my actions. Forever.” experience negative conse–Kahlil Gibran quences and not have divine guidance or help? The first line of the song indicated where to find the Answers to my questions eventually came through life answer to successful living; but the second line made suc- experiences and believing we are truly loved by our crecessful living conditional based on behaviour. ator. In hindsight, I realize that is not my truth. Bad behavBeing good or doing good works have their rewards, iour seemed to have a reward unto itself; and good behav- but I am persuaded that divine help is not conditional on my actions. There is a greater plan than our determinaiour did not always have the yielded desire. How good was good enough? And who rated this tion and resolve to “being good.” behaviour? Relying on human understanding made the quest treacherous because opinions vary greatly. “Aim at heaven and you will get earth thrown in. Aim SL The question begs an answer. Does seeking divine at earth and you get neither.” –C.S. Lewis

FEBRUARY 2010

9


FOREVER BY WILLIAM THOMAS

SPEED DATING

So many shallow people, so little time

W

ith so few marriages today outlasting the warranty of the wedding gifts, I don’t know why I was surprised to learn about speed dating. Speed dating is one of the latest trends among “power daters” – singles in their late 20s looking for long-term mates in beat-the-clock board game style. Renting trendy clubs in 22 cities around the world, dating services are offering singles evenings in which a client can date seven people in 90 minutes. And that includes the time it takes for the guys to get up after a seven-minute date at a table for two and move on to another woman. It’s like the lonely hearts club on amphetamines – courting on anabolic steroids. So, in today’s world of dating, when bells go off, it’s not love. That’s actually the signal that all “dates” have ended and you must rotate to spend seven minutes trying to select the candidate who will someday bear your children. I’m thinking the café set-up is costing these daters valuable time. The walking to and from tables, the distraction of music and drinks – it’s archaic. Why not rent your local Tim Hortons’ donut shop for an hour every Saturday and speed date at the drivethru window? And if everything went really well 10

in the first five minutes, you could get the Tim Hortons’ manager to marry you in a pre-packaged but lovely ceremony that would not exceed your remaining two minutes. Your new bride climbs through the window into your car, you drive to the nearest motel for the honeymoon, grab a fast beer and minute steak on the way and, before you know it, you’ve got two girls and two boys incubated on a “48 Hour Special” at InvitroWorld. They’ll start school Monday morning at the Grade 7 level in an accelerated math program. By Wednesday, you could be in marriage counselling, by Thursday divorced and, after an appropriate healing period of, say, Friday, you wouldn’t even lose your spot at Tim Hortons’ drive-thru for “Speed Dating – The Second Attempt,” the following Saturday night. Perfect. Sorry, but as baby boomers, we took dating seriously. We respected dating as a foundation for a solid and lasting relationship. And we took our time – as much time as we needed – to chill a bottle of Mateus Rosé, borrow a joint and put on a Doobie Brothers album. We didn’t get to know each other. Hell, half the time we couldn’t remember we’d even met. And that made it even more special because your date always seemed new and interesting, and you could use the same lines repeatedly. Today, well, it’s different. I have a

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

friend who’s been on so many blind dates, one more and he wins a seeing-eye dog. Though faster may well spell disaster, the rules of courtship and engagement have not changed. Here’s a few dating rules, one a minute if you’re still on the clock. First, confirm that your prospective date is in fact someone of the opposite sex. Second, do not be misled by heavy make-up or false eyelashes. With the media spotlight now off him, Bill Clinton could be dating again. Third, remember the strongest sense of all – smell. Women are attracted by the scent of money, while a guy prefers a perfume that gives off the aroma of the interior of a new car. Fourth, never underestimate the power of a good opening line like: “I know what you’re thinking but, as a matter of fact, I am the last man on earth. Can I pick you up at eight?” Fifth, a date is like a job interview. And if you don’t believe that a date is a face-to-face application for a position of hard work, with long hours and little reward – go ahead, get marSL ried already.

William Thomas is the author of nine books of humour including Margaret and Me about his wee Irish mother. www.williamthomas.ca


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THE FLOAT HOME BY NADINE JONES

I

The author visits with her neighbours on the dock of her houseboat.

Photo: Jackie Asante

wouldn’t say it was moving from the sublime to the ridiculous, but it was a tremendous leap from a 5,000-square-foot log home in the northern B.C. forest to a 900-squarefoot houseboat in the city. My husband and I had split and, at 60, I was alone for the first time in my life. For the next three years, living aboard a houseboat, I was rocked to sleep in the tidal arms of Fraser – the river. The house was two levels, built on pontoons and secured to a wharf in Richmond. No property is included with the purchase of a houseboat – not even the private wharf outside the front door. Like all other water dwellers, I paid moorage, which included electricity. I heated the house most of the year with a small propane stove. The home had a dormer verandah, which I had enclosed with a glass roof and sliding glass doors opening to a small balcony. I moved my bed into the enclosed glass space so I could study the Big Dipper before falling asleep. Most of the time, it was heaven, but there were drawbacks. Living on the river in the spring, summer and fall is great! Not so wonderful were days when winter storms buffeted the house and the pontoons took on water, so the house and I listed sideways.

With no man around, I went out in the dead of night on the dark slippery wharf. With my hair forming icicles in the wind, I bailed out the pontoons until the place righted itself. That wasn’t a lot of fun. I was getting older, but the thought of being a landlubber again kept me bailing through three winters. Some people are smarter than others. I never learned to read a tide guide before doing a big shop, so, when I returned with laden arms, the gangplank was invariably at a right angle as I tot-

tered down clutching grocery bags. It was the same thing when I staggered back from the corner gas station with 10-gallon canisters of propane. The problem would have been solved with a little forethought, but I never seemed to run out of fuel or food when the tide was in. Looking at the overall picture, houseboat living didn’t leave much to complain about for three-quarters of the year, except the leaks! Every float home I ever visited, including mine, leaked from the constant swaying back and forth on the tides. Not bad leaks, just hard-to-locate small drips, which necessitated a bucket on the floor until the culprit was found and patched. Except for six more houseboats moored side by side along the dock, all my neighbours were boat owners who felt superior to us float home dwellers tethered to Mother Earth. At a moment’s notice, they could unhitch themselves from the dock and sail away for days or weeks. My immediate neighbours took off around the world! Wendy and Bob Rerie and their two children, Sharon, 11, and Brian, 12, sailed around the world and back in a 42-foot Spray-Built called The Rovin’ Robin, while I was still tied up at the dock! My other neighbours were ducks,

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seals and fish. Over time, I became known as the Duck Lady because I learned quite a bit of Duck, and when I called – or quacked – to my feathered friends, they would fly to my front door looking for dinner. Two domesticated large Muscovy ducks, which had undoubtedly escaped from a barnyard, became close friends. The two were inseparable girlfriends – they always swam and walked together. Because one was black and one white, I naturally named them White Duck and Black Duck. White Duck was really friendly (it was cupboard love, I’m sure). If I put a plastic sheet down on the kitchen floor (ducks aren’t housetrained), she would come inside and preen herself. Until then, I didn’t know ducks are aware of every single feather. If I touched a feather and said, “You haven’t done this one,” White Duck knew exactly which feather I had touched and swiped it with her beak. Black Duck never came in the house but deigned to sit on the balcony railing accepting tidbits. Often there were emergencies. One day, I found a very thin duck at my front door. I brought her in, put her in a bathtub of water, and phoned Wild Life Rescue. They dispatched a volunteer and after examination found the female Mallard had an obstruction in her gullet, which prevented her from eating. It was removed and I was called a few days later to watch while she

was released to rejoin her flock. ritual for me to bang a few times on the Life on the river was never dull. I wharf and watch while the fish swarmed was aware that salmon fingerlings mi- around waiting for a meal. They were grated down the Fraser on their way to about a foot long, and they got so tame, the ocean, but I didn’t realize they could I could stroke their backs without causbe tamed enough to pat. One day, while ing them undue alarm. sitting on the wharf, I noticed a group of Eventually, the novelty of river living fish swimming around under my house. palled – especially in the winter – so I Lying on the wharf, I held a half loaf of regretfully decided to become a landbread in my hand and lowered it into the lubber again. But the peace and contentwater. Timid at first, the fish came and ment I felt while gently rocking in my surveyed the situation and then started float home, looking up at the stars at 09-0161 WR Sure Sign - SeniorLiving:Ad 2/12/09 1:32 PM Page 1 biting at the bread. Soon it became a night, will remain with me always. SL

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Though surround ed on three sides by water, Vancouver has very little moorage space for float homes and what is available is pricey – the least expe nsive is almost $700 per month. There is a small but high-end hous eboat community moored at the edge of Granville Island, a few hom es at Richmond Marina, and two or three communities in Ladner along the South Arm of the Fras er. Some homes compare to any elaborate residence on land, but have space for a sailboat or motor launch alongside – and picture win dows to watch the water world go by.

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FEBRUARY2010 2010 FEBRUARY

13


Six Steps to Staying Young at Heart BY ANNE DANAHY, MS RD

A

lthough the rate of heart disease has been decreasing in Canada, it remains the leading cause of death for those over the age of 55. While it’s true that advancing age puts people at risk, most of the other factors that increase the odds of a heart attack or stroke are diet- or lifestyle-related. The good news is that everyone, regardless of their age, can lower their chances of developing heart disease with these six simple steps. 1) Eat fruits and vegetables. The fibre in produce helps to lower cholesterol levels, and the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that all fruits and vegetables provide keep arteries strong and reduce blood pressure. Eat at least five servings each day and strive for variety. The best choices include leafy green and brightly coloured vegetables, such as spinach, carrots and sweet potatoes, as well as grapes, oranges and any type of berries. 2) Skip meats that are high in cholesterol-raising saturated fat, such as sausages, hamburger and most other cuts of beef. Eat fish instead. Any fish is healthy (as long as it’s not fried), but

cold-water fish such as salmon, herring, rainbow trout and sardines have the greatest amount of heart-healthy omega-3 fat. Eating fish twice a week can help improve cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure. 3) Go a little nutty! Snack on a handful of raw almonds, walnuts or peanuts, instead of potato or corn chips. Nuts are a great source of protein, as well as heart-healthy fats. The fat in most chips will raise cholesterol, while nuts can help lower it. 4) Spend some quality time in the kitchen. Preparing meals from scratch is the most effective way to reduce sodium, and improve blood pressure. Examine food labels for sodium content, and strive for less than 2,400 mg per day. Skip the frozen dinners, canned soups and packaged rice, all of which are high in sodium. Instead, add some zip to meals with fresh or dried herbs, low salt seasoning mixes and lots of heart-healthy garlic. 5) Make half of grains consumed whole. In their latest revision to Canada’s Food Guide, Health Canada urges

all individuals to add more whole grains to their diets. Foods made with whole grains have more vitamins and minerals, in addition to soluble fibre, which has been shown to decrease cholesterol. Replacing white bread, rice or pasta with whole-grain alternatives will help people meet their daily fibre goal of 2035 grams, and it could help clear arteries of plaque build up. 6) Get moving! The most recent physical activity recommendations from the Public Health Agency of Canada suggest that all adults (including those over the age of 65) aim for at least 30-60 minutes of moderately intense physical activity most days of the week. Regular exercise is essential for anyone who wants to strengthen his or her heart, maintain a healthy weight and enjoy life! If the thought of spending that much time at the gym is daunting, consider everyday activities such as vacuuming, mowing the lawn, raking leaves, dancing or playing ball with grandchildren. Strive for a balance between structured “exercise” such as walking, swimming or biking and acSL tivities such as these each day.

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Taking the Complexity out of Complex Care

B

.C. has a province-wide, single point of entry system to manage how seniors access facilities providing complex care. This program applies to all five health regions. Almost all complex care services for seniors, including home care, adult day centres, residential care, respite care and specialized services are available by contacting the health authority office in your region. This office can be located through the Yellow Pages. In the light blue pages, containing provincial resources, you will find three pages with the title “HEALTH AUTHORITIES” at the top. The offices within the telephone directory’s region will be listed by municipality under “Home & Community Care.” A case manager will be able to take your call, answer your questions and get the process started for you. The case manager will do an assessment of your physical, emotional and psychological status. This includes memory and other cognitive functions as well as your ability to perform tasks (referred to as Activities of Daily Living or ADL) such as bathing, dressing, feeding, grooming, toileting, medicine taking, shopping, cooking and cleaning. The case manager also looks at the supports in place to assist the applicants’ current caregiver, if there is one, and will note the level of stress the caregiver may be under.

If a case manager feels that the person needs a complex care residence, and the client is willing to go into care in three months or less, their name is submitted to the placement committee in the health authority region they live in. If the client prefers a placement in a different health authority region, they can request this. However, they may have to first be placed in a residence in their area and put on a transfer list to the other region. If the client refuses an offered bed, their name will be dropped from the placement process. Admission is based on need and the acuteness of the situation, not the length of time the person is on the waitlist. There is also a loose rotation system whereby a residence will offer the first available bed to someone in the hospital, the next available bed to someone in the community and the next bed to someone waiting for their preferred choice. However, this system is often interrupted by factors such as hospital discharge needs, community emergencies, cultural factors, particular skills offered at the facility, etc. For more information about complex care or other types of residential options, Senior Living offers a book called To Move or Not to Move: A Helpful Guide for Seniors Considering Their Residential Options. You can order it by filling out a form included in this magazine or through the Senior Living online bookstore at www.seniorlivingmag.com/bookstore. SL

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15


ONE KOOL CAT STORY AND PHOTO BY KEVIN MCKAY

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ot every author gets their first book published at the age of 65, but neither do they receive inspiration from a remarkable orphaned cat named after their husband’s grandmother! Unlikely as it sounds, that is what happened to Rebecca Kool, though there were a number of other steps along the journey. Perhaps the most important was Rebecca’s decision to move to Japan, a life-altering choice at the age of 50 that saw her land at the airport in Nagoya in October 1994 unable to read, write or speak Japanese. “My kids wondered if I had gone off the deep end!” she says. Prior to leaving everything behind and moving to a new country, Rebecca was working in Victoria for a seniors’ retirement complex as the on-site manager. She started before the facility even opened, helped show suites and worked on marketing and promotion. “It was an interesting job and I loved it,” she says. “I was in my heels, tottering across planks over the mud to get into the display suite. Once we had a full building, my job became the day-to-day management of the hotel. I oversaw food services, maintenance, staffing and all other aspects. I worked 12-hour days, seven days a week. I had an apartment, but only slept there.” After six years on the job, Rebecca’s wanderlust surfaced. Fate, in the form of some chance encounters, pointed her in a new direction. First, she became good friends with a scientist and his wife who did contract work in Japan for six months each year. Then, an official from the Japanese equivalent of the Ministry of Health dropped by to look at the facility as part of a study on how seniors are cared for in Canada. Finally, Rebecca’s colleague mentioned a friend who had lived in Tokyo for a year in a home-stay situation. “My friends assured me I would have no trouble finding work in Japan,” says 16

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


Rebecca. “I wanted to travel. I took a deep breath, sold my house, packed a couple of suitcases and left.” Rebecca recalls clearly when the move hit home. “I woke up to the captain of the plane telling us were landing in Nagoya. I lifted my window shade and looked down to see Japanese kanji characters written on the rooftops and thought, ‘I am really here.’ I was excited beyond words.” Rebecca settled in and started to meet other non-Japanese people, mostly Canadians and Americans. These contacts led to various part-time jobs teaching English. For three years, she taught English at an all-girls junior and senior high school. “I was told not to speak Japanese to the girls,” she says. “I had to devise all sorts of ways to communicate with them as I could not speak the language. I was a popular teacher because I let them let their hair down a bit. My classes were quite raucous and we moved all the desks around and things like that.” Rebecca also taught a Sunday evening class for Japanese teachers who taught English. “I was a resource for them. We discussed current events or interesting topics then went to drink beer,” she says with a laugh. It was while teaching this class that Rebecca met Takeshi, a Math teacher who had received special permission to take the class in order to maintain his English skills. Shortly after, the couple started dating and, in March 2000, they were married in Japan. A month later, they married again, this time in Portland, Oregon. Needing a place to live, American-born “Air-Force Brat” Rebecca, who had lived most of her adult life in British Columbia, and her new Japanese husband settled in Mexico. “We lived in Ajijic for four years. It’s a little village on a lake, full of Canadians and Americans,” says Rebecca. “I had studied Spanish in high school for four years, so I thought I could do better with the language than I had in Japan.” An active opera group in the community caught Takeshi’s interest since he enjoys singing opera, so the couple jumped right in. “We were privileged to see Jose Carras perform live in the opera house in Guadalajara.”

Rebecca also got back into writing during this time, managing to get her first published works included in the local paper. Back in 1996, while visiting family and friends, Rebecca signed up for a four-day writers workshop on Cortez Island with noted Saskatchewan author Sharon Butala. All of the participants were asked in advance to submit a short piece of their own writing, so Rebecca submitted one related to Japan and food. “We were to get our piece back dur-

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ing a one-on-one exit interview with Sharon,” she recalls. “During my interview, we talked briefly about my stay in Japan. She told me she liked the piece I had done and dashed out ‘intriguing’ and ‘a fresh voice’ at the bottom of the page. I was stunned. Here was Sharon Butala telling me I had a ‘fresh voice.’ It doesn’t get any better than that! I credit her with unlocking the door for me to continue pursuing writing.” And then her muse came without warning.

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“We adopted three cats in Mexico,” says Rebecca. “The first was a long, lean golden tabby that leaped in the air to catch things that flew. We named him Tama: he was usually successful catching hummingbirds and butterflies. The day we saw him catch a fly, I went straight to my computer and wrote this story. The boy in it is my husband, and the cat is Tama, of course. You see, my husband could catch flies with his hands. He had been taught by his mother as she had been taught by her mother, whom the cat was named after.” Before publishing success would come her way, illness forced Rebecca and Takeshi to abandon Mexico. She was worried she had Multiple Sclerosis but, after travelling to Portland for a diagnosis, she was informed she was suffering from environmental bad water and bad food in the country resulting in high levels of metals in her blood. She also suffered typhoid while in Mexico, as well as four stings from scorpions. “We had to leave and decided it was time to come to Canada,” says Rebecca. “We packed this little trailer with boxes, sold everything else and drove all the way. Neither one of us had ever driven a trailer before. Because our left signal didn’t work we only made right turns. We never mastered backing up so it took us 17 days to make it to Canada. I will never forget pulling up to Peace Arch, crossing with all our papers. The border guard said, ‘welcome home,’ and I burst into tears. It was so sweet. Canada really is home, and though I have affinity for my birthplace, I have a great love for this country too.” After settling back in the Lower Mainland, Rebecca set out to find a publisher for her manuscript. She managed to get her story in the top five finalists by one publisher in 2006, but did not make the final cut.

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

The following year, Rebecca’s perseverance finally paid off. “I met the publisher of Gumboot Books at the Surrey Writers Conference,” she says. “I talked with her and showed her the manuscript for Fly Catcher Boy. She asked to read it, and we made the deal a couple of days later.” The publisher accepted the manuscript as Rebecca had written it, and then found an illustrator for the book in Toronto, a young man named David Namisato. “The illustrations are so lovely that even if you don’t read it, you will love it,” says Rebecca. “There is colour and action, but you know it takes place in Japan. It is important for kids to have a global perspective. The more we can get them reading and understanding other cultures, the better.” In addition to writing, Rebecca is an avid photographer and loves to cook. “I’m an excellent cook,” she says. “My son, who became a chef, is so much better than I am, but if you ask him what his favourite dishes are, he’ll tell you Mom’s chicken wings and Christmas fudge with marshmallows. Not only a good cook but a creative one: who else puts marshmallows in fudge?” While getting word out about Fly Catcher Boy, Rebecca is planning a second children’s book, and working on memoirs of her time in Japan. She has even started a website and a blog to expand her audience. She says of Fly Catcher Boy, “This one has been so well received by educators. I want to keep writing and publishing as long as I can. It was always my heart’s desire to write and be published. I am proof that it’s never too late. Hold on to whatever passion you have. Be patient. If you SL don’t give up it’s sure to happen. I’m living proof!” To purchase Fly Catcher Boy, visit Senior Living’s online bookstore at http://www.seniorlivingmag.com/bookstore


E BL 10 A 0 IL 2 A H AV RC A M

Finding the Right Residence for You

1 & 2 BEDROOM INDEPENDENT LIVING SUITES

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inding a residence that suits your needs and desired lifestyle begins by asking questions. First, make an accurate and honest assessment of your physical, financial, mental and lifestyle needs. This information will help you ask the right questions when you are visiting the residences. Visit as many residences as you can. Call to set up an appointment for a tour. (If your needs fall into the Complex Care category, or you require subsidization, see “Taking the Complexity out of Complex Care” on page 15 for details about how to proceed through the application process.) In addition to touring the residence, you will often be invited to stay for a meal or even stay overnight to sample the services and atmosphere. Make sure you ask questions that address your particular needs and collect materials to study in greater depth. When you have narrowed your preferences to a couple residences, make an appointment to visit each residence again. Ask for a copy of the Occupancy Agreement or Residence Contract and a copy of the policies and procedures. The Occupancy Agreement will provide information about fees, services, resident rights, operator and resident responsibilities, exit criteria and conditions of termination. Policies and procedures will tell you about things like parking, entering and exit processes, having visitors, noise restrictions, pet rules, smoking rules, etc. Confirm the price and charges for extra services. Are any price increases expected? What services are included? Is there a maximum percentage the prices can be increased per year? Other areas to scrutinize are environment, staffing, residence safety, emergency procedures, resident/family responsibilities, social activities and the degree to which the residents have choice and autonomy. Is there an appeal process for dissatisfied residents? Find out how each resident’s needs are assessed and monitored to establish the point at which your needs may not fit the level of care provided at that residence. Inquire about policies on refunds, transfers and discharges. Schedule a couple “surprise” visits to the residence at different times of the day and week to see how the residence is managed during busy and slack times. Ask residents about their experiences. Take your family members along and ask for their opinion. For more help in determining what kind of residence is best suited for you, Senior Living offers a book called To Move or Not to Move: A Helpful Guide for Seniors Considering Their Residential Options. You can order it by filling out a form included in this magazine or through the Senior Living online SL bookstore at www.seniorlivingmag.com/bookstore.

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19


Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland Distribution Locations

ABBOTSFORD DOWNTOWN BUSINESS ASSOC ABBOTSFORD REC CENTRE ABC RESTAURANT - MARSHALL FV REGONAL LIBRARY GREYHOUND BUS STN IGA MEDICHAIR MSA GENERAL HOSPITAL PEOPLES DRUG MART SEVEN OAKS MALL SHARES SHOPPERS DRUG MART TRIANGLE COMMUNITY CENTRE ZELLERS BURNABY ABC RESTAURANT AMICA @ RIDEAU MANOR BOB PRITTIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BONSOR COMMUNITY CENTRE BREAD GARDEN BRENTWOOD SKY TRAIN STN BURNABY GENERAL HOSPITAL CAMERON RECREATION CENTRE CANADA WAY LODGE CHOICES MARKET IN THE PARK CONFED COMM CNTR FOR 55+ EASTBURN COMMUNITY CENTRE EDMONDS COMM CENTER FOR 55+ EDMONDS PUBLIC LIBRARY EDMONDS SKYTRAIN STN EILEEN DAILEY FITNESS CENTRE GILMORE SKYTRAIN STATION HILTON HOTEL HOLDOM SKYTRAIN STATION IGA INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL HEALTH & VACCINATION CLINIC KENSINGTON ARENA LANCASTER MEDICAL LAKE CITY SKYTRAIN STATION LOUGHEED SKYTRAIN STN MCGILL PUBLIC LIBRARY MEDICHAIR METROTOWN BUS LOOP MULBERRY SENIOR’S RESIDENCE NORBURN MED CENTRE OLD ORCHARD MEDICAL CLINIC PATTERSON SKYTRAIN STN PRODUCTION WAY SKYTRAIN STN REGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES ROYAL OAK SKY TRAIN STN. SAFEWAY SPERLING SKY TRAIN STN. SFU LIBRARY SPERLING SKYTRAIN STATION STATION SQUARE MEDICAL CLINIC TIM HORTON’S WILLINGDON COMMUNITY CENTRE

20

COQUITLAM BREAD GARDEN CHIMO POOL & SOCIAL REC CENTRE COQUITLAM CITY CENTRE LIBRARY COQUITLAM LIBRARY DOGWOOD PAVILION DUFFERIN SENIORS CENTRE GLEN PINE PAVILION PARKWOOD MANOR POIRIER COMMUNITY CENTRE PARK & RIDE RESIDENCES AT BELVEDERE SHOPPERS DRUG MART DELTA DELTA HOSPITAL GEORGE MACKIE LIBRARY INSIDE RACK - RICKY’S KENNEDY SENIOR’S REC CENTRE KINSMEN ASSISTED LIVING LADNER COMM CENTRE LADNER PIONEER LIBRARY LADNER PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT MCKEE SENIORS RECREATION CENTRE NORTH DELTA REC CENTRE NURSE NEXT DOOR PINEWOOD LEISURE REC CENTRE SOUTH DELTA LIBRARY SOUTH DELTA RECREATION CENTRE SUN GOD RECREATION CENTRE THE WATERFORD WINSKILL AQUATIC CENTRE FORT LANGLEY FORT LANGLEY LIBRARY IGA LANGLEY AI WHEELCHAIRS ALDERGROVE MALL BROOKSWOOD LIBRARY DOUGLAS REC CENTRE HARRISON LANDING LANGLEY LIBRARY LANGLEY SENIORS CENTRE LANGLEY SENIORS VILLAGE LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE MAGNOLIA GARDENS MARKET PLACE IGA MAIN SPOT NEWS THE RENAISSANCE RETIREMENT RESORT TIMMS COMMUNITY CENTRE WALNUT GROVE COMM CENTRE WALNUT GROVE LIBRARY MAPLE RIDGE MAPLE RIDGE HOSPITAL MAPLE RIDGE LEISURE CENTRE MAPLE RIDGE LIBRARY NEW WESTMINSTER 22ND ST SKYTRAIN STN BRAID SKYTRAIN STATION CARE POINT MEDICAL CENTRE

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

CENTENNIAL COMMUNITY CENTER CNTR OF INTEGRATION FOR AFRICAN IMMIGRANTS CENTURY HOUSE COLUMBIA ST STN EDWARD JONES HYACK HOUSE NEW WESTMINISTER QUAY NEW WESTMINSTER LIBRARY NEW WESTMINSTER SKY TRAIN STN QUEENBOROUGH COMMUNITY CENTER ROYAL COLUMBIAN HOSPITAL

MINORU ARENA MINORU SENIORS CENTRE RICHMOND ADDICTION SERVICES RICHMOND CENTRE FOR DISABILITY SEAFAIR MEDICAL CLINIC SHOPPERS DRUG MART SOUTH ARM COMMUNITY CENTRE STEVESTON COMMUNITY CENTRE THOMPSON COMMUNITY CENTRE VOLUNTEER RICHMOND INFO SERV WEST RICHMOND COMMUNITY CTR

NORTH VANCOUVER CAPILANO LIBRARY CHURCHILL HOUSE EVERGREEN HOUSING ADMINISTRATION KIWANIS LYNN MANOR KIWANIS TOWERS LION’S GATE HOSPITAL LONSDALE QUAY LONSDALE QUAY BUS LOOP LYNN VALLEY MEDICAL CLINIC MEDICAL CLINIC - 1940 LONSDALE AVE MOUNT SEYMOUR MEDICAL CLINIC NORTH SHORE COMMUNITY RESOURCES NORTH SHORE NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE NORTH VANCOUVER CITY LIBRARY NUTRITION HOUSE PARKGATE LIBRARY PEMBERTON & MARINE MEDICAL CLINIC QUEENSDALE MARKET SILVER HARBOUR MANOR SUPER VALU THE SUMMERHILL WAL MART WESTVIEW MEDICAL CLINIC

SURREY AQUATIC CENTRE ARBOURSIDE COURT BUENA VISTA LIBRARY BUY RITE FOODS CHOICES MARKET CLOVERDALE LIBRARY CLOVERDALE REC CENTRE FLEETWOOD COMMUNITY CENTRE FLEETWOOD LIBRARY GATEWAY SKYTRAIN STN GUILDFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY GUILDFORD SENIORS VILLAGE IMPERIAL PLACE KENT SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTRE KING GEORGE SKYTRAIN STN KIWANIS PARK PLACE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY MEDICHAIR NEWTON ARENA NEWTON GENERAL STORE NEWTON LIBRARY NEWTON WAVE POOL N SURREY REC CENTRE OCEAN PARK LIBRARY PEACE ARCH MEMORAIL HOSPITAL PHARMASAVE 10654 KING GEORGE PHARMASAVE 9558 - 120TH ST PHARMASAVE 15280 - 101ST AVE ROSEMARY HEIGHTS SENIORS VILL SAVE ON SCOOTERS SCOTT RD SKYTRAIN STN (N) SCOTT RD SKYTRAIN STN (S) SEMIAHMOO PUBLIC LIBRARY SHOPPERS DRUG MART SHOPPERS HOME HEALTH SOUTH SURREY ARENA SOUTH SURREY INDOOR POOL SOUTH SURREY REC CENTRE STRAWBERRY HILL LIBRARY SUNRISE PAVILLION SURREY GARDENS / SURREY VILL SURREY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL SURREY CENTRAL SKYTRAIN STN THE CHEMISTS PHARMACY TOM BINNIE PARK COMM CENTRE WESTMINSTER HOUSE WHALLEY LIBRARY WHITE ROCK/ S SURREY PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT

PITT MEADOWS PITT MEADOWS LIBRARY PITT MEADOWS REC CENTRE SHOPPER DRUG MART PORT COQUITLAM AMICA AT MAYFAIR TERRY FOX LIBRARY WILSON REC CENTRE PORT MOODY EAGLE RIDGE HOSPITAL PORT MOODY COMM SERVICES PORT MOODY LIBRARY PORT MOODY SOCIAL REC CENTRE RICHMOND BRIGHOUSE LIBRARY BUS STOP - 6390 #3 RD CAMBIE COMMUNITY CENTRE CAMBIE PUBLIC LIBRARY GARDEN CITY MED CLINIC HAMILTON COMMUNITY CENTRE IRONWOOD LIBRARY LANG CENTRE MINORU AQUATIC CENTRE

CONTINUED NEXT PAGE


MAINLAND DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS - CONTINUED VANCOUVER 1 KINGSWAY LIBRARY 29TH AVE SKY TRAIN STN 411 SENIOR’S CENTRE AMICA AT ARBUTUS MANOR ARBUTUS MALL BARCLAY MANOR BC WOMENS HOSPITAL BREAD GARDEN BRITANNIA ARENA / LIBRARY BROADWAY & BURRARD WALK IN BROCK HOUSE SOCIETY BURRARD SKYTRAIN BUS STOP - 750 BROADWAY CAPERS - 2285 4TH AVE CAPERS - 1675 ROBSON ST CAPERS MARKET CARE MEDICAL CENTRE CENTRAL MARKET - 830 THURLOW CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS COMM CNTR CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS LIBRARY CHOICES MARKET - 1202 RICHARDS CHOICES MARKET - 3493 CAMBIE ST CHOICES MARKET - 2627 16 AVE CITY SQUARE FAMILY PRACTICE COLLINGWOOD HOUSE COLLINGWOOD LIBRARY CROFTEN MANOR DENMAN COMMUNITY CTR DENMAN MALL DIAMOND HEALTH CARE CENTRE DOCTOR’S OFFICE 777 W BROADWAY DOUGLAS PARK COMM CENTRE DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTRE DUNBAR PUBLIC LIBRARY FALSE CREEK COMMUNITY CENTRE FIREHALL LIBRARY

FRASERVIEW LIBRARY FROG HOLLOW NEIGHBORHOOD GF STRONG REHABILITATION CTR GRANDVIEW TOWERS GRANVILLE ISLAND MARKET GRANVILLE MEDICAL CLINIC HASTINGS COMMUNITY CENTRE HASTINGS PUBLIC LIBRARY HOME INSTEAD - VAN, NORTHSHORE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE JOE FORTES LIBRARY JOYCE SKYTRAIN STN KENSINGTON COMMUNITY CENTRE KENSINGTON LIBRARY KERRISDALE ARENA KERRISDALE SENIORS CENTRE KERRISDALE LIBRARY KHATSALANO MED CLINIC KILLARNEY COMMUNITY CENTRE KILLARNEY MARKET KITSILANO NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE KITSILANO PUBLIC LIBRARY KIWASSA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY LITTLE MOUNTAIN NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE LONDON DRUGS - 1187 ROBSON MAIN ENTRANCE RACK MAIN ST SKYTRAIN STN MAPLE MEDICAL CLINIC MARPOLE COMMUNITY CENTRE MARPOLE LIBRARY MEDICAL CLINIC - 1280 GRANVILLE MERCATO MALL MID-MAIN COMM HEALTH CENTRE MT PLEASANT COMMUNITY CENTRE MT PLEASANT NGHBRHD HOUSE NANAIMO SKY TRAIN STN

MAGAZINE

OAKRIDGE LIBRARY OAKRIDGE SENIOR’S CENTRE O’KEEFE SENIOR LIVING APT PARKVIEW TERRACE PHARMASAVE 595 BURRARD PLATINUM CARE RAYCAM COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW PUBLIC LIBRARY RENFREW SKY TRAIN STN RICHMOND/VAN HEALTH UNIT RILEY PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE RILEY PARK LIBRARY ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE ROYAL CENTRE MEDICAL RUPERT SKYTRAIN STN SHANNON OAKS SHOPPERS DRUG MART SIDNEY MANOR SINCLAIR CENTRE SORRENTO MARKET STADIUM SKYTRAIN STN S GRANVILLE PARK LODGE S GRANVILLE SENIOR’S CENTRE SOUTH HILL LIBRARY SOUTHVIEW HEIGHTS AND TERRACE ST PAUL HOSPITAL STRATHCONA COMMUNITY CENTRE STRATHCONA LIBRARY THUNDERBIRD COMMUNITY CENTRE TROUT LAKE COMMUNITY CENTRE UBC HOSPITAL VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY VGH EMERGENCY WATERFRONT SKY TRAIN STN WEST END AQUATIC CENTRE WEST END SENIORS NETWORK WEST POINT GREY PUBLIC LIBRARY YMCA COMMUNITY SERVICES

WEST VANCOUVER AMICA AT WEST VANCOUVER BUS STOP 2002 PARK ROYAL BUS STOP 2051 PARK ROYAL GLENEAGLES COMMUNITY CENTRE HOLLYBURN HOUSE SUPER VALU WEST VAN MEMORIAL LIBRARY WEST VANCOUVER COMM CENTRE WHITE ROCK HOME INSTEAD PACIFIC CARLTON SUNNYSIDE MANOR THE PENINSULA RESORT RETIREMENT LIVING

More locations needed. Please contact us with your recommendations.

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Recommend a Distribution Location Near You! Senior Living is looking for convenient, high traffic distribution locations throughout the Greater Vancouver region. If you know of a place of business or activity centre that would be a convenient location for interested readers to pick up our magazine, let us know. Email: office@seniorlivingmag.com Phone 1-877-479-4705 FEBRUARY 2010

21


The UPSIDE to DOWNSIZING P BY DR. PATRICIA TWAY

eople spend the first half of their lives acquiring possessions, and the last half getting rid of them. Downsizing is often seen as a negative because people fear change and cannot let go, but change can keep a person young and allow him or her to move on. Downsizing is necessary when moving to a smaller home or an apartment, a retirement facility or to live with a relative. This shrinking of a world after so many years of expanding can be a negative experience unless looked at in a positive light. A group of mostly seniors at a brown bag lunch for women in transition, saw the upside to downsizing, “I gave all my jewelry to my nieces and granddaughters,” said one woman at the luncheon. “Now, instead of leaving them those things in

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my will, I don’t have to carry insurance; I don’t have to worry about losing those items; and I feel free of all that stuff. And the bonus is I now get to see my heirs enjoying [them].” What she didn’t expect was that her nieces and granddaughters would treat her like a queen. “They can’t seem to do enough for me,” she said. “I get invited to many extra family functions, I get more letters and phone calls from them, and they constantly worry about what I might need or want.” Her story resonated with

the group. Give items to loved ones today instead of waiting for “someday.” Ownership carries responsibilities. The more a person owns, the more responsibilities he or she has. Giving up things no longer needed limits responsibilities and saves money. Items donated to shelters, churches and charitable organizations help others. The same holds true for items sent to consignment shops – if the items sell it brings in a little money, the purchaser enjoys them, and some consignment shops give the money to the charitable organization that sponsors them. Tax receipts are often given for items donated to charitable organizations. Don’t hold on to the past, instead, live in the present – get rid of that clutter and look forward to a simpler future. Move forward with creative, positive energy. Finally, downsizing helps get rid of clutter. Most people tend to be packrats: collecting, keeping and storing stuff they don’t really need or use. One last upside: downsizing can stop SL people from becoming clutterbugs.

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NEWS BRIEF

B.C. Seniors’ Retirement residences recognized by new Seal of Approval

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eniors seeking quality retirement homes should look for communities that qualify for the new Seal of Approval, an independent quality review program launched by the B.C. Seniors’ Living Association (BCSLA). This program will identify senior living communities that adhere to the highest industry standards and ensure seniors have the opportunity to enjoy vibrant, safe and rewarding lifestyles. To obtain the BCSLA Seal of Approval, the community must complete an internal self-assessment and an independent external review. Successful communities meet multiple criteria in five areas: safety, infection control, staff training, resident services and assisted living supports. BCSLA members endorse the Seal of Approval as a way to publicly demonstrate their excellent service, professional integrity and industry leadership. Seal of Approval residences will give today’s seniors and future seSL niors the best in retirement living.

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alentining In ictoria

The Legislative buildings at dusk

I

s an Olympic event your ideal Valentine venue – or is it going to interfere with this day of love? If romance, in your perfect world, doesn’t include skating rinks, ski slopes or a swarm of spectators, escape the hectic pace and head over to the Island. Victoria offers many award-winning opportunities. You may not go home with a medal, but you’ll definitely earn a few brownie points. Here are half a dozen ways you can spoil your sweetheart this month and beyond:

Tea For Two

Valentining in Victoria wouldn’t be complete without sharing “a spot of tea.” Although there are cheaper tearooms in town, the Fairmont Empress has raised the most pinkies over the years. The ivy-draped icon has been honouring this British tradition since 1908 and, beneath the painted portraits of Queen Mary and King George V, you’ll dine on delectable dainties, 24

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Photos: Deddeda Stemler/Tourism Victoria

BY JANE CASSIE

scrumptious pastries and scones topped with clotted cream. Silver service, gracious surroundings, sipping the Empress Blend from fine-bone Royal Doulton – it’s a favourite that’s filled with pomp and prestige, even if you have to dig a little deeper into your retirement savings.

A Sweetheart Harbour

Snuggle up on a horse-drawn carriage, get cozy on a pedalpowered Kabuki Kab or hoist it up a notch on a double-decker bus. There are many ways to check out Victoria’s quaint inner harbour together. A pedestrian promenade that rims the waterfront offers more hand-holding moments. While strolling this walkway, you’ll be entertained by a lively marina on one side and a lineup of artisans on the other. Magicians, musicians and mimes perform alongside carvers, painters and jewelry makers. In spite of the energy and bustle, this happening hub always seems


to be in holiday mode – unhurried and relaxed. And when night falls, the Legislative Buildings light up like Cinderella’s castle, adding even more whimsical romance to the air!

Escape To Yesteryear

The steep turrets and chimneys of Craigdarroch Castle soar above opulent homes in the heart of Victoria. Mosey together through this baronial four-floor masterpiece and get the guided scoop on its past. Hear the story of Joan Dunsmuir, the original resident – her life saga, the family feud, their struggle for power and money. Admire the period furnishings, polished wood and stained glass. Then huff and puff your way up the 87 stairs to the top floor tower and check out the city view. But while en route, beware – Joan’s unsettled spirit is still known to lurk about.

Lavish Victorian era furnishings, exquisite stained glass and detailed woodwork carved by artisans of days gone by.... these combine to create a warm, expansive entertainment experience. When you’re finished, take time to browse the Gift Shop and relax in the Castle grounds. Open daily from 10am – 4:30 pm for self-guided tours.

info@thecastle.ca

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Craigdarroch Castle

A short distance away is the home of another famous Victoria female. Although the yellow clapboard dwelling is not nearly as flamboyant, its history is just as captivating. Emily Carr was raised here with her five older sisters, but as a young woman she escaped the city confines to live, write and paint about the wilderness and natives of British Columbia. Placards throughout the modest interior convey the life of this Canadian artist and, like Joan Dunsmuir, rumour has it Emily’s mother still lingers in a few of the rooms.

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25


Play Together

Anne Hathaway’s Cottage may not be haunted, but it’s definitely a hit for Shakespeare fans. You’ll find this quaint thatched roof replica 10 minutes from the downtown core. Mirroring the birthplace of William Shakespeare’s wife, it’s been fashioned with antiques that date back to the 16th century. Take a guided tour, browse through the English-style village and re-fuel with a pint at the pub. Like the other historical hits, this one will definitely take you on that romantic step back in time.

Picnic in the park

Okay, so it may still be too chilly in February to share a patch of grass with your sweetie, but this city has so many What to do today? Play WiiTM golf with some friends. Chat about the latest book club selection. Work out with a fitness class. Join the chorus in a sing-a-long. So much choice. Our residents love to connect with others. That’s why we offer plenty of social activities and lots of unscripted fun. Anything that appeals to the desire to stay active. What are you doing for fun today? Play at The Summerhill. Phone for your personal tour. 604.980.6525

135 West 15th Street (off Lonsdale) North Vancouver | 604.980.6525 www.the summerhill.ca Part of Pacific Arbour Retirement Communities

Where good things come together.

Dallas Road

time: Romantic travel Proof 1 Senior’s Living Housing Special magazine Size: (1/4 page Vertical) 3.5” w x 4.75”h, colour Rep: Ann Lester | ann@seniorlivingmag.com | 250.390.1805 Artwork to: Barbara Risto | publisher@seniorlivingmag.com

BC Ferries www.bcferries.com

To Do: Romantic things oric House Museum tle Hist Craigdarroch Cas 250-592-5323 astle.com www.craigdarrochc Carr House 250-383-5843 m www.emilycarr.co

r: Flightseeing tou

West Coast Air .com www.westcoastair

y: A Romantic Sta a agnolia Hotel & Sp

The M 250-381-0999 l.com www.magnoliahote oria: k out Tourism Vict For more info, chec .com @tourismvictoria fo in : es iri qu In ail Em ria.com www.tourismvicto

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


arm-in-arm sea-viewing walks and ever-growing gardens, it’ll make you woozy. Here are a few of the hottest plots.

Beacon Hill Park – Pathways lace around this 200-acre city park where playing fields host sports fans, ponds are home to bird life and benches overlook gregarious flowerbeds. The southern-most side butts up to Dallas road and an ocean-hugging walkway. Rocky ridges and sandy beaches are etched into this coastal jaunt. Take time, sit back and soak in the vista of Juan de Fuca Strait and distant Olympic peaks. And if you want to get more out of those Rockports and romance, continue the hand-in-hand action all the way to the jetty perch of Ogden Point. The saunter and seascape will surely increase your pulse rate! When it comes to bountiful blooms, the internationally acclaimed Butchart Gardens wins the green thumb! A rose garden, sunken garden, Italian garden, oh my! Waterfalls, ponds and bridges are all linked together by undulating pathways. Even in February, when the million plants on this

s d e fi i s s a Cl

Inner Harbour sky view

50-acre property are still snoozing, you can admire the intricate designs and the finest of greenery. Take Your Love Higher West Coast Air’s deHavilland floatplane rises to this occasion and, during the 30-minute tour, you and your love will be swept off your feet. As well as these valentine venues, you’ll soar over patchwork farmlands, shimmering lakes, untouched forests and verdant golf greens. A strand of rocky shoreline trims this majestic land mass and is a buffer to the sapphire waves. Backed by coastal peaks and the omnipresent sentinel of Mount Baker, it’s a spectacular setting that will win the heart of any Valentine. And after seeing it with this bird’s eye view, you’ll likely agree – B.C.’s capital SL is a destination that will always take the gold!

RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

$30 for 20 words or less. $1.25 per extra word. Boxed Ad - Small (2.2 x 1.2) $110. Boxed Ad - Large (2.2 x 2.4) $210. Add Logo - $25 extra. Red spot color 10% extra. Plus 5% GST. All Classified ads must be prepaid. Cheque or Credit Card accepted. Toll Free 1-877-479-4705 Deadline: 15th of the month. Make cheque payable to: Senior Living, 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

RESOURCE DIRECTORY Areference concise reference guide A concise guide of services and products offered by businesses and organizations throughout the BC Mainland of services and products LTD

LEARN COMPUTERS AT HOME with a patient and supportive woman. Professional with 25 years experience. Vancouver only. Maryse 604-694-0790 www.learncomputersathome.com

Photo: Jane Cassie

Abkhazi Garden – The Fairfield district is home to this dazzling display where giant Garry Oaks canopy 100-yearold rhodos, sculptured azaleas and a year-round floral carpet. Learn about the story of founders, Peggy and Nicholas Abkhazi – their trials, tragedies, romance and reunion. And before heading out, take time for the tearoom. While dining on open-faced sandwiches, lemon loaf and truffles, you’ll take in more of this visual overload.

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Are you looking for an economical way to advertise your product or service? Success in advertising isn’t a one shot effort. To get the best results, planning your advertising budget to extend over a year gives you the best bang for your buck. Senior Living’s Resource Directory provides frequency at a price small businesses can afford. It keeps your company name consistently in front of consumers where they see it every month. Call 1-877-479-4705 for prices and details.

FEBRUARY 2010

27


Mind GAMES

Crossword PUZZLE Across 1. City in SE Finland 6. Rifts 10. Notice of an intended marriage 12. Murders 14. Set that is a part of a larger set 16. Female fox 17. Small cask 20. Monarch butterflies 22. Botswana monetary unit 23. Footslog 25. NE New Jersey town 27. Vim 28. Approval 29. French mathematician and philosopher 31. Native South African 34. In an awful manner 36. Toward the back 38. Plant fence 39. Column dwellers

41. Spreads sleeping sickness 44. Solution resulting from dissolving out 46. Sheepskin leather 47. Minor falsehood 50. Smooth fabrics 52. Traded 53. Vamoosed 55. Lounged 57. Aegean island 58. Male name 59. Tidy 61. Retained 62. Scottish coronation site 63. Equilateral parallelograms 64. Makes a record of

Down 1. Chief prize 2. Standard-setting agency

3. Arabian royal house 4. Unbolt 5. Undo (e.g. a dress) 7. Send 8. State of confusion (3-2) 9. Ancient upright stone slab with markings 11. Oceanic animal forming mosslike colonies (3,3) 13. Sudden in action 15. Silkworm 18. Fraternal organization 19. Leave (2,4) 21. Cloak-and-dagger 24. Stainable 26. Fenced areas 30. Big cat crosses 32. Catches 33. De facto 35. Caused to go 37. Film comedian and director 39. Feel pain 40. Door posts 42. Special disposal of goods 43. Ultimate goal (3-3) 45. Intertwine 48. Sicker 49. Shelf-like sleeping space 51. Assault (3,2) 54. Old-fashioned person 56. Depression 60. Born

ANSWERS

28

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


Photo: Jason van der Valk

state which items are to be given to your two granddaughters before the remainder of your estate is shared by your children. Another way to preBY GOLDIE CARLOW, M.ED vent future haggling is to give the pieces to your two granddaughters Dear Goldie: now before you die. This will give you What do I do with a family who peace of mind and end all further diswon’t take me seriously? For months, cussions. I have been trying to discuss my Will Enjoy your time with your family with them, but they always become while you are active and well. Try not amused and assure me that I am not to worry about their future. That will about to die. be in their hands. I am 86 years old and have no serious illness. I live alone in an apart- Dear Goldie: ment and do my own housekeeping I am a healthy active male in my and shopping. I am a church member early 70s. I walk every morning and and also do volunteer work with lonely play golf twice a week. I am active in seniors to keep busy. local charity groups, attend opera and My Will states that my money, bonds the symphony and really enjoy the and investments are to be divided be- single life. tween my three children, but my worry So, why am I writing to you? Well, concerns the family heirloom china and silver. Two granddaughters would love to have some of it, but I have a feeling one of my daughters will not be willing to share with them. Is there a solution? –D.N.

ASK

Goldie

Dear D.N.: Yes, I can think of at least two solutions. If you have a legal Will, you can

Senior Peer Counselling Centres (Lower Mainland) New Westminster 604-519-1064 North Vancouver 604-987-8138 Burnaby 604-291-2258 Richmond 604-279-7034 Vancouver West End 604-669-7339 Coquitlam – Tri-Cities 604-945-4480 Vancouver Westside 604-736-3588

Goldie Carlow is a retired registered nurse, clinical counsellor and senior peer counselling trainer. Send letters to Senior Living, Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria, BC V8T 2C1.

it seems every lady I meet wants to settle down in marital bliss, and I am not interested. I had a good marriage and still enjoy my children and grandchildren. I like to date for evenings out at dinner and entertainment. That is all I need. Is this unreasonable? –L.W. Dear L.W.: No, this is not unreasonable, and I’m sure you can find ladies who will be interested this type of dating. I wonder if you are clear in explaining your intentions. It seems odd that all your dates are looking for marriage. Many women tell me they enjoy an occasional evening out with no strings attached, just a bit of romance and certainly good manners. You seem to enjoy the lifestyle to which you have become accustomed. All I can suggest is to keep your communication lines clear so there is no misunderstanding. I wonder what will happen if you do SL meet someone you can’t resist.

You’ll Love It Here

WHEN YOU LIVE AT SHANNON OAKS you’ll have more time to enjoy life and do the things that matter to you most. An independent seniors living community, you’ll live well in your beautifully appointed suite and enjoy amenities and services that provide for your every need including: delicious meals, daily activities, weekly housekeeping and 24-hour emergency response from your resident managers. Come see why you’ll want to make Shannon Oaks your home. Call today for your personal tour.

VA NCOU VER | 604.324. 6257 www.shannonoaks.com Baptist Housing | Enhanced Seniors Living | Since 1964 FEBRUARY 2010

29


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SENIOR LIVING HOUSING DIRECTORY FOR BC LAUNCHED! It’s finally here - the housing directory our readers have been asking for...

www.FindSeniorHousing.ca It is our intent to make this the most up-todate, comprehensive senior housing directory for BC you will find anywhere! Content can be searched easily by location, type of housing or special amenities. We have over 400 listings, with about half containing newly posted information. Please bear with us for a month or two as we continue to gather and post the most up-to-date information on all the senior residences throughout BC that we can find.

www.seniorlivingmag.com 30

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


BBB Better Better Better Better

Business Business Business Business

Bureau Bureau Bureau Bureau

SCAM ALERT BY LYNDA PASACRETA

Keep Your Valentine’s Day Rosy

V

alentine’s Day is one of the most popular times of the year to send flowers. Many people don’t think twice about where they buy their flowers. That is why the Better Business Bureau would like to remind consumers, before they start smelling the roses, to make sure they know whose roses they smell! Each year, the BBB receives numerous reports from consumers that show a pattern of complaints alleging non-delivery or late delivery of flowers and extra charges on credit cards. Make sure you know the florist you’re dealing with before handing over credit card information. Here are some smart shopping tips for this Valentine’s Day: Call and speak to the company – see how they treat you and find out their physical address. Stay local. Avoid delivery complications – order flowers from a store in your city or in the city where the recipient resides. Variety is the spice of life. Roses are traditional, but can be pricey. Flowers that have bright garden-like colours in combination with roses are also popular. Presentation is the key. Think about hand-delivering the flowers for that personal touch.

Make sure you know the florist you’re dealing with before handing over credit card information.

E-Cards Be cautious when opening e-cards on Valentine’s Day. Holidays are a popular time to send e-cards to loved ones. However, spam emails have been reported to have a malicious computer Storm malware attached to them. A rash of malware-infected emails with the subject line, “You make my world Beautiful” have been sent to inboxes around the world. The email’s direct recipients were instructed to click on a link to receive their e-cards. Once users clicked on the link, a virus was automatically downloaded and invaded their computers, which exposed email contact lists to potential identity theft and financial loss. Be sure you only open emails, attachments and links from people you know, and use your anti-virus software to enhance your email filters to block the threat. This Valentine’s Day, be careful about opening the next secret e-ad-

mirer email, and do some homework about the florist you choose. In the end, you’ll have a better chance of keeping SL your Valentine’s Day rosy!

Lynda Pasacreta is President of the Better Business Bureau of Mainland B.C. Contact the BBB to check a company report or Buyers’ Tip before you purchase or invest. www.mbc.bbb.org or 604-6822711. To contact Lynda Pasacreta, e-mail her at president@mbc.bbb.org

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31


Reflections THEN & NOW

BY GIPP FORSTER

I

went to my first drive-in movie on my bicycle. I was supposed to have a date, and the girl was excited when I suggested a drive-in movie! But when I arrived to pick her up on my bicycle, she glared at me and slammed the door in my face. Girls sure are hard to understand sometimes. That was one of those times. So, I went alone to my first drive-in movie. I don’t remember what movie was playing, but I do remember sitting on the mound where the speaker pole was grounded. I held the speaker in one hand and dug into my popcorn with the other. I remember some of the ditty that coaxed the 15 cents out of my pocket to buy the popcorn. “Let’s all go to the lobby. Let’s all go to the lobby. Let’s all go to the lobby and get ourselves a treat! The popcorn can’t be beat. The candy sure is sweet. Let’s all go to the lobby and get ourselves a treat!” A catchy little tune, it’s still with me after all these years. Of course, it wasn’t the most romantic time. Pressing a cold metal speaker to my ear while hugging a chilly steel post, staring at a distant screen next to a sprawling bicycle cannot really be considered romantic. But it was exciting to watch a movie while sitting under the stars surrounded by steamy car windows! It couldn’t get much better than that – if you didn’t take into consideration not having a date – or a car. It was an adventure! Later on, of course, I would take 32

a date to a drive-in movie with my buddy Dudly and his girl – in his car. But I have to admit it wasn’t always easy getting a date with a girl willing to hide in the trunk of Dudly’s car so we wouldn’t have to pay. I wasn’t cheap. I was just always broke. Some girls understood, but most gave up talking to me. I never understood – the trunk was clean and I was a fair conversationalist. What was their problem? To my knowledge, not many drivein movie theatres still exist. Of course,

But it was exciting to watch a movie while sitting under the stars surrounded by steamy car windows! they weren’t really theatres – acres of steel posts in the great outdoors that looked like a graveyard in the daytime. Some of the ones I remember became a flea market on Saturdays and Sundays, where people bought what they thought were treasures. But the era of drive-in movies seemed adventurous to me. Not many people can equate them with their bicycles, but I can! These days, often in the summer when my wife and I are sitting on our patio staring up at a star-studded sky, I’m reminded of the nights at the drivein movies. A couple of times, I’ve been tempted to crawl into the trunk of a car

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Photo: Krystle Wiseman

DRIVE-IN MOVIE

to see if I could still do it. I’d probably throw something out of whack and get stuck in there. I don’t think I’ll try it – too much of a gamble! I tried putting a chair on the front lawn in the wee dark hours and staring at the television through the living room window, but it’s not the same. My wife, thoughtful and sympathetic, made me popcorn the one time I tried it. But she was charging a dollar a bag and not 15 cents, so I went without. For me, all that’s left of the drivein movie is the memories. But they are good memories, filled with foolishness, daring, adventure and romance – including a memory of the very first time I went with my bicycle as my date! Those were simpler times I like to think; a time without video games, cellphones, iPods, or $10 movies. A time when all things seemed new and some things were found under a canopy of stars; a time when you thought about today without too much thought of tomorrow; a time to be young. SL


Bob and Teresa Marshall, the driver/escort and owners of Pitmar Tours, are excited to offer this program of coach tours for 2010. Come and join us! For the full 2010 brochure call us

Spring Warm up in San Diego, Palm Springs and Las Vegas

March 30th - 16 Days Time to warm up as we head south. This tour is a favorite as we experience the desert cactus in bloom. Highlights include a stay in Old San Diego, San Diego Zoo, Sea World, four nights in Palm Springs, Living Desert Park, Joshua Tree National Park, the Follies Show, Las Vegas, Reno, Scotty’s Castle, Virginia City. Join us and explore ! 17 meals $2,295 Cdn PP Dble Occ

Olympic Peninsula -May 9th - 4 Days

The Washington Olympic Peninsula is diverse in landscape and home of many of the world’s largest trees. Join us as we explore the temperate Hoh rainforest and the Makah native culture in Neah Bay. Discover Port Townsend as a local guide reveals their historical treasures. 4 meals $685 Cdn PP Dble

Southern Rockies and Waterton Lakes National Park

Portland Rose Festival and more - June 9th - 5 Days

This trip takes in many aspects of this 102nd historic Rose Parade as well as a night at the native resort with a special “Bird in a Clay” dinner. Enjoy the parade in the comfort of your reserved indoor seating at the Memorial Coliseum, a stones throw from your luxury accommodations. Please compare to other Rose Festival Tours. We have so much more fun ! 4 meals $829 Cdn PP Dble Occ.

Whistler - Barkerville - Kamloops - July 7th - 5 Days

We thought it would be great this year to travel to Whistler, home to the 2010 Olympics. You will view some of the venues as well as explore British Columbia’s Gold Rush town of Barkerville. Also included is a visit to BC’s Wildlife Park in Kamloops where you can view over 65 BC species in a 50 hectare park. 4 meals $725 Cdn pp Dble Occ. plus HST

Cruise and Coach the New Orleans, Branson & Texas

Sept 18 - 23 Days Get ready for Cruising down the Pacific Coast, coaching across California, Texas and Louisiana. Stroll along the River Walk in San Antonio, explore the Houston Space Center, rediscover the revitalized city of New Orleans, including the devastated area from the Katrina flood and a special Plantation tour. Branson, Missouri delivers first rate entertainment with Mickey Gillies, Shoji Tabuchi, Yakov Smirnoff and more. This trip is packed with entertainment, history and a load of fun. Make sure you book early! 32 meals $3595 Cdn pp Dble

Victorian Country Christmas - Dec 3 - 3 Days

This itinerary is guaranteed to lift your spirits and send you into the Christmas season with joy in your hearts. We have included a Dinner Theatre, dazzling light displays, a night at the 5 star Tulalip Hotel, the Victorian Christmas Craft fair in Puyalip and Factory Outlet shopping. 3 meals $485 Cdn PP Dble Occ.

Butchart Gardens and Chemainus Dinner Theatre - Dec 7 - 3 Days

Join us on Vancouver Island this year as we experience Butchart Gardens at Christmas. Tens of thousands of coloured lights combine with evergreen swags and wreaths of holly and winter berries to line walkways. and festoon lamp posts. You then enjoy the traditional “Christmas Carol” play at the Chemainus Dinner Theatre. 2 meals $495 Cdn pp Dble Occ.

June 28th - 7 Days

This is a great trip as you discover the best of the Canadian Rockies through Osoyoos, Cranbrook and into the World Heritage site of Waterton Lakes National Park. Take a boat tour on Waterton Lake and find out what Head Smashed Buffalo Jump is all about. Explore Fort Mcleod, birthplace of the North West Mounted Police. Return over Rogers Pass with a final night at the Three Valley Lake Chateau. 6 meals $1135 Cn plus GST PP Dbl occ.

Alberni Inlet & Pacific Rim Park - July 27 - 4 Days

Trains, ferries, ships and a coach are in store for you on this tour over to the West Coast of Vancouver Island. Take a boat tour from Port Alberni along the West Coast, through the Broken Islands to Ucluelet on the MV Francis Barclay. Explore Pacific Rim Nat’l Park, discover the Maclean Mill National historic site riding the rails of the Alberni Valley Pacific Steam Train. 4 meals $785 Cdn pp Dble plus HST

Queen Charlottes Explored - August 16 - 11 Days

This tour explores the diverse Haida heritage of the Queen Charlotte/Haidi Gwaii Islands. Revel in the spectacular scenery through the inside passage on the ferry, The Northern Explorer. Discover the ancient Skedans village site on Louise Island in a Zodiac boat with interpretive talks and wild life stops. Return via the Yellowhead Highway through the rugged wilderness of Northern Region of BC and the ranchlands of the Cariboo Region. Tour limited to 36 passengers so book early! 7 meals $1995 Cdn PP Dble plus

Copper Canyon - Mexico

Hosted by Bob and Teresa Marshall - November 6th - 11 Days 18 Meals

Four times larger than the Grand Canyon, Mexico’s Copper Canyon is a spectacular area filled with beauty and unique cultures and traditions. Your exploration of this hidden part of Mexico begins in Tucson, Arizona. You’ll then travel through the beautiful Sonora Desert to the Sea of Cortez and you hotel overlooking the San Carlos Marina in San Carlos. You'll travel on the Chihuahua-Pacifico Railroad for an amazing journey through tunnels and over bridges, as you begin your introduction to the beautiful views of the Copper Canyon. Reserve for our coffee night slide show - March 23rd, 2010

Coming in May of 2011 - Legendary Waterways Pack and Unpack only once on this spectacular 14 night Journey from Amsterdam to Budapest aboard the 5 Star Amadeus Princess. We will visit 5 European Countries; Holland, Germany, Austria, Slovakia and Hungary. We will travel on four of Europe’s most famous rivers; The Main, Rhine, Moselle and the Danube. This memorable trip will include all of your meals as well as wine included with every dinner. In addition all your city tours will also be included. Call for more information.

What’s included on ALL Pitmar Tours?

Home pick up and return*Luggage handling for one suitcase*Deluxe air conditioned highway coach*Keepsake name tag* Daily travel journal*Accommodations* All scheduled entrance fees and group meals*Full narration*Group photo*Laundry soap*Bottled water.

Website: www.pitmartours.com - email:teresa@pitmartours.com

BC Reg # 3561


Fine Dining– Everyday Only One of the Many Things You Will Love at Your New Home

Call Now to Book Your Tour & Enjoy a Complimentary Meal Some Conditions Apply

5 Star Resort Inspired New Independent/Assisted Living From $2300 per month – All inclusive

2525 King George Hwy., White Rock/Surrey

2245 Kelly Avenue, Port Coquitlam

604.944.2341

www.avenirgroup.ca

604.535.9194


February 2010 Senior Living Vancouver Edition