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SPECIAL HOUSING EDITION AUGUST 2010

Vancouver’s 50+ Active Lifestyle Magazine

Developers change to meet senior demand Tips for Choosing a RETIREMENT RESIDENCE Getting REAL with your REAL ESTATE


������������������������������� ������������� ��������������� Senior Living Housing Directory is a valuable online resource for seniors and family members looking for alternative housing to match their desired lifestyle, or medical/mobility needs. Over 500 senior residences and housing communities throughout BC are listed in this comprehensive directory. Compare services, amenities, and prices. Sort your selection by region, or type of care. This directory is published by Senior Living, a monthly magazine distributed to approximately 850 locations across BC.

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Senior Living’s online searchable senior housing directory is a perfect complement to its semi-annual senior housing special editions in February and August. Senior Living also publishes a 128 page book called “To Move or Not to Move? A Helpful Guide for Seniors Considering Their Residential Options.” We have sold over 3,000 copies of this book. No other magazine we know of has such a comprehensive, interconnected group of housing resources. For more information about any of these products or services, call (250)479-4705 or toll-free 1-877-479-4705. Or email office@seniorlivingmag.com

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AUGUST 2010

MAGAZINE

(Vancouver & Lower Mainland) is published by Stratis Publishing. Other publications by Stratis Publishing:

• Senior Living (Vancouver Island) Publisher Barbara Risto Editor Bobbie Jo Reid

SPECIAL HOUSING EDITION

editor@seniorlivingmag.com

FEATURES

Contributors David Adimora, Goldie Carlow, Brent Cassie, Jane Cassie, Jane Elliott, Gipp Forster, Elizabeth Godley, Erika Grundmann, Nadine Jones, Kevin McKay, Chris Millikan, Rick Millikan, Barbara Small, Leonard Stegmann, William Thomas, William R. Walters, George Zador

A guide to residences participating in this issue.

Copy Editor Allyson Mantle

DEPARTMENTS

3 Directory of Senior Residences 4 Not for Everyone

Comprehensive tax solutions.

Advertising Manager

Barry Risto 250-479-4705 Toll Free 1-877-479-4705 sales@seniorlivingmag.com

Discover hidden treasures when you downsize.

8 Own Sweet Home

Ann Lester 250-390-1805 Mathieu Powell 250-479-4705 Barry Risto 250-479-4705

by Barbara Small

19 Forever Young by William Thomas

Vancouver couple turns lemons into lemonade.

24 Between Friends by Doreen Barber

10 Developers Meet Demand

Retirees look for luxurious accommodations.

Contact Information – Head Office

COLUMNS 2 The Family Caregiver

7 Old, Old Stuff

Ad Sales Staff

28 Classifieds 30 Crossword

Island couple build their dream home.

6 The Lure of a Private Retreat

Proofreader Holly Bowen

25 BBB Scam Alert

Senior Living Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

12 Choosing a Retirement Residence

Phone 250-479-4705 Toll-free 1-877-479-4705 Fax 250-479-4808 E-mail office@seniorlivingmag.com Website www.seniorlivingmag.com

14 Pet Therapy

Assessing wants and needs – now and in the future.

31 Ask Goldie

by Goldie Carlow

32 Reflections: Then & Now by Gipp Forster

Furry visitors offer much-needed affection.

17 Getting Real with Your Real Estate A look at legal options for your home.

Subscriptions: $32 (includes GST,

18 My Olympic Legacy

postage and handling) for 12 issues. Canadian residents only.

This dream takes an Olympic-sized budget.

No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Senior Living is an indepdendent publication and its articles imply no endoresement of any products or services. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. Unsolicited articles are welcome and should be e-mailed to editor@seniorlivingmag.com Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland is distributed free in Vancouver, North & West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Delta, Twawwassen, White Rock, Surrey, Cloverdale and Ladner. ISSN 1911-6373 (Print) ISSN 1991-6381 (Online)

22 Alluring and Beautiful Baker Hiking near the snowy peak.

26 Hanging Loose in Paradise

Trolley travel and walking tours around Waikiki.

Senior Living Vancouver is available at most Recreation Centres and Libraries in the following municipalities: • VANCOUVER • BURNABY • NEW WESTMINSTER • WHITE ROCK • NORTH VANCOUVER • LADNER / TSAWWASSEN • PORT MOODY • COQUITLAM • PORT COQUITLAM • SURREY • RICHMOND • WEST VANCOUVER • LANGLEY • ABBOTSFORD • PHARMASAVE STORES THROUGHOUT BC

MAGAZINE

Call 1-877-479-4705 for other locations. AUGUST 2010

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THE FAMILY CAREGIVER

Caregiving and Residence Placement When family members can no longer provide the level of care required, it may be time to consider a long-term residence.

O

ne of the most challenging caregiving transitions is moving a family member into residential care. This decision is often made during a time of crisis, either because the care recipient is no longer able to safely stay in his or her own home or because family members can no longer provide the required level or type of care. It is normal to feel guilt, grief or anxiety when facing this decision, and there will often be differing perspectives from those involved. Caregiving does not end when your family member moves into a residence. You may have more free time and will not have sole responsibility for his or her personal care, but you will still provide emotional support, make legal and financial decisions, visit and participate in care decisions. Keep these ideas in mind during this difficult time:

1. Share the care. You are now part of a care team. Good communication is essential. Clarify what care the residence staff will provide and what is expected of you. The staff may not provide care exactly as you had, but your family member’s health has changed and care needs will be different. 2. Visiting. There is no formula for how often to visit. Regular, predictable visits are helpful. Have others share in the visiting. Try to establish a balance between visits with activities and quiet time. When is the best time to visit? When is your family member most alert? When do they have their meals? 3. Addressing requests to go home. Your family member may repeatedly ask to go home. This can be very difficult to hear and often triggers feelings of guilt. Acknowledge these requests with a statement such as: “I know how much you want to go home and I wish it were possible.”

BY BARBARA SMALL

Remind them why they moved into care initially – “because you kept falling at home,” “you need more care now than I can give you,” “this is the safest place for you to get the care you need.” Try not to act defensive and don’t make empty promises to take them home. Ask them what you can do or bring them that would allow their new surroundings to feel more like home. 4. Share your expertise with the staff. With your history, you know your family member better than any of the staff and can provide insight into your family member’s needs and preferences, so they can receive the unique care they require. 5. Become an advocate for your family member, so he or she receives suitable care. Find out what the protocol is for feedback at the residence. Find out whom to speak to about specific concerns and the best time to contact this person (for example, not during shift SL change). Next month: Balancing Caregiving and Self-Care Barbara Small is the Program Development Coordinator for Family Caregivers’ Network Society located in Victoria, BC. www.familycaregiversnetwork.org

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


Directory of Senior Residences BRITISH COLUMBIA Abbeyfield Clinton  ***

250-459-2755; 115 Cariboo Hwy 97, Clinton www.abbeyfieldclinton.retirement-homes.ca 8 Units; Free laundry facilities; all meals; computer stations; fitness centre; garden; games room; crafts

Abbeyfield Houses of Vancouver  *** 604-261-1180; 1275 West 6th Ave, Vancouver www.abbeyfieldvancouver.com Garden; laundry facilities; near library; certain pet restrictions; all meals; scooter parking

Amica at Arbutus Manor   (page 13)

604-736-8936;2125 Eddington Drive, Vancouver www.amica.ca; 40 Units Activity programs; assistance offered; flat laundry; flexible meal choices; housekeeping

Amica at Mayfair   (see page 13)

604-552-5552; 2267 Kelly Avenue, Port Coquitlam www.amica.ca; 86 Units Activity programs; cable TV; free laundry facility; community kitchen; fitness centre; certain pet restrictions

Amica at Rideau Manor   (see pg 13)

604-291-1792; 1850 Rosser Avenue, Burnaby www.amica.ca; 140 Units Games room; free laundry facilities; 24hr call system; housekeeping; parking; activity programs; insuite full or part kitchens

Amica at West Vancouver   (see pg 13) 604-921-9181; 659 Clyde Avenue, West Vancouver www.amica.ca Housekeeping; linen & towels supplied; games room; garden; hair salon; library; 24hr call system’

Concorde, The   (see page 5) 250-490-8800; 3235 Skaha Lake Rd, Penticton www.diversicare.ca; 77 Units Dining room; all utilities; housekeeping; laundry facilities; social activities; salon; crafts

Lynn Valley Care Centre  (see pg 4) 604-982-3700; 1070 Lynn Valley Rd, North Van www.lynnvalleycare.com; 34 Units All meals provided; special diets available; near library, recreation centre, shopping

Concord Retirement Residence  (pg 18)

Pacifica, The   (see back cover)

604-531-6498; 15869 Pacific Ave, White Rock www.concordretirementresidence.com 44 units; Activity programs; flexible meal choices; certain pet restrictions apply; ocean view; cooking allowed insuite

Courtyard Gardens  (see page 5)

604-273-1225; 7051 Moffatt Rd, Richmond www.courtyardgardens.ca Heat & Hydro; all meals; housekeeping; wellness clinic; laundry amenities; room service

Gilmore Gardens  (see page 5)

604-271-7222; 4088 Blundell Rd, Richmond www.gilmoregardens.com; Tuck shop; coffee shop; library; hair salon; activities centre; private dining room

Harmony Court Estate  (see page 15)

604-527-3300; 7197 Canada Way, Burnaby www.harmonycourtestate.ca Activity programs; housekeeping; pet restrictions; fitness centre; restaurant; 24hr call sys

Harrison Landing   (see page 14)

604-530-7075; 20899 Douglas Cres, Langley www.harrisonlanding.com 2 meals; light housekeeping; laundry; 24hr call system; social activities; library; lounge

Hawthorn Park   (see page 5)

250-861-6636; 867 K.L.O Road, Kelowna www.hawthornpark.com; Pool area; craft room; dining room; games room; library; social activities

Arrowtarian Rotary Villa  *** 250-265-3370; 212 7 Avenue, Nakusp www.arrowtarian.com; 43 Units Certain pet restrictions; free laundry facilities; parking; insuite cooking; lounge; crafts

Langley Gardens  (see page 11)

Astoria, The  (see back cover) 604-998-1616; 2245 Kelly Avenue, Coquitlam www.astorialiving.ca; 135 Units 5-star meals; social activities; wellness programs; fitness centre; games room; lounge

Maple Ridge Seniors Village  (pg 8)

Berwick On The Park  *** 250-377-7275; 60 Whiteshield Cres, Kamloops www.berwickrc.com Activity programs; housekeeping; internet; cable; lounge; games room; fitness centre

Menno Place    (see page 17) 604-851-4004; 2021 Primrose St, Abbotsford www.mennoplace.ca Activity programs; housekeeping; laundry service; some meals; 24hr call system

Cedars at Beulah Gardens, The  (pg 5)

Mulberry, The  (see page 10)

604-251-4114; 3355 East 5 Ave, Vancouver www.beulahgardenhomes.com; 89 Units 24hr Emergency Response; housekeeping; bistro; social programs

604-888-0228; 8888 202 Street, Langley www.chartwellreit.ca; 155 Units Social programs; hairdresser; games room; garden; lounge; library; computer stations

604-466-3053; 22141 - 119 Ave, Maple Ridge www.retirementconcepts.com; 118 Units Activity programs; housekeeping; all meals; 24hr call system; dining room; garden

604-526-2248; 7230 Acorn Avenue, Burnaby www.themulberry.ca In-house chef; weekly housekeeping; heat; hydro; cable TV; 24hr video security; laundry

604-484-0588; 2525 King George, Surrey www.pacificaliving.ca; 16 Units Activity programs; housekeeping; linen & towels supplied; parking; social programs

Shannon Oaks  (see page 3)

604-324-6257; 2526 Waverly Avenue, Vancouver www.shannonoaks.com; 144 Units Cable TV; housekeeping; free laundry facility; all meals; hair salon; 24hr call system

Summerhill, The  (see page 10)

604-980-6525; 135 West 15 St, North Vancouver www.thesummerhill.ca; 108 Units Activity programs; 24hr call system; free laundry facilities; garden; insuite kitchens

Sunwood (Purchasable Housing) (pg 12) 604-463-5527; 12241 - 224 St. Maple Ridge www.sunwoodliving.com; 93 Units Activity programs; games room; lounge; spa; theatre; cats/dogs allowed; housekeeping Thornebridge Gardens   (see page 5)

604-524-6100; 649 - 8 Avenue, New Westminster www.thornebridge.ca; 144 Units 24hr on site staff; fireside lounge; grand dining room; organized activities; corner store

Westminster House  (see page 6)

1653 140 St, Surrey www.westminster-house.org; 140 Units Activity programs; chapel; games room, garden; insuite kitchen; RN/RCA/LPN

SASKATCHEWAN Parkville Manor  (see page 13)

306-933-9394; 625 - 25th St East, Saskatoon www.parkvillemanor.com Library; computer centre; general store; heated swimming pool; sauna; billiards; sundeck; greenhouse TYPES OF HOUSING SERVICES PROVIDED

 (I) Independent / Supportive Living

(A) Assisted Living

 (C) Complex Care

(X) Campus of Care

*** More information on these residences

can be found at :

www.findseniorhousing.ca AUGUST 2010

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Not for Everyone Housing

BY ERIKA GRUNDMANN

M

y husband, Walter, and I began looking for a Northern Gulf Island property in 1990, with the intention of retiring 10 years later. However, a convergence of life-altering events significantly advanced the time frame. The sudden death of our daughter from a massive brain hemorrhage due to an aneurysm, one month before her twentieth birthday, made us reassess our priorities. Though we lived in a beautiful part of Victoria and enjoyed our jobs, surely there was more to life than the nine-to-five routine. Walter would soon have to make an intense, long-term commitment to a new telescope project and my job as French instructor would end with the relocation of DREP to Halifax. My interest in the life of an obscure sailor had led us to visit the legendary boating couple Sharie and Allen Farrell. Their simple, unfettered and unregulated life of building and sailing beautiful boats manifested calmness, a sense of peace and contentment. All these factors shaped our decision to retire sooner rather than later. “All growth is a leap in the dark, a spontaneous, unpremeditated act without benefit of experience” (Henry Miller) became our guiding principle. After much searching, in 1991 we purchased eight forested acres, west-facing, high-bank waterfront – as close to a dream property as we could afford. In spring 1994, we put our Victoria house up for sale. When it sold in July, at ages 53 and 56, we cut all ties and

moved to “our” island. Chattels stored in the garage we had built the previous summer, we set to work on making habitable a rough cabin that was on the property. It was the time of the comet Hyakutake and every night when we visited the outhouse, our way was illuminated by what we came to call “God’s flashlight.” Throughout the winter months, amidst much discussion and changing of mind, Walter drew up plans for a modest house. He would patiently explain the reasons my vision was either impossible to execute or impossibly beyond our budget. We devised a system where changes had to be agreed upon by both – and initialed on the drawing. There would be no “but I thought you said....” With the first hint of spring, in February 1995, we mixed cement and poured the footings. We were on our way. Much of the lumber used was milled from timber on our property. We framed walls and built trusses; installed windows designed in segments that we could physically handle; we wrestled 20foot (six-metre) sheet metal panels on to the roof. As it was a hassle to cross over to Campbell River to rent and return a

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


Housing sander, I decided to hand-sand the edgegrain fir floor that Walter had laid. Once a week, we’d make the twoferry trip to town to buy supplies. It provided a much needed break and lunch out. Our conversation centred around vapour barriers, pony walls and fascia boards. We became physically fit and nimble, able to climb a ladder while carrying one end of a two by six. We cursed the rains of June 1995, when we had just laid the plywood floor. Since we avoided contractors, we were spared delays and excuses and saved a lot of money. When things went awry we had no one to blame but ourselves. We were always mindful of potential accidents and got through the process without a major injury. And though there were tense moments and miscommunications, unlike many others, our marriage survived! In September 1996, with great personal satisfaction, we moved into our closeto-finished house – one year and eight months after we’d started. With the exception of the drywall (we’d experienced enough renovations to know the drudgery), we had done it all ourselves. A visitor once asked, “Do you love your house?” I can say, we do! It’s simple and not as artsy as some here on the island, but it’s cozy, warm, bright, practical and will do us into old age as the primary living space is all on the main floor. If anything, it’s maintaining the property that will do us in. But then, that is what keeps us outdoors and flexible. We struggle with challenging wireless Internet connections. We’ve learned

to always close a garden gate. Our life is ruled by ferry schedules. Local politics demand tolerance – and a sense of humour. We have a love-hate relationship with summer residents and tourists: we welcome them like a fresh breeze, yet are relieved at their departure. Walter has taken up fine woodwork and I’ve immersed myself in writing – it helps to have a diversion other than fundraising. An exotic place this is not, nor is

it for everyone, but for us this is now SL home. Would we trade? Never!

Ask any senior what they value and they will tell you it’s remaining as independent as possible for as long as possible. In all the award-winning residences that we operate, Diversicare is committed to this philosophy. We offer seniors the most comprehensive range of personalized service levels, including independent and assisted living as well as 24 hour care, depending on the location. Please call the residence nearest you, or visit our corporate website for more information.

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Housing

BY DAVID ADIMORA

The Lure of a Private Retreat

W

Comprehensive Tax Solutions

hether for summer, winter or year-round use, a vacation property you can call your own is a dream shared by many Canadians. Some people want access to recreational activities, like skiing or fishing. Others simply want a relaxing environment where their family can meet away from the stresses of day-to-day life. Whatever your reasons, it’s important to consider the financial implications of owning a second property. Here are some areas to investigate before you purchase your dream retreat. Paying for your dream Unless you have the full purchase price in cash, you will need to examine your financing options before buying. The criteria set by lenders for borrowing against vacation property are often different from

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

those applied to other properties. The right solutions will vary from person to person. For example, it may make sense to place a mortgage directly on the vacation property or, conversely, on your primary residence – or even liquidate other assets to fund the purchase. Extra Costs Be sure to take into account the additional costs that may come with ownership. Do a cash-flow projection that includes all the costs of ownership, not just mortgage or financing costs. This can mean property taxes, insurance, repairs, utilities and even the extras that can enhance the vacation experience such as a boat or recreational vehicle. To help offset some of these costs, consider renting your vacation property when you’re not using it. Factor in this additional income to lower the projected carrying

costs of the property. Ownership options When you make your purchase, you’ll need to decide how you want to structure the ownership of your property. You might decide to register ownership in the name of only one spouse, particularly if the other spouse is a business owner and is concerned about potential creditors. However, many couples choose to register the property jointly. In such cases, the property passes automatically to the surviving spouse upon death, and does not form part of the deceased owner’s estate. The advantages are that probate and other estate fees may not apply, and the property should not be held up in the estate settlement process. However, in some cases, spouses want to keep their property separate with no automatic right of survivorship (particularly if they have children from a previous relationship). Keep in mind that ownership issues can be complex. There are many factors to consider in structuring the ownership of your property. To decide, it’s important to get good advice and consider the issues in the context of your overall estate plan. Protecting your dream Once you’ve taken the plunge and made your purchase, it’s important to protect your vacation property against unforeseen events. A time of crises, such as a death or disability, is a difficult time to make financial decisions. Serious cash flow problems could force your family to sell. Home insurance offers essential protection against such events as fire and theft. If you’ve financed your purchase, you should consider life insurance to cover the outstanding mortgage in the event of your death or the death of a spouse. And make sure you have enough disability insurance to maintain payments if you or your spouse are unable to work. There is typically a less liquid market for vacation properties. A forced sale could net significantly less than the property’s SL true value.


Old, Old Stuff

Housing

BY LEONARD STEGMANN

A

fter years of thinking about it, I finally took all my dusty treasures that had been stashed in the rapidly disintegrating cardboard box labelled “old, old stuff” and transferred them into a shiny new state-of-the-art plastic storage container, with patented locking lid. And then I labelled that “old, old stuff.” Not that all of the junk in that box was particularly ancient. In fact, most of it only goes back as far as my childhood – I’ll thank you to keep your comments to yourself. I rummaged around and found some baseball cards, mostly of players you’ve never heard of, and an autographed baseball, which includes the signature of Yogi Berra. There were some slides of a camping trip taken in 1965 and even a class photo from Grade 3. Gosh, I was a cute kid! Actually, there were some old, old keepsakes in the box – a Bible from 1634 and some newspaper clippings about a U.S. presidential assassination. No, not Kennedy, Lincoln. There was a bullet from the Battle of Gettysburg and a handwritten and decorated book page from around 1220. That’s old, eh? I like old objects – I’ve always been fascinated by these physical links to the past. I remember sitting in the guidance counsellor’s office in Grade 8 and answering his “what would you like to be” question with a chirpy, “An archeologist!” The poor man was at a loss, which I didn’t understand at the time, and so I watched curiously as he fumbled helplessly through his rack of Accountant, Nurse and Teacher brochures. I caught a bit of Antiques Roadshow tonight and suddenly realized that my perspective has changed. As I get older, I’m starting to see the “big picture.” Until fairly recently, I had always looked at these old bits of stuff as objects that had worked their way down through the years, following a long and winding road until settling in their final resting place, which, of course, was with me. Now I have one more ex-

ample of “thinking” that I can put in my ever-expanding file that I’ve labelled “The Arrogance of Youth.” When I was given my antique Bible and Lincoln newspaper clipping by my great-great-aunt, I had foolishly assumed that they were now mine. And it’s taken me nearly 40 years to realize I’ll be doing nothing more than simply holding them for a while. And then the Bible, the newspapers and all my other accumulated stuff will continue on their journey through time, like a leaf floating down a stream: without me. And I begin to realize that older people understand this, and so begin to give away their treasured possessions to those they care about, in order to help both the stuff and the person on their way. I can see the time approaching when I too will bestow my most valued possessions upon my most valued people. But that won’t be for a while yet. So, don’t even think about asking for the Yogi Berra ball. SL

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Call for a Free In-Home Consultation 604.904.2397 or toll free at 1.877.904.2397 www.livingwellhomecare.ca

For more information visit

www.carepanions.ca or call 604-862-1414 email: info@carepanions.ca

Mention you saw this ad and save $50. AUGUST 2010

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We care about Seniors and their Families.

Maple Ridge Seniors Village Campus of Care Assisted Living Suites available Now! 604.764.8877

Maple Ridge Seniors Village

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Rosemary Heights Seniors Village

778.545.5000

Guildford Seniors Village

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Dufferin Seniors Centre

604.552.1166

The Terraces on 7th

604.738.8380

retirementconcepts.com 8

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

OWN SWEET HOME BY JANE ELLIOTT

L

ike most people about to retire, we looked forward to those activities we’d never had time for before, like travelling across Canada in a motorhome or visiting exotic places. Then along came a fly in the ointment, otherwise known as an unscrupulous financial advisor. As ignorant and trusting investors, my husband and I lost our entire retirement portfolio, including some of the equity in our home. Forced to sell our house, we’d thought of downsizing at some point, but suddenly we had no choice. Opting to move to Vancouver Island, which we had always hankered after, we settled on a rundown house in Port Alberni, custom-built for its original owners in 1973. The house had an unusual design to fit an unusual shaped lot. Empty for a year prior to our purchase, it hadn’t been updated for at least 15 years. Snags included an old oil furnace, three very drab, leaky bathrooms, and a precipitous front garden, which really should only be attended by gardeners trained in mountaineering. On the plus side, the house sits on a hill and has views from almost every room: east to majestic Mount Arrowsmith; south up the Alberni Inlet where cruise, logging and tall ships can be seen; west to the town and harbour of Port Alberni and beyond to the snow-capped peaks of Strathcona Provincial Park and the Comox Glacier. Our daughter is very knowledgeable about sustainable interior home design. Her credo is “beautiful designs with green treads,” which amounts to what is known as “ecofriendly living.” But beware – you can get carried away with this green obsession. My newfound passion for sustainability was overruled when my husband refused to consider a windmill atop the roof. Against the use of fossil fuel, we replaced the original oil furnace with a heat pump, which reduces greenhouse gas emissions and has the additional benefit of air-conditioning. Removing the oil tank from a downstairs storage room meant the space could be converted, with some framing and drywalling, into a spacious fourth bedroom. Two years have been spent getting rid of ivy and other invasive plants on the steep bank, and now we are landscaping with native plants that require little or no watering. A giant Douglas fir was topped for safety and a shady, weedinfested lawn has been left to evolve into moss and walk-on chamomile. Until recently, a clothesline was an emblem of another era – now laundry flaps in the breeze between a fir and a maple – picturesque and another eco option for the summer months. Off-white, eco-friendly low VOC (Volatile Organic Compounds) paint, covers the walls throughout the house. VOC in


Photo: Jane Elliott

Housing

paints increases as more colour is added. Although coloured walls are the current fashion, I believe these will soon be passé. I refused to use Pistachio or Savannah anywhere, in spite of opposition from various quarters. Our choice of classic white (Sea Pearl) sets off our collection of excellent watercolours. We revel in most of the original “retro simplicity.” The staircase to the above-ground basement has hand-turned Maple spindles; there is a stunning floor-to-ceiling white flint fireplace in the living room, and the lower exterior is flanked

with local river rock. The positioning of original windows is effective in enhancing natural cross-breezes, which cut down on energysucking air-conditioning. Most windows have, to date, been replaced with energy-efficient ones. A deep roof overhang on the south side means the house needs less cooling in the hottest months and also creates a long covered balcony. We did most of the renovations ourselves with the help of our children — well, actually, it was the other way around, but they found it enjoyable. They also helped us shop for amazing sale prices on high-efficiency appliances to reduce energy and water usage. Our first thought had been to buy a cheap house with potential and resell it as soon as it was finished. Who would have guessed we could find such a hidden jewel — a unique and gorgeous home? True, we still cannot go on those exotic trips we once planned owing to the aforementioned financial disaster, but we love it here in the Alberni Valley, which is a paradise for hiking, boating and fishing. We’ve been here three years now, and have been able to let go of our economic woes, which at one time seemed impossible. From where I sit, I see the M.V. Frances Barkley pull out of the harbour. This is the daily packet freighter that serves the Alberni Inlet. I watch for another 10 minutes as she disappears from view behind Polly’s Point. It makes my day. SL

A WORD TO THE WISE . LONGWOOD .

Along with a great Island lifestyle, Nanaimo boasts up to 50% lower home prices than other major centers in BC. Since 1993, Longwood has been recognized as one of the best adult communities in Canada. Now Thornbridge, the next phase in this master planned 50 acre village is ready. If you’re

A quality community by:

interested in worry and maintenance-free living, call us. Better still, visit.

Visit www.ThornbridgeAtLongwood.com CLIENT: InSight Developments PUBLICATION: SENIOR LIVING MAGAZINE AD SIZE: 7.25” x 4.75”

1.800.878.0588 AUGUST 2010

9


Housing

DEVELOPERS CHANGE TO MEET DEMAND Today’s seniors are driving the demand for luxurious accommodation with a variety of amenities.

A

bout a year ago, Helen Friesen decided it was time to move to a retirement residence. Since her husband had passed away five years ago, she’d lived alone and, frankly, she was lonely. Her son and daughter-inlaw were clearly concerned about her. And on top of that, she didn’t feel like cooking anymore, an activity she’d previously enjoyed. At 83, “I was certainly ready to make the move,” Helen says. She hasn’t looked back. Luckily for her, there was a new retirement complex a few blocks away

BY ELIZABETH GODLEY

from the Burnaby home she’d lived in for 22 years, close to the seniors’ centre where she’d been a dedicated volunteer and – as it turned out – where some of her former neighbours were already living. She quickly settled into a bright one-bedroom suite with enough room for her china cabinet and entertainment unit. A keen cribbage player, Helen was soon enjoying regular card games, as well as the daily 3 p.m. tea service in the main-floor lounge and chatting with other residents on the beautifully landscaped terrace. Although she prefers to make her own breakfast – her suite

includes a two-burner cooktop and a microwave – she joins her friends, old and new, in the dining room for lunch and dinner. Today’s downsizing seniors have high expectations, says Peter Gaskill, president of Pacific Arbour Retirement Communities in Vancouver. “They are looking for more space, more choice of services, more amenities. People want more, and they are willing to pay for it.” To date, his company has developed two seniors’ complexes, one in Vancouver and one in Burnaby, with another two to be built on the North Shore if approved by the municipality.

Play Together

What to do in our garden patio today? Green thumbs never stop growing. Plant peonies, dig around dahlias and cultivate cucumbers. Armchair gardeners are welcome too – bask in the sun with a good book or sip lemonade in the shade. Play shuffleboard or challenge a chum to a life-sized checkers or chess match. Dip a toe into fun at a pool party or BBQ, all in the company of new friends. Enjoy summer at The Mulberry. Plant a new beginning!

What to do today? Play WiiTM golf with some friends. Chat about the latest book club selection. Work out with a fitness class. Join the chorus in a sing-a-long. So much choice. Our residents love to connect with others. That’s why we offer plenty of social activities and lots of unscripted fun. Anything that appeals to the desire to stay active. What are you doing for fun today? Play at The Summerhill. Phone for your personal tour. 604.980.6525

135 West 15th Street (off Lonsdale) North Vancouver | 604.980.6525 www.the summerhill.ca Part of Pacific Arbour Retirement Communities

Where good things come together. 10

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


Housing Maureen O’Toole agrees. As the Marketing and Community Relations Co-ordinator for Berwick Retirement Communities, she points out that new retirement residences include a spa, a theatre designed for live performances and movies, and a stand-alone pub decorated in Old English style; landscaping includes waterfalls and other water features. Today’s seniors are driving the demand for luxurious accommodation. They did not live through the Great Depression and were able to take advantage of the boom years after the Second World War. This may explain why, at one Vancouver residence, complaints skyrocketed when the fresh flowers on the dining-room tables were replaced with plastic ones. Prospective residents also have high standards when it comes to meals, which must be tasty and nutritious. The old model, where everyone dined together at a certain time, is changing to a more flexible timetable where meal service is available almost on demand.

As for location, it is important to be within walking distance of shops and doctors’ offices, with transit, a library and a community centre nearby, preferably in a mid-rise building, welllandscaped, with lots of common areas where residents can mingle with other compatible people their own age. A shuttle for shopping and sightseeing trips is de rigueur. Peter, involved with the design and development of more than 50 seniors’ retirement complexes during his career, says retirees today want spacious accommodation so they don’t have to get rid of their sofas, entertainment units and other large pieces of furniture. “We work very hard to make our floor plans highly efficient in their use of space,” says Peter. “And we believe in having lots of amenities within the building.” These can include woodworking shops, a music room where residents can practise their instruments in private, an art studio where instructors give regular

Virginia’s World Was Shrinking

classes, a library and a well-equipped exercise room. Wii is very popular, as are sing-alongs. Movies and live entertainment are available on a regular basis, as are outings for lunch and sightseeing. Afternoon tea and a pre-dinner cocktail hour are a daily occurrence. One thoughtful feature that seniors appreciate is “cheater ensuites” – bathrooms with two entrances – one from the corridor or living room for visitors, the other from the bedroom for those nighttime calls of nature, Peter says. Seniors were once reluctant to live in high-rise buildings because of concerns about fire but that disinclination has eased since the advent of sprinkler systems. So, as developers offer far more amenities at retirement residences, and with far fewer responsibilities of home ownership, seniors can enjoy their retirement in comfort and safety. For a list of senior residences advertising in this special housing edition of SL Senior Living, see page 3.

Now she has so much to look forward to

W

hen Virginia was on her own, she lost touch with people. Aside from the holidays and occasional outings with her family, she spent a lot of time at home alone. Now that Virginia lives in a Chartwell residence, she is surrounded by people with similar interests and experiences. Her new friends are quickly becoming her best friends.

1222 King George Hwy., S. Surrey/White Rock

8888 – 202 Street Langley, BC

604-541-8861

604-888-0228

Visit us online at www.chartwellreit.ca 323-Langley-BCSeniorLiving-August.indd 1

AUGUST 11 15/07/10 2010 2:01 PM


Housing

Choosing a Retirement Residence If you decide moving to a retirement residence is the right choice for you, be sure you consider all your wants and needs – now and in the future.

R

ealtors say location is everything, but when it comes to senior housing, location is just one of the many factors to consider when deciding to transition to a retirement residence. A careful and honest assessment of wants and needs, as well as thorough planning can help minimize the risks of making mistakes. Some people prefer to age in place at home, but for those considering a move, here are some questions to ask prior to selecting a new residence: Financial Resources: How much money do you have in your savings? What is your income from pensions and other sources? Are you still working or retired? Can you expect to receive some income from the sale of your home or other assets? You need to know your bottom line. Determine af-

12

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

BY KEVIN MCKAY

fordability now and in the future, so your income provides you with a roof over your head for years to come. Lower income seniors may be eligible for some types of subsidized housing. Health: What are your health concerns or issues? Is there


Housing

Lifestyle: Chances are your move will involve a degree of downsizing. Are you prepared to give up some of the material things and activities you currently enjoy? Will you still be able to tend a garden? Perhaps you are used to hosting family dinners and parties – will you still be able to in your new home? Are you prepared to accept the fact that some things in your life will change? Meals: Do you enjoy cooking or are you tired of preparing meals for only one or two people? Would you like some assistance with meal preparation or would you prefer to have all your meals prepared for you? Meal man-

ome back to the place you call home.

agement at different residences can range from no assistance, whatsoever, to providing all your meals. Community: Moving means adjustments. What other factors are important to you? Are there shops and a grocery store nearby? Is there a seniors’ recreation centre and a library in the area? What about parks and green spaces? Are you near the ocean, a river

or lake? What sort of view will you enjoy? Is the location secure? Is public transportation convenient? Do you have family or friends located nearby or in the same building? Once you have determined what is most important to you, make the choice that will make you as comfortable and pleased with your decision as SL possible.

09-1148

a hospital nearby? Is your new home located close to your doctor or a health clinic? Is help available to you at your new place? The many types of senior housing come with various levels of care, so this becomes an important consideration when moving.

Experience our Wellness & Vitality™ Lifestyle… a treat for all the senses! Our Wellness & Vitality™ philosophy focuses on aging well while providing activities and programs that stimulate the body, mind and spirit. Enjoying life to its fullest just comes naturally when you are able to choose your pleasure from one day to the next. Be it sensory, savoury, spiritual, social or strengthening programs, your life will be enriched. Just ask the residents who live here! You’re never too old to feel young again. Experience the Amica™ difference today!

Saskatoon’s Premiere Retirement Community

Live life to the fullest with

and exclusive

program of customized strength training and exercise for mature adults.

Visit an Amica Wellness & Vitality™ Community in your neighbourhood or www.amica.ca Port Coquitlam ~ Amica at Mayfair ~ 604.552.5552 Kerrisdale ~ Amica at Arbutus Manor ~ 604.736.8936 West Vancouver ~ Amica at West Vancouver ~ 604.921.9181 Burnaby ~ Amica at Rideau Manor ~ 604.291.1792 Victoria ~ Amica at Douglas House ~ 250.383.6258 Victoria ~ Amica at Somerset House ~ 250.380.9121 Sydney ~ Amica at Beechwood Village ~ 250.655.0849

AUGUST 2010

13


Health & Wellness

A

PET THERAPY

s long ago as 1790, Quakers in England discovered the value of the age-old bond between humans and animals when they took friendly dogs to mental asylums and found they helped to quiet the chaos. The Pet Therapy program started in the Lower Mainland around l970. A group, initiated by friends of the Vancouver SPCA, got together calling themselves Pets and Friends. Although many such animal/patient groups have been organized since then, Pets and Friends – volunteers and their pets – visit over 200 facilities. According to residential home staff, patients who are regularly visited by pets are more receptive to medical treatment and nourishment. “Everyone needs to touch, both physically and emotionally, and holding or patting a dog seems to fulfill both those needs,” says Kara O’Mara, recreation director and volunteer co-ordinator at St. Jude’s Anglican Home in Vancouver. Contrary to what the younger generation may think, seniors weren’t always seniors. During their lives, they bonded with their babies, cherished their children and were lovingly held by their partners, then, one day, the touching stops. A great many seniors

14

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

BY NADINE JONES

have no hands to hold or bodies to hug, so stroking or patting a dog provides that stimulation. Usually, just the sight of a pet will bring smiles, and the proximity of something warm and alive fills a void, if only for a short time. It isn’t cancer or heart troubles that bothers seniors the most “It’s loneliness,” says one support staff. Maria Tennison has worked in many seniors’ homes in the Lower Mainland and can’t praise the Pet Therapy programs enough. “I can’t believe the change in the seniors when pets visit,” she says. Maria says some patients lie prone in their beds, showing no interest in anything, but they suddenly come alive in response to a pet beside them. She says some of the incidents she’s witnessed are nothing short of miraculous. Volunteer visits usually last from 10 to 30 minutes, depending on the pet and the senior. At St. Jude’s, Brian Bartel and his Golden Retriever, Ruby, are paying their weekly visit to 92-yearold Dorothy McIsaac, who came to Canada as an English war bride in l945. “I think [Ruby] lights up when she comes in to visit me,” says wheelchair-bound Dorothy in her tidy room where Ruby leans


Health & Wellness against her. “But I wouldn’t have called her Ruby. I wouldn’t have thought of it.” When Brian isn’t volunteering with Ruby, he works as a helicopter bush pilot in Northern B.C., so he has many fascinating stories to share as the residents pat Ruby’s head. Brian and Ruby are members of the St. John’s Ambulance Society. “When I put Ruby’s St. John’s Ambulance scarf around her neck, she knows it is a visiting day and she can’t wait to get going,” says Brian. “She enjoys the attention as much as the seniors!” And what does Brian get out of volunteering his time? “It makes me feel good!” he says. Fifty-two-year-old Diane Booth, who visits seniors with her gentle Border Collie, Molly, every Sunday at Seniors Village in Surrey, has a personal reason for volunteering. “I lost my beloved sister to Alzheimer’s Disease,” says Diane. “They call that awful disease ‘The Long Goodbye’ because you lose a little more of your loved one as time passes.” Her sister deteriorated for quite a few years, first in a hospital and, then, in a Home. “Then one day, I took Molly to visit her and a miracle happened. All of a sudden, it was as though a window opened and I had my sister back. She was lucid, she knew who I was, and she made a fuss of Molly. It was unbelievable! It didn’t last long, but it happened!” Ever since her sister died, Diane and Molly have given their time to make a difference in the lives of confined seniors. Molly and Ruby, like other visiting pets, must undergo a short training session to ensure they won’t freak out if they get poked by a cane or have an ear tugged too hard. Most pass the test, but some don’t. No special breed of dog is better suited than others to visit – it all depends on individual temperament. Labs and retrievers are usually big and gentle, but not always. Some lap dogs lap up the attention, while others are skittish around strangers. The benefits of Pet Therapy are well recognized and celebrated. Golden Girls actress Betty White, 88, an Animal Rights activist, is writing her sixth book. In Pet Love, she writes, “All over the

world major universities are researching the value of pets in our society. Pets have the power to heal – especially the elderly. Pets are one of nature’s best sources of affection. They can take the human mind off loneliness, grief, pain and fear.” Betty is one of many well-known people who recognize the positive impact animals have on humans. In his book, Love, Miracles and Animal Healing, Dr. Allen Schoen, DVM, writes, “Love for pets can

literally save lives.” St. Jude’s own resident physician Dr. Keith Hatlelid agrees, “Unless they were allergic to animals, our residents would have had pets of some sort in their lives in the past. I feel that having pets in a [residence] would be a reminder of that and would offer a sense of comfort.” The medicine of love – given and received in Pet Therapy – is just what the doctor ordered! SL

Welcome to Burnaby’s Affordable

Premier Seniors Community Featuring

• Newly renovated suites, with built in breakfast bar, fridge, microwave

• Spacious Garden Room entertainment centre,

with plasma TV, fireplace, dance floor and outdoor garden patio area • Country Kitchen for fun family gatherings • Fireside and Coffee Lounge where easy and rewarding friendships start • Games Room with flat screen TV and New Library • Fitness Centre with Personal Trainer

For More Information & Tour

Call (604) 527-3300

AUGUST 2010

15


News Brief

Be A Hero

O

n Sunday, August 8 at Trout Lake Park, walkers will join family, friends and neighbours in taking their first steps towards becoming a kidney hero by participating in the 2010 Vancouver Kidney Walk organized by The Kidney Foundation of Canada, BC Branch. Participants are also encouraged to consider registering to be an organ donor. The day begins at noon and will include entertainment, refreshments, prizes, a delicious barbeque and a silent auction. So, lace up your walking shoes, we don’t just want your pledges; we want your kidneys too. Not now! Later… when you don’t need them anymore. Come to the walk, bring your pledges, and sign up to be a Kidney Hero by registering to be an organ donor. You might win a prize, you will save a life! Register at www.kidney.ca/bcwalk SL

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Enjoy the contents of both the Vancouver and Vancouver Island magazines plus much, much more

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Enjoy Life to the Fullest WHEN YOU LIVE AT SHANNON OAKS YOU’LL HAVE MORE TIME TO ENJOY LIFE. An independent seniors living community, experience the freedom and independence to do exactly what you want, when you want. Stay active and live well. Life at Shannon Oaks includes a great selection of daily activities to choose from, delicious home-cooked meals, and weeklyhousekeeping of your private suite.

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Visit us today for a personal tour and come see why you’ll want to make Shannon Oaks your home. VAN COUVER 604.324 .6257

VI CTORI A 250. 595. 625 7

www.shannonoaks.com Baptist Housing | Enhanced Seniors Living | Since 1964

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

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Getting Real with Your Real Estate

BY WILLIAM R. WALTERS

A

home is typically an individual’s or couple’s most substantial asset. Of course, a home is more than a financial asset, especially if within it the generational drama of family life has played out. The numerous values embodied by a home mean that people will often have conflicting goals with regard to it as they age. They may wish to remain living in it for reasons of sentiment or identity, while recognizing that physical decline may prevent this; they may wish to minimize probate or transfer taxes arising on death, but do not wish to gift or sell the home before they die. Increasing numbers of people see the transfer of their property into joint tenancy with one or more of their children as a way to achieve many of these goals simultaneously. The apparent simplicity of this solution, however, masks potentially serious problems that other, equally effective planning options, can avoid. When a joint owner of a property dies, the property passes to the surviving owners directly. Neither probate fees nor property transfer taxes are paid. Although appealing, numerous potential problems can negate these benefits. During a parent’s lifetime, these may include: Loss of control: all joint owners must agree if the property is to be sold or mortgaged; Loss of access to equity: joint owners must agree to mortgage the property; Conflict within a family: other children not on title may feel resentful or unfairly treated; Increased risk: the property will be vulnerable to claims by a joint owner’s creditors or spouse in the event of separation or divorce. After the death of a parent, one of the most serious problems is that the prop-

erty may not pass to the child who was on title as a joint owner. Those children not on title may argue that the house should form part of the parent’s estate. When a parent puts an adult child on title as a joint tenant without receiving payment, a presumption arises that the property forms part of the parent’s estate. The child who received the property by way of survivorship must overturn this presumption. Failure to do so means the property will pass according to the terms of the parent’s will. Even if the child is successful in overturning the presumption, a good deal of time, energy and money likely will have been expended to achieve this result. The risk of these problems may be minimized or eliminated entirely by alternatives to joint tenancy including: A co-ownership agreement executed under seal. This solution minimizes the potential that siblings will be able to successfully challenge the transfer to their sibling, but does not fully address other issues such as control of the property, access to its equity, or the vulnerability of the property to creditors or a separating spouse of the child on title with their parent. A principal residence trust. Almost all of the problems and risks of joint tenancy can be addressed through a trust, including those arising after the death of N Y PE A O TOD W IN NOVE MO

Legal

the parent, but at the cost of considerable expense and ongoing administrative requirements to maintain the trust. Doing nothing and retaining the property solely in the parent’s name (or selling it). The property then passes according to the parent’s will and probate fees of roughly 1.4 per cent will have to be paid. Arguably, this fee is a relatively small charge for maintaining control of the property, retaining access to the equity, and minimizing sibling disputes both before and after the death of the parent. The parent’s will can be drafted to accomplish goals such as retention of the property within the family. Whether or not to put a home into joint names with an adult child is not a straightforward decision. The financial merits of such an arrangement and the alternatives to it are usually quantifiable and, consequently, readily assessed. The decision is made complex, however, by the unquantifiable elements of life, such as the values, emotions and family dynamics of the parties involved. Whatever solution one chooses, it is important that the decision be informed by an awareness of the merits and risks from a legal perspective to avoid undesired or, at the very least, unexpected results. SL This article is informational only. For advice on your specific situation, consult your legal advisor.

VISIT ABBOTSFORD’S NEWEST 1 & 2 BEDROOM INDEPENDENT LIVING SUITES

TO BOOK YOUR TOUR CALL TOM OR HEATHER

604.851.4007 | WWW.MENNOPLACE.CA

2099 Primrose Street, Abbotsford, BC DISPLAY SUITES OPEN DAILY BY APPOINTMENT (EXCEPT SUN)

AUGUST 2010

17


Lifestyle

MY OLYMPIC LEGACY

A

nyone living in Greater Vancouver knows that $500,000 doesn’t buy much of a home these days. Lucky if your abode was acquired before home ownership became an almost prohibitive expenditure. I am fortunate to be living in a South Surrey townhouse, worth a bit more than five hundred thou, with windows looking at pleasant views; a small backyard packed with greenery and, from the front, trees and a glimpse of the North Shore Mountains. Very pleasant, especially compared to homes with just a view of the adjoining building or a bleak yard. But still, when it comes to looking out a window, nothing beats a water-view – the sea or lake – with the feeling of peace

18

BY GEORGE ZADOR

and relaxation it seems to convey. My wife and I are both old enough to consider the not-too-distant necessity of downsizing to an apartment and have, for a while, been looking at all our possessions with an eye to what we could do without. Well, we could be quite comfortable in about 1,200 sq. ft of living space, half of what we now have. And if we were to move to an apartment, wouldn’t it be great to have the water-view we both love? Millennium Water, the fabulous residential development on False Creek that was home to the athletes of the 2010 Winter Olympics began marketing units to the public and invited all to open-house viewing of several layouts. So, we decided to make a day of it and go have a look. We joined the hordes of similarly interested folks who traipsed through the gorgeously display-furnished units and were stunned by the beauty of a huge three-bedroom unit with unobstructed views of the bay and the high-rises of the West End, all framed in the North Shore Mountains. Yep, we could live here. When I asked the attendant for the price of this unit, her answer of “four-and-a-half” was the abbreviated version of what I had to mentally append with the word “million.” And that’s before taxes, she said. All right, I thought, there must be something more affordable. The next unit we entered had the love-at-first-sight heartbeat recognition of “this could be it” with a view just like the previous, two bedrooms and a total of 1,150 sq. ft. plus generous balcony space. “Two-and-a-half,” said the attendant. “Anything under a million?” I asked politely.

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

“Oh sure! Several units.” And she directed us to another building. Ground floor, street view, one bedroom and bath, 650-square-foot total area, which is just large enough to swing a cat, and somewhat of an insult to the meaning of “home,” as such small (and even smaller) apartments are called in promo literature nowadays. The attendant quoted, “Only 850 for this unit,” and I was relieved that it meant thousand – but for a small apartment? What planet are we on? Among the people mostly shaking their heads over the cost of proposed ownership, there was a sprinkling of buyers. Why was I not surprised to see that a large number of them were foreign visitors, some with translators doing their negotiation? So, sour grapes maybe? Not really. There are plenty of other places I couldn’t afford to buy – not just here. I know the City of Vancouver is on the hook to pay off the cost of construction, and buyers of any nationality should be a good thing, right? Yes, in an economic sense. Emotionally, no way! This was to be one of our major Olympic legacies and to find it priced even higher than comparable properties of the area, so out of affordability to the vast majority of the host city is an affront to us all. But perhaps not so surprising after the way-too expensive ticket prices to major Olympic venues we had in the first place. Bottom line? I will not be enjoying the view from any window of Millennium Water, only the cost-free spectacle of its architectural beauty from the outside. I will have to be satisfied with its legacy to the community and, for my own, the Olympic coins and red mitSL tens will have to suffice.


FOREVER BY WILLIAM THOMAS

The End of Gentle Humour

G

ordon Arthur Kelly was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on July 17, 1912 to very little fanfare. In fact, his parents abandoned him when he was only a few weeks old and an evangelical preacher and his wife adopted him. When they moved to San Diego his life changed. The Great Depression hit America just after he graduated from high school and, at the age of 16, he rode the rails doing odd jobs to survive. Later, he graduated from teachers college, but took a job at KGR-Radio in San Diego because it paid more. With that entry into the entertainment industry his career was enhanced, his life course was charted, and millions of North Americans laughed at him for the next half a century. He created a radio show called People Are Funny and took it to television where it was a seven-year hit. In a kind and gentle manner, he made us laugh aloud and more importantly, he made us laugh at ourselves. He was a handsome and dignified man who epitomized the “gentle” in gentleman. He loved children, had five of his own and, at 74 years, enjoyed one of the longest marriages in the history of show business. By talking to children and not down to them, he created a unique form of humour that was a sensation on U.S. television in the ’60s and is as knock-down funny today as it was back then. Kids Say The Darndest Things was a “riot” for early family television. Gordon Arthur Kelly who became Arthur Gordon “Art” Linkletter upon adoption died May 26 this year at 97 years of age. His death marked the end of an outstanding human being and a talented, moral man. It also heralded, at least in the North American entertainment industry, the end of gentle humour. Profanity, cruelty, sexism, racism or shock-jock was never a part of Art Linkletter’s world of comedy, but today they are the cornerstones of stand-up and sitcom shows. Obscene humour is easy, which is why everybody’s a comedian on “Open Mike Night.” Clever and clean comedy takes hard work and talent, which is why, at this very moment, you can’t name a great comedian who works clean. The last time I attended Yuk Yuk’s, I needed a shower when I got home.

So as far as good, honest humour goes, Art Linkletter was a one-of-a-kind entertainer. Joey Bishop once said that Art Linkletter had interviewed so many children, he couldn’t talk to you without bending down. After years of working with children, the People Are Funny host once defined a child as an object halfway between an adult and a television set. This is a test. If you do not find these excerpts from Art Linkletter’s Kid Say The Darndest Things funny, and I mean smile, chuckle or laugh out loud, then we’ve lost you to the new, but not improved, brand of humour. These are actual question and answer exchanges between Art Linkletter and kids on his show: He asked a child if he knew the meaning of the saying ‘The early bird gets the worm’ and the kid said: “They’re welcome to it. I ate one once and it tasted like cold spaghetti!” Art: “What kind of lawyer is your father?” Kid: “The good kind. He gets people out of jail.” Art: “How old is your mom?” Kid: “My mom says she’s 30, but she’s really 36.” After determining that the child did not receive an allowance, Art asked him how he got money. Kid: “I get a nickel every day I don’t have a damp bed.” Art: “How are you doing?” Kid: “I made a dime last week.” Art: “Did you see Santa this year?” Kid: “See him? I fixed him a bourbon and water.” Art Linkletter was always impressed by a letter he got from a kid that said, “I always watch you when I’m sick.” Most of us will remember this man when a great gale of SL laughter erupts at nobody’s expense. William Thomas is the author of nine books of humour including The True Story of Wainfleet. www.williamthomas.ca AUGUST 2010

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Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland Distribution Locations

ABBOTSFORD DOWNTOWN BUSINESS ASSOC ABBOTSFORD REC CENTRE ABC RESTAURANT - MARSHALL FV REGONAL LIBRARY GREYHOUND BUS STN IGA MEDICHAIR MSA GENERAL HOSPITAL PEOPLES DRUG MART SEVEN OAKS MALL SHARES SHOPPERS DRUG MART TRIANGLE COMMUNITY CENTRE ZELLERS BURNABY ABC RESTAURANT AMICA @ RIDEAU MANOR BOB PRITTIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BONSOR COMMUNITY CENTRE BREAD GARDEN BRENTWOOD SKY TRAIN STN BURNABY GENERAL HOSPITAL CAMERON RECREATION CENTRE CHOICES MARKET IN THE PARK CONFED COMM CNTR FOR 55+ EASTBURN COMMUNITY CENTRE EDMONDS COMM CENTER FOR 55+ EDMONDS PUBLIC LIBRARY EDMONDS SKYTRAIN STN EILEEN DAILEY FITNESS CENTRE GILMORE SKYTRAIN STATION HARMONY COURT ESTATE HILTON HOTEL HOLDOM SKYTRAIN STATION IGA INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL HEALTH & VACCINATION CLINIC KENSINGTON ARENA LANCASTER MEDICAL LAKE CITY SKYTRAIN STATION LOUGHEED SKYTRAIN STN MCGILL PUBLIC LIBRARY MEDICHAIR METROTOWN BUS LOOP MULBERRY SENIOR’S RESIDENCE NORBURN MED CENTRE OLD ORCHARD MEDICAL CLINIC PATTERSON SKYTRAIN STN PRODUCTION WAY SKYTRAIN STN REGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES ROYAL OAK SKY TRAIN STN. SAFEWAY SFU LIBRARY SPERLING SKYTRAIN STATION STATION SQUARE MEDICAL CLINIC TIM HORTON’S WILLINGDON COMMUNITY CENTRE

COQUITLAM BREAD GARDEN CHIMO POOL & SOCIAL REC CENTRE COQUITLAM CITY CENTRE LIBRARY COQUITLAM LIBRARY DOGWOOD PAVILION DUFFERIN SENIORS CENTRE GLENPINE PAVILION GLENPINE SENIOR CENTRE PARKWOOD MANOR POIRIER COMMUNITY CENTRE PARK & RIDE RESIDENCES AT BELVEDERE SHOPPERS DRUG MART DELTA DELTA HOSPITAL GEORGE MACKIE LIBRARY INSIDE RACK - RICKY’S KENNEDY SENIOR’S REC CENTRE KINSMEN ASSISTED LIVING KINVILLAGE COMMUNITY CENTRE LADNER COMM CENTRE LADNER PIONEER LIBRARY LADNER PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT MCKEE SENIORS RECREATION CENTRE NORTH DELTA REC CENTRE NURSE NEXT DOOR PINEWOOD LEISURE REC CENTRE SOUTH DELTA LIBRARY SOUTH DELTA RECREATION CENTRE SUN GOD RECREATION CENTRE THE WATERFORD WINSKILL AQUATIC CENTRE FORT LANGLEY FORT LANGLEY LIBRARY IGA LANGLEY AI WHEELCHAIRS ALDERGROVE LIBRARY ALDERGROVE MALL BROOKSWOOD LIBRARY DOUGLAS REC CENTRE HARRISON LANDING LANGLEY LIBRARY LANGLEY SENIORS CENTRE LANGLEY SENIORS VILLAGE LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE MAGNOLIA GARDENS MARKET PLACE IGA MAIN SPOT NEWS THE RENAISSANCE RETIREMENT RESORT TIMMS COMMUNITY CENTRE WALNUT GROVE COMM CENTRE WALNUT GROVE LIBRARY MAPLE RIDGE MAPLE RIDGE LEISURE CENTRE MAPLE RIDGE LIBRARY NEW WESTMINSTER 22ND ST SKYTRAIN STN

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

BRAID SKYTRAIN STATION CARE POINT MEDICAL CENTRE CENTENNIAL COMMUNITY CENTER CNTR OF INTEGRATION FOR AFRICAN IMMIGRANTS CENTURY HOUSE COLUMBIA ST STN EDWARD JONES HYACK HOUSE NEW WESTMINISTER QUAY NEW WESTMINSTER LIBRARY NEW WESTMINSTER SKY TRAIN STN SENIOR SERVICES SOCIETY QUEENBOROUGH COMMUNITY CENTER ROYAL COLUMBIAN HOSPITAL NORTH VANCOUVER CAPILANO LIBRARY CHURCHILL HOUSE EVERGREEN HOUSING ADMINISTRATION KIWANIS LYNN MANOR KIWANIS TOWERS LION’S GATE HOSPITAL LONSDALE QUAY LONSDALE QUAY BUS LOOP LYNN VALLEY MEDICAL CLINIC MEDICAL CLINIC - 1940 LONSDALE AVE MOUNT SEYMOUR MEDICAL CLINIC NORTH SHORE COMMUNITY RESOURCES NORTH SHORE NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE NORTH VANCOUVER CITY LIBRARY NUTRITION HOUSE PARKGATE LIBRARY PEMBERTON & MARINE MEDICAL CLINIC QUEENSDALE MARKET SILVER HARBOUR MANOR SUPER VALU THE SUMMERHILL WAL MART WESTVIEW MEDICAL CLINIC PITT MEADOWS PITT MEADOWS LIBRARY PITT MEADOWS REC CENTRE SHOPPER DRUG MART PORT COQUITLAM AMICA AT MAYFAIR ASTORIA RESORT RETIREMENT LIVING TERRY FOX LIBRARY WILSON REC CENTRE PORT MOODY PORT MOODY COMM SERVICES PORT MOODY LIBRARY PORT MOODY SOCIAL REC CENTRE RICHMOND BRIGHOUSE LIBRARY BUS STOP - 6390 #3 RD CAMBIE COMMUNITY CENTRE CAMBIE PUBLIC LIBRARY GARDEN CITY MED CLINIC HAMILTON COMMUNITY CENTRE

IRONWOOD LIBRARY MINORU AQUATIC CENTRE MINORU ARENA MINORU SENIORS CENTRE RICHMOND ADDICTION SERVICES RICHMOND CENTRE FOR DISABILITY SEAFAIR MEDICAL CLINIC SHOPPERS DRUG MART SOUTH ARM COMMUNITY CENTRE STEVESTON COMMUNITY CENTRE THOMPSON COMMUNITY CENTRE VOLUNTEER RICHMOND INFO SERV WEST RICHMOND COMMUNITY CTR SURREY AQUATIC CENTRE ARBOURSIDE COURT BUENA VISTA LIBRARY BUY RITE FOODS CHAPTERS STRAWBERRY HILL CHOICES MARKET CLOVERDALE LIBRARY CLOVERDALE REC CENTRE CLOVERDALE SENIORS’ CENTRE FLEETWOOD COMMUNITY CENTRE FLEETWOOD LIBRARY GARDENS AT SEMIAHMOO GATEWAY SKYTRAIN STN GUILDFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY GUILDFORD SENIORS VILLAGE IMPERIAL PLACE KENT SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTRE KING GEORGE SKYTRAIN STN KIWANIS PARK PLACE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY MEDICHAIR NEWTON ARENA NEWTON GENERAL STORE NEWTON LIBRARY NEWTON WAVE POOL N SURREY REC CENTRE OCEAN PARK LIBRARY PEACE ARCH MEMORAIL HOSPITAL PHARMASAVE 10654 KING GEORGE PHARMASAVE 9558 - 120TH ST PHARMASAVE 15280 - 101ST AVE ROSEMARY HEIGHTS SENIORS VILL SAVE ON SCOOTERS SCOTT RD SKYTRAIN STN (N) SCOTT RD SKYTRAIN STN (S) SEMIAHMOO PUBLIC LIBRARY SHOPPERS DRUG MART SHOPPERS HOME HEALTH SOUTH SURREY ARENA SOUTH SURREY INDOOR POOL SOUTH SURREY REC CENTRE STRAWBERRY HILL LIBRARY SUNRISE PAVILLION SURREY GARDENS / SURREY VILL SURREY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL SURREY CENTRAL SKYTRAIN STN THE CHEMISTS PHARMACY CONTINUED NEXT PAGE


MAINLAND DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS - CONTINUED TOM BINNIE PARK COMM CENTRE WESTMINSTER HOUSE WHALLEY LIBRARY WHITE ROCK/ S SURREY PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT VANCOUVER 1 KINGSWAY LIBRARY 29TH AVE SKY TRAIN STN 411 SENIOR’S CENTRE AMICA AT ARBUTUS MANOR ARBUTUS MALL BARCLAY MANOR BC WOMENS HOSPITAL BREAD GARDEN BRITANNIA ARENA / LIBRARY BROADWAY & BURRARD WALK IN BROCK HOUSE SOCIETY BURRARD SKYTRAIN BUS STOP - 750 BROADWAY CAPERS - 2285 4TH AVE CAPERS - 1675 ROBSON ST CAPERS MARKET CARE MEDICAL CENTRE CENTRAL MARKET - 830 THURLOW CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS COMM CNTR CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS LIBRARY CHOICES MARKET - 1202 RICHARDS CHOICES MARKET - 3493 CAMBIE ST CHOICES MARKET - 2627 16 AVE CITY SQUARE FAMILY PRACTICE COLLINGWOOD HOUSE COLLINGWOOD LIBRARY CROFTEN MANOR DENMAN COMMUNITY CTR DENMAN MALL DIAMOND HEALTH CARE CENTRE DOCTOR’S OFFICE 777 W BROADWAY

DOUGLAS PARK COMM CENTRE DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTRE DUNBAR PUBLIC LIBRARY FALSE CREEK COMMUNITY CENTRE FIREHALL LIBRARY FRASERVIEW LIBRARY FROG HOLLOW NEIGHBORHOOD GF STRONG REHABILITATION CTR GRANDVIEW TOWERS GRANVILLE ISLAND MARKET GRANVILLE MEDICAL CLINIC HASTINGS COMMUNITY CENTRE HASTINGS PUBLIC LIBRARY HOME INSTEAD - VAN, NORTHSHORE JACK LILLICO DENTURE CLINIC JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE JOE FORTES LIBRARY JOYCE SKYTRAIN STN KENSINGTON COMMUNITY CENTRE KENSINGTON LIBRARY KERRISDALE ARENA KERRISDALE SENIORS CENTRE KERRISDALE LIBRARY KHATSALANO MED CLINIC KILLARNEY COMMUNITY CENTRE KILLARNEY MARKET KITSILANO NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE KITSILANO PUBLIC LIBRARY KIWASSA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY LITTLE MOUNTAIN NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE LONDON DRUGS - 1187 ROBSON MAIN ENTRANCE RACK MAIN ST SKYTRAIN STN MAPLE MEDICAL CLINIC MARPOLE COMMUNITY CENTRE MARPOLE LIBRARY

MEDICAL CLINIC - 1280 GRANVILLE MERCATO MALL MID-MAIN COMM HEALTH CENTRE MT PLEASANT COMMUNITY CENTRE MT PLEASANT NGHBRHD HOUSE NANAIMO SKY TRAIN STN OAKRIDGE LIBRARY OAKRIDGE SENIOR’S CENTRE O’KEEFE SENIOR LIVING APT PARKVIEW TERRACE PHARMASAVE 595 BURRARD PLATINUM CARE RAYCAM COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW PUBLIC LIBRARY RENFREW SKY TRAIN STN RICHMOND/VAN HEALTH UNIT RILEY PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE RILEY PARK LIBRARY ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE ROYAL CENTRE MEDICAL RUPERT SKYTRAIN STN SHANNON OAKS SHOPPERS DRUG MART SIDNEY MANOR SINCLAIR CENTRE SORRENTO MARKET STADIUM SKYTRAIN STN S GRANVILLE PARK LODGE S GRANVILLE SENIOR’S CENTRE SOUTH HILL LIBRARY SOUTHVIEW HEIGHTS AND TERRACE ST PAUL HOSPITAL STRATHCONA COMMUNITY CENTRE STRATHCONA LIBRARY THUNDERBIRD COMMUNITY CENTRE TROUT LAKE COMMUNITY CENTRE UBC HOSPITAL VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY

VGH EMERGENCY WATERFRONT SKY TRAIN STN WEST END AQUATIC CENTRE WEST END SENIORS NETWORK WEST POINT GREY PUBLIC LIBRARY YMCA COMMUNITY SERVICES WEST VANCOUVER AMICA AT WEST VANCOUVER BUS STOP 2002 PARK ROYAL BUS STOP 2051 PARK ROYAL GLENEAGLES COMMUNITY CENTRE HOLLYBURN HOUSE SUPER VALU WEST VAN MEMORIAL LIBRARY WEST VANCOUVER COMM CENTRE WHITE ROCK HOME INSTEAD PACIFIC CARLTON STARBUCKS - 1730 152ND STREET SUNNYSIDE MANOR THE PENINSULA RESORT RETIREMENT LIVING WHITE ROCK ACTIVITY CENTRE WHITE ROCK MUSEUM & ARCHIVES

Now distributed at all Pharmasave stores throughout BC. VANCOUVER ISLAND EDITION DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT VANCOUVER ISLAND BC

VANCOUVER EDITION DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT MAINLAND BC

Recommend a Distribution Location Near You! Senior Living is looking for convenient, high traffic distribution locations throughout the Greater Vancouver region. If you know of a place of business or activity centre that would be a convenient location for interested readers to pick up our magazine, let us know. Email: office@seniorlivingmag.com Phone 1-877-479-4705 AUGUST 2010

21


Travel & Adventure

Alluring and Beautiful Baker BY JANE CASSIE

O

n a clear day, you can see Mount Baker from the city of Seattle, the San Juan Islands and our sundeck in White Rock. Like an omnipresent sentinel, its 3,285 metre-high snowy summit contrasts with every bluebird sky. Although not the highest Cascade peak in the range, it’s definitely the iciest. No doubt, that’s why the Lummi Indians once coined it Koma Kulshan, meaning, “The Great White Watcher.” As well as enticing winter powder hounds, this Washington icon is etched with plenty of trails to lure us fairweather hikers. In our earlier mountaineering years, we’d tried a few of the more challenging routes: the steeple-steep switchbacks of Church Mountain, the craggy ascent up Goat Trail, and the heart-thumping heights of Heliotrope Ridge. During every thigh-burning ascent, we were privy to astonishing rewards from flower-clad meadows to panoramic views. Now, years later, my quads aren’t quite as peppy about doing the pitch. Thank heavens Ptarmigan Ridge offers us the best of both worlds – jaw-dropping vistas without as much uphill grunt work. But even though there’s a little less elevation gain, this hike isn’t exactly a walk in the park. It can be rough and sketchy in parts and, depending on the annual snowfall, may still be draped in some of the slippery white stuff. Ominous clouds can also quickly horn in, enshrouding the surrounding beauty and blurring the route. But on this day, it’s crystal clear and totally free of nature’s obstacles – and we’ve come prepared with enough GORP and Gortex to combat any famine or foul weather. A National Forest pass is mandatory to park anywhere in the Mount Baker recreation area and after doling out our $5 at the Glacier Public Service Center, we travel eastward and upward on Highway 542. The paved pathway bisects groves of evergreens, sub-alpine flora and vacated ski lifts that wait patiently for the winter ski mob. After numerous swerves, curves and hairpins, we climb 1,676 metres and reach Artist Point. This is where our SUV 22

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

gets a well-deserved break and our legs take over. Access to the Chain Lakes’ trailhead and spectacular ridge walk can be found in the parking lot’s northwest corner. And on this sunny Sunday morning, it’s not hard to find. “It may seem a bit like Grand Central,” Brent says, as we follow the crowd, “But it’ll thin out once we get going.” My hubby has hoofed enough popular hills in the past to know, and as soon as we head away from this bustling hub, the strand of nomads fan out over Mother Nature’s wonderland like ants at a picnic. Our pencil-thin pathway traverses the base of lava-made Table Mountain and though the steady incline isn’t too strenuous, my eyes are fixated on the route ahead. Primarily, this is so I can safely manoeuvre the roots and rubble underfoot. Secondly, it helps steady my vertigo on this open southern slope that hovers high above Swift Creek and Rainbow Valley. But every so often, I just have to take a moment and look around. And this isn’t a tactic to slow my raging pulse. Beyond the talus slope and yawning gorge is a vista that even Heidi would drool over. The jagged majestic Mt. Shuksan dominates the backdrop of this picture postcard setting. Glacial remains pocket many of the weather worn crevices and its needle-sharp summit seems to pierce the cloudless sky. I’m awestruck by its magnitude and mes-


merized by its beauty. But just ahead, there’s visual overload in store, and if I want to see it, I have to keep on trekking! At the 3km mark, we come to a fork in the footpath, where the Chain Lakes Trail divides. Many of the hikers take this low road. It descends 152 metres to a splattering of lakes, then elevates to Herman’s Saddle at 244 metres where the snow cone of Baker beautifies the backdrop. But we manage to get even closer. As if spellbound like mice of the pied piper, we head for the high road, a route that will lead to the base of this icy apex. Along the way, our tundra trail is flanked by a riot of wildflowers: Flaming Paintbrush, glorious Partridge Foot and Alpine Spirea. Mountain Monkey plants provide a cushy groundcover and edible-ready blueberries are perfect for snacking on – especially by the namesake ptarmigan birds, who populate the area. Colour-rich flora, snow-draped knolls, granite monoliths; the only thing missing is a round or two of the Happy Wanderer. We elevate to higher ground, gingerly cross ice fields and steer clear from gaping cracks and crevices. And with each step, we get closer to that alluring landmark. We pass the 1,768-metre mark and a kilometre further come to the base of the Coleman Pinnacle. But there’s no need to scale this steep-pitched summit. We have what we’ve come here for. And while setting up our picnic at Camp Kiser, we can’t take our eyes off it. It seems to be within our reach and is more captivating than ever. There, in all its full-blown beauty is the glistening gem, the crown jewel, the snowy mountain that I can see from my deck SL in White Rock – alluring and beautiful Baker.

Photos: Brent Cassie

Travel & Adventure

Are you a Care Giver or expect to be one?

You are not alone! Embrace the Journey - A Care Giver’s Story

For more information: www.mtbaker.us/summer

96 pages Softcover 5.5” x 8.5” Price $14.95

Valerie Green’s personal story as a care giver to her elderly parents is the most relevant book on “aging in place” I have read to date. It provides a powerful insight into the challenges faced by every care giver. It unveils the challenges, heartaches, struggles and agonizing decisions that often need to be made along the way. If you are currently a care giver, or anticipate being one in the near future, this book is a must-read. - Publisher Barbara Risto, Senior Living magazine

To order, please send cheque for $19.84 ($14.95 plus $3.95 S&H & GST) payable to Senior Living. Please include your clearly written shipping address and phone number. MAIL TO: Embrace Book Offer c/o Senior Living 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

Allow two weeks for shipping.

AUGUST 2010

23


BETWEEN FRIENDS BY DOREEN BARBER

WALKING OUT OF YOUR PAST “...it comes down to you, you have to make a choice to walk out of your past and nobody can do it with you. You might be in a mess together, but you walk out of it alone. That is your challenge; that is your chore.” –Dr. Phil McGraw

A

t 19 months old, Helen Keller was a happy, healthy child who already spoke a few words. After she suffered an illness accompanied by high fever, however, she became deaf and blind

for life. Feeling lost, Helen would hang on to her mother’s skirt to get around. Although a very bright child, she became extremely frustrated by her inability to communicate and began to throw temper tantrums. Her mother, inspired by an account in Charles Dickens’ American Notes of the successful education of another deaf

and blind child, sought professional advice from the Perkins Institute For The Blind. Through the Institute, Helen’s mother met Anne Sullivan, also visually impaired, who became Keller’s instructor. It was the beginning of a 49-year relationship. With Anne Sullivan’s help, Helen became an author, political activist, lecturer and was the first deaf and blind person to earn a bachelor’s degree. While in college, she wrote her autobiography, The Story of My Life and over the years authored 11 more books. Travelling around the world speaking to groups, she became famous and had many opportunities to meet well-known and influential people. –Maya Angelou Her determination and the many people who helped her, most importantly Anne Sullivan, contributed to her success.

“If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.”

SUBSCRIPTION ORDER FORM

“I can see, and that is why I can be happy in what you call the dark, but which to me is golden. I can see a God-made world, not a man-made world.” SL –Helen Keller

Vancouver Edition 12 issues for $32 (includes GST) Name ________________________________________________ Purchase a Subscription for $32 and never miss an issue! Address ______________________________________________ City __________________________________________________ Province ____________ Postal Code _________________

Mail cheque to:

Senior Living 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1 24

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Doreen Barber is pursuing a Master’s degree in Biblical Counselling at the The Biblical Life College & Seminary.


BBB Better Better Better Better

Business Business Business Business

Bureau Bureau Bureau Bureau

SCAM ALERT

BY LYNDA PASACRETA

REBATE PROGRAMS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE

H

ave you seen an ad in the local paper offering $500 worth of free groceries or gas if you make a substantial purchase at a retailer? Your Better Business Bureau would like to remind consumers that if an offer sounds too good to be true, it usually is. BBB has received thousands of complaints North America-wide about companies who offer online gas and grocery voucher redemption services. Retailers are contacted by third-party marketing companies who offer the companies an opportunity to give their potential customers an incentive to shop at their store. While there are many legitimate programs in the marketplace, be wary of the free gas and grocery offers. Consumers who want to take advantage of the offer have to enroll through a website, after they make their retail-store purchase. The websites have names like, claimyourfoodandfuel.com, freegrocerycenter.com, gasandgrocerydepot.com, claimyourgroceries.com and freebeegas.com. In all cases, consumers have to jump through several hoops to get their vouchers for gas or groceries. BBB has received numerous complaints alleging non-receipt and delay in the receipt of the vouchers, even after following the company’s instructions for the redemption program. Complaints allege consumers have mailed the required receipts to the company and have had difficulty obtaining the vouchers. In the worst cases, consumers are finding out, after a few months of waiting, that the company has gone out of business. Three separate companies have gone out of business and have been involved in civil litigation. BBZ Resource Management (Arizona), Tidewater Marketing (Florida) and My Free Travel (Illinois) have either gone out of business or failed to honour their commitments to their customers. Over the past three years, the companies have amassed 4,451 complaints. Locally, Dodd’s Furniture in Victoria reportedly lost $100,000 through the program (Source: Victoria TimesColonist) when the store ended up offering either an in-store credit on purchases or a flight and two nights in a hotel in Las Vegas to replace the promotion.

BBB suggests businesses and consumers looking to partner with a company that offers incentives and/or certificate programs diligently research the business and its owners. Make sure that the company is trustworthy by checking it out with BBB. If you have had an unsatisfactory experience with a comSL pany, file a complaint at mbc.bbb.org

Lynda Pasacreta is President of the Better Business Bureau of Mainland B.C. www.mbc.bbb.org To contact Lynda Pasacreta, e-mail president@mbc.bbb.org

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AUGUST 2010

25


Travel & Adventure

Hanging Loose in Paradise Day-Tripping Around Honolulu

STORY AND PHOTOS BY CHRIS & RICK MILLIKAN

H

onolulu makes a perfect one-week, hang-loose holiday. Nixing the rental car, we invest in trolley passes for travelling to outlying attractions and sturdy sandals for robust walks around bustling Waikiki. The beachside neighbourhoods present tropical gardens and numerous sculptures revealing its regal past: Princess Bernice reading to schoolchildren; Princess Victoria surrounded by beloved peacocks; King Kalakaua, arts patron who reinstated the hula; Prince Kuhio, elected U.S. congressman for 20 years. A lei-draped statue honours Duke Kahanamoku, Hawaiian Olympic swimmer who popularized surfing, once an exclusively royal sport. Inspired, we decide to surf – sitting-down! This popular canoe alternative began in the ’50s. Launching from the beachfront of Waikiki’s oldest hotel, Captain Russell urges six of us to paddle our outrigger through crashing waves; then steering shoreward, we wait patiently under the bluest of skies for “the big one.” Amid tanned devotees on sleek surfboards, we survey Waikiki’s shimmering high-rises. Suddenly paddling furiously, our jolly crew catches a monstrous wave and races smoothly toward the beach. So much fun, this thrilling ride repeats twice more. Southward, we saunter into Kapiolani Park beneath gigantic 100-year-old monkey pod trees. In the 1870s, King Kalakaua founded and named this beautiful green refuge after 26

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

his wife. He also established Honolulu Zoo, where a nearby bronze Gandhi strides under an enormous banyan tree. This immense park stretches along three kilometres of shoreline and encloses Waikiki Aquarium. Here, reef sharks swim benignly past our faces. Pulsating jellyfish, tiny seahorses, rare sea dragons, shy octopi, fidgety shrimp and moray eels thrive in smaller tanks; rainbow arrays of fish flit among dazzling corals. Behind, San Souci’s sweeping golden sands attract sunbathers and couples like us who snorkel this marine sanctuary’s gentle waters. Our first trolley ride skirts Saturday’s busy farmer’s market near Diamond Head, then veers onto Oahu’s spectacular windward coast. After glimpsing paddling surfers, sailboarders, kite-boarders and hang gliders, our chatty driver pulls over, announcing a natural marvel – a spectacular blowhole! Below the cliff, we watch waves pound into the underwater lava tube forcing sparkling geysers skyward. At Hanauma Bay, everyone heads to the ancient crater rim for picture-perfect shots. Dotted with stately palms, the white crescent beach embraces gorgeous turquoise waters. Hawaii’s first marine preserve provides snorkellers a pristine coral reef teeming with 420 fish species. Arriving at Sea Life Park, the walk-through aquarium further introduces Hawaii’s marine excitement. Ocean panoramas frame lagoons where visitors can ride dolphins, kiss


Travel & Adventure sea lions and dive with rays. In smaller pools, penguins preen and toddle; sea turtles munch heads of lettuce and monk seals bask and frolic. A ride into Chinatown reveals another side of Honolulu’s alluring past. Chinese immigrants first arrived in the 1800s, building this community of family stores twice devastated by fire. Brothels and opium dens proliferated during the Second World War. And in the last decade, this historic area was revitalized by new art galleries, upscale restaurants, boutiques and art nouveau Hawaiian Theater re-opening in 1996. A charming sculpture of young Sun Yat-sen stands in a garden oasis, a reminder that China’s first president was raised here. Munching flaky egg tarts warm from the bakery, we mingle with locals shopping for produce, fresh fish and herbs in an open street market. After peering at curiosities in shop windows, our explorations conclude with a dim sum lunch of savoury dumplings. On returning to Diamond Head, our trolley driver explains, “This famous crater’s name originated in the 1700s when British sailors thought calcite crystals covering its slopes were diamonds.” Our plan is to hike to the rim and back, an easy sounding 5.6 kilometres. Armed with bottled water, sunscreen and hats, a paved path leads us upward to a steep, uneven dirt track following

the original 1908 pathway to artillery placements. Switch-backing to a 74step stairway, we continue climbing, passing through a dimly lit, narrow 68-metre tunnel. Puffing, sweating and guzzling water up 99 more steep steps, we rest at a panoramic lookout before gasping up one last staircase of 54 spiralling steps. Thankfully, it replaced an earlier ladder! Finally emerging through a small gunnery opening, superb vistas of Waikiki appear below. Local shaveice treats back at the trailhead reward

»

this hardy trek. Magic of Polynesia proves an amazing sample of Waikiki’s nightlife. Integrating Polynesian dances, songs and chants, renowned illusionist John Hirokawa waves his wand and a helicopter appears on stage. Casting spells, people vanish and just as suddenly reappear. Objects take flight, mysteriously dissolve and even evolve into something else entirely. Astounding pyrotechnics and lasers add to the total wonderment! Our last trolley offers stops at the

A Great Gift Idea! Reflections, Rejections, and Other Breakfast Foods Reflection��s,��������

st Foods

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Limited Edition

Limited Edition!!

A collection of Gipp Forster’s published columns in Senior Living magazine, with other unpublished writings thrown in for good measure. A unique blend of humor and nostalgia, Gipp’s writings touch your heart in such an irresistible way, you will want to buy not only a copy for yourself, but as a wonderful gift for friends and family members. 128 pages Softcover • Published by Senior Living

MAGAZINE

& Unpublished Writings A Collection of Published nist Gipp Forster by Senior Living Colum

REDUCED Price: $10.00

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Please allow two weeks for shipping.

____ BOOKS @ $10.00 each SHIPPING (FIRST BOOK $3.95; ADD’L BOOKS $1.95 EACH)

AUGUST 2010

27


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Pearl Factory, Thurston Botanical Gardens and Hawaii’s oldest Ukulele Factory before arriving at our destination, Hawaii’s largest museum. In 1889, Charles Reed Bishop built the acclaimed Bishop Museum for Princess Bernice, his beloved wife; last descendant of the Kamehameha family. Nowadays, it houses her family heirlooms among millions of Polynesian treasures. Ancient chants welcome us into the newly renovated three-story Hawaiian Hall. Above, a double-hull koa canoe and sperm whale’s immense skeleton

are suspended. At floor level, a model heiau temple and actual thatched hale await us; original carved stone deities and wooden tikis reflect pre-contact beliefs and legends. The second floor’s human realm highlights the land’s impact on daily life. Interactive stations and displays help us understand cultural practices and social structures. The third floor showcases the ali’i realm: high chiefs’ magnificent feather cloaks, legacies of princess cousins Bernice, Ruth and Emma and the Monarchy’s 1893 overthrow.

Photos: Page 26, Maori Haka at the Polynesian Cultural Center on Oahu’s north shore. Page 27, Too many luaus. This page, top, On the trolley, inside Diamond Head crater. Right, An octopus at Waikiki Aquarium. Page 29, the climp up Diamond Head.

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

$30 for 20 words or less. $1.25 per extra word. Boxed Ad - Small (2.2 x 1.2) $110. Boxed Ad - Large (2.2 x 2.4) $210. Add Logo $25 extra. Red spot color 10% extra. Plus tax. All Classified ads must be prepaid. Cheque or Credit Card accepted. Toll Free 1-877479-4705. Deadline: 15th of the month. Make cheque payable to: Senior Living, 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave.,Victoria BC V8T 2C1 28

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

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Travel & Adventure techniques and comedic Samoans gathering and husking coconuts. Emerging from these island entertainments, all gather to behold Rainbows of Paradise, an outrigger parade that winds along the picturesque waterway. Our own restful canoe ride follows this musical extravaganza. The luau proves fit for a King, complete with royal court pageantry. After feasting on poi, pineapple, purple sweet potatoes and coconut pudding, we head for Ha, Breath of Life, a new theatrical spectacle. Featuring an elaborate series of haunting, flamboyant and fiery dances, this saga traces an action-packed journey into manhood among Polynesia’s many cultures. Homeward bound, we enjoy reviewing the diverse medley of car-less escapades that fulfilled our keen interest in sightSL seeing – and keeping fit!

When You Go: Polynesian Cultural Center www.polynesianculturalcenter.com Waikiki Trolley www.honolulutours.net/ Waikiki Aquarium www.waquarium.org Magic of Polynesia www.magicofpolynesia.com Bishop Museum www.bishopmuseum.org Sea Life Park www.sealifeparkhawaii.com

The trolley returns through historic downtown Honolulu; we hop off across from Kawaiaha’o Church, where monarchs were baptized, married and crowned – and services continue in the Hawaiian language. King Kamehameha’s nearby golden statue memorializes his unification of these islands. Behind him, a former palace now serves as state supreme court. Inside, heritage centre exhibits explain the evolution of Hawaii’s legal system. Across King Street stands Iolani Palace, home of Hawaii’s last reigning monarchs. Long before the White House – even Buckingham Palace – this elegant Victorian palace had indoor plumbing, electric lights and telephones. King Kalakaua and his sister successor Queen Lili’uokalani entertained international leaders there. The United States’ only palace now displays royal regalia, exquisite furnishings and artifacts. A chartered bus allows us to go native at the Polynesian Cultural Center on Oahu’s north shore. Here we experience island hospitality in replicated huts, meeting houses and on grassy commons of six villages spread over 42 lush acres. While others stick on tattoos, weave baskets and throw spears, we play Fijian rhythm instruments, join exuberant Maori Haka and sample Tahitian soda bread. We also watch Hawaiian hulas, vigorous Tahitian huras, Tongan drumming

Legendary Waterways of Europe May 14,2011 16 Days ��41 Meals ������������������ ��������������� ��������������������� ������������������������� ���������������������� ���������������������� ������������������ �����������������

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29


Mind GAMES

Crossword PUZZLE Across 2. Worn to protect the clothing 6. Fermented grape juices 11. Lady’s-finger 13. State resident 15. English princess 17. Fixes 18. Ogles 19. Underground part of a plant 20. Deuces 21. Thin glutinous mud 22. Authentic 23. Finish first 25. Biddies 26. Person whose religion is Judaism 30. Devote 32. Modify 36. Complete change 37. Shooting sport 38. Sealing compound 40. Purchase

41. Places to sleep 47. Shaft horsepower 49. Executive Officer 50. Away 54. Pal 55. Imitator 56. Tester 57. Hawaiian port 58. Draw near 59. Book of the Bible 60. Annoys 61. Native of Switzerland 62. Type of packsack

Down 1. Florida city 2. Inert elemental gas 3. Move past 4. Lubricates

5. Yuletide 6. Of moderate temperature 7. Insert 8. Planet 9. Breathe noisily 10. Hates intensely 12. Flightless bird 14. Small dam 16. Part of speech 24. Rich and fashionable travellers 26. Trash 27. Spouse 28. Group of tents 29. Genus of vermin 30. Step in ballet 31. Short letter 33. Paint unskillfully 34. Be sorry for 35. Plaything 39. Highest 42. Public exhibition 43. Judges 44. Metal fastener 45. Mathematics 46. Raised platform 47. Evade work 48. Unwieldy ship 51. Career golfers 52. Unpleasant smell 53. Salver 54. Stylish

ANSWERS

30

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


Photo: Jason van der Valk

ASK

tions of lonely women. I am a widow of four years, so know of what I speak. Maybe you are a hermit living in Strathcona Park! Goldie warned you to beware. Well, this a warning to all widows too.

BY GOLDIE CARLOW, M.ED

Dear Readers: Well, as I am sure you have concluded, I was deluged with responses to B.G. I did not have space for all of them in my column, so this is just a cross-section. I was concerned at the amount of personal information offered to B.G., before the ladies had an opportunity to meet him or see his references. Again, I warn them to really get to know such a companion before setting off to some foreign port. Neglect in this matter could endanger a SL respondent’s life.

Goldie

Dear Goldie: I just read your article re: B.G. finding a person to travel with and am probably replying a little late. As a 67-year-old widow just returning from a cruise, I would have found it much more stimulating in the company of a nice gentleman. If you would like to pass on my reply, I would be very grateful and I do have many references. I am slim, blonde, blue-eyed retired professional and have lived independently for about 10 years. I am considered to be a good listener and have a sense of humour. I have travelled to England, Turkey, Hawaii, South Africa and Mexico and would love to experience more travel, especially with company. Looking forward to hearing from B.G. Thank you. –B.D. Dear Goldie: In response to your article in the June 2010 issue of Senior Living magazine, I would like to submit the following information regarding B.G.’s quest to meet a travelling companion. I am an independent self-sufficient retired government employee of 25 years. Born in Alberta June 26, 1936, I enjoy dancing, dining and golf (prominent member of a private golf club). I like walking, skiing, ice skating, tennis, bowling and curling. I exercise regularly at home and at the gym. I have lived at my current residence for 15 years and prior to that, I spent 25 years in Vancouver. I love life, people, sightseeing and new adventures. I

have a good sense of humour and love to laugh. Further particulars can be made available by arranging a personal meeting. I look forward to hearing from B.G. Thank you. –J.S. Dear Goldie: To B.G. [Letter from widow number 436!] Your letter in the June issue of Senior Living was very interesting. I have three theories to this problem: 1.You are a university student looking for material about widowed seniors for your thesis; 2.You have some sort of affliction that would turn off all women; 3.You are still married to a lovely lady and you are looking for some fun. If you are living on South Vancouver Island, you would know there are a multitude of widows who would gladly go on a vacation with someone who is going to pay the bill. You are cruel to play with the emo-

Senior Peer Counselling Centres (Lower Mainland) New Westminster 604-519-1064 North Vancouver 604-987-8138 Burnaby 604-291-2258 Richmond 604-279-7034 Vancouver West End 604-669-7339 Coquitlam – Tri-Cities 604-945-4480 Vancouver Westside 604-736-3588

Goldie Carlow is a retired registered nurse, clinical counsellor and senior peer counselling trainer. Send letters to Senior Living, Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria, BC V8T 2C1.

Next Month in Senior Living...

Health & Wellness Staying healthy is about staying fit. Find out how Vancouver boomers and seniors are leading active lifestyles – and reaping the benefits. AUGUST 2010

31


Reflections THEN & NOW

Photo: Krystle Wiseman

BY GIPP FORSTER

THE JAMES STREET BOYS

W

hen I was a kid, I belonged to a gang. We called ourselves “The James Street Boys.” There was Raymond Jourdain, Terry Collins, Wayne Pushmen, Stuart Lockeyer and, of course, me, who took up the rear in case of cowardly attacks by our imaginary enemies – also, I walked slower than everyone else. We had a couple of honorary members in our gang as well: honorary because they didn’t live on James Street. Georgie lived on Gilmour Street and Kenny on Bronson Avenue. We were tough as long as we didn’t have to fight anyone. Chests puffed out, we walked about intimidating girls and smaller kids with hard menacing stares. Putting lots of bravado in our swagger, we were impressive – at least in our eyes. Terry Collins was the leader. Although, I was immediately cast into this role when we visited my greatgrandfather’s house a couple of blocks away. My Auntie Maimie would hand out cookies to each of us, and we thought it expedient to promote me to the role of leader to ensure the cookie harvest. The moment we left greatgrandfather’s house, however, I was quickly demoted to the back of the pack! Had I understood then what inferiority complex meant, I might have been

emotionally damaged. But I didn’t, so I’m not. At least I don’t think I am! At any rate, as far as we were concerned, The James Street Boys were the heroes of 1947. Even though I was always chosen to be the German (or enemy) when we played war, I knew I was a necessary part of the gang – someone had to be shot, right? Our archrivals were The Callahan

– in about an eight-block radius. They had a Saint Bernard dog named Buck. According to the Callahans, if Buck ever caught us, he would eat us! Where the envy came in was in the winter. The Callahans would strap Buck to this incredible sleigh their dad had made that two kids could sit in and one kid would ride the runnels holding onto the back. It had bells and you could hear them coming a block away, which gave The James Street Boys plenty of time to hide. From behind snowbanks and bushes, we would watch them sail by – three on the sleigh and the rest of The Percy Street Gang trotting alongside. My plan to attack them with snowballs, garnered me stares as though I’d just lost all my marbles. But the years have now stolen those days of adventure and daring when gangs were gangs without spilling a drop of blood. Buck’s gone, the Callahans scattered and The James Street Boys dispersed and are forgotten by most. But not by me! Those were glory days, when innocence pretended to be experienced. Days of climbing roofs, raiding the Pell’s plum tree and the Rowley’s rhubarb patch. It was highrisk stuff, but we could handle it. We were tough. We were The James Street Boys! SL

Chests puffed out, we walked about intimidating girls and smaller kids with hard menacing stares.

32

Boys, who we called The Percy Street Gang. A whole bunch of brothers with a few friends thrown into the mix, they lived three blocks up and had a giant backyard surrounded by a high wooden fence; we’d spy on them through the knotholes or spaces between the boards only when we were positive none of them were home. Bravery wasn’t one of our strong suits. The James Street Boys gave me the honour each time of making sure the Callahans weren’t home. They told me no one could check things out as well as I could. I’ve never figured out why the gang looked so surprised when I returned with my report. It was like they thought I might not come back at all. The Callahans had one thing that was the envy of every kid – boy or girl

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


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Senior Living Magazine Vancouver Edition August 2010  

50+ Active Lifestyle Magazine for Vancouver & Mainland BC Canada