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SPECIAL HOUSING EDITION AUGUST 2009

Vancouver’s 50+ Active Lifestyle Magazine

Retirement Home Trends AGING IN PLACE


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AUGUST 2009

MAGAZINE

(Vancouver & Lower Mainland) is published by Stratis Publishing. Other publications by Stratis Publishing:

• Senior Living (Vancouver Island) • Senior Lifestyle: A Housing Guide for Vancouver Island

SPECIAL HOUSING GUIDE DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

Publisher

Barbara Risto

27 Classifieds

4 Happy Together

Editor

Bobbie Jo Reid editor@seniorlivingmag.com

7 The New World of Retirement

Proofreader

Allyson Mantle

8 Retirement Home Trends

Advertising Manager

Barry Risto 250-479-4705 Toll Free 1-877-479-4705 sales@seniorlivingmag.com

12 The Psychology of Moving

Ad Sales Staff

RaeLeigh Buchanan 250-479-4705 Ann Lester 250-390-1805 Mathieu Powell 250-589-7801 Contact Information – Head Office

Senior Living Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

COLUMNS 2 The Family Caregiver

15 50+ Buyers Change Housing Trends

9 Between Friends

by Barbara Small

by Doreen Barber

22 Assisted Living Residences 23 Aids to Daily Living

Subscriptions: $32 (includes GST,

31 BBB Scam Alert

14 Senior-Focused Realtors

16 Walking Into San Francisco’s Golden Past

Phone 250-479-4705 Toll-free 1-877-479-4705 Fax 250-479-4808 E-mail office@seniorlivingmag.com Website www.seniorlivingmag.com

28 Crossword

10 Forever Young by William Thomas

29 Ask Goldie

by Goldie Carlow

32 Reflections: Then & Now by Gipp Forster

24 Somewhere to Sleep

postage and handling) for 12 issues. Canadian residents only.

No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Senior Living is an indepdendent publication and its articles imply no endoresement of any products or services. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. Unsolicited articles are welcome and should be e-mailed to editor@seniorlivingmag.com Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland is distributed free in Vancouver, North & West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Delta, Twawwassen, White Rock, Surrey, Cloverdale and Ladner. ISSN 1911-6373 (Print) ISSN 1991-6381 (Online)

26 Complex Care Residences 26 Campus of Care Residences 27 Adapting Your Home

Senior Living Vancouver is available at most Recreation Centres and Libraries in the following municipalities: • VANCOUVER • BURNABY • NEW WESTMINSTER • WHITE ROCK • NORTH VANCOUVER • LADNER / TSAWWASSEN • PORT MOODY • COQUITLAM • PORT COQUITLAM • SURREY • RICHMOND • WEST VANCOUVER • LANGLEY • ABBOTSFORD • PHARMASAVE STORES THROUGHOUT BC

MAGAZINE

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THE FAMILY CAREGIVER

A

lthough family caregivers are good at taking care of others, they are not always good at taking care of themselves. As the demands for caregiving increase, their own needs often get pushed aside. Caregivers can quickly become exhausted, overwhelmed and burnt out. Some signs that caregivers need some caregiving themselves are exhaustion, irritability, insomnia, hostility, tearfulness and resentment. Before this happens, it is important that caregivers take time to relax and rejuvenate. As the person receiving care, you can give back to your caregiver by encouraging him or her to take some time to replenish energy or arrange for others to pitch in and help. Below are some suggestions: 1. Acknowledge your caregiver’s hard work with verbal appreciation. They may respond initially by saying, “It’s nothing really” or “No problem.” For many people, it is difficult to accept compliments. However, if the person giving the compliment keeps hearing disclaimers, he or she may stop expressing appreciation. A simple recognition of one’s time and effort is enough to make a caregiver feel appre-

MAGAZIN

HOME

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Taking Care of Your Caregiver

ciated. You could say to them, “I want to acknowledge you. Thank you for doing all that you do for me.” 2. Encourage your caregiver to attend a support group. Although friends and family can be supportive, opening up and sharing feelings with strangers can often be easier, especially strangers who can relate to the situation. Both in-person and on-line support options are listed on the FCNS website at www.familycaregiversnetwork.org or in the Network News newsletter. 3. Share the care by co-ordinating with family and friends to take some duties off the caregiver’s hands. If everyone takes one task, the impact can be huge. Arrange for someone to relieve your caregiver for extended periods. Set this up on a regular basis. It will give the caregiver something to look forward to. 4. Arrange for help with errands and chores. Often the regular household chores and daily errands get pushed aside by the more essential requirements of caregiving. Arrange for others to help with these or, if possible,

pay someone to do the housekeeping, gardening or shopping. 5. Prioritize. Help your caregiver determine which tasks are unnecessary or less important. Family caregivers often want to do it all and may need “permission” to let go of tasks without feeling they are failing you. 6. Give the gift of relaxation. Treat your caregiver to a manicure, massage or other relaxing pleasure with a gift certificate. If finances are a concern, ask family members and friends to chip in. 7. Finally, have some fun and laugh together. Spend some time together that does not revolve around caregiving. If able, attend a play together or arrange for dinner to be delivered, stay home and watch a movie. Taking time to show your appreciation to your caregiver can help him or her stay strong, healthy, and better able to care for you for as long as is SL needed. Next month: Help at Home: Resources to Assist Family Caregivers

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An ritable Gift ). r a Cha free . Conside y or entirely tax income (largel rement nt for life your reti Rates on aranteed payme profitable. Interest Gu s - now Beat Low Salvation Army. RIF buy P] & SP MA R FO eipt. RR nuity with HERE ation rec [CLICK 20% don ITE] ritable Gift IT WEBS r a Cha tax TO VIS entirely . Conside HERE gely or income (lar ICK ent life rem [CL . ment for your reti Rates on Guaranteed pay s - now profitable Interest y. & RIF buy Beat Low vation Arm P] with Sal n receipt. RRSP FOR MA Annuity donatio HERE free). 20% [CLICK ITE] Gifts, Pub WEBS IT Pledged ur TO VIS Cash and ceeds, Life Ins HERE efits on Pro ben ICK SP tax RR [CL will receive ainder Trusts, l Estate. Rem tribution l, Rea cial con ies, Charitable ugh a Wil Your spe urit uests thro P] ded Sec uities, Beq FOR MA licly Tra MUSIC HERE s, Gift Ann ance Gift [CLICK ]

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Information and access to a variety of businesses and organizations whose appreciated customers include the 50+ consumer. 2

BY BARBARA SMALL

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Barbara Small is the Program Development Coordinator for Family Caregivers’ Network Society located in Victoria, BC. www.familycaregiversnetwork.org


More Than Just a Magazine

I

f you thought Senior Living was just a magazine, you will be surprised to find out that it is much more than that. Senior Living is actually TWO magazines - one is published for Vancouver Island residents, the other for readers on the Lower Mainland. Some articles are the same in both magazines, but most are different, since Senior Living shapes its content to its readers. For example, in the Vancouver Island version, you will find articles about people who live on the island; in the Vancouver version, the articles will be about Lower Mainland residents. Of course, if you want to read about what’s happening “across the pond”, all you have to do is go online at www.seniorlivingmag.com to find full versions of both magazines. Senior Living has also published several books, including the very popular “To Move or Not to Move”, a helpful 128-page guide for seniors considering their future housing options. This book provides an extensive amount of information about the housing alternatives that are available. It discusses everything from staying in your own home, to finding a residential solution that fully meets your particular needs. It presents the ins and outs of independent, assisted living, and complex care residences and gives you a list of questions to consider when viewing a potential residence. For a list of the contents (or to order) visit the Senior Living online Bookstore. Vancouver Island residents have had the opportunity for the last four years of attending a one-day event called the “50+ Active Living Celebration”. This event, founded by Senior Living in March 2006, offers over 50 displays by active people over the age of 50, demonstrating their favorite hobbies and pastimes. About an equal number of senior-focused businesses support this event. A stage with all day entertainment and an appetizing café round out the event. Senior Living also e-mails a monthly newsletter to subscribers. It’s free – all it takes is a minute to sign up on the Senior Living website. The newsletter contains articles on successful retirement, recipes, gardening and travel tips, Sudoku puzzles, videos, humor, etc. It’s a little different from our magazine in focus - to get a taste, you can view back issues on our website. We invite you to visit www.seniorlivingmag.com where you will find some offerings that can only be provided through a vehicle such as the wide world web. It’s a work in progress, so look for ongoing changes and additions. As an example of one of the most recent additions to our website, check out the new Discussion Forum, where readers can create their own discussions with other visitors. If you would like to discuss an issue or point of view, post your comment to this forum. We hope this will become a community

BY BARBARA RISTO, PUBLISHER

focal point for our readers to exchange information and enjoy the interaction with other visitors. We’ve also recently added the capability for website visitors to comment on recent articles posted. If you’ve enjoyed a particular article in our magazine or have something to say about it, find the article online and post your comment for others to read. And don’t forget to check out our website’s video section. Just this week, we added a video clip sent in by one of our readers about her recent zip-lining adventure in Fiji. If you have a video you’d like to share with other readers, send us an email with a description of its content. If it’s a match for our site, we will gladly add it to our growing inventory of videos. As you can see, Senior Living truly is more than just a magazine. Senior Living on-line: www.seniorlivingmag.com

��������������������������� Visit

www.seniorlivingmag.com/discussion

Share your opinions, views & comments Senior Living invites you to join the on-line discussion. Choose your topic, share your opinion, comment on the opinions of others...

Stay in touch! AUGUST 2009

3


Long-time friends Dorothy Furness (left) and Marion McGree (right) take a trip down memory lane.

Happy Together T

he third time was the charm. Twice before, the lives of Marion McGee and Dorothy Furness had intersected and, while friendships were forged, circumstances would conspire to pull the friends apart until the day of a chance meeting in a New Westminster Safeway store. Marion had recently moved to an apartment in the neighbourhood in order to be near the George Derby Centre, where her ailing husband Bert was receiving care in his final months. While walking up an aisle, Marion was delighted 4

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

BY KEVIN MCKAY

and surprised to run into her old friend Dorothy. “This was not my regular Safeway,” says Dorothy, “but on this particular day it was on my route, and I decided to stop to pick up a few things. I was delighted to see Marion. We were delighted to see each other. And we have stayed in close touch ever since that day.” The friends grew up in vastly different circumstances. Dorothy, the youngest of three children, was raised in the Okanagan town of Summerland. After attending busi-

ness school in Penticton for one year, she found clerical work at the Dominion Experimental Station in Summerland, where the Federal Government conducted experiments and research on various types of foods, including fruits, vegetables and some animals. “This was a fascinating place to work,” says Dorothy. “There was a lot of very important work going on. They were always working on developing new strains and varieties.” But after five years on the job, Dorothy took a position at the Summerland


y

Order of Nurses look after my mother, and I really appreciated what they did. I wanted to do that myself.” After working at several jobs over her teenage years, Marion wound up working at St. Paul’s Hospital as a nurse’s aide. The Sister in charge of the floor told Marion she wasting her time, and suggested she go back and get her Grade 12. By 1946, Marion had graduated from Little Flower Academy High School and from there, she attended Nursing School at St. Paul’s,

»

graduating in 1949. For her first nursing job, she accepted a post at Summerland General Hospital where she met Dorothy for the first time. Marion only stayed for one year, but she says, “All the nurses there were treated very well. We were all invited out by members of the entire community to dinners, picnics and other social events. I must have met just about everybody in town.” At the Victoria boarding house, Dorothy met her future husband, Tom

Reflections, Rejections, and Other Breakfast Foods Reflection��s,��������

t Foods

and Other Breakfas

Limited Edition

Limited Edition!! A collection of Gipp Forster’s published columns in Senior Living magazine, with other unpublished writings thrown in for good measure. A unique blend of humor and nostalgia, Gipp’s writings touch your heart in such an irresistible way, you will want to buy not only a copy for yourself, but as a wonderful gift for friends and family members. 128 pages Softcover • Published by Senior Living

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Medical Clinic, which eventually led to similar work at a big medical clinic in Victoria. “I lived in the Craigmyle guest home, which is in the shadows of Craigdarroch Castle. I entered into a whole new phase of my life, meeting new people and learning how to live away from my family,” she says. “This was a boarding house with about 30 people living there, a nice mix of older and younger people. I had my own private room and there were common areas for meals and to socialize.” It was while living here that Dorothy made history as one of the survivors of a plane crash! On December 24, 1950, a small CP Air plane, on its way to Penticton, crashed almost without warning on Okanagan Mountain. The pilot was killed instantly and the co-pilot succumbed to his injuries the next day, while the stewardess and 15 passengers all survived, none of them with serious injuries. Dorothy remembers, “This was the first air crash in the world in which both pilots died and all the passengers survived.” Marion, on the other hand, was the oldest of seven children. She was born in Calgary but moved to Vancouver when she was six, travelling all the way with her parents and younger siblings in a Model T Ford. The depression years were very tough on Marion and her family. Though her dad did find work as a grocer clerk at Eatons, the family struggled to pay the rent, so were constantly on the move. “I attended seven different schools from Grades 1 to 7,” she says. “My mother was never too well, which meant lots of work for me. I made a vow that I would never have any children of my own. Because my mother was always sick and in bed, I became a full-time babysitter by the age of 11. My job was to look after the baby.” When Marion was 13, her father informed her he had found her a job bussing and waitressing at the Trocadero Restaurant on Hastings Street. “My father had some idea I would become a restaurant owner,” she says. “This was a big blow to me as I had only one interest, and that was to become a nurse. I had watched the members of the Victoria

AUGUST 2009

5


Furness. He worked as a statistician for the Provincial Government in Victoria after receiving his commerce degree, and soon left to establish himself in Vancouver before inviting Dorothy over so they could become married. Not long after, Tom went back to Normal School in order to follow his passion of becoming a teacher. Once he had his papers, Tom was hired by the Burnaby School District and worked for a number of schools over the years, eventually rising to principal of Second Street School. While he did this, Dorothy worked for a couple of years as a stenographer until her daughters came along in 1954 and 1957. “Both of my daughters became world travellers,” she says. “My Linda and Nancy lived my dream of travelling. I became a world traveller as well, starting with Elderhostel.” Following her year in Summerland, Marion applied for postgraduate studies in Pediatrics and was accepted at Children’s Memorial Hospital in Montreal. Here she met Bert McGee, the man she would soon marry. He was graduating from McGill with a commerce degree, but after some unenjoyable jobs, he decided to apply to UBC to get his education degree. By then, he and Marion had two small children, so the whole family moved into off-campus housing. Bert’s first teaching job was at McPherson Park. The school had occasion for the teachers to get together socially, and Bert could hardly wait to introduce Marion to his new buddy, Tom. This was the second time the women’s lives crossed, and Marion and Dorothy were pleasantly surprised to see a familiar face. “We were just so delighted to meet each other again,” says Dorothy. “It was a wonderful moment.” “After that meeting, we became such good friends,” says Marion. “We would visit at each other’s homes, go for dinners and outings. Our families got to know each other. We even discovered that we had both been married on September 1, one year apart, so we often celebrated our wedding anniversaries together.” Eventually, the two families drifted apart when new jobs at different schools meant they didn’t see each other as much. And things stayed that way until the chance meeting at Safeway. By then, Dorothy’s husband had long passed away,

Marion’s husband would follow soon after, and all the children – Dorothy’s pair and Marion’s four – had grown up and moved out. The two women stayed in touch this time, forging even stronger bonds of friendship than before. Dorothy introduced Marion to Century House, a seniors’ centre in New Westminster and they started to go on trips, dinners and outings. The two also discovered a passion for learning. Together, they signed up for a series of courses at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. They attended the lectures and would then discuss what they had learned over dinner, comparing notes and discovering they did not always agree on every point. Despite these occasional divergent viewpoints, both were in total unison on what their friendship meant to them. “We both appreciate each other so much,” says Marion. “Dorothy is like a sister to me. We can chat over anything, including things that are personal, and we both know it will never go any further.” Over their lifetimes, both women had lived in a variety of homes, apartments and other dwelling places, so when they saw that a new assisted living complex was being built in New Westminster they both put their names in. “At the time, we decided we weren’t ready so we took our names back off,” says Marion. “A year later, we were ready and after a short wait I moved in during October 2008.” Two months later, Dorothy moved in. “I just love it here,” she says. “You meet the most wonderful people and get to know them and their stories. The staff here [are] just great. We have meetings to see if there are any complaints, but the meetings never last long. I am on the fourth floor and Marion is on the ground floor, which works out very well for us. We keep in touch but we both allow each other our own space. It’s a wonderful set up.” Marion agrees. “I love being here. I still have my independence, which is important to me, but if I want to connect to a larger community, I just have to open the door and go down the hall. I had lots of experience with moving in my life, and I hate moving. This is my home now.” After life’s long journey, these two friends can finally say SL they have both arrived together at home.

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


The New World of Retirement

T

he face of retirement living has changed dramatically. No longer does growing older mean living out your senior years in a rocking chair, being cared for by your children. Today, retirement living means many things to many people, and more and more private and public care facilities are re-directing their programs to support an active, aging population. Whether you’re just entering your retirement years or have been retired for awhile, the range of housing options that best suit your social and medical needs is vastly expanding. If you have good health, but are tiring of day-to-day chores and upkeep that comes with owning a house, a multitude of Independent / Supportive Living housing residences are popping up all over the province, offering a wide range of accommodation and hospitality services, such as meals and housekeeping. If your health is moderate and you need a little extra assistance performing daily tasks, like grooming or getting in and out of bed, a new level of housing care called Assisted Living is also available. And if you are having difficulty directing your own care due to degrading health, Complex Care (Residential) housing options exist to help relieve you and your loved ones from the burdens of daily caregiving. No matter what your housing or care needs, British Columbia has something for almost everyone moving into retirement. And seniors of all ages are finding that senior residences are helping to improve their quality of life.

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Retirement Home Trends Present and future developments in senior housing in North America

W

e consulted with the experts to compile a list of retirement home trends. Here are some of the most important factors affecting the senior housing industry today: • High-end luxury seniors’ residences and communities offer a vast choice of amenities: spas and stateof-the-art fitness clubs, bowling alleys and putting greens, beauty salons, art studios, Internet lounges and gourmet dining • Increased demand for more varied recreational and social activities • Expensive two-bedroom suites have the lowest vacancy rates, suggesting luxury is in demand • “Customer-centric” is the mantra of today’s retirement home industry • Ownership is viewed as an option to rental facilities, with growing interest in retirement condo ownership and life-lease • Active seniors join retirement communities at a younger age • Seniors are retiring to cottage country and eventually move into a retirement residence there (compared with Ontario as a whole, a higher percentage of the age 75 and over population in areas like Muskoka and Simcoe County are living in retirement residences) 88

SENIOR SENIOR LIVING LIVING VANCOUVER VANCOUVER && LOWER LOWER MAINLAND MAINLAND

• Meeting the needs of active seniors as well as those needing more care, allowing resident greater opportunity to age in place

commodations

• Broader range of health services with more health-care support than in the past

Destination retirement communities, with people from across the country gravitating to these purpose-built, expansive communities where residents can age in place. More choices, including condominiums, townhouses, and bungalows, arranged in small and large settings will cater to increasing consumer expectation and market demands. Larger suites in retirement residences and more varied and lavish amenities and services will be available, like home theatre in every suite. Also, a greater range of innovative programming, including opportunities for continuing education. SL

• Developers planning and building retirement residences and communities today, anticipating the amenities and services that will be in demand in 10 to 15 years • However, most of the luxurious residences being built today will be mid-range in 20 years from now when baby boomers, with their sky-is-thelimit standards, are seeking ac-

The Future of Retirement Homes in North America:


Between Friends REASON

“The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.” –Albert Einstein

Q

uestioning the perception of our mind’s abilBY DOREEN BARBER ity to discern extraordinary happenings will be debated long after those of us now living have Where does reason fit in these spheres? Reason is maindeparted this life. ly a left brain function. To allow the intuitive side or a gut reaction to navigate Common sense is not that common. If we were to ask this life for some would be insanity. The intellectual side an adult driver if it is reasonable to drink and drive, the reof our brain is like an invisible entity wanting to orches- sponse would likely vary depending on the individual’s betrate our every thought because it is havioural habits and background. rational, lucid, and balanced or so it Is it reasonable to say a Canada would seem on first impression. goose is Canadian? Yes, according To allow the intuitive The two different approaches to to a comment I heard recently made side or a gut reaction to on a U.S. television station. decision making do not seem to be connected. They battle for control As children, we learned a set of navigate this life for some of our thoughts and emotions, somevalues based on age appropriate rawould be insanity. what like handling a bomb that is tionale. As adults, a new set of prinarmed and ready to explode. ciples must have evolved or rationale would not mature. “Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are all so re“An explanation of cause is not a justification by reamarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.” son.” –C.S. Lewis –Douglas Adams Reason is gained from trial and error or experience. It Some of us have highly developed right brain hemi- is an activity that could be listed as a skill. Sound judgspheres, while others are left-brain dominant. The right ment and the ironing out of life’s wrinkles are sometimes brain uses imagination, feelings, philosophy and religion, gained personally and, at other times, because of input and presents possibilities, etc. The left brain uses logic, is from others. detail-oriented, has ordered facts, rules, and is practical For some people, reason comes as a gift, for others, it SL and safe. takes considerable effort.

AUGUST 2009

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FOREVER BY WILLIAM THOMAS

Parrots – Comedians of the Pet World

A

plucky parrot in El Salvador broke up a gang of robbers and handed them over to police. Thieves had broken into his residence in the capital of San Salvador and fled with valuables including the parrot. When police in a routine check stopped the getaway car, Paquita began squawking: “Robbery! Robbery!” These were the exact words spoken by Paquita’s owner when the thieves broke in. Suspicious, police checked the trunk and found the rest of the loot. That arrest led them to other members of the organized theft ring. Paquita made the front page of all the country’s newspapers. All pet lovers claim their cats and dogs talk to them but how many of our four-footed friends can name 100 objects and understand the concept of categories, size and absence. Alex could. As documented in her book Alex & Me, Irene Pepperberg’s 30-year research project with the brainy African grey parrot is amazing. By adding numbers, differentiating shapes, colours and textures Alex may have come closer to exhibiting human intelligence than any other animal on earth. He was also a rascal, who enjoyed dancing and needling his handler. If Pepperberg happened to greet another parrot in the laboratory first, Alex would sulk all day, refuse to cooperate and become very demanding. One such day, Alex demanded a nut and Pepperberg ignored him. Even af10

ter decades of interplay with the parrot, she was stunned to hear him say: “Want a nut. Nnn-uh-tuh.” Like, do I have to spell this out for you, Science Lady? The Guardian described Alex as “smarter than the average U.S. president.” An unfortunate and wholly unnecessary word – “average.” Winston Churchill’s parrot was not nearly as smart as Alex, but was twice as surly. Although disputed by the prime minister’s relatives, Peter Oram claims he inherited the 104-year-old bird from his father-in-law, who first sold the parrot to Churchill and then took him back when the British legend died in 1965. Old and cranky, “Charlie” is the resident celebrity at Oram’s garden centre in Surrey, England. Claiming Churchill taught him the words, Oram says that when Charlie is startled out of his sleep, he immediately screams: “Screw Hitler! Screw the Nazis!” Whether or not “Charlie” once belonged to him, Churchill would be heartily amused. Any bird that speaks like a person is a natural source of fanciful anecdotes. Like the preacher purchasing a parrot at the pet shop. “Doesn’t scream or curse, does he?” “Not at all. He’s a pious parrot. Pull that string attached to his right leg and he recites the Lord’s prayer. Pull that string attached to his left leg and he retells the story of Job.” “What happens if I pull both strings at once?” “I fall off my perch, you @#%8*/!”

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

replied the parrot. No pet has spawned more jokes than the talking parrot. Like the one about the frustrated magician working on a cruise ship in the Caribbean. With a different audience each night, the magician was able to do the same tricks repeatedly. One problem: the captain’s parrot flew around the room during the shows and understanding how the magician worked, heckled him. “Look, it’s not the same hat. Not the same hat.” “Look, he is hiding the flowers under the table. Under the table.” “All the cards are the Ace of Spades!” The magician wanted to strangle the bird but he couldn’t. It was the captain’s parrot. At the end of a show, just as the magician was going to make himself disappear in a puff of smoke, the ship hit an iceberg and went to the bottom in seconds. There were only two survivors – the magician and the parrot sharing a piece of a lifeboat. They stared at each other with hate, but did not utter a word. This went on for a day and another and another. After a week, just as the magician was about to lapse into unconsciousness, the parrot nodded at him and said: “OK, I give up. What did you do with SL the boat?” William Thomas is the author of nine books of humour including Margaret and Me about his wee Irish mother. www.williamthomas.ca


APRIL 2009 APRIL 2009

GARDENING TIPS FOR APRIL (POST GARDENING TIPS FORWINTER) APRIL (POST WINTER) Herbal Remedies For Anxiety Herbal Remedies For Anxiety

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Come Laugh With Us FILL YOUR DAYS WITH LAUGHTER. When you live at Shannon Oaks you’ll have more time to smile and do the things that matter to you most. An independent seniors living community, you’ll live well in your beautifully appointed suite and enjoy amenities and services that provide for your every need including: delicious meals, daily activities, weekly housekeeping and 24-hour emergency response from our resident managers. “ASK A PROFESSIONAL”

VICTORIA 250.595.6257

w w w. sh a n n o n o a ks. c o m Baptist Housing | Enhanced Seniors Living | Since 1964

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This month you will see some interWEBSITE EXPANSION esting INTERACTIVE additions to This month you will see some interour website. We will be adding an esting INTERACTIVE additions EVENTS section, where the com-to our website. Weinformation will be adding an munity can post about EVENTS events. section,We where upcoming will the alsocombe munity can post information about adding a “social” component called upcoming events. Wevisitors will alsocan be “SPEAK OUT” where adding a “social” component called post articles and comments. “SPEAK OUT” where visitors can articles and to comments. Apost FRESH LOOK our Readers Newsletter. Tell us what you think... A FRESH LOOK to our Readers Newsletter. Tell us what you think...

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This will be something inspirational, like the Tiger TITLEblurb on the Business Newsletter. Blah, Woods This will be something inspirational, likelife. the ITiger Blah, blah....And that’s how I look at my will Woods the Business Newsletter. Blah, I be betterblurb as a on golfer, I will be better as a person, Blah, blah....And that’s how I look at my life. I will will be better as a father, I will be a better husband, as aas golfer, I willThat’s be better a person, I I be willbetter be better a friend. the as beauty of tomorrow. There better asas a father, I willThe be alessons better husband, iswill nobe such thing a setback. I learn today I will apI will be betterand as a friend. That’s the beauty of tomorrow. There ply tomorrow, I will be better.” is no suchWoods thing as a setback. The lessons I learn today I will ap-Tiger ply tomorrow, and I will be better.” -Tiger Woods

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port that we can bring you this magaSenior Living. It’sWe because of their supzine every month. encourage you, portreader, that we bringknow you this magathe tocan let them through zine every month. We encourage you, YOUR patronage of their business that the appreciate reader, to let them you them asknow well. through YOUR patronage of their business that Advertiser A you appreciate them as well. Advertiser B Advertiser A Advertiser C Advertiser B Advertiser D Advertiser C Advertiser D

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website to track Senior Living con�nues to develop more ways to stay in [READ MORE] HOME REPAIRS (POST-WINTER) touch with our loyal readers. our rapidly We will doJoin a section that’s related to growing home renovations, HOME REPAIRS (POST-WINTER) etc. Handyman tips, etc. We will put these articles newsle�er membershiprepairs, today. We will do a section that’s related to home renovations, on our website to track them.

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Canwe write Proof 3 Can putaajoke link here. to a pop-up cartoon (pdf), or a link to a funny video on our Can we put a link to a pop-up cartoon website? SENIOR LIVING MAGAZINE: HOUSING GUIDE (pdf), or a link to a funny video on our website? JUNE 2009 Size: 1/4 Page, 3.5” w x 4.75”h, colour 100s OF ARTICLES • CURRENT & ARCHIVED Rep: RaeLeigh Buchanan Tel: 250.479.4705 | rbuchanan@seniorlivingmag.com HOUS• SENIOR MAGAZINES •| BOOKSTORE GARDEN TIPS FOR APRIL ING INFO • SENIOR FOCUSED BUSINESSES RECIPE OF THE MONTH GARDEN TIPS FOR APRIL

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repairs, etc. Handyman tips, etc. We will put these articles [READ MORE] on our website to track them. [READ MORE] HOW FULL IS YOUR LIFE? This is an inspirational, motivational article designed to be HOW FULL IS YOUR LIFE? uplifting but thoughtful at the same time. We will put this This is an inspirational, motivational article designed to be article on our website to track it. uplifting but thoughtful at the same time. We will put this [READ MORE] article on our website to track it. [READ MORE] YOU’LL WANNA SEE THIS! Something really extraordinary -- like the sand on the YOU’LL WANNA SEE THIS! ocean, or this month, a car that plunges over an embankSomething really extraordinary -- like the sand on the ment in Arizona missing a drop into a ravine by inches. ocean, or this month, a car that plunges over an embank[READ MORE] ment in Arizona missing a drop into a ravine by inches. [READ MORE] COOL WEBSITES TO VISIT (in addition to ours!) Will find interesting places readers can go on the web -COOL WEBSITES TO VISIT (in addition to ours!) starting with www.iserenity.com and www.howisitmade. Will find interesting places readers can go on the web -com starting with www.iserenity.com and www.howisitmade. com A CHANCE TO WIN ANDRE RIEU CD OR DVD No entry necessary - this month every newsletter recipiA CHANCE TO WIN ANDRE RIEU CD OR DVD ent will be entered in the draw for several CDs and DVDs. No entry necessary - this month every newsletter recipiMore details about prizes. Draw date: April 15/09 ent will be entered in the draw for several CDs and DVDs. More details about prizes. Draw date: April 15/09 TRAVEL ARTICLE We have an article to put in this issue - RB TRAVEL ARTICLE [READ MORE] We have an article to put in this issue - RB [READ MORE]

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11


The Psychology of Moving M

any people can expect to move several times during their senior years. One such happier circumstance occurs when people move closer to family, particularly grandchildren. Even the most happily settled grandparents will sometimes pick up and move clean across the country when the grandchildren move away. These grandchildren can be tiny but powerful magnets. Seniors will often choose to move because their current house and garden have become more of a burden than a joy to maintain. Downsizing from a larger house to a smaller house, condo, or retirement community is a very common reason to move. People who are clear about their own changing abilities often find making the decision to move much easier. But there is a big difference between wanting to move and thinking you should. There is a big difference between wanting to move and having to deal with other people who think you should! Selling your home and moving is a difficult enough chore even when you actually want to sell your home. Clearly, the people who have the easiest time moving are those who want to move. They have a clear idea of where they want to go and why. The process may be difficult at times but they stay focused on what they want in the end. By contrast, people who have a more difficult time selling their home and moving are those who don’t want to move but think they should. These are often people who have lived in their home for a long period of time, are very comfortable in these familiar surroundings, but may recognize it’s becoming increasingly difficult to maintain the property. One thing that keeps these people from taking action is the fact they focus on the process of moving, rather than the outcome of moving. The entire process can be quite overwhelming. Thinking of all the things that need to be dealt with, given away, donated, stored, brought along, or discarded is enough to cause even the most resolute person to freeze up. Furthermore, people can also be paralyzed by the unknown. The home they live in is familiar. What’s ’out there’ is not. Some downsizing companies have learned the best way 12

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

BY RICK HOOGENDOORN

to help a senior client along with a move is to have them move first and deal with the downsizing and selling of their home afterward. The only decisions to make, then, have to do with where you’re going and what you’re taking with you. Everything else is ‘put off’. This easier first step gets things in motion and it is easier to keep them in motion afterward. Wouldn’t you be less resistant to selling your home if you didn’t live in it anymore? Some seniors go through a grieving period when they finally decide to sell their home. Our homes are filled with


memories. The longer we’ve lived in them, the more memories we’ve accumulated and the more it may seem that the house we live in is ‘a part of us’. There is nothing wrong with wanting to remain in your own home. It’s okay to love it. It’s even okay to love it and move on anyway. For some seniors, the home they live in is the home where their children grew up. Some people see a connection between their home and a wife or husband who has since passed on. If they sell their home, will they lose that connection, or some of those memories? Many people can’t even articulate why their home means so much to them. And they’re afraid that if they talk about it too much they’ll be talked into moving. Younger people rarely experience a conversation about their need to sell their house. They’ve never imagined what it would be like to be told they need to sell “for their own good.” Remember that you have the final decision. It’s your life, and unless you are in a situation where you or some other member of your household is in some kind of danger, or your health or financial situation is so bad that you cannot be care for at home, if you don’t want to move and you don’t think you should move, don’t move. Now, if you would rather not move but you recognize it would be better if you did, that’s a different story. And again, you may be focusing on the process, instead of the outcome. You may be imagining yourself unhappy in your new place of residence when it’s entirely possible it will grow on you and you’ll be happy there. There is something to be said for choosing to move when you can, rather than waiting until you are forced to. It is a part of life that our health fails as we get older. Sometimes it’s gradual, sometimes not. Being forced to sell your home because of a sudden decline in health isn’t, in itself, very healthy. There is much to think about when considering any kind of move. Know that you’re going to be faced with a whole range of emotions, and sometimes you’re going to second guess yourself. Just remember to focus on the end result, instead of the process. The most important thing you can do, is be honest with yourself about your needs and capabilities both now and in the future. Some people are very capable and are also surrounded by friends and family members who can help keep them in their home if their health fails. Others are less connected in the community and run the risk of becoming isolated and alone if their health becomes a factor. Unfortunately, these are the same people who often overvalue their familiar surroundings and remain at home much longer than it would be wise to do so. In the latter case, when previously isolated people move, for example, into a retirement community where the social interaction is much more readily available they often blossom and become reinvigorated. Making a move should be about making your life better in some way. And that’s where your focus should be. SL

South Granville Park Lodge • Extended Care • Intermediate care, respite and convalescent care • 24 hour registered nursing • Excellent meal choice with dietician’s supervision • Extensive recreation and entertainment programs • Daily housekeeping and laundry service

1645 WEST 14TH AVENUE VANCOUVER For tours and information call

604-732-8633

email: sgplodge@telus.net

“Caring for seniors in our community for over 30 years” AUGUST 2009 VANCOUVER

Senior Living Special Housing Edition Contains articles pertaining to senior housing. Find out more about

• senior housing options and alternatives • how to determine what kind of housing is right for you • how other seniors are managing their housing • professionals, services and products available to seniors who are living independently (aging in place) • and much more

TO ORDER a copy... Please mail a cheque for $5.25 ($5 plus GST), along with your name, phone number and address, to Senior Living, 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1. We will mail you a copy of this special housing edition upon receipt of payment.

VIEW ONLINE for Free... You can view the complete special housing edition on our website -- look for the Vancouver August 2009 Edition at www.seniorlivingmag.com AUGUST 2009

13


M

Senior-Focused Realtors

any financial planners, insurance professionals, and other business people are now obtaining special designations that speak to their ability to deal with seniors’ issues. Realtors are also taking courses to better understand the senior market. In many instances these professionals will then advertise their designation, hoping to attract older clients. What you need to know is that there are great, helpful, professionals who have these designations, and great, helpful professionals who don’t. Conversely, having one of these designations is no guarantee that you’ll be dealing with an ethical person, although many of the organizations do have some kind of a Code of Ethics and will expel a member for contravention of their standards. The education being provided by organizations like the Canadian Academy of Senior Advisors is helpful and inspiring. While it is impossible for younger people to really experience what it is like to be a senior and deal with life at an older age, this education does help professionals understand and even empathize with some of the basic issues seniors face. Patience, under-

standing, respect. Perhaps it shouldn’t take courses to foster these qualities in our business community, but if that’s what it takes to better understand and serve senior clients, it’s better than nothing. Teaching business people the housing options seniors have, the downsizing issues seniors face, the decision-making challenges with regard to a move, and the health issues that may necessitate these changes, generally makes for a more helpful professional, be they a financial planner or a realtor. The best way to find a professional you trust is usually by a referral. Ask your friends. Ask your family. And if you don’t trust yourself to make the right choice, ask a friend or family member to be there when you meet the professional. Ask them if they have experience dealing with seniors. Ask them how helping a

E T I S WEB

senior move is different than helping younger people, and ask what services they provide that might be especially helpful to you. The biggest danger in listing your house is in listing your house at a price that is far too low. To avoid this, ask for a Current Market Evaluation from several realtors and, if you are still unsure, pay to have your home appraised. Do not base your price on the “assessed value.” If you are ever approached by somebody who wants to buy your home as part of a ’private deal’, especially if they are a financial professional or a real estate agent, get third-party advice from your lawyer. Even if they are a trusted friend, neighbour, or family member, obtain third-party advice from your lawyer on “private deals,” and seek out professionals who can provide you with an independent appraisal of your property. SL

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SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


T

50+ Buyers Change Housing Trends

he new generation of retirees are setting buying trends that differ significantly from the choices made by seniors a decade or so ago, say realtors who specialize in the 50-plus demographic. Today’s retirees are more active, healthier, living longer, and bring with them a staunch refusal to give in to “old age.” As a result, their buying choices reflect a desire to stay active and enjoy life to its fullest. This often means downsizing to properties with less maintenance, allowing the flexibility of travel or the pursuit of personal hobbies - some will move to smaller homes, some will renovate their existing home and others will use the equity from the sale of their home to travel. One size, as they say, does not fit all. Royal LePage president Phil Soper says Canadians aged 50-plus are defying conventional notions of old age by redefining how and where they want to live. “Today, with longer life expectancies, better health and more wealth, the 50-plus group have a plethora of options available to them and there is no longer one best practice. This group is not interested in sitting around in rocking chairs and knitting. They are more interested in white-water rafting.” Some look to 55+ residences to surround themselves with people of similar age and interests. These residences can range from private condominium dwellings and townhouses to gated communities with single dwelling rancher-style homes. Other retirees, however, enjoy the stimulation that comes from a community in which people of all ages live – these buyers want to relocate into housing developments that cater to the

broader spectrum of ages, but they still want the benefits of less maintenance In a survey, and the ability to pack their bags and one in thre e peop le aged 50-plu go, knowing their property will res said they re curn tly have m main secure and well tended in their ore house th th ey want or an absence. need. 35% would Seniors will increasingly opt for prefer to b different or uy a condos that have an array of preminew home. 1 7% would um services available, believes Ted prefer to b uild a new home. Tsiakopoulis, an Ontario economist 15% would with CMHC. The neuvo-condo prefer to re model th e ir current h will have gyms staffed with perome. 1 2 % would lik sonal trainers, theatres, pools, rese to purch a second h ase taurants, spas, concierge services, ome, allow in g s th easonal liv em and 24-hour on-site security. ing. For the more adventuresome, seasonal properties are an attractive addition to their real estate portfolio, especially for those who want to flee the rainy or overcast winters to more tropical climates for an extended period of time. They are looking for their “second home” in places like Arizona, Mexico, Costa Rica, Malaysia and even Australia. Developments are springing up in all these areas, ready to serve the needs of these Canadian snowbirds. Many people, when they hit their late 50s, begin thinking about where they want to settle in the next stage of their lives. For some, the consideration of future deteriorating health plays a big factor in their decision. They look for properties with little upkeep, that have few or no mobility barriers such as stairs, and that are part of a secure community. Rancher-style houses and condominiums with elevators are an increasing perfect fit. CORTES ISLAND, BC The marketplace is already starting to feel the effects of these buying trends. Learn � Explore � Discover And as the 50+ demographic continues to grow, the need for more housing to Free Catalogue 800.933.6339 match the lifestyles of these retirees is hollyhock.ca SL going to become even greater.

choose peace

H O L LY H O C K

AUGUST 2009

15


Walking Into San Franciso’s Golden Past STORY AND PHOTOS BY CHRIS & RICK MILLIKAN

C

onvenient public transit supports our recent series of revealing walks into San Francisco’s past. Perfectly situated at Queen Anne Hotel, our wide-range of investigations start with a Victorian Homes Walk. Our guide, Shonna, introduces us to our Victorian lodgings. “Often mistaken for a mansion, this four-story landmark began as a girl’s finishing school in 1890. Corner turret, bay windows and gabled roof reflect Queen Anne architecture.” Inside, she notes how teachers once taught ballroom dance in the lounge where guests like us now sip afternoon sherry among period antiques. “In our breakfast salon, girls once enjoyed mealtimes, and learned proper etiquette.” Strolling through Pacific Heights, we view 200 meticulously restored row houses; Shonna points out distinguished Queen Annes, ornate Italianates featuring fancy columns and rounded bay windows and Stick designs with lacy gingerbread trim. At the tour’s conclusion, we descend to lively Union

Cable car

Street and hop a bus to Fisherman’s Wharf. We enter Ghirardelli’s former chocolate factory complex and cross brick-terraced courtyards toward the waterfront. After inspecting the marine park’s vintage vessels and taking a spectacular Bay

olden Museum and G The Maritime ou the backgr nd Gate Bridge in

16

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Cruise, we savour chowder dinners and return on Powell Street’s cable car. Next morning is dedicated to roaming Golden Gate Park. Designed in the 1870s, distinctive trees and plants transformed its natural sand dunes into an urban sanctuary. After posing near the turn-of-the-century Conservatory of Flowers, we meander through Shakespearean, Japanese and Botanical Gardens – and the new Academy of Science. Joining Urban Trek in Union Square on another day, chief trekkie Anton shows us historic photos recounting, “In 1850, Mayor Geary established this square, named for pro-union rallies before and during the Civil War; that 30-metre monument commemorates Admiral Dewey’s Spanish American War victory. The sculpted Victory atop reveals a much-loved benefactor. Born into a large, poor family, Alma de Bretteville earned cash posing nude


at Mark Hopkins Institute of Art. While modelling for Victory, she became besotted with sugar heir Adolph Spreckels. Though twice her age, she married her sugar daddy five years later! Alma is affectionately known as San Francisco’s greatgrandmother.” Departing the square, everybody admires Heart Art. Four such vibrant sculptures decorate each corner, welcoming all to surrounding benches, open-air cafés, frequent concerts, art shows and impromptu protests. In an adjacent, now upscale shopping enclave, Anton grins, “Maiden Lane was once a hotbed of entertaining women – and definitely not maidens!” San Francisco’s newspaper-of-the-day reported the ramshackle collection of cheap brothels, gambling halls and saloons as “a carnival of crime.” Between the 1848 discovery of gold and 1906 earthquake, nine-blocks enclosed the infamous Barbary Coast, named after pirate-plagued North Africa. Here, sea captains “shanghaied” unsuspecting drunk and drugged seamen from bars – who eventually awoke sailing away to China! As the city rebuilt after the earthquake, the Barbary Coast fell into oblivion, soon facing laws prohibiting such districts. Next to Chinatown’s dragon-adorned Pagoda Gate, our group learns debauchery reigned here for another decade, with opium dens, houses of prostitution, gambling and crime. Nowadays, North America’s oldest and largest Chinatown encompasses 24-blocks of exotic atmosphere: pagoda-roofed buildings, strings of red lanterns and bustling markets displaying colourful fruit, vegetables and fish; specialty shops, traditional pharmacies, temples, fortune cookie factories and fine Chinese eateries. Emerging from a small bakery, we devour fresh warm egg custard tarts on the sidewalk. At Portsmouth Square, where Chinese elders play cards and chess under prolific pink cherry blossoms, we discover

»

Peace of mind, comfort and security are just part of daily life at Sunnyside Manor – your private apartment, nutritious meals, weekly housekeeping and caring staff available 24 hours a day.

Our services include recreational activities, social outings and Assisted Living care to meet your needs.

Come for a personal tour, and have lunch on us.

Call 604.531.7470 15340 - 17th Avenue White Rock, BC V4A 1T9 www.SunnysideManor.com Retirement Community A member of the Unicare Group of Companies • White Rock • West Vancouver • Nanaimo • Kelowna • Edmonton

Home Pi up an ck Retur d ns!

Proof 1 Seniors Living Magazine: Vancouver/Lower Mainland RaeLeigh Buchanan 1-877-479-4705 toll free rbuchanan@seniorlivingmag.com Aug 9 - 12 Days Its not too late! Book NOW! Marvel at our majestic Canadian Rockies as you stop to appreciate all their splendor on this tour. Highlights include a 90 minute tour of Maligne Lake, (rated one of the top ten by National Geographic), Oh Canada Eh! Dinner show, Wells Gray Nat’l Park, West Edmonton Mall, Columbia Ice Fields Tour, Royal Tyrell Museum in Drumheller. Learn all about the Canadian oil industry while touring the tar sands in Fort McMurray Alberta. $2135 PP plus GST Dble Occ. 15 meals.

Aug 29-Sep 1st. Take a ride on the Kettle Valley Steam Railway from Summerland for 90 minutes of spectacular views. Taste some of the Okanagan’s finest wines, tour Kelowna’s Jammery and Vernon’s Planet Bee Honey Farm during this short and fun four day excursion in the Okanagan. $675 Cdn plus GST PP based on Dble Occ. 4 meals. Oct 15-18th. WOW! What an explosion of color we experienced last year on this trip. We enjoyed the serene beauty of the resort at Lake Chelan so much we decided to add an extra day and take a cruise up the lake and explore the Stehekin Valley and Rainbow Falls. The Oktoberfest will still be in full swing on our last night in the Bavarian town of Leavenworth where you can take in the activities and browse the many European shops. $855 Cdn PP based on Dble Occ. No GST - 7 Meals

Bob and Teresa Marshall as Driver and Escort

Call for our full 2009 brochure!

The authors sipping sherry in San Francisco

604-596-9670 toll free 1-877-596-9670 teresa@pitmartours.com www.pitmartours.com

AUGUST 2009

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San Francisco began here as Yerba Buena, then was renamed in 1847 after the Bay. In this pueblo’s former plaza, plaques mark its first public school site and where “Stars and Stripes” first flew after the young California Republic joined the U.S. When Sam Brannan found gold on the American River, this village exploded to over 20,000. The earliest cable cars ran past this park in 1873. Using mining car technology, cable manufacturer Hallidie introduced them along Clay Street for

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When you see this logo on an advertisement in Senior Living, you will find additional information provided by this advertiser on our website. Go to www.seniorlivingmag.com and click on the ASK A PROFESSIONAL tab on the Home Page. This will take you to a table of contents of articles written by professionals who advertise in Senior Living. Is there information you would like posted in this section in the future? Let us know - we will pass the request along to the appropriate businesses and professionals with the expertise to address the subject you propose. Check back frequently for new additions as we continue to expand this new section of our website. Industries with Current Postings on

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five cents a ride. The earthquake disrupted the popular route and others. Although streetcars and buses replaced most cable cars, three lines remain as National Historic Landmarks. In the nearby Financial District at the initial Bank of America, all eyes peer through Monkey See, windows at its masMonkey Do sive vault. Anton tells us, “In 1904, Amadeo lan Ginsberg waxed poetic during Giannini founded the Bank of Italy, which became the the 1950s Beatnik era. Popping into Bank of America. Giannini introduced Café Trieste, we find a wall plastered branch banking, loaning cash to work- with 50 years of glossy photos, some ers in the back of a Green Street sa- showing Francis Copolla who wrote loon. Transporting assets hidden under The Godfather screenplay here, and a wagon load of produce, locals told Pavarotti sipping pungent coffee after how his money smelled like peaches delivering rousing arias. Across grassy Washington Square rises glorious twin after the earthquake!” Wave-like pavements recreate the spired Saints Peter and Paul Cathedral, Bay’s previous shoreline in Jackson where Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Square Historic District, one of San Monroe posed for photos after marrying at City Hall. Francisco’s oldest commercial neighbourhoods. Anton shows us 1850s warehouses that bareWHEN YOU GO ly survived the earthquake’s • www.que enanne.co raging fires. The army decided m – offers convenienc charm and e among V against blasting this area as a ictorian ho cific Heights m es of Pa. firebreak, thanks to hundreds • www.victo rianwalk.co of stored barrels of whiskey m – reveals on San F rancisco’s insights that would have stoked the distinctive restoration architecture , b e a u tiful garden inferno. Now upscale gal, mous hom s and som es. e faleries, restaurants and clubs, • www.reda ndwhite.co some of these three-story m – founde narrated c d in 1892, ruises inclu brick buildings retain cast d e one to the Gate. Golden iron shutters as fire protec• w w w.francisca tion. A nearby inscription nrestauran luscious se t.com – o describes how, in 1855, the afood sele ffers c ti o n s p a w n ith magnifi oramas of future Union General Shercent San Francis co Bay. • www.urba man established its corner ntrekusa.co m – provide walks into bank and resided on the s guided the city’s ri veting past. second floor. • www.john sgrill.com – a nation landmark im Reaching North Beach, al literary mortalized in Dashiell Ha M a we’re immersed in old ltese Falco mmett’s n; serves lu scious grille seafood an world deli coffee houses, d meats, d pasta. where European tradi• www.sfc ityguides.o rg/current_ tions remain, and haunts html – outl schedule. ines many o f where Jack Kerouac the availab guided walk le freeing tours. spun his tales, and Al-

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


Catching a bus up Telegraph Hill, Anton explains that in mid-1800, a marine telegraph stood there, two high wooden arms semaphoring ships’ arrivals. The 210-foot [64 m] Coit Tower was the legacy of Lillie Hitchcock Coit, who bequeathed one-third of her fortune to beautify her beloved city. We’d just seen a different Coit legacy in Washington Square: a sculpture of three firefighters carrying a woman. Rescued from fire as a child, riding Knickerbocker Engine Number 5 by 15 and honorary firefighter as an adult, Lillie had a lifelong relationship with firefighters. Some say the Art Deco Coit Tower resembles a fire hose nozzle, another tribute to Lillie’s heroes. Inside the tower, Diego Rivera-inspired murals depict California’s Depression Era. Stepping outside, everyone soaks up spectacular views of the Bay Bridge, the world’s longest steel highlevel bridge; Treasure Island, manmade for 1939’s Golden Gate Exposition; Yerba Buena Island, coastguard home; Alcatraz’s abandoned maximum security prison; Angel Island, where Asian immigrants once landed and the iconic Golden Gate Bridge painted international orange for visibility in fog, subtly blending with nature and enhancing the Bay’s entrance since 1937. Zigzagging down the steep Filbert Steps through lush hillside gardens to Levi Strauss Plaza and museum, we view early blue jeans exhibits detailing how Strauss and his partner initially developed riveted tough denim pants for miners. A vintage streetcar takes us along the Embarcadero. After removing earthquake damaged double-decker freeway in 1989, the beaux art Ferry Building emerged and was refurbished for artisans, gourmet shops, restaurants and outdoor Farmers Markets on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Returning near Union Square on Bay Area Rapid Transit [BART] subway, we head for century-old John’s Grill. Amid oak-panelled walls covered with photos of old San Francisco, we fork up more succulent seafood and toast the city’s SL rollicking past. AUGUST 2009

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Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland Distribution Locations

ABBOTSFORD DOWNTOWN BUSINESS ASSOC ABBOTSFORD REC CENTRE ABC RESTAURANT - MARSHALL FV REGONAL LIBRARY GREYHOUND BUS STN IGA MEDICHAIR MSA GENERAL HOSPITAL PEOPLES DRUG MART SEVEN OAKS MALL SHARES SHOPPERS DRUG MART TRIANGLE COMMUNITY CENTRE ZELLERS BURNABY ABC RESTAURANT AMICA @ RIDEAU MANOR BOB PRITTIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BONSOR COMMUNITY CENTRE BREAD GARDEN BRENTWOOD SKY TRAIN STN BURNABY GENERAL HOSPITAL CAMERON RECREATION CENTRE CANADA WAY LODGE CHOICES MARKET IN THE PARK CONFED COMM CNTR FOR 55+ EASTBURN COMMUNITY CENTRE EDMONDS COMM CENTER FOR 55+ EDMONDS PUBLIC LIBRARY EDMONDS SKYTRAIN STN EILEEN DAILEY FITNESS CENTRE GILMORE SKYTRAIN STATION HILTON HOTEL HOLDOM SKYTRAIN STATION IGA INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL HEALTH & VACCINATION CLINIC KENSINGTON ARENA LANCASTER MEDICAL LAKE CITY SKYTRAIN STATION LOUGHEED SKYTRAIN STN MCGILL PUBLIC LIBRARY MEDICHAIR METROTOWN BUS LOOP MULBERRY SENIOR’S RESIDENCE NORBURN MED CENTRE OLD ORCHARD MEDICAL CLINIC PATTERSON SKYTRAIN STN PRODUCTION WAY SKYTRAIN STN REGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES ROYAL OAK SKY TRAIN STN. SAFEWAY SPERLING SKY TRAIN STN. SFU LIBRARY SPERLING SKYTRAIN STATION STATION SQUARE MEDICAL CLINIC TIM HORTON’S WILLINGDON COMMUNITY CENTRE

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COQUITLAM BREAD GARDEN CHIMO POOL & SOCIAL REC CENTRE COQUITLAM CITY CENTRE LIBRARY COQUITLAM LIBRARY DOGWOOD PAVILION DUFFERIN SENIORS CENTRE GLEN PINE PAVILION MEDICHAIR POIRIER COMMUNITY CENTRE PARK & RIDE RESIDENCES AT BELVEDERE SHOPPERS DRUG MART SUPER VALU DELTA DELTA HOSPITAL GEORGE MACKIE LIBRARY INSIDE RACK - RICKY’S KENNEDY SENIOR’S REC CENTRE KINSMEN ASSISTED LIVING LADNER COMM CENTRE LADNER PIONEER LIBRARY LADNER PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT MCKEE SENIORS RECREATION CENTRE NORTH DELTA REC CENTRE NURSE NEXT DOOR PINEWOOD LEISURE REC CENTRE SOUTH DELTA LIBRARY SOUTH DELTA RECREATION CENTRE SUN GOD RECREATION CENTRE THE WATERFORD WINSKILL AQUATIC CENTRE FORT LANGLEY FORT LANGLEY LIBRARY IGA LANGLEY ALDERGROVE MALL BROOKSWOOD LIBRARY DOUGLAS REC CENTRE HARRISON LANDING LANGLEY LIBRARY LANGLEY SENIORS CENTRE LANGLEY SENIORS VILLAGE LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE MAGNOLIA GARDENS MARKET PLACE IGA MAIN SPOT NEWS THE RENAISSANCE RETIREMENT RESORT TIMMS COMMUNITY CENTRE WALNUT GROVE COMM CENTRE WALNUT GROVE LIBRARY MAPLE RIDGE MAPLE RIDGE HOSPITAL MAPLE RIDGE LEISURE CENTRE MAPLE RIDGE LIBRARY NEW WESTMINSTER 22ND ST SKYTRAIN STN BRAID SKYTRAIN STATION CARE POINT MEDICAL CENTRE

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

CENTENNIAL COMMUNITY CENTER CNTR OF INTEGRATION FOR AFRICAN IMMIGRANTS CENTURY HOUSE COLUMBIA ST STN EDWARD JONES HYACK HOUSE NEW WESTMINISTER QUAY NEW WESTMINSTER LIBRARY NEW WESTMINSTER SKY TRAIN STN QUEENBOROUGH COMMUNITY CENTER ROYAL COLUMBIAN HOSPITAL

MINORU ARENA MINORU SENIORS CENTRE RICHMOND ADDICTION SERVICES RICHMOND CENTRE FOR DISABILITY SEAFAIR MEDICAL CLINIC SHOPPERS DRUG MART SOUTH ARM COMMUNITY CENTRE STEVESTON COMMUNITY CENTRE THOMPSON COMMUNITY CENTRE VOLUNTEER RICHMOND INFO SERV WEST RICHMOND COMMUNITY CTR

NORTH VANCOUVER CAPILANO LIBRARY CHURCHILL HOUSE EVERGREEN HOUSING ADMINISTRATION KIWANIS LYNN MANOR KIWANIS TOWERS LION’S GATE HOSPITAL LONSDALE QUAY LONSDALE QUAY BUS LOOP LYNN VALLEY MEDICAL CLINIC MEDICAL CLINIC - 1940 LONSDALE AVE MOUNT SEYMOUR MEDICAL CLINIC NORTH SHORE COMMUNITY RESOURCES NORTH SHORE NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE NORTH VANCOUVER CITY LIBRARY NUTRITION HOUSE PARKGATE LIBRARY PEMBERTON & MARINE MEDICAL CLINIC QUEENSDALE MARKET SILVER HARBOUR MANOR SUPER VALU THE SUMMERHILL WAL MART WESTVIEW MEDICAL CLINIC

SURREY AQUATIC CENTRE ARBOURSIDE COURT BUENA VISTA LIBRARY BUY RITE FOODS CHOICES MARKET CLOVERDALE LIBRARY CLOVERDALE REC CENTRE FLEETWOOD COMMUNITY CENTRE FLEETWOOD LIBRARY GATEWAY SKYTRAIN STN GUILDFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY GUILDFORD SENIORS VILLAGE IMPERIAL PLACE KENT SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTRE KING GEORGE SKYTRAIN STN KIWANIS PARK PLACE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY MEDICHAIR NEWTON ARENA NEWTON GENERAL STORE NEWTON LIBRARY NEWTON WAVE POOL N SURREY REC CENTRE OCEAN PARK LIBRARY PEACE ARCH MEMORAIL HOSPITAL PHARMASAVE 10654 KING GEORGE PHARMASAVE 9558 - 120TH ST PHARMASAVE 15280 - 101ST AVE ROSEMARY HEIGHTS SENIORS VILL SAVE ON SCOOTERS SCOTT RD SKYTRAIN STN (N) SCOTT RD SKYTRAIN STN (S) SEMIAHMOO PUBLIC LIBRARY SHOPPERS DRUG MART SHOPPERS HOME HEALTH SOUTH SURREY ARENA SOUTH SURREY INDOOR POOL SOUTH SURREY REC CENTRE STRAWBERRY HILL LIBRARY SUNRISE PAVILLION SURREY GARDENS / SURREY VILL SURREY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL SURREY CENTRAL SKYTRAIN STN THE CHEMISTS PHARMACY TOM BINNIE PARK COMM CENTRE WESTMINSTER HOUSE WHALLEY LIBRARY WHITE ROCK/ S SURREY PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT

PITT MEADOWS PITT MEADOWS LIBRARY PITT MEADOWS REC CENTRE SHOPPER DRUG MART PORT COQUITLAM AMICA AT MAYFAIR TERRY FOX LIBRARY WILSON REC CENTRE PORT MOODY EAGLE RIDGE HOSPITAL PORT MOODY COMM SERVICES PORT MOODY LIBRARY PORT MOODY SOCIAL REC CENTRE RICHMOND BRIGHOUSE LIBRARY BUS STOP - 6390 #3 RD CAMBIE COMMUNITY CENTRE CAMBIE PUBLIC LIBRARY GARDEN CITY MED CLINIC HAMILTON COMMUNITY CENTRE IRONWOOD LIBRARY LANG CENTRE MINORU AQUATIC CENTRE

CONTINUED NEXT PAGE


MAINLAND DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS - CONTINUED VANCOUVER 1 KINGSWAY LIBRARY 29TH AVE SKY TRAIN STN 411 SENIOR’S CENTRE AMICA AT ARBUTUS MANOR ARBUTUS MALL BARCLAY MANOR BC WOMENS HOSPITAL BREAD GARDEN BRITANNIA ARENA / LIBRARY BROADWAY & BURRARD WALK IN BROCK HOUSE SOCIETY BURRARD SKYTRAIN BUS STOP - 750 BROADWAY CAPERS - 2285 4TH AVE CAPERS - 1675 ROBSON ST CAPERS MARKET CARE MEDICAL CENTRE CENTRAL MARKET - 830 THURLOW CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS COMM CNTR CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS LIBRARY CHOICES MARKET - 1202 RICHARDS CHOICES MARKET - 3493 CAMBIE ST CHOICES MARKET - 2627 16 AVE CITY SQUARE FAMILY PRACTICE COLLINGWOOD HOUSE COLLINGWOOD LIBRARY CROFTEN MANOR DENMAN COMMUNITY CTR DENMAN MALL DIAMOND HEALTH CARE CENTRE DOCTOR’S OFFICE 777 W BROADWAY DOUGLAS PARK COMM CENTRE DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTRE DUNBAR PUBLIC LIBRARY FALSE CREEK COMMUNITY CENTRE FIREHALL LIBRARY FRASERVIEW LIBRARY

FROG HOLLOW NEIGHBORHOOD GF STRONG REHABILITATION CTR GRANDVIEW TOWERS GRANVILLE ISLAND MARKET GRANVILLE MEDICAL CLINIC HASTINGS COMMUNITY CENTRE HASTINGS PUBLIC LIBRARY HOME INSTEAD - VAN, NORTHSHORE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE JOE FORTES LIBRARY JOYCE SKYTRAIN STN KENSINGTON COMMUNITY CENTRE KENSINGTON LIBRARY KERRISDALE ARENA KERRISDALE SENIORS CENTRE KERRISDALE LIBRARY KHATSALANO MED CLINIC KILLARNEY COMMUNITY CENTRE KILLARNEY MARKET KITSILANO NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE KITSILANO PUBLIC LIBRARY KIWASSA NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY LITTLE MOUNTAIN NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE LONDON DRUGS - 1187 ROBSON MAIN ENTRANCE RACK MAIN ST SKYTRAIN STN MAPLE MEDICAL CLINIC MARPOLE COMMUNITY CENTRE MARPOLE LIBRARY MEDICAL CLINIC - 1280 GRANVILLE MERCATO MALL MID-MAIN COMM HEALTH CENTRE MT PLEASANT COMMUNITY CENTRE MT PLEASANT NGHBRHD HOUSE NANAIMO SKY TRAIN STN OAKRIDGE LIBRARY

MAGAZINE

OAKRIDGE SENIOR’S CENTRE O’KEEFE SENIOR LIVING APT PARKVIEW TERRACE PHARMASAVE 595 BURRARD PLATINUM CARE RAYCAM COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW PUBLIC LIBRARY RENFREW SKY TRAIN STN RICHMOND/VAN HEALTH UNIT RILEY PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE RILEY PARK LIBRARY ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE ROYAL CENTRE MEDICAL RUPERT SKYTRAIN STN SHANNON OAKS SHOPPERS DRUG MART SIDNEY MANOR SINCLAIR CENTRE SORRENTO MARKET STADIUM SKYTRAIN STN S GRANVILLE PARK LODGE S GRANVILLE SENIOR’S CENTRE SOUTH HILL LIBRARY SOUTHVIEW HEIGHTS AND TERRACE ST PAUL HOSPITAL STRATHCONA COMMUNITY CENTRE STRATHCONA LIBRARY THUNDERBIRD COMMUNITY CENTRE TROUT LAKE COMMUNITY CENTRE UBC HOSPITAL VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY VGH EMERGENCY WATERFRONT SKY TRAIN STN WEST END AQUATIC CENTRE WEST END SENIORS NETWORK WEST POINT GREY PUBLIC LIBRARY YMCA COMMUNITY SERVICES

WEST VANCOUVER AMICA AT WEST VANCOUVER BUS STOP 2002 PARK ROYAL BUS STOP 2051 PARK ROYAL CAPERS - 2496 MARINE GLENEAGLES COMMUNITY CENTRE HOLLYBURN HOUSE SUPER VALU WEST VAN MEMORIAL LIBRARY WEST VANCOUVER COMM CENTRE WHITE ROCK HOME INSTEAD PACIFIC CARLTON SUNNYSIDE MANOR THE PENINSULA RESORT RETIREMENT LIVING

Now distributed at all Pharmasave stores throughout BC.

VANCOUVER ISLAND EDITION DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT VANCOUVER ISLAND BC

VANCOUVER EDITION DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT MAINLAND BC

Recommend a Distribution Location Near You! Senior Living is looking for convenient, high traffic distribution locations throughout the Greater Vancouver region. If you know of a place of business or activity centre that would be a convenient location for interested readers to pick up our magazine, let us know. Email: office@seniorlivingmag.com Phone 1-877-479-4705 AUGUST 2009

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Assisted Living Residences

A

ssisted Living residences combine private ac- requirements associated with medication assistance. For some seniors, moving into an Assisted Living resicommodation with support services and social activities to help seniors who may require regular dence is a logical choice. Usually they have been receiving help with daily activities to continue living as independently home care several times during the week, but the tasks of as they can. It often provides the bridge between home sup- maintaining a house and ensuring their needs are completely port and residential care. Often residents are people who no met in a timely and safe way begin to be a strain on them, and longer want or are able to live totally independently in their often their family members as well. The services and safety provided by an Assisted Living residence allow the own homes, but they aren’t candidates yet for the toresident to remain significantly independent tal care provided by Residential Care (also – longer than they may have managed called continuing care or complex care) living on their own. facilities. Health authorities require Not all residents of private pay that assisted Living residents need Instead of a sterile hospital Assisted Living residences reto be mobile or at least able to environment, Assisted Living quire significant care or assisttransfer on their own. Services ance. Many are there because you may expect at an Assisted residences are often apartment they want a simpler lifestyle Living residence include: without the worry of main• Housing (rooms with buildings with private suites. Intaining a home and they seek lockable doors in a home to stead of waiting areas and cafethe companionship of other an apartment-style building people their own age. They with private self-contained terias, there are cozy gathering also may have chosen Assuites, usually with their own areas with couches, fireplaces, sisted Living over Independbathrooms and cooking facilient Living because they want ties) gardens, and atriums. some minor help (assistance with • One to three meals and snacks medications, for example) or they an• Housekeeping ticipate the day when they may need this • Laundry help. They want to settle into a stable, comfort• Social and recreational opportunities able lifestyle and be ready for whatever comes. • 24-hour emergency response system Some residences may contract with home health agencies • Assistance with activities of daily living, if needed, such as bathing, dressing, toileting, hygiene and grooming, eating, to come in and offer personal assistance to residents. Today’s Assisted Living residences do not look like the and walking old-style nursing homes many of us are used to. Instead of a • Assistance with medications. Residences can be subsidized by government, offering sterile hospital environment, Assisted Living residences are seniors a comfortable home for 70 per cent of their after- often apartment buildings with private suites. Instead of a tax income, or privately funded, providing accommodation nurse’s station, there is a help or reception desk that hanat market rates. An increasing number of private residences dles any inquiries from residents. Instead of waiting areas are partnering with provincial health authorities to provide and cafeterias, there are cozy gathering areas with couches, units at subsidized costs. To qualify for subsidized services, fireplaces, gardens, and atriums. Dining areas can rival luxurious banquet rooms, complete you must be assessed by a case worker from the Vancouver with an experienced chef and servers. Often entertainment Island Health Authority (VIHA). Because health and safety is important to seniors, legis- is provided during or after mealtimes. Themed dinners and lation introduced by the provincial government Community elegant soirees can make up the mixture of monthly events Care and Assisted Living Act, requires all Assisted Living residents look forward to with great anticipation. Pleasresidences in British Columbia to be registered and meet ant surroundings contribute to the feeling of well-being as health and safety standards. Any health or safety complaints neighbors chat and plan their activities together. Stimulating will be investigated by the province’s Assisted Living Reg- outings may be planned by an events coordinator, with transistrar. The standards cover everything from safe building portation provided for those residents who don’t drive. For many, it’s a big relief when they can place the day to design to ensuring residents’ rooms are clean and that balanced and nutritious meals are served. They also include the day tasks in the hands of an assisted living operator. Resi22

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND


dents are free to enjoy the privacy of their own suite, entertain friends, or join in group social activities. The choice is theirs. With a positive attitude, many new friends can be made. Daily activities such as exercise programs and afternoon tea or happy hour make the time pass quickly. Special events such as bingo, sing-alongs around the grand piano, or movie nights, offer opportunities to mix and mingle with other residents. An added benefit for family members is knowing that their parent is being well cared for in a safe and comfortable environment. Visits can take on a whole new dimension when the stresses of coping with daily living are not part of SL the relationship.

Aids To Daily Living

“A

ids to Daily Living” (ADLs) are devices that help people with disabilities to function at their highest possible level and enjoy the highest possible quality of life. ADLs are also referred to as “assistive devices” or “adaptive technology.” Both government and non-profit organizations (the Red Cross, for example) provide funding to people with disabilities for ADLs. Whether or not you’re eligible for funding can be based on a number of factors, such as the type and cost of the device you need, your household income, the province (and in some cases, city) of residence, and the nature of your disability. The provincially funded Aids to Independent Living program in British Columbia loans medical equipment, free of charge. Clients must be referred by an occupational therapist, homecare nurse, physiotherapist, or other health unit staff and must also undergo a financial eligibility test. For those who do not qualify for funding or need devices not funded by the program, a variety of ADL products can be purchased through medical supply stores. These stores carry hundreds of products such as canes, walkers, scooters, special chairs, grab bars and poles, stairlifts, health monitors, transfer devices, bathing apparatus, grooming and eating utensils, therapeutic beds and pillows, exercise equipment, ramps, stair lifts, and more. SL

Are you a Care Giver or expect to be one?

You are not alone! Embrace the Journey - A Care Giver’s Story

96 pages Softcover 5.5” x 8.5” Price $14.95

Valerie Green’s personal story as a care giver to her elderly parents is the most relevant book on “aging in place” I have read to date. It provides a powerful insight into the challenges faced by every care giver. It unveils the challenges, heartaches, struggles and agonizing decisions that often need to be made along the way. If you are currently a care giver, or anticipate being one in the near future, this book is a must-read. - Publisher Barbara Risto, Senior Living magazine

To order, please send cheque for $19.84 ($14.95 plus $3.95 S&H & GST) payable to Senior Living. Please include your clearly written shipping address and phone number. MAIL TO: Embrace Book Offer c/o Senior Living 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

Allow two weeks for shipping.

AUGUST 2009

23


Somewhere to Sleep T BY NADINE JONES

he issue of access to quality care in our senior years touches all of us, sooner or later. Unfortunately, increasing costs and decreasing government funding have made beds in both private and subsidized not-for-profit care facilities harder to pay for and harder to find for seniors needing these services in B.C. “Government funding is contributing less and less to our costs, while our needs continually increase,” affirmed Deborah Geogan, Administrator of the 151-bed, non-profit Rosewood Manor in the Vancouver suburb of Richmond. “Our special case unit, opened in 2006 for dementia patients, has improved the lives of those residents. But the unit wouldn’t have been possible without our Rosewood Manor Care Foundation, established in 2000 in cooperation with Vancouver Coastal Health. We must raise money to augment care and services for our residents.” B.C. boasts many care facilities, both private and subsidized, but the majority have long waiting lists and seniors usually don’t get their first choice of facility when they want or need care. The Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Health Authorities govern subsidized facilities. To be considered for care, a health authority professional assessor must first evaluate each client’s level of need. At that time, the level of care is decided, and location preferences of the client are noted. Occasionally, preference and availability coincide, but often a patient in need is placed in the area’s first available bed, and then can request a move to his or her first-choice – a transfer that may take years. While an equal combination of money, health and avail24

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

ability govern whether or not a senior finds accommodation when needed, lack of availability means longer waiting lists. And long lists have consequences for the health of seniors who eventually find appropriate beds. In fact, there was a 60 per cent increase in the mortality rate for seniors in residential care between 2001 and 2006 - not because of negligence, but an unfortunate outcome of long waiting lists. Seniors were, and continue to be, in worse health by the time a bed is found. An alternative to residential care is user-paid home care, which the present government has described as “an appropriate substitute for residential care.” As access to residential care has decreased, funding to home care should have increased. But according to a report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, between 2001 and 2007 there was a 30 per cent decrease in home support for seniors 75 years and older. It is estimated that chronic conditions such as diabetes, arthritis and heart disease comprise two-thirds of admissions to hospitals, where seniors often wait for residential care beds to become available. Known as “Bed Blockers,” these seniors occupy acute care spaces because they can’t be admitted into subsidized or private care. If facilities (which used to be classified as either Intermediate or Long-Term Care, but are now collectively referred to as Complex Care) were more accessible and more adequately funded, it would reduce the pressure on the province’s primary and acute care systems, which are both woefully overcrowded. Eighty-one-year-old Rachel pre-registered (with a $100 deposit) at a private facility. After a six-month wait, her


name rose to the top of the list, but she wasn’t ready to give up her home; she declined the accommodation. Her name remained on the list, although no longer at the top. At the beginning of July, Rachel had a fall in her home and was ambulanced to hospital, where she continues to occupy an acute care bed. Because she had postponed moving into the private care facility, she will now have to wait until a rehab bed within the hospital system becomes available. Some seniors are fortunate and able to move into their preferred private care facility. Maxine Howarth, 87, is such a tenant. Wanting the safety and security of a shared residence, she moved into her first choice retirement residence. “There is not one thing I don’t like,” she says. “I have company when I want it, and I can be a recluse in my suite if I so choose. I feel safe. There are lots of planned recreational activities. I could be busy all the time. The food is great, the main meal is provided daily and I’m happy.”

While an equal combination of money, health and availability govern whether or not a senior finds accommodation when needed, lack of availability means longer waiting lists. Costs at Maxine’s home range from $2,410 a month for a studio suite to $3,650 monthly for a two-bedroom suite. For an extra person, there is a $550-a-month charged, and any special care is paid for by the resident. Presently the facility houses 123 people: six couples, 92 women and 19 male tenants. At Rosewood Manor, Bea Skorstengard is a model tenant. “Bea is our fundraising poster girl for the Foundation,” quipped Megan Kinghorn, the Recreation and Volunteer Manager. Bea, 94, is a registered nurse who trained at Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster and has nursed across Canada both in hospitals and privately. She has one son and a granddaughter who live nearby. “I do wish I had more visitors,” she quietly whispers. “You can be lonely in a crowd.” Fortunately, her new home offers a variety of programs. For fun and relaxation, Bea has learned to play Tone Bells. Cost at this non-profit facility ranges from $29.90 to $71.80 per diem based on taxable income. These are examples of the kind of facilities, which may or may not be available in your area. Taking the time to do some advanced research on available options will help you SL make informed decisions when the time comes.

Imagine condominium living in the heart of White Rock. Peace of mind, comfort and security, nutritious meals, weekly housekeeping and caring staff. Just some of the exciting features at the elegant Pacific Carlton.

Come for a personal tour, and have lunch on us.

Call Call 604.531.1160 604.531.1160 15366 - 17th Avenue White Rock, BC V4A 1T9 www.PacificCarlton.com

Retirement Community

A member of the Unicare Group of Companies • White Rock • West Vancouver • Nanaimo • Kelowna • Edmonton

Proof 2 Seniors Living Magazine: Vancouver/Lower Mainland RaeLeigh Buchanan 1-877-479-4705 toll free rbuchanan@seniorlivingmag.com

• Support Services • Housing Services • Community Education • Volunteer Opportunities • Province wide web-based seniors housing directory • One on one housing counseling • Community education on the housing and services needs of seniors including Housing Counselor training • Support Services for seniors residing in New Westminster • Temporary Housing and Outreach Services to those who are homeless or at risk of homelessness (BC Lower Mainland)

Encouraging, informing, and supporting the independence and wellness of the older adult.

209-800 McBride Blvd., New Westminster BC

604-520-6621

www.seniorservicessociety.ca

Email: info@senior services society.ca AUGUST 2009

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Complex Care Residences

F

or individuals already disabled to the point of requiring daily nursing care as well as other support services, continuing care facilities provide comprehensive care services in a single setting. While most older persons and their families see continuing care usually as a last resort, it may in fact be the best setting for disabled persons with multiple problems, requiring multiple types of services. The Application Process For Complex Care Facilities BC has a provincewide, single point of entry system to manage how seniors access facilities providing complex care. This program applies to all five health regions, including Vancouver Coastal Health. Almost all complex care services for seniors, including home care, adult day centres, residential care, respite care, and specialized services are available by contacting the Home & Community Care office in your region. This office can be located by looking in the Yellow Pages. In the light blue pages, which contain provincial resources, you will find several pages with the title “HEALTH AUTHORITIES” at the top. The offices within the telephone directory’s region will be listed by municipality under “Home & Community Care.” By calling the toll-free number 1-888533-2273, you can obtain the office phone numbers of other municipalities outside your region. This should put you in contact with the appropriate office and an intake worker or case manager will be able to take your call, answer your questions and get the process started for you. They will set an appointment to see you for an assessment of your physical, emotional, and psychological status. This includes memory and other cognitive functions as well as your ability to perform tasks (referred to as Activities of Daily Living or ADLs) such as 26

bathing, dressing, feeding, grooming, toileting, medicine taking, shopping, cooking and cleaning. The case manager also looks at the supports that are in place to assist the caregiver and will take into consideration the level of stress the caregiver may be under. People who are assessed as requiring complex care must fit certain requirements in order to be eligible. The case manager can explain these requirements. People who do not qualify for complex care, may qualify for assisted living. (Assisted living is for people who can direct their own care but need some help with one or two daily living tasks. They need to be mobile or at least able to transfer on their own.) If a case manager feels that a person is in need a complex care placement, and the client is willing to go into care in three months or less, their name is submitted to the placement committee in that health authority’s region. If the client prefers a placement in a region in the province other than the one they currently live in, they can request this. However, they may have to first be placed in a facility in their immediate area and then put on a transfer list to the other region, which is under the direction of a different health authority. The client will be asked to select their preferred facility. The committee will attempt to match the client with this facility, but if a bed is not available in that facility the client may need to accept a bed in a different facility and put their name on a transfer list for when a bed does become available in the preferred facility, which can be any length of time. If the client refuses an offered bed, their name will be dropped from the placement process. Admission is based on need and the acuteness of the situation, not the length of time the person is on the waitlist. There is also a loose rotation system whereby a facility will offer

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Campuses Of Care Residences

C

ampuses of Care facilities combine all three levels of care – independent living, assisted living and continuing care – in a single setting. Often this is referred to as “aging in place” since the structure allows an individual to move from one care option to the next as their health needs change. Under one roof, they can be assured the independence of retirement home living and the security of long term care. As we age and our care needs change, some of us may need all three of these housing options. Moving to a new home in a new community can be stressful, so campuses of care offer different care options where seniors can move from one part of the development to another depending on the level of care required. If a bed is not immediately available in the residential care area, an alternative temporary care plan can usually be created in assisted living until the bed becomes available, thus making the transition as smooth as possible This option is of great benefit to couples whose care needs are different. The campus of care option allows the couple to live on the same site where they can visit one another and have meals together.

the first available bed to someone in the hospital, the next available bed to someone in the community and the next bed to someone waiting for their preferred choice. However, this system is often interrupted by factors such as hospital discharge needs, community emergencies, cultural factors, particular skills offered at the facility, etc. SL


Adapting s d e fi i s s a l C Your Home F ew people have a perfect home, but minor changes can make life easier and safer for someone who may have some mobility limitations. To avoid trips and falls, remove loose mats, install more lighting and make sure there’s adequate space to maneuver between furniture. Consider installing a second railing on stairs and ramps, and install grab bars in areas like around the tub, toilet and shower. Either repair or clearly mark floor and walkway areas that are uneven. To make it easier to open closets, drawers and doors, install “D” shaped handles, or lever-type door knobs. Lever-type taps in the kitchen and bathroom are easier to manipulate than round ones. To adapt your kitchen, choose appliances that are easy to use and maintain. They should have control knobs that are easy to reach, turn, push or pull. The same goes for large appliances like stoves, washers and dryers, etc. Control settings should be easy to read. Buy appliances that are easy to clean. Raise or lower the work surfaces in your kitchen to heights that require minimal bending. Allow for sitting rather than standing in areas where tasks may take a bit of time. People often find it difficult to reach very low or high cupboards. Adjusting the shelving so that frequently used items are within comfortable reach can help. Shelves mounted on rollers can increase access and avoid straining to reach items at the back of the storage area. They also require less effort to pull out. Pivoting or revolving shelves can make corner areas more accessible. In the bathroom, raise your sink and counters to a height that eliminates stooping. Locate faucets and taps to the front or side for easier access. Raised toilets make it easier to move

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from a standing position to sitting and vice versa. Transfer benches make getting in and out of tubs easier and allow you to remain seated while in the tub. Installing a walk-in bathtub creates easier, safer access than a conventional tub. Handheld showers allow you to direct water where needed. Install non-slip flooring and bath surfaces. Remote controls make operating the TV, video and music systems easier. Consider a cordless phone (with 2-4 handsets so you can have one in each room) that has a speaker option for better grip and hands-free operation. Wider door and doorways will help accommodate scooters, wheelchairs and walkers. Install peepholes and an intercom

system so you can see and talk with whoever is outside your door without opening it. Grab bars are a very helpful feature for the bathroom. A physiotherapist can tell you the best place to position them. A very helpful free publication called Maintaining Seniors’ Independence Through Home Adaptations: A Self Assessment Guide is available from CMHC. This large print booklet describes various adaptations with checklists to help a senior understand the various possibilities that exist to make mobility around the home easier and safer. The publication can be read or downloaded from their website (www. cmhc.ca). A printed copy can be ordered by calling 1-800-668-2642. SL

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27


Mind GAMES

Crossword PUZZLE

Down

Across 1. Opposition to war 7. Incite 11. ----- of Athens (Shakespeare) 12. Easily carried 14. Homeric poem 15. Female name 16. Jazz background 17. Thank you (French) 18. River in central Europe 19. Dread 20. Hydrated magnesium silicate 22. Himalayan monster 23. Corrodes 26. Keen 28. Immature newts 31. Line of seats 32. Having legal force 33. Woven hair 34. King 37. Aggressive remark 38. Wombs

28

39. Vicious expression 41. Clergyman 43. Language spoken south of Lake Chad 44. In a soaking fashion 45. Crematory heap of wood 46. Body of students who graduate together 47. Collection of things for public display 49. Betrays 52. Perjurer 54. Wrap up 57. Dismounted 58. William Howard ----, former President 59. Pan-fry 60. Impress forcefully 61. Plant-sucking insect 62. Better 63. Rustlers

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

1. Large sum of money 2. Arabian chief 3. Does together (2-4) 4. Republic in S Asia 5. Moved very fast 6. Wealthy 7. 20th president of the U.S. 8. Off-Broadway theater award 9. Russian nuclear submarine 10. Thaw 11. Wood 13. Less well cooked 15. Nearby 21. Female name 24. Main artery 25. Chirp 27. Enormous 29. Pixie 30. Fierce person 35. Celestial body such as Cygnus X1 (1-3,4) 36. Gemsbok 38. City in E Brazil 39. Sets of programs 40. Arouse to a sense of danger 42. Wearing a veil 44. Ballroom dance 45. Micronesian island 48. Passover 50. Simpleton (Austr) 51. Cyclical water flow 53. Small number (1,3) 55. German river 56. “Taxation without representation” lawyer ANSWERS


Photo: Jason van der Valk

ASK

Goldie

BY GOLDIE CARLOW, M.ED

Dear Goldie: What can I do to influence a family member’s irresponsible behaviour? My oldest grandson is in his early thirties and seems determined to meet self-destruction. He has a good education and is employed with a satisfactory work record. It’s his free time that I am concerned about. He drives an expensive, high-powered car and speeds excessively. The police have cautioned him and he has been given numerous speeding tickets. So far, he hasn’t injured anyone, but I fear it is only a matter of time before he kills himself or someone else. Goldie, I love him dearly and have a good relationship with him. Is there any way to help him? –H.B. Dear H.B.: It is difficult to see someone you love risk his life so irresponsibly. One thing in your favour to help your grandson is that you have maintained a good relationship. Communication is your best method of getting through to him about the seriousness of this matter. But it may take persistent effort on Senior Peer Counselling Centres (Lower Mainland) New Westminster 604-519-1064 North Vancouver 604-987-8138 Burnaby 604-291-2258 Richmond 604-279-7034 Vancouver West End 604-669-7339 Coquitlam – Tri-Cities 604-945-4480 Vancouver Westside 604-736-3588

Goldie Carlow is a retired registered nurse, clinical counsellor and senior peer counselling trainer. Send letters to Senior Living, Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria, BC V8T 2C1.

your part. Begin the process of helping by emphasizing the importance of your relationship. He is your oldest grandson, so there is an element of dependency should you ever need help. Will he be there for you? Tell him he is also setting a dangerous example for younger family members who may lack his driving experience. Would he want one of them to die by mimicking his behaviour behind the wheel? Also, discuss the chance of a severely debilitating accident. Question his acceptance of a future as an invalid from this time forward with no chance of recovery. Finally, does he want to cause another person’s death, and live with a prison record and guilt for the rest of his life? You can communicate in a good relationship. Also, he loves you and that will encourage him to listen. He is a carefree spirit, but you can help him to see that he has a responsibility to care for other people and himself on life’s journey. Dear Goldie: I am a widower in my 70s in good health and living an active lifestyle.

I would like to travel in Europe and Asia, while I am healthy and able. My problem is finding a suitable travelling companion for company and a degree of safety. I have a friend of three years who is physically and financially fit, and has expressed an interest in accompanying me. We have become close friends, enjoying similar interests and entertainment. At the same time, each of us is very independent. My worry is that being in such close contact during our travels, we might lose that cherished independence. I don’t want to spoil our great friendship either. –K.L. Dear K.L.: Your options need serious contemplation. The fact that you are questioning your travel companion indicates your hesitancy. The two of you need to discuss these worries thoroughly before making final plans. After your few years of friendship, you must each be aware of any habits that could upset you in a more confined situation. Face these matters honestly and discuss them openly so neither of you will experience problems later. If doubt still exists, then it may be wise to rethink your travel plans, and maintain the friendship you have enjoyed. Only you can decide about sharing your trip. Perhaps a weekend trip together will bring clarity to you. SL Bon voyage!

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Mail to: Senior Living 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1 AUGUST 2009

29


E T I S WEB

Visit Senior www.seniorlivingmag.com

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MY PATCHWORK LIFE

TO MOVE OR NOT TO MOVE?

A Helpful Residential Options Guide for Seniors

If you are a senior who has been wondering lately whether you should consider moving - then this is the book that can help you ask the right questions and find the solution that is right for you. Maybe you find the maintenance of your current home more difficult due to diminishing ability or energy, or you simply want a lifestyle that allows you more freedom and less responsibility. A handy reference guide for seniors and their families wrestling with the issues around whether relocation is the best option. Helpful, easy to read information and suggestions to help you understand the decisions that need to be made and some of the solutions possible. Published by Senior Living. 128 pages.

by Patricia O’Connor

After training as a fashion model in Dublin Patricia O’Connor travelled Europe and the US, working for many top designers, then several years as a popular TV presenter, followed by a career as a stockbroker and real estate agent.182 pages.

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MORNING LIGHT - Triumph at Sea & Tragedy on Everest by Margaret Griffiths

In the spring of 1982, 68-yearold George Griffiths sailed solo from Britain to Barbados, where he was met by his two sons.Six months later, Blair was dead, crushed by a six-storey wall of ice. In 1985, George Griffiths trekked with his grandson to Everest Base Camp, where he found peace. Published 2008 by Rocky Mountain Books. 288 pages. Hardcover.

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REFLECTIONS, REJECTIONS AND OTHER BREAKFAST FOODS by Gipp Forster

A collection of Gipp Forster’s published columns in Senior Living magazine, with other unpublished writings thrown in for good measure.

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RED TOMATOES by Les MacNeill

In 2001, a brutal attack while sailing the South Pacific, left Les MacNeill with 8 skull fractures, severe brain trauma, and a ruptured eye. Although not expected to live, he wrote this story of the trip, his recovery, and how he lives with his injuries. 100 pages. Price $14.95

30

THE SPOILS OF ANGEL’S WAR by Dave Sheed

EMBRACE THE JOURNEY - A Care Giver’s Story by Valerie Green

The very personal story of her own journey as a care giver to her elderly parents. Relevant for numerous adult children who are faced with a similar challenge. 96 pages.

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IDENTITY THEFT: In Your Good Name by George Greenwood

One in four Canadians has been directly affected or knows someone who has been a victim of identity theft. The best prevention is to be aware of the problem and how it is carried out. 173 pages. Price $26.95

THE SEARCH FOR JACQUELINE

By Patricia O’Connor

The search for the truth behind the reported death of the mother of top model Annie O’Hanlon. Annie receives an urgent call from journalist Dermot Moore who believes her mother Jacqueline is still alive.

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NUDE ON A FENCE by Eliza Hemingway

Fourteen short stories about people in compromising situations similar to being caught nude on a fence. Some are humorous, others poignant. 269 pages.

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The story unfolds in England at the beginning of WWII. Angela Gibson, affectionately known as Angel, finds out that it isn’t always the plans that we make for our life, sometimes it’s the plans that life makes for us that determines the course of our life. 144 pages.

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NATURE’S BOUNTY: Why certain foods are so good for you by Dr. Bala Naidoo

Reduce the risks of heart disease, cancer, type-2 diabetes and obesity by choosing your food carefully. 176 pages.

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NATURE’S BOUNTY: More about foods for a longer and healthier life by Dr. Bala Naidoo

By choosing your food properly, you can reduce the risks of heart disease, cancer, type-2 diabetes and obesity. 168 pages.

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GIPP FORSTER’S COLLECTED RAMBLINGS by Gipp Forster

A collage of over 150 anecdotes and insightful ruminations on life’s experiences, first aired on C-FAX radio, now provided in print format for your reading enjoyment. 188 pages.

Price $10.00

Purchase these items online at www.seniorlivingmag.com

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

GST and Shipping Costs will apply. Please allow 2 weeks for delivery


BBB Better Better Better Better

Business Business Business Business

Bureau Bureau Bureau Bureau

SCAM ALERT

BY LYNDA PASACRETA

Door-to-Door Alarm Sales Tactics Alarm Homeowners

B

etter Business Bureau is ume? Do he or she ignore you despite check with the company to verify this warning consumers to be saying you are not interested? Find a person is an employee. extremely cautious Ask for a licence. Security when answering the door to systems sellers are required to travelling alarm system salesSome unscrupulous door-tobe licensed by the Ministry of persons. BBB has received Public Safety and Security and complaints from homeowners door sellers will put pressure the seller is required to prowho were subjected to highon you to close the deal at vide proof. The Ministry also pressure sales tactics, and handles complaints from both felt deceived by the salesperthat moment, and try to individuals and businesses. To son into buying an expensive learn more go to: www.pssg. alarm system. entice you with special offers. SL gov.bc.ca Reports from consumers allege that representatives For more advice and to are going door-to-door and are stating affiliation with well-known way to end the conversation quickly to check out company reports, go to www. security system companies in order avoid long, drawn-out pressure sales bbb.org to persuade them to sign up for their pitches. services. Concerns include the aggresVerify the individual. If you are insive sales tactics to install the security systems, pricing issues, and further terested in buying from a door-to-door Lynda Pasacreta is President of the problems with contracts, which lock- seller, get everything in writing includ- Better Business Bureau of Mainland B.C. ing price, warranty and all conditions. Contact the BBB to check a company rein consumers to long-term service. port or Buyers’ Tip before you purchase According to the RCMP, consum- Tell the salesperson you will check it or invest. www.bbbvan.org or 604-682ers were offered time-sensitive deals out and get back to him. Get the busi- 2711. To contact Lynda Pasacreta, e-mail that included free installation and ness card from the individual and her at president@bbbvan.org were promised that their security system would be linked directly to local info@platinum-care.com • www.platinum-care.com RCMP and ambulance services, which RECEIVE (604)668-5929 CARE IN • 1-888-308-7971 is not possible in British Columbia. THE COMFORT OF HOME BBB advises consumers to do their due diligence prior to making any deProviding your family with superior and reliable cisions on home security systems: live-in & live-out caregivers, care-aids and nannies. Be aware of pressure sales tactics. Some unscrupulous door-to-door sellers will put pressure on you to close the deal at that moment, and try to entice you with special offers. Listen to his or her tone. Does it increase in vol-

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WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE?

W

hen I was a little boy, I used to think life would be forever. Adults would always be adults; and children would always be children. I thought that any pet I might be fortunate enough to have, no matter what species, would always be there as a friend and companion. I thought every child in the world could speak English and had to go to bed at the exact same time, but adults had to stay up long after it became dark. I honestly believed a cow could jump over the moon, and the moon was made of cheese. I also believed if a tiger ran around a tree long enough, it would turn into melted butter. I believed in the tooth fairy too. But I could never understand why she wanted kids’ teeth, and I wondered what she did with them. Santa Claus was to be looked forward to, but also feared because he was the father of mystery. Goblins only came out on Halloween. I believed that one day I would be big enough to save all the turkeys at Thanksgiving. A penny was a marvellous adventure, and a nickel was the greatest gift in the world, if I was allowed to spend it! Cowboys of the silver screen became babysitters on Saturday afternoons. Hopalong Cassidy, Roy Rogers and Gabby Hayes were more real than my sister; and their horses far smarter than my older brother. Everything was so large then. Snowbanks were larger, rooms were larger, and adults were larger than life. 32

Imagination was king, and a little boy could be anything he wanted to be: a pirate, a soldier, an Indian, a cowboy, an explorer or even Tarzan. Little girls played with dolls. But they weren’t just dolls. They were real children to children who pretended to be mothers. Fairy tales were real. Pinocchio was a puppet and, yet, he was a real boy too! Dogs could talk and stuffed toys told of undreamed adventures. Lead soldiers could win wars and even come back to life after being killed, if you wanted them to.

Imagination was king, and a little boy could be anything he wanted to be: a pirate, a soldier, an Indian, a cowboy, an explorer or even Tarzan. It was a world within the world made of sugar and ice cream, “may I,” and tag. Now, these many years later, I often go back there to visit. Just an old man seated on the bench of memory in a long ago time when little boys’ feet smelled and their noses ran. I play with the shadows, and giggle when I hide, waiting to be found. Nothing was impossible there. It was a land of giants and a land of rules and a land of enchantment; a place that would never end and I would never have to leave it. Things would always remain the same. But then truth and reality coaxed me

SENIOR LIVING VANCOUVER & LOWER MAINLAND

Photo: Krystle Wiseman

Reflections THEN & NOW

BY GIPP FORSTER

away from that land; and I crossed the sea to the land of endeavour and determination. Now, as I await even another land, I hear the call of that first life. The season of the child, the spring of boyhood, the place where worry was held by adults and play was the treasure of children. A place that still calls when my mind and heart take time to listen. Oh, indeed, being a child was a fantasy that insisted on being real, and imagination was a constant companion that stayed close 24 hours a day. It was a time when weeds grew with the flowers and only adults were aware of it. We kids were too busy believing we would always be kids to take notice of or count the years. And then one day, we left that field to scale the mountains that surrounded us. And the mountains took us farther and farther away from the valley. Until we wondered and wonder still, was that valley real or did we only imagine it? Now, from the mountain peaks, we look down searching for the valley. And the lyrics of songwriters whisper to us: “Where have all the flowers gone? The answer my friend is blowing in the wind. The answer is blowing in the wind.” SL Indeed, it is!


BC EDITION

Published by Senior Living

JANUARY 2009

14.95 Buy it now! �

REG. PRICE: $

ONLY

$

9.95

To Move or Not to Move? A Helpful Guide for Seniors Considering Their Residential Options

If you are a senior who has been wondering lately whether you should consider moving - either because you find the maintenance of your current home more difficult due to diminishing ability or energy, or you simply want a lifestyle that allows you more freedom and less responsibility - then this is the book that can help you ask the right questions and find the solution that is right for you. • What residential options are available? • Define your current situation - What residential option is right for you? • How to research and assess Independent and Assisted Living residences. • What do Independent, Assisted Living and Complex Care facilities have to offer? • How much does it cost to live in an Assisted Living residence? What subsidies are available? • Thinking of moving in with family members? Questions to consider before making your decision. • Are there any other residential options besides Independent, Assisted Living and Complex Care facilities? • If you choose to stay in your own home, what are your options and what should you plan for? • Who can help you decide what you can or cannot afford? • Funding sources available to seniors - tax deductions, housing subsidies, home care subsidies, equipment loan programs, renovation grants, etc. • Selling your home - how to find the right realtor or relocation services to assist your move. • Downsizing - Where do you start? How do you proceed? • Adapting your home to meet your mobility needs - tips and suggestions • Hiring home care services; do it yourself or hire an agency? • Legal matters - how to make sure you receive the care you desire should you not be able to communicate due to some incapacitating condition • AND MUCH MORE Advice from professionals who are experts in the area of assisting seniors with their relocation

questions and concerns. A handy reference guide for seniors and their families wrestling with the issues around whether relocation is the best option. This 128-page book provides helpful, easy to read information and suggestions to help seniors and their families understand the decisions they need to make.

ORDER FORM - “To Move” Name_______________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________ City_________________________________ Prov ___________ Postal Code_______________ Phone _____________________

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Read my article on the Senior Living website at www.seniorlivingmag.com

August 2009 Senior Living Magazine Vancouver Edition  

50+ Active Lifestyle Magazine for Vancouver & Mainland BC Canada

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