Page 1

OCTOBER 2011 TM

Vancouver’s 50+ Active Lifestyle Magazine

Beauty & Fashion

Looking Your Best Fall Trends

www.seniorlivingmag.com


������������������������������� ������������� ��������������� Senior Living Housing Directory is a valuable online resource for seniors and family members looking for alternative housing to match their desired lifestyle, or medical/mobility needs. Over 500 senior residences and housing communities throughout BC are listed in this comprehensive directory. Compare services, amenities, and prices. Sort your selection by region, or type of care. This directory is published by Senior Living, a monthly magazine distributed to approximately 850 locations across BC.

����������������������������������������

�����������������������

������������������������� ������������������������� �������������������������� �������������������� ������������������������� �������������������

����������������� ����������������������� Search For Housing

Senior Living’s online searchable senior housing directory is a perfect complement to its semi-annual senior housing special editions in February and August. Senior Living also publishes a 128 page book called “To Move or Not to Move? A Helpful Guide for Seniors Considering Their Residential Options.” We have sold over 3,000 copies of this book. No other magazine we know of has such a comprehensive, interconnected group of housing resources. For more information about any of these products or services, call (250)479-4705 or toll-free 1-877-479-4705. Or email office@seniorlivingmag.com

Housing Definitions Assess Your Needs Articles

����������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������� ����������������

������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������


Northern sound

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

1


OCTOBER 2011

Be Your Best ������������� At Any Age

www.seniorlivingmag.com

���������������� ���������������������������������� ��������������������������������� ������������������������������������ ������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� �������������������������� ���������������������������������� ��������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ������������������������������ ����������������������������������� �������������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ����������������������������� ��������������������������������� ��������������������������������� ����������������������������������� �������������������������������������� ������������������������������ ��������������������� ������������������������������� �������������������������� ������������������������������������ ��������������������������������� ����������������������������������� ������������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ������������������������������������ �������������������������������������� ����������������������������������� ����������������������������������� ��������������� �������������������������������� �������������������������������������� ������������������� �������������������������������� ����������������������������������� ������������������������������������� ����������������������������������� �������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� ����������������������������� �������������������������������������� ��������������������������������� ������������������������������ �������������� 2

SENIOR LIVING

FEATURES

COLUMNS 4 The Family Caregiver

6 A Dream Come True

by Barbara Small

A young Korean girl grows up to become a beautiful Canadian fashion model.

26 Forever Young by William Thomas

8 Fall & Winter Trends

Fashions for women and men not to be missed this season.

30 BBB Scam Alert

10 Seasonal Beauty Tips

31 Ask Goldie

by Lynda Pasacreta by Goldie Carlow

Classy cosmetic trends for beauty conscious maturing women.

32 Reflections: Then & Now

12 Fashion Through the Ages

by Gipp Forster

A look back on how our clothing choices have changed over the decades.

14 Dressing Well at Any Age

Fashion forward looks without looking ridiculous.

18 Having a Riot

British Columbia Entertainment Hall of Famer Bill Reiter may be retired, but he’s still having fun!

20 Horse Tales

Cover Photo: Fashion model Yuna Seder. Story page 6. Photo: Philippe Martin-Morice

June Henning knew from an early age that horses were in her blood.

22 Cooking in Liguria

A mouth-watering Italian adventure.

28 A Pizza Garden

An abandoned railway line gets a new lease on life. Senior Living (Vancouver & Lower Mainland) is published by Stratis Publishing. Publisher Barbara Risto Editor Bobbie Jo Reid editor@seniorlivingmag.com Ad Coordinator & Designer Steffany Gundling Copy Editor Allyson Mantle Advertising Manager Barry Risto 250-479-4705 ext 101 Toll-free 1-877-479-4705 sales@seniorlivingmag.com Ad Sales Staff Mitch Desrochers 604-910-8100 Ann Lester 250-390-1805 Mathieu Powell 250-479-4705 ext 104 Barry Risto 250-479-4705 ext 101 WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Head Office Contact Information: Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1 Phone 250-479-4705 Fax 250-479-4808 Toll-free 1-877-479-4705 E-mail office@seniorlivingmag.com Website www.seniorlivingmag.com Subscriptions: $32 (includes HST, postage and handling) for 12 issues. Canadian residents only. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Senior Living is an independent publication and its articles imply no endorsement of any products or services. The views expressed herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. Unsolicited articles are welcome and should be e-mailed to editor@seniorlivingmag. com Senior Living Vancouver Island is distributed free throughout Vancouver Island. Stratis Publishing Ltd. publishes Senior Living Vancouver Island (12 issues per year) and Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland (12 issues per year). ISSN 1710-3584 (Print) ISSN 1911-6403 (Online)


������ seniorlivingmag.com Enjoy the contents of both Vancouver and Vancouver Island magazines... plus much much more! Do you have an event to promote? We can help. Click on our Events page to post your inoformation for Free.

ASK A ���

seniorlivingmag.com

Professional advice and information on a variety of products and services that suit your needs are published on the Senior Living website.

THE ADS OF THESE ASK A PRO CONTRIBUTORS CAN BE FOUND WITHIN THE MAGAZINE.

SENIOR EXPO PAST & FUTURE

LOCAL EVENT LISTINGS

INSPIRING VIDEOS

SENIOR HOUSING DIRECTORY

ONLINE BOOKSTORE

ARTICLES ABOUT ACTIVE SENIORS & RELATED TOPICS

����������TO SENIORS

We can help businesses market to seniors throughout the Vancouver Island and Greater Vancouver areas. Whether print, web, or a combination of both, you can place your advertising message with confidence, knowing it will reach your intended audience. Over 120,000 readers per month Up to 75,000 unique visitors per month

COV UPS Store ������������������ � ������������������ � �������������������� 6 Accessibility Solutions �� �������������������� �� � ��������������������� 10 Allegro ���������������� �� 17 Northern Sound Hearing Clinics ������������������ �������������������������������� ��� 19 Clear Choice ������������������������������������ ����������������������������������� 23 Carepanions

�����������������������

�������� ����������������� ������������������ ��������������

���� �������

Contact sales@seniorlivingmag.com or call 1.877.479.4705, ext 101 www.seniorlivingmag.com/advertising

���� ��������

�����������

���������������

������������������������������������������������������������ WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

3


THE FAMILY CAREGIVER

Acknowledging the Losses Associated with Being a Caregiver

F

amily caregiving brings with it many changes for everyone involved. Among these is the loss of people’s expectations for their future. While people expect to grieve when someone dies or is diagnosed with a terminal illness, many don’t anticipate the losses one can experience through caring for someone while adjusting to changes in their health. Depending on the specifics of your family member’s health or disability, you may be struggling with one or more of the following losses: • Independence: Your day is now planned around someone else’s needs and schedule. • Privacy: Various health-care workers may be coming into your home to help with the care. You may now need to involve others in making financial and other personal decisions. • Your hopes and dreams for the future: Were you planning to travel after retirement? Will your parents be moving in with you, so you can care for them? • Financial security: Will your savings be going toward paying for care? Do you have to retire early? • Your relationship with the care re-

ceiver: Do the roles feel like they are reversed now? Do you feel like you are now your spouse’s caregiver and no longer his or her partner? • Your social life, hobbies, and leisure time: No time to see your friends anymore? Too tired for that weekly bridge or golf game? • Your job: Will you need to retire early, turn down a promotion or simply quit your job so you can provide care? Your grief in response to these losses can manifest in many ways including guilt, anxiety, helplessness, irritability or frustration. It is important to express these emotions as they occur, rather than allowing them to build up. Suggestions for coping with caregiving-related loss include: • Recognize and talk about your feelings. Good friends, family members, or local religious organizations can be sources of support. • Join a support group. Support groups provide caregivers with the opportunity to share with other caregivers and learn from one another. The Family Caregivers’ Network and other disease-specific agencies, such as the Alzheimer’s Resource Centre, provide

Next Month in Senior Living...

Estate Planning

SENIOR LIVING

support groups for family caregivers. Visit www.familycaregiversnetwork.org for information. • Honour your memories of what used to be but acknowledge the present and what is still possible. Your life is not going to be the same, but it does not mean that you can’t still enjoy it. Resistance is a lot more draining than acceptance. • Create new dreams, new connections, and new travel plans for the future, based on your life as it is now. • Write down your thoughts and feelings. For individuals who enjoy writing, it can be a wonderful way to process loses. • Read a book on coping with grief and loss and chronic illness. • Do activities you enjoy. You may want to garden, read, go for a walk or sit on the beach. • Asking for help to meet the ongoing demands of caregiving. SL Next month: How You Can Help the Family Caregivers in Your Life Barbara Small is the Program Development Coordinator for Family Caregivers’ Network Society located in Victoria, BC. www.familycaregiversnetwork.org

Planning now to ensure the people and causes closest to your heart are taken care of. 4

BY BARBARA SMALL

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


First Call Medical Alert Program You are never alone.

IfÊ anÊ emergencyÊ isÊ detected,Ê aÊ caringÊ SecurTekÊoperatorÊwillÊrespondÊquickly,ÊreadyÊ toÊ help.Ê HelpÊ inÊ anyÊ emergency,Ê includingÊ medical.Ê StayÊ connectedÊ andÊ liveÊ safeÊ withÊ theÊcomprehensiveÊSt.ÊJohnÊAmbulanceÊFirstÊ CallÊMedicalÊAlertÊProgram.ÊForÊmoreÊdetailsÊ aboutÊourÊcomprehensiveÊprogramÊcall: Tel:Ê604.321.2651 Toll-free:Ê1.866.321.2651

�����������������������������

������������������������������������ St. John Ambulance has been supporting seniors in residential facilities for the past fourteen years with our Therapy Dogs Visitation Program”, states Larry Odegard CEO of St. John Ambulance B.C./Yukon division. “Our First Call Medical Alert program now offers support to those seniors who are living in their own homes”. St. John Ambulance has partnered with SecurTek, a highly regarded monitoring and telecommunications company in Western Canada to offer a program that supports, informs and educates seniors living independently. Our Medical Alert system has the most technologically advanced fall detector, a two way voice transmitter and waterproof Personal Help Button. Trained responders stand by 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help in any emergency; medical, fire, flood, or intruder. Someone is there day and night ready to help “We are excited to supply this unique fall detector. Not everyone has this device, and if a fall is detected, our system can call through to the monitoring station even if the buttons are not pushed. This extra layer of reassurance really makes our First Call Program stand out from the competition”, Odegard says. During the in home installation and orientation for the Medical Alert, fall prevention and home safety are discussed. Seventy

percent of all falls occur in and around the home; however falls are not an inevitable part of the aging process. Falls are preventable with education and awareness. To enhance home safety, St. John Ambulance then walks through the home with the customer to identify potential ‘hot spots’ that may pose hazards. Customers are left with a St. John Ambulance Family First Aid Kit, and a Lifelong Learning transferable gift certificate that can be used toward any CPR or First Aid Course.

������������������������������������� ����������������������������������� “Each of us want to live in our own homes, independent for as long as possible. It’s a more familiar and healthier place to be. This complete approach to independence is the type of product you want to invest in before you really need it. It’s reassuring for us and our families to know we are connected and can receive immediate help at the push of a button. More than just a great product, First Call Medical Alert is a great program”.

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

5


Fashion & Beauty

A Dream Come True BY KEVIN MCKAY

6

SENIOR LIVING

Fashion model Yuna Seder.

fashion show at Oakridge Mall in Vancouver. I was fortunate to get a great job early for both television and a print ad. It was for Pappas Furs downtown and they put this huge print ad on the window of their store with my picture there. It made me feel really proud. I felt like I had finally accomplished my dream, something I never thought I would be able to do. I wanted to be a model and now I was one. I felt like I could tell the world, ‘Here I am’ since I had arrived.” One of the Vancouver Sun’s freelance writers started to use Yuna as a model for her articles when she did stories on fashion. Naturally modest and shy, Yuna never saw most of the articles, instead relying on friends to tell her they had seen her in the paper. Over the years, Yuna has done work for both print ads and runway shows. “It doesn’t matter to me what I do,” she says. “I simply

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Photo: Kevin McKay

G

rowing up in Seoul, Korea in the early 1970s, Yuna Seder really stood out amongst her high school peers. Most Korean women do not attain great height, but at five feet ten inches (183 centimetres), Yuna was a veritable giant, and she was teased. Since she already loved fashion, the decision to become a model at the age of 15 was an easy one. Unfortunately, the decision was much easier than reality would prove to be. “My favourite subject was art class because in addition to things like painting, we got to work on things like clothes design, which I loved,” remembers Yuna. “Fashion was my top category in school. I wanted to be a model, and my mother went along with my decision but my father, who was very strict, said absolutely not.” The dream likely would have died then if not for a chance meeting with a Canadian named Rick Seder who was travelling the world in 1979. He was in Korea for a three-day visit before leaving for South America when he ran into 21-yearold Yuna, who was managing a jewelry store, at the time. “He met me and says he instantly decided he had to stay longer,” says Yuna. “On the day he was to leave, he tore up his plane ticket and wound up staying for a year and a half. At first, I felt sorry for him since he was very poor. I started taking care of him. Over time, I got to know him and fell into a relationship with him. We got married in 1981 in Korea, a big wedding. I got to wear two dresses, one traditional Korean one and a western dress as well.” The young married couple moved to Canada and settled in Surrey. While Yuna settled in and started to learn more English, she took a couple of jobs at Korean factories in Vancouver. Within a couple of years, however, she gave up all work in order to be a stay-at-home mom to her three children. Her two sons helped her adjust to being a Canadian as they both excelled at hockey. Her eldest even went on to play major junior hockey for the Kamloops Blazers and one year for the Vancouver Giants. She became a great hockey fan, cheering along her sons as they played. Then, in the early 1990s, the modelling bug bit again. Despite the fact she was a little older than most models, at the time, she decided to see if she could get into the business. She thought things might be a little different for her being Korean, so she visited John Casablanca’s modelling agency to see what they could tell her. “I met someone there who told me I had potential, but that I should take a night school course, so that is what I did,” says Yuna. “Even while taking this initial course, I already started getting modelling work. My first job was on the runway at a


love any modelling work I get.” One show she has been doing for 20 years now is the Wedding Fair. She says, “It is the best show – my very favourite – because it is like a family atmosphere. The people running it have great hearts and are very kind. I now know most of the people involved and most of us come back year after year.” In addition to modelling, Yuna spent some time in the local film and television industry as an extra, appearing in an episode of Stargate, Deep Rising and with Will Smith in I Robot. She was paid at the union rate and was flattered to be asked for specifically. She says she is no longer looking for work in Hollywood North due to the long days and major time commitments. While recognizing that a model’s career involves ups and downs – times of being very busy and times where your look is not so much in demand – Yuna is also acutely aware that not many clients look for older models. “I would love to travel to Milan and Paris to do modelling jobs, but I have to face the reality that it is very likely that my opportunities to do so are gone.” Yuna hopes that things might change for models in her age group as time marches on. In 2011, the first wave of baby boomers is turning 65 and this group of people has been marketed to like no other in history. Most models that appear in fashion magazines are young and beautiful, but Yuna feels it

does not have to be this way. “I hope and believe that boomers will start to make demands to see more models in my demographic. I see fashion spreads featuring classic dresses and clothes intended for more mature women being worn by 20-year-old models. This makes me think that the designers have the wrong idea when modelling these clothes. They should have their eyes open to have the model fit the clothes they are showcasing.” Yuna enjoys all aspects of modelling and claims the only part she dislikes is not working. On the other hand, she models for fun and loves meeting new people. She says, “There are so many good people in the industry and I enjoy getting to know them. Right from the start, that is what I loved the most about modelling. All my best friends are models and most of them are younger than me, which maybe helps me look younger than my 54 years.” According to Yuna, appearance is not the most important attribute for a model to have. “I think it’s more about the person,” she says. “Personality is more important than beauty. If you have a good heart, the beauty just comes out naturally. With a bad attitude, the beauty disappears. I believe a woman’s smile is one of the most powerful things in the world. At least my husband thinks so. He always claims that my smile is SL his whole world.”

Fashion and Beauty Tips from Yuna: 1. Never use foundation as it tends to make lines on the face look deeper. Use a good face cream instead. 2. Always use sunscreen for protection from UV rays. 3. Use a face moisturizer to keep the skin supple. 4. Apply makeup sparingly. 5. Don’t eat too many sweets and drink plenty of water. 6. A proper amount of rest is very important. 7. Oral health is important, see a dentist twice a year. A good smile is essential. 8. Longer hair looks youthful. Make regular appointments to see a hairdresser for a trim and to look after split ends. 9. Clothes and glasses are a matter of personal preference. Only wear styles that elicit positive feelings. 10. Laughter is good: beauty radiates from the inside out. WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Do you get the Senior Living Readers Newsle�er? Sign up today by visi�ng our website at

www.seniorlivingmag.com Each month, we email subscribers our latest newsle�er containing informa�on you won’t find in our magazine. You never know what we’ll include! We have ar�cles on: • successful re�rement • seasonal recipes • computer �ps • gardening • travel • health • fitness • housing • finances • caregiving, etc. PLUS: Info on upcoming magazine features, events, senior-focused adver�sers, advice ar�cles on our website and interes�ng videos.

Become one of our Newsle�er subscribers today. No charge. Just visit our website at www.seniorlivingmag.com and sign up for our newsle�er on the Home Page.

OCTOBER 2011

7


Fashion & Beauty

Fall & Winter Trends: Personalize Them

Problem: Dressing for the Weather Solution: Layers! Get ready for any weather scenario by layering clothing with camisoles, lightweight knit tops, cardigans and vests. The easiest way to add flare to outfits this fall is with colourful scarves, hats, and gloves: a simple way to add personality. Problem: Will following trends make you look like you’re trying to be 20 years old again?

8

SENIOR LIVING

Solution: The trick is to work with classic and well-fitted clothing. Pick a favourite current trend to incorporate. Add a trendy scarf or some chunky bracelets to wardrobe basics to make them come alive. Add a great plaid skirt to a basic top or sweater. Always be sure to wear pieces that flatter body shape (see page 16). To know when to stop accessorizing, use this rule of thumb: wear only two to three pieces of similar accent colour or prints. And, last but not least, to avoid looking like teenagers beyond their bestbefore date, be conscious of hemlines that ride too high and necklines that dip too low. Problem: Trending on a budget Solution: Learning the rules of shopping on a budget is a good idea no matter how much disposable income is available, especially when it comes to following trends. Invest in good quality basics that fit and will last several years. Be willing to spend a little more on these items, they will pay off in durability, flexibility and comfort. When it comes to trend pieces, determine how much use an item will get when deciding how much to spend on it. Items that will stand the test of time are worth spending a little more on, while one-season pieces could come in under budget. WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Photos: Bonnie Pollard

F

all and winter can be two of the most difficult seasons to co-ordinate wardrobe because of unpredictable weather. This can leave fashionistas frustrated and confused as to how to look amazing, while preparing for Mother Nature. And what about money? Following trends can be expensive and timeconsuming. Take heart, fashion lovers! Fashion and makeup expert Bonnie Pollard of Bonnie Pollard’s Fashion in Motion shares advice on how to dress for the weather on a limited budget, and what to get excited about this season.

BY STEFFANY GUNDLING

The great thing about going for an inexpensive trend piece, while still having good quality basics, is the ability to change a style and refresh it frequently. BONNIE’S FALL/WINTER PICKS FOR WOMEN: Blast from the Past: Sophisticated styles from the ’70s and ’80s make a comeback in woman’s fashions this fall. Expect to see: Plaids, polka-dots,


coloured pants, colour blocking, long knee-length hemlines, culottes, wideleg trouser pants, faux fur and sherpa, and geometric prints. Colour Trends: Browns and greys; as well as merlot, teal, saffron yellow, burnt orange, bold blue and red. Do Not Miss Out On: Leopard Prints (in moderation), plaid knee-length Aline skirts, faux fur vests or faux fur trimmed garments, cardigan sweaters in fall colours, and an essential pair of brown boots (ankle- or calf-length). BONNIE’S FALL/WINTER PICKS FOR MEN: Carey Grant Swagger: This fall and winter season pays homage to the suburban preppy look for men. Expect to see: Turtlenecks, plaid, bold-colour shirts and ties, chunky knits and cardigans. Colour Trends: Grey, smoky earth tones, burnt orange, teal and maroon. Do Not Miss Out On: Textured neutral scarves, suiting vests, textured or plaid blazer or sports coat, colour focused on dress shirts and ties, grey cardigan sweaters and a great pair of SL brown shoes. For more upcoming fashion advice, trends and updates, join Bonnie Pollard’s Fashion in Motion Facebook page. WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

9


Fashion & Beauty

Seasonal Beauty Tips E

STORY AND ILLUSTRATIONS BY STEFFANY GUNDLING

xperimenting with new makeup looks and techniques can be intimidating, but when done correctly, can make all the difference; it can highlight and define unique features, and allow the wearers the ability to express themselves creatively and with confidence. Here are some classy makeup tips for mature women who want to enhance their beauty:

This will prevent the dreaded mascara overload that is a common practise when applying mascara. For quick defined eyes, apply mascara to the top side of the upper lashes, and then to the bottom side of the upper lashes. Use the eyelash curler for 3-5 seconds and, if needed, use the eyelash brush to separate lashes. Do not draw in eyebrows – this look is too bold; rather, take some brow

Foundation

powder or eyeshadow that matches the brows, and gently blend.

Stay away from shiny, shimmery foundations and powders. Although many beauticians will say it creates a “soft focus” effect, the opposite is true. Shine adds contrast, which emphasizes the lines on the face. Stick to a matte foundation to reduce contrast. Less is more. Try highlighter pens and tinted moisturizers that have a lighter touch.

Eyebrows and eyelashes

A simple trick to add volume and drama to eyelashes is to curl them. 10

SENIOR LIVING

Lipstick

When it comes to what looks best on mature women, lipstick opinions vary. Some say lighter shades and nudes are the way to go, while others swear by lip plumpers and wine tones. Don’t be limited to one shade. But remember, if the lips are darker, go simple with the rest of the makeup and vice versa. Possibly the greatest mistake maturing women make is relying on old WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

practices of makeup from youth. This can make wearers look outdated, old and out of touch. Don’t be afraid to experiment. Follow modern makeup trends and palettes to keep a look fresh. Here are three Fall/Winter 2011 looks not to be missed:

Simply Red

This look is all about femininity and sensuality. Simplicity is the key, but with bold red/wine-coloured lips, it’s anything but boring. Many women stray away from going bold with deep red lips for fear of looking too “made up.” To create the illusion of volume, add a gloss over top of lipstick. The trick is to play down the rest of the face. A light sweep of nude-coloured blush and well-defined eyelashes is all that’s needed. To bring it to another level, try adding a small smear of white or light golden eyeshadow to the inner portion of the eyelids – it will brighten up the eyes and face.

Simply Red Fall 2011 Look

Metallic Plum

Plums and metallics are an important component of the Fall/Winter colour palette. This look is all about elegance and warmth, while still being modern. The eyes consist of two shades of metallic greys. With the lighter grey, lightly cover the whole lid. Then use the darker grey to introduce subtle drama by only adding it slightly to the outer cor-


ners of the eyes. With a small makeup brush, outline the lower outer corners of the eye. This is sure to open up the eyes, adding a subtle sexy effect. For blush, choose a plum to light pink hue and gently apply it to the sides of the cheekbones. A magenta-based or plum-based nude lipstick completes the look. Apply mascara as needed.

Metallic Plum Fall 2011 Look

Earthy Classic

Earth tones are a classic Fall/Winter palette. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different browns and yellows as they flatter most complexions. To achieve this look, choose three warm earth-toned eyeshadows – preferably a light yellow/gold, red clay and a medium to dark brown. First, gently sweep the light yellow across the whole lid, stopping just below the brow. Then, apply the red clay only to the lid. Next, take the darker earth tone and softly blend it only on the outer corners of the eyes. Blend well to make sure there are no distinct lines between each colour. The final step is to outline only the lower outer section of the eyes, and blend it so it is barely visual. This look will brighten and open up the eyes, while still keeping the look subtle and classic. For blush, choose a tan to warm clay hue and lightly apply it to the sides of the cheekbones. Stick with an orangeto brown-based lipstick to complete the look. Apply mascara as needed.

Featured Business

Continuity of Care for Successful Senior Care By Doug Ozeroff Starting with one facility in Chilliwack in the late 1980s, the Jamal family of Vancouver has successfully built up Retirement Concepts to 18 “campuses of care” – or “communities” as Susie Youle, Director of Sales prefers to call them. “We have five on the island, three in the interior and the balance is in the Lower Mainland.” Susie says a big part of their success is their resident-focused approach. “When residents come to one of our facilities, they’re getting what they want, not what we want to give them.” She says all their communities are beautifully built, clean, welcoming and safe. And that’s important for everyone. “Your family and friends also have to be comfortable coming to the place that you’re going to be living in.” The other ingredient to their success is their staff. “We have fantastic staff, we really do,” says Susie enthusiastically. Many of the staff have worked there for years, some as many as 15, ensuring there is continuity of care.

their preferences - those familiar things that make a residence really seem like a home and a community. As we age it becomes harder for us to deal with change and that continuity becomes even more important. “Let’s face it, if someone is doing some fairly intimate care on you, it’s difficult in the first place because you’ve lost some of your independence and dignity... but if there’s a different person every day, that can be really awkward,” says Susie. Unlike the old senior care model that separated couples when one needed care, Susie says their concept is more inclusive. “For example, in Nanaimo we have independent living, assisted living and full care. That allows people to age in place and it also allows couples to remain together, which is huge. It allows them to spend more quality time together.” Susie says the industry is rapidly changing. “We’ve gone almost from the horse and buggy

�������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������

Susie, who has worked there for almost eight years herself, says low staff turnover is due largely to the Jamal family’s philosophy. “They treat employees and residents with the same respect as any of the family members.” That continuity is important because it allows staff to get to know the residents and

age in senior care to the jet set age. In order to compete, we have to stay at the top of our game in service, buildings, food, recreation, competitive pricing... all of those things.” She predicts Retirement Concepts will continue to lead the way.

ADVERTISEMENT

Earthy Classic Fall 2011 Look SL

RETIREMENT CONCEPTS

1160 - 1080 West Georgia St, Vancouver BC OCTOBER 2011 11 1.800.388.8311 • www.retirementconcepts.com

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


Fashion & Beauty

FASHION THROUGH THE AGES BY NADINE JONES

W

e have all seen dresses on dogs and chinos on chimps, but over the millennia, clothing has been a uniquely human adaptation, evolving from animal skins worn by hairy cave dwellers to... well, animal skins worn by hipster café dwellers. Change has been the one constant over the intervening years. Just think of the various styles and materials that have come in and out of vogue. Look back over the years and it is obvious that clothing is like Karma: what goes around comes around. Don’t throw it out, it will become stylish again! For example: flat soles to platforms and back again; floor-length skirts to minis so tiny there is scant material between hem and waist; wasp waists with large cinch belts to accentuate the positive; and then Hippy looseness along with the mandatory long straight hair and beads. The Hippy sixties, the roaring twenties – with Flappers dancing the Charleston, and the Depression years – when most people wore hand-me-downs are most memorable. There were dance marathons during the Depression, with the girls in flared skirts, where often-hungry young people danced until they dropped from fatigue, all for a small prize. Clothing styles over the years have been poles apart. Today, when boobs are busting out all over, is a far cry from the era of the Second World War when it was stylish for young women to “bind” their chests so they would present a slim silhouette. Not only upper garments, but hats and shoes also change with the times – tams to turbans, cloches to wide-brimmed hats with flowers and the pillbox to baseball caps. Matching high heels shoes to clothes, whether feet hurt or not, caused many foot problems in later years. Strapless shoes, shoes with straps right up the leg; toeless shoes and heelless shoes; platforms and flats; high heels and low heels; French heels and square heels were all worn at some point but perhaps the shoes worn during the Depression with big holes in the soles were most unforgettable. They were stuffed with cardboard – a fine substitute for insoles, except in the rain when they became mushy and oozed their way out onto the sidewalk. There was no way to be discreet with half a wet sole sticking out the bottom of a shoe. In the l930s, movie magazines featured Shirley Temple 12

SENIOR LIVING

or Deanna Durbin or Joan Blundell or some other “star” on the cover. The advertisements within those pages caused readers to drool over Frederick’s of Hollywood lingerie and Coco Chanel’s designs. Edith Head was THE costume designer in Hollywood, and the Westmores were THE makeup artists for the stars. It was always a dream to hope to dress like them. Early in the Second World War, Marlene Dietrich was the first to blatantly wear a pantsuit and, of course, that style took off! Look at Hilary Clinton’s wardrobe today. Many clothing styles underwent changes influenced by the state of the world: the hippy era was a revolution in which fashion was the antithesis of the suffocating clothing at the turn of the century; in the ’20s, full-bodied bathing suits with their wide shoulder straps actually lost their front skirts – how daring! And from those clinging dark blue suits with the yellow piping around the bottom, the neck, and the armholes, gradually swimwear progressed to one-piece; and then latex one-piece in a variety of colours; and then a two-piece top and bottom; to today’s itsy bitsy teeny weeny yellow polkadot bikinis. Jeans, stylish since the fifties, are still in but at one point girls weren’t allowed to wear jeans to school. But they were allowed to wear crinolines under shirt-waist dresses – sometimes as many as three – scratchy, and stiff with starch, which hurt the back of the legs. And not to be thought prudish, Slim Jims became stylish with tapered legs worn with ankle-high desert boots, always in beige coloured suede with laces. And about that same time, the popular white suede “Bucks” appeared on the market, complete with a little sack of white powder for a quick, cheap clean. Before the advent of synthetics – like nylon, polyester, latex and more – cotton, wool, and linen were king. Postwar, synthetics offered more variety and decreased prices, but in many respects, brought down quality as well. While fashion is mainly discussed in relation to women’s clothes, men too have had to adapt and change their wardrobes, though not as radically nor as often. A 90-yearold relative remembers as a youngster wearing stovepipe pant legs and plus fours with the distinctive diamondshaped-pattern argyle sweaters and socks (they are making a comeback). And staying on top of the ride, he recalled wide to narrow

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


lapels and back again. Suits were first fashioned with waistcoats but latterly without, while one-, two-, three- and four-buttoned jackets have all moved in and out of menswear. Similarly, sports jackets in various cuts and fabrics have been paired with a wide variety of patterned and coloured pants. Advertising, the climate, and finances seem to have been the three determining factors in what is worn. Clothing manufacturers can’t profit if styles don’t change frequently. The number of clothing and footwear retail stores has escalated because of increased demand and prosperity, and mushroomed in response to clever advertisements. Children plague their parents (and grandparents) to buy at name brand specialty stores because that is where their friends shop. But before retail chain outlets, there were many singular styles, which fleetingly came and went. Harking back to the ’50s and ’60s again, remember poodle skirts made of one large circle of felt with a felt appliquéd poodle ad-

My goal is to help you reach yours. I’ll work one-on-one with you to develop a comprehensive investment strategy – one that’s right for you and your family’s unique needs and goals. And, I’ll maintain ongoing contact to ensure it remains flexible enough to move with you through each stage of your life. You can be confident I share your goal of enhancing your financial success over the long term. Call me, Peter Tsiandoulas, Branch Manager, Investment Advisor, at 604-654-5414.

PRIVATE INVESTMENT ADVICE

520 17th Street, Ste 200, West Vancouver, BC

tdwaterhouse.ca

hered to them and accordion pleated skirts and peasant blouses; huge padded shoulders and, hallelujah, remember the freedom from garter belts that held up thigh-high silk stockings? Stockings were scarce during the Second World War and developed runs, which were stopped with natural nail polish. Crepe stockings with the black seam up the back didn’t run and looked great, they just developed holes, which could be managed and then someone invented pantyhose, yip-

pee! If a person couldn’t afford stockings, she painted her legs! There were styles popular and unpopular. Possibly throwing out garter belts and wearing comfortable shoes were the two best innovations. Depending on budget and slavery to style, many fashions have been worn and walked in: long and short, tight or loose, comfortable and uncomfortable, but thankfully, unlike the Emperor who had no clothes, there’s always SL something to wear.

Not all Snow Birds Head South! Discover Amica For Your Winter Wellness Getaway Amica is the ideal vacation destination for mature adults who want to beat the winter blahs and still be close to home. Treat yourself or someone special to a vacation-like stay at one of our retirement communities. Our unique Wellness & Vitality™ Residences will rejuvenate you with amazing programs and amenities; will pamper you with superior services and will delight you with engaging activities. Stay for a week or two or more! It's a great place to meet new friends and enjoy the very best of vacation-style retirement living. Call an Amica community today to book your personal tour. Port Coquitlam ~ Amica at Mayfair ~ 604.552.5552 Kerrisdale ~ Amica at Arbutus Manor ~ 604.736.8936 West Vancouver ~ Amica at West Vancouver ~ 604.921.9181 Burnaby ~ Amica at Rideau Manor ~ 604.291.1792 Victoria ~ Amica at Douglas House ~ 250.383.6258 Victoria ~ Amica at Somerset House ~ 250.380.9121 Sidney ~ Amica at Beechwood Village ~ 250.655.0849

10-1747

TD Waterhouse Private Investment Advice is a division of TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. (Member of the Canadian Investor Protection Fund), a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. TD Waterhouse is a trade-mark of The Toronto-Dominion Bank, used under license. M01932 (0110) WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

13


Giving you confidence and peace of mind

WE CAN HELP YOU Prepare an overall move plan Organize, sort, downsize Pack, unpack, settle you in Ship items to family members Oversee and coordinate move day Get your home ready for resale and much more...

Lighthouse Services

(604) 202 9234 Visit our sites at: www.lighthouseservices.ca www.helpseniors.ca

email: info@lighthouseservices.ca

Locally owned and operated

14

SENIOR LIVING

DRESSING WELL AT ANY AGE BY ELIZABETH GODLEY

J

udy Westacott has always been passionate about fashion. “Ever since my teen years, I always wanted to be in style,” she says. “I was a shy girl, and clothes were a way of expressing myself.” At 56, dressed in a fuchsia jacket and a knit dress in the same tone, she is still young at heart enough to exult in vibrant colours. She’s also not timid about combing thrift and outlet shops for bargains, or trading clothes with friends. An executive assistant in Vancouver, Judy says she prefers to spend money on entertainment, not clothes. She’s a regular at Value Village and the Salvation Army, not to mention consignment stores. And for a quirky touch, she will wear mismatched earrings if they suit her mood and add to her outfit. A few basic pieces can go a long way with the right accessories, she says. “A good black skirt is essential.” Just change the look with a hat or scarf, a ruffled blouse or a plain sweater. Jeans, too, can be dressed up with a glittery belt and jewelry, or down with a checked shirt. As for dressing more conservatively with age, Judy says she has found middle age liberating. “You get to a space where you really just don’t care [what others think],” she says. Like Judy, Ardis Breeze has always loved clothes. Two of her aunts were professional seamstresses, and not only made her outfits for special occasions, but produced beautifully tailored dolls’ costumes. Her mother was also an expert at the sewing machine. Over the years, Ardis developed a sense of style that has carried her into her 80s – although today, comfort also plays an important role in her wardrobe. And her taste has become a little more conservaArdis Breeze

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Photo: Elizabeth Godley

WE HELP SENIORS


tive. “You know, there comes a time when you say, ‘Oh, what a fabulous dress – but not for me.’” Today, Ardis often wears blue, which flatters her colouring. “But my real thing is black and white,” she says. Recently, she arrived for a lunch date in Vancouver in a black-and-white marled cardigan and black trousers, with a jaunty black-and-white striped silk scarf at her neck, black-and-white striped socks, and flat black-andwhite lace-up shoes. Both Judy and Ardis enjoy shopping, and will snap up bargains when they find them. Ardis lives part of each year on Hornby Island, where a clutch of boutiques display clothing that is funky but elegant, and she can often be found searching the sale racks. During winters in Toronto, she enjoys expeditions to the fashion outlet stores north of the city. “At any age, you want to look a little bit different – you want to have a signature,” says Israeli-born designer Nurit Perla, now based in

Don’t let hearing loss slow you down. O ur

ST BIGGreEbate cash e year! h of tt our website for Visi

details

Vancouver. Nurit began her career designing children’s clothing, and her adult line is imbued with a sense of playfulness (www.talia-designer-clothes.com). “When we’re young and have a perfect figure, it’s easy to look good. The time to start being A Nurit Perla design. creative is when you lose your figure. I see a lot of women after 50 or 60, and they look amazing.” Nurit favours loose trousers, striped fake fur and intricately detailed jackets and blouses. Colours tend to be neutral, with the occasional dash of white or a bright colour for contrast. “I don’t aim for any particular age,” she says, adding that her clients range from 30 to 80. “Some people get freer as they age – they feel they don’t have to answer to anybody.” However, compared with her younger clients, she says, more mature women may combine pieces differently. “My mother used to say there are no young or old people, just young SL and old souls.”

Book a complimentary hearing screening today with your nearest Connect Hearing clinic. Should you benefit from hearing aids, you’ll be offered a pair to try for two weeks at no cost, and no obligation.* We’re certain you’ll notice the difference better hearing makes. Call 1 800.563.HEAR or visit our website at connecthearing.ca to arrange your complimentary hearing screening and, for a limited time, save up to $1,000.

HEARING AIDS

2 WEEK

FREETRIAL*

+ SAVE UP TO $1,000 Registered under the College of Speech and Hearing Health Professionals of BC.

DVA, WCB accepted

LIMITED TIME OFFER! �����������������������������������������������������������

With 14 convenient locations in the Lower Mainland to serve you: ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

1 800.563.HEAR connecthearing.ca

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

15


���������������������� ������������������������

���������� ����������������� ������

���������

����������������� ������������������������������� 16

SENIOR LIVING

����������������������������������������� ���� ��������� ��������� ��������� ����� ���� ����� ������� �������� ��� ������ �������� ���� ��� ���� ���� ��������� �������� ������� ������ ������������������������������������������� �������� ���� ��������� �������������� ����������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������� ������������������������������� ��� ���� ������ ��� ������ ���� ����� ��������� ���������� ��� ����������� ������ ��� ���� ����������� ��� ������ ������� ����� ���� ������ ������� ������ ������� �������� ����� ������ ��������������������������������������������� ���� ��� ��� ��� ����������� ������� ����� ��������� ����� ���� ��� ���� ����� ����� ������ �������� ���� ����� �� ������ ����������� ������ ����������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������� ��� ������� ���� ������ ���� �������� ���� ����� ��������������������������

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


��������������

� ���� � � ��� �� �������� � ����� �� ���

�������� ������������� ����������������������

��������������

�������� �� ������� ���

���� ��� ����� ���� ������ �����

���������������������������������� ��������������������� ������������������������������� �������������� ������������������������������

������������������ ������������� ������ ��������� ������

������� ������������� ������ ��������� ������

�����������

������������������

��������������������������������������� ���������������������� �������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������� �������������������������������

��������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������� ������������������������� ��������������������������������������������� �����������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������

����� ���� ���� ����� ������������ ��� ������������������������������� ������������ ������������� ��� ���� �����������������������������

�������������� ��������

����������������� �������������������������������

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

17


Having a Riot

Arts & Entertainment

BY KEVIN MCKAY

18

SENIOR LIVING

“Terry David Mulligan and I went down to the audition with all these older actors who were there,” recalls Bill. “They said to team up with somebody for the next portion of the audition so I went with Terry, who was the only person I really knew. I thought we did okay because the floor producer laughed at something I said and he didn’t laugh at anyone else.” Bill left the audition and put it out of his mind. He resumed his everyday life until one evening a few days later. “I was enjoying dinner at the Ho Ho Restaurant with the meagre profits from the record store,” says Bill, “when the kid I had left working at the store phoned me to tell me that CBC had called to say I got the job. This was not at all what I had planned for a career, and never had been when I was growing up. It was just one of those things. I was just thinking that it would a riot to be on TV. Luck plays a very big part in it. Out of that audition, Terry and I hosted three different shows: A Second Look, Pifffle & Co. and Hey Taxi.” Following those programs, Bill was hired to be the central performer for a BCTV kids show called Zig Zag. It was while doing that show that he got the call from CBC Radio asking him if he wanted to be part of Doctor Bundolo’s Pandemonium Medicine Show. Bill did not hesitate to say yes. “It was the greatest thing I ever did,” he says. “That show went on for nine or 10 years and was just tremendous. We would record two shows every second Thursday at the theatre in the Students Union building at UBC, and they would be aired at a variety of days and times over the course of those years, which always seemed strange to me when it just continued to grow in popularity.” Some of the other actors who appeared on Bundolo included Norm Grohmann, Steve Woodman, Marla Gropper, Bill Buck and Ted Stidder, but Bill believes the true secrets of the success of the show were producer Don Kowalchuk and the great writing team. Bill remembers, “We had a genius writer named Colin Yardley. Jeff Groberman was the other writer and it was he and

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Photo: Kevin McKay

D

espite the fact he is a bona fide member of the British Columbia Entertainment Hall of Fame, Bill Reiter is not a household name. His face, on the other hand, is more familiar. But Bill’s calling card, the distinguishing feature that is instantly recognizable to nearly everyone living in this province, is his signature voice. “Even when I was a kid my friends used to tell me I had a great voice for radio,” he says. “One of the things I always tried to do was change the normal read and say things in a different way. I tried to grab the listeners’ ear, really make them notice the commercial.” Bill was and is very successful at making people do just that. To date, he has appeared in over 5,000 radio and television spots and even though he is trying to retire, at the age of 68, the phone has not stopped ringing. “I am still in the mode of being retired because I am no longer seeking work,” he says. “I am not handing my resumé to anybody. This is where I am but ironically, in the last two months, I have been getting all these phone calls to do work making commercials.” In addition to all those ads, Bill stayed busy over the years in a number of other endeavours including, but not limited to, hosting a children’s television show, central performer in a comedic CBC radio program, radio disc jockey, stage actor, producer, writer and even guest appearances on such television shows as The Beachcombers and King of Kensington. It has been one amazing career and, in a way, it all started because of Bill’s love of music. While spinning discs as one of CKLG-FM’s young disc jockeys, Bill started producing and hosting a radio show called Groovin’ Blue, the first all-genre black music radio show in Canada. Bill and a fellow named Bobby Garrison owned Bill & Bob’s Records, which occupied half of the narrowest store in the world, located in Chinatown. It was while selling vinyl in that eight-foot-wide (2.4-metre-wide) store that someone gave Bill’s name to the CBC as they were searching for new television talent.


Colin who had the original idea. Colin and I would be constantly on the phone when he would write something for the show. He would bounce all these ideas off me and I would be adding things and making suggestions. During the performances, which were live, there was some adlibbing and some changes, but mostly we stuck to the script. I still hear from people who tell me that back when Bundolo was on, it was the highlight of their week.” One of Bill’s great successes was his role as Sasq in the Kokanee TV commercials, which started airing in the fall of 1985, and the success was due at least in part to his quick wit and creativity. While they were filming the first commercial, he realized something was missing. “I went to Miles Ramsay, the director, and told him there had to be something better for me to say than just ‘Yo’ after my wife asked if I had brought the Kokanee. He told me to go ahead and adlib, so for the next take I said, ‘Yo, my little mugwump.’ It became a catchphrase, like ‘Where’s the Beef?’ and in the next Valentine’s Day edition of the Vancouver Province newspaper at least seven or eight of the dedications were from guys to their mugwumps. I thought this was incredible. Kokanee did very well at this time as well, moving from eight per cent of the market share to 37 per cent.” Trying to make something good even better defines Bill’s career. He says, “I always felt being given a great line is a gift. I have always treated my profession with a lot of care. I really respect being an actor. It is such a shame when people don’t see acting as an art form. Watching two wonderful actors together is to experience them creating something marvellous.” So after such a remarkable career, Bill Reiter is trying to call it quits. What has changed? Bill explains, “When you are a freelance entertainer and you are offered work, your heart starts to race. It’s almost like you are a fish seeing the fly and getting closer to it. You love participating in your profession so much. And then there is the monetary gain. It affects your emotions. But now my emotions are no longer affected. The only word that comes to mind is defeat. It’s a strange word but apropos because you are

defeating an emotion that can really depress you.” To stay busy in his “retirement,” Bill is spending time on a couple of new hobbies. One is an online radio program in which he takes the nom de guerre DJ Zig Zag and blogs about music. The other is his YouTube channel, where he uploads material from his halcyon days as a performer, adding to it slowly as he is still busier with work than he had intended to be. Everything has come full circle. Bill does not make a profit on his Internet

projects, and does not intend to make anything from them. He says, “There is no money in these things but when I started out making commercials and doing shows there was no money in those things either. I did it to have a riot. And I am doing the blog and the YouTube channel for the same reason. I am doing it to have a riot.” SL For more info or to see Bill Reiter online, visit wagradioonline.blogspot.com and youtube.com/user/BillReiter

Live Well and Stay Active WHEN YOU LIVE AT SHANNON OAKS YOU’LL HAVE MORE TIME TO ENJOY LIFE. An independent seniors living community, experience the freedom and independence to do exactly what you want, when you want. Stay active and live well. Life at Shannon Oaks includes a great selection of daily activities to choose from, delicious home-cooked meals, and weeklyhousekeeping of your private suite. Visit us today for a personal tour and come see why you’ll want to make Shannon Oaks your home. VA N C O U V E R 604.324.6257

VICTORIA 250.595.6257

www.shannonoaks.com Baptist Housing | Enhanced Seniors Living | Since 1964

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

19


Lifestyle

Horse Tales

T

hree-year-old June Henning thought she was a horse. From an early age, she learned to escape her dysfunctional family by entering her very own fantasyland where animals, especially horses, ruled. Some kids are kitty crazy or in puppy love, but for June, it was always horses and, finally, after waiting 12 years, she had one of her own, Jessie, a standard breed. June and Jessie spent all their waking hours together. The young girl groomed, fed and rode her pal daily in the wideopen spaces of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. For two years, they shared a special bond until notice arrived by mail from June’s father, who had moved to B.C. to look for work, that the family would move to the Coast. June had to sell Jessie who was in foal. “I never fully recovered from losing Jessie,” says June. “She was my best friend and confidant. I remember running to the barn blinded by tears, screaming with a breaking heart. My dad promised to buy me another horse; alas, another failed promise.” Although the people who bought Jessie sent photos of her and her colt, they eventually lost touch and when that happened June promised herself that one day she’d own another horse. “It took me 15 years to fulfill my

June guiding Carli Kormosi on horse Zena at Pacific Riding Academy.

promise, and then I found and bought a Palomino mare. Roy Rogers had his Trigger, but I had Bonny Gold.” After purchasing the Palomino, June joined a North Vancouver association called Pal, where she eventually became the horse show chair and association bookkeeper. She worked with Bonny Gold and taught her all the moves required for entry into horse shows, where both she

Photo: Dee Walmsley

BY DEE WALMSLEY

and her daughter competed; they won a number of ribbons. “I showed her in classes along with other Palominos. Bonnie never did well in the colour class as she had a fair bit of black hair in her hind quarters, however, she did win some ribbons in the costume class,” says June. Bonnie bore two fillies, the first was a Palomino and the second a chestnut, they were both sired by the same Arabian stallion, making them half Arabian, another class all its own. Eventually, June sold her to a horse-lover on the Island. Bonnie had one more foal and, later, June ended up boarding her on the Surrey farm. “The first time I saw an Arabian horse I knew my quest was about to begin,” she says. “I wanted to spend my time breeding, training and showing these magnificent animals, and so I purchased acreage in South Surrey and went looking for a stallion.” June bought her first Arabian horses, a two-year-old stallion and a yearling filly, from some breeders in Estevan, Saskatchewan. “I stood the stallion for outside breeding and sold the filly when she two years old. The horses were (in the Arabian horse world) Straight Egyptian horses, meaning that their bloodlines

Retirement Living in Grand Vancouver Style. Suites le b AvailaW! NO

Call Julia to arrange a personal visit 604.738.8380 1570 West 7th Avenue Vancouver

terracesonseventh.com 20

SENIOR LIVING

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


could be traced back to horses in Egypt. I’m not a horse whisperer, but I’ve always had a special connection with them. I bred and broke my own horses, and sold the foals. I never had any formal training, just read a few books, shared experiences with other people and, for the most part, I guess it was just my plain old natural ability.” Another of her Arabian stallions, Ghalic, came to her with a history of abuse. He was rescued from a chicken barn, barely able to hold his head up, with no food or water. “Ghalic was very strong-willed, just like me, so we never really bonded. I showed him in Park, a class designation where horses are shown at a walk, trot and canter, judged on their brilliant, high action, where he did very well.” While the rewards of breeding horses are many, like watching a newborn wobbling its way to the mare’s teat, experiencing the joy in a foal romping, and delighting in a child’s face when ownership makes a dream come true, there are also pitfalls. The workload is enormous: having the right bloodlines that people like, and the conformation that people want, factor into the business, and then there are the health issues and deaths. Raising horses is an expensive proposition. June bred her leased mare for a few years and then to defray costs leased her out. She sold her stallion and replaced the horse breeding business with boarding horses. She stabled some private owner’s recreational horses but most of her animals came from the Cloverdale Raceway. June not only boarded these horses but also worked with them on a physical level using herbs and natural healing methods to get them back at the track. She found the work both challenging and heartbreaking. “There is a lot of animal abuse in the racing industry; I spent my time nurturing the horses in my care while they healed both physically and mentally.” They call it “the sport of Kings” but it’s all about money. When horses lose at the track and they are no longer “in the money,” they are often sent to the slaughterhouse. June continued to board horses for 30 years in South Surrey and the Okanagan before returning to the Coast. Today, she shares her love of horses with special needs kids at the Pacific Riding Academy (www.prda.ca). There, June spends her time grooming and saddling up the horses for riding lessons. “I lead a horse for a 45-minute lesson and assist the rider with their instructions from a qualified instructor, and I help the kids feel safe and confident while in the ring.” PRDA has over 38 years of experience providing therapeutic riding and activities for Lower Mainland communities. Horses have always been part of June’s life; they are in her blood. “Mostly I remember the connection I had and the love for them, which I still feel today. We shared many happy times as a family looking after and showing our animals.” Somewhere within her still lives a three-year-old girl who SL thinks she’s a horse.

A Great Gift Idea! Reflections, Rejections, and Other Breakfast Foods Reflection��s,��������

st Foods

and Other Breakfa

Limited Edition

MAGAZINE

& Unpublished Writings A Collection of Published ist Gipp Forster by Senior Living Column

A collection of Gipp Forster’s published columns in Senior Hoodoos Living magazine, with other unpublished writings thrown in for good measure. A unique blend of humor and nostalgia, Gipp’s writings touch your heart in such an irresistible way, you will want to buy not only a copy for yourself, but as a wonderful gift for friends and family members.

Limited Edition!! 128 pages • Softcover • Published by Senior Living

Price: $10.00 “Reflections” MAIL-IN ORDER FORM Name________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________ City____________________________________________ Prov ___________ Postal Code_______________ Phone _________________________________ Email ________________________________________________ BOOKS @ $10.00 each (5% GST on above total) SHIPPING (FIRST BOOK $3.95; ADD’L BOOKS $1.95 EACH)

= $____________ = $____________ = $____________

(12% HST on shipping)

= $____________

TOTAL

= $____________

___ CHEQUE (make payable to Senior Living) ___ CREDIT CARD ____VISA ____MC CARD NUMBER ______________________________ EXPIRY DATE ________________

Mail to: Senior Living Box 153, 1581–H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Please allow two weeks for shipping. OCTOBER 2011

21


Cooking in Liguria Travel & Adventure

BY JO-ANN ZADOR

O

ur Italian “simply benissimo” culinary experience in the Ligurian region confirmed for us that dreams do come true. This was a long-standing aspiration for my husband and I, the desire to shop, cook and eat in an environment that pleased the palate, and connect with people who love food! We are independent travellers, so joining this culinary adventure to Italy, offered by the Rustico Cooking School of New York, did evoke a bit of trepidation. We were afraid of being slotted into a group led by an officious organizer who provided us with “Hello, my name is” tags and herded us into an orderly line. Our fears were quickly dashed; having settled nicely on the appointed day into historic accommodation in a seaside, art deco hotel in the village of Rapallo, we joined the group for a welcome drink and introductions. This first meeting with Micol and Dino, owners of Rustico, instantly put us at ease. They turned out to be an adorable couple: friendly, down to earth and knowledgeable. We knew we had chosen well, even before the first of the extraordinary tables and many adventures that comprised our marvellous week together. We enjoyed lunch at Vesuvio in Rapallo, featuring the seafood cuisine of Liguria. That meal confirmed we needed good appetites; Micol told us to “taste” but not to feel pressured to eat. The culinary adventures offered by Rustico are different from most; we chose it for that reason. Instead of being headquartered in a villa, adventuring to local markets for supplies, then home to learn and cook, our gastronomic venture promised the perfect combination of hands-on food preparation, behind-the-scenes glimpses into the various local delicacies, and free time for excursions. All our food and paired dinner wines, instruction, accommodation and transportation was included in the price. We toured Frantoio Bo in Sestri Levante, an ancient family-run olive oil mill, where we tasted and developed an appreciation for the qualities of the best olive oil. Sugar highs were experienced with an outing to the Romanengo candy and chocolate factory in Genova, while the process of production was demonstrated, using centuries old equipment. Their Easter eggs delighted the child in all of us. Gelati rounded off the day’s sampling and education at Defilla, the premier place for a cooling treat in Chiavari. Walter’s petite boutique winery, hidden in a basement cave in his humble hillside home in Riomaggiore, found us sipping his prize-winning wines, while enjoying a captivating wine-making lesson in the simplest of situations. Visiting with Walter came at 22

SENIOR LIVING

The author and her husband George delight in the joy of cooking.

the end of a trek along the promenade, the Via dell’Amore, that clung precariously to the scrap of land fronting the sea, as we walked from Manarola to Riomaggiore, two of the five picturesque villages of the Cinque Terre. Our hands-on experiences were loaded with fun as well as being instructive. With our eyes dazzled by all we made, we pled for release from cleaning our plates while still begging for more. Our palates sang as we discovered that the humble blending of herbs, revered basil, with nuts – tiny pinoli and crunchy walnuts – with fresh sea bounties such as cuttlefish, calamari, mussels or bream, and superb olive oil, could produce simply delicious meals. Many Ligurians contributed to the success of our journey, where we were welcomed and treated as family. At Manuelina’s in Recco, we cobbled together “Foccacia de Recco,” a cheese filled version of this classic dimpled flatbread that has made Chef Mario famous across Italy. The first of many tantalizing tastes we created: knead oil, water and flour together and stretch it into car-tire sized paper-thin dough. Next, top with stracchino, a fresh cheese similar in texture to a creamy goat cheese. Top this with another thin layer of dough, bake in a very hot oven until the top is crisp and the cheese oozes. Corzetti pasta with fresh herbal, nutty filling completed our hands-on portion while Mario prepared a towering seafood salad as part of the dinner and wine pairing that was to come. One pleasurable morning, we were welcomed to the family run pasta shop Pastificio Dasso in Rapallo. Working in the spotless kitchen, with gleaming stainless steel appliances, the owner, Mauritizia, and the shop’s master pastina, Maria, guided us while we kneaded dough into pasta. We hand-cranked corzetti, ravioli, and nun’s hat

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


or agnolotti through an old, highly polished pasta machine and blended a fresh basil, pinoli filling for the ravioli. We enjoyed our successes at lunch, ending with generous pieces of Mauritizia’s nona’s still-warm apple cake, baked that morning and delivered, by bicycle, from the hills above the shop. A very early misty morning found us at Ristorante U’Giancu, a five-star, local favourite Genovan dining spot overseen by owner and head chef Fausto Oneto, a legend in Italy and many parts of the world. Crazy busy morning: 14 dishes prepared by us under his tutelage! The story of the restaurant’s origin is delightful. Fausto’s momma used to cook for her sons with produce from her garden. One day, passersby knocked on her door, drawn by the heavenly aromas. After Momma Oneto fed this group, word spread, more visitors arrived; soon she realized she could charge for her meals, and so U’Giancu was born. Still on the original spot, a substantial building houses the restaurant. We picked our produce from the same garden that began it all – Momma watching over us from her sepia-toned photo on the wall. Fausto and his handsome sous-chef son led us through the preparations of a multicourse Ligurian lunch. We made two different foccacias, one topped with finely sliced red onion and the other with sea salt and olive oil. Also, we made fresh ravioli and its filling, and tagliatelle with basil pesto. We prepped racks of herbed lamb, and deep fried zucchini flowerets, a mushroom tart, a fresh asparagus tart, robustly flavoured roasted potatoes and for dessert, a sweet, fresh lemon gelati and a fresh pear chocolate cake. While cramming all these experiences into seven days, we still had time to enjoy other experiences. We spent a couple of hours at an outdoor market in Rapallo, followed by shopping bliss at a salumeria to taste and buy local cheeses, cured meats, dried pastas, sauces and olive oils. A refreshing half-hour boat ride from Rapallo’s marine dock delivered us to the teardrop shaped harbour of Portofino. The afternoon was spent exploring its twisty cobbled lanes, perusing the art galleries, taking fizzy lemonade on the palazzo facing the harbour, and enjoying the best in people watching!

Our time in Portofino culminated with dinner at a premier restaurant, Trattoria del Marinaio. Dinner featured freshly caught fish and wine pairings at tables fronting the picturesque harbour. Time for dinners at many of Liguria’s restaurants was somehow found: A sumptuous dinner in Rapallo; a grand seafood dinner at Ristorante Rosa in the classic fisherman’s town, Camogli; lunches of crispy, chickpea farinata (pancake) at Tre Merli in Genova, and seafood delicacies at Polpo Mario in Sestri Levante and

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

the welcome lunch at Vesuvio. Our final evening meal we shared outside Genova at Ristorante Ferrando, overseen by the owner. We left there as family as well! Far too soon, our week was over, goodbyes exchanged and promises made to stay in touch. Our sense of having spent a comfortable week with family is tucked into our memory book, along with pictures that will bring joy for years to come. SL Molto bene! For more information, visit online at www.rusticocooking.com

OCTOBER 2011

23


Senior Living Vancouver & Lower Mainland DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS ABBOTSFORD

CLEARBROOK LIBRARY FRASER VALLEY LIBRARY MSA CENTENNIAL LIBRARY MT. LEHMAN LIBRARY ZELLERS

ALDERGROVE

ALDERGROVE KINSMEN COMMUNITY CENTER ALDERGROVE LIBRARY ALDERGROVE MALL

BURNABY

ABC RESTAURANT ADVANCED MOBILITY AMICA AT RIDEAU MANOR BOB PRITTIE PUBLIC LIBRARY BONSOR COMMUNITY CENTRE BURNABY GENERAL HOSPITAL CAMERON RECREATION CENTRE CHOICES MARKET IN THE PARK CONFEDERATION COMMUNITY CENTRE FOR 55+ EDMONDS COMMUNITY CENTRE FOR 55+ EILEEN DAILEY LEISURE POOL & FITNESS CENTRE GUARDIAN PHARMACY HARMONY COURT HILTON HOTEL IGA INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL HEALTH & VACCINATION CLINIC LANCASTER MEDICAL LIFELABS MCGILL PUBLIC LIBRARY MEDICHAIR OLD ORCHARD MEDICAL CLINIC REGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES SETON VILLA STATION SQUARE MEDICAL CLINIC THE POPPY RESIDENCES THE MULBERRY RETIREMENT RESIDENCE TIM HORTON’S TOMMY DOUGLAS LIBRARY WILLINGDON COMMUNITY CNTR ZELLERS PHARMACY

COQUITLAM

BELVEDERE CARE CENTRE BREAD GARDEN COQUITLAM CITY CENTRE LIBRARY COQUITLAM LIBRARY DOGWOOD PAVILION DUFFERIN SENIORS CENTRE GLEN PINE PAVILLION PARKWOOD MANOR PINETREE COMMUNITY CENTRE RESIDENCES AT BELVEDERE SHOPPERS DRUG MART

DELTA

FRASER VALLEY LIBRARY AT GEORGE MACKIE GEORGE MACKIE LIBRARY KENNEDY SENIORS RECREATION CENTRE MARK’S PHARMACY NORTH DELTA REC CENTRE NURSE NEXT DOOR SUN GOD RECREATION CENTRE

FORT LANGLEY

FORT LANGLEY LIBRARY

LANGLEY

A & W - 22259 48 AVE A & W - 8790 204 ST A & W - 6241 200 ST A1 WHEELCHAIR UNLIMITED SUPPLY LTD BROOKSWOOD LIBRARY BUY-LOW FOODS CITY OF LANGLEY LIBRARY DOUGLAS REC CENTRE HARRISON POINTE LANGLEY GARDENS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY LANGLEY LAWN BOWLING LANGLEY LIBRARY LANGLEY LODGE LANGLEY SENIORS CENTRE LANGLEY SENIORS VILLAGE LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE MAGNOLIA GARDENS MURIEL ARNASON LIBRARY MURRAYVILLE LIBRARY PERSONAL MOBILITY SIMPSON MANOR SUNRIDGE GARDENS RENAISSANCE RETIREMENT RESORT TIMMS COMMUNITY CENTRE WALNUT GROVE COMMUNITY CENTRE WALNUT GROVE LIBRARY WILLOWBROOK LIBRARY Zellers

MAPLE RIDGE

MAPLE RIDGE LEISURE CENTRE MAPLE RIDGE LIBRARY

NEW WESTMINSTER

CARE POINT MEDICAL CENTRE CENTENNIAL COMMUNITY CENTRE CENTURY HOUSE DUNWOOD PLACE RETIREMENT RESIDENCE EDWARD JONES HYACK HOUSE KIWANIS CARE CENTRE LEGION MANOR NEW WESTMINISTER QUAY NEW WESTMINSTER LIBRARY QUEENSBOROUGH COMM CNTR SENIOR SERVICES SOCIETY

SUNQUEST MOBILITY THORNEBRIDGE GARDENS WAFFLE HOUSE

NORTH VANCOUVER

BOOK WAREHOUSE CAPILANO COLLEGE LIBRARY CAPILANO LIBRARY CHURCHILL HOUSE EVERGREEN HOUSING ADMIN KIWANIS LYNN MANOR KIWANIS TOWERS LONSDALE QUAY LYNN VALLEY MAIN LIBRARY MEDICAL CLINIC MOUNT SEYMOUR MEDICAL CLINIC NORTH SHORE COMMUNITY RESOURCES NORTH SHORE NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE NORTH VANCOUVER CITY LIBRARY NUTRITION HOUSE PARKGATE LIBRARY PEMBERTON & MARINE MEDICAL CLINIC QUEENSDALE MARKET SILVER HARBOUR MANOR SUPER-VALU THE SUMMERHILL VILLAGE GREENWAY, THE WESTVIEW MEDICAL CLINIC

PITT MEADOWS

IGA PITT MEADOWS LIBRARY PITT MEADOWS REC CENTRE SHOPPERS DRUG MART

PORT COQUITLAM

AMICA AT MAYFAIR ASTORIA RESORT SUPERVALU TERRY FOX LIBRARY WILSON REC CENTRE

PORT MOODY

KYLE CENTRE PORT MOODY LIBRARY PORT MOODY RECREATION COMPLEX

RICHMOND

BRIGHOUSE LIBRARY CAMBIE COMMUNITY CENTRE CAMBIE PUBLIC LIBRARY GILMORE GARDENS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY HAMILTON COMMUNITY CENTRE IRONWOOD LIBRARY KIWANIS COURT MINORU AQUATIC CENTRE MINORU ARENA MINORU SENIOR’S CENTRE PRECISION HEARING RICHMOND CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RICHMOND CENTRE INFO BOOTH ROSEWOOD MANOR S.U.C.C.E.S.S. AUSTIN HARRIS RESIDENCE

SEAFAIR MEDICAL CLINIC SHOPPERS DRUG MART SOUTH ARM COMMUNITY CENTRE STEVESTON COMMUNITY CENTRE STEVESTON LIBRARY THOMPSON COMMUNITY CENTRE O’KEEFE SENIOR LIVING APARTMENTS WEST RICHMOND COMMUNITY CENTRE

SOUTH DELTA

DELTA HOSPITAL KINSMEN ASSISTED LIVING KINVILLAGE COMMUNITY CENTRE LADNER COMMUNITY CENTRE LADNER PIONEER LIBRARY LADNER PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT MCKEE SENIORS RECREATION CENTRE SOUTH DELTA LIBRARY SOUTH DELTA RECREATION CENTRE THE WATERFORD TSAWWASSEN LIBRARY WINSKILL AQUATIC CENTRE

SURREY

ABC RESTAURANT 158TH ABC RESTAURANT KING GEORGE ARBOURSIDE COURT CHAPTERS - STRAWBERRY HILL CHOICES MARKET CLOVERDALE LIBRARY CLOVERDALE RECREATION CENTRE CROSSROADS MOBILITY SOLUTIONS DON CHRISTIAN REC CENTRE ELIM VILLAGE FLEETWOOD COMMUNITY CNTR FLEETWOOD LIBRARY GUILDFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY GUILDFORD SENIORS SERVICES LOUNGE GUILDFORD SENIORS VILLAGE IMPERIAL PLACE KENT SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTRE KIDNEY CARE CENTRE KINSMEN PLACE LODGE KIWANIS PARK PLACE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY MEDICHAIR NEWTON LIBRARY NEWTON SENIOR CENTRE NEWTON WAVE POOL NORTH SURREY REC CENTRE OCEAN PARK LIBRARY PACIFICA RESORT RETIREMENT LIVING PEACE ARCH MEMORIAL HOSPITAL PERSONAL MOBILITY ROSEMARY HEIGHTS SENIORS VILLAGE SEMIAHMOO PUBLIC LIBRARY CONTINUED NEXT PAGE

24

SENIOR LIVING

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


MAINLAND DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS - CONTINUED SHOPPERS DRUG MART SOUTH SURREY ARENA SOUTH SURREY INDOOR POOL SOUTH SURREY REC CENTRE STRAWBERRY HILL LIBRARY SUNRISE PAVILLION SURREY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL SURREY SPORTS AND LEISURE COMPLEX THE CHEMISTS PHARMACY VANCITY - NEWTON WESTMINSTER HOUSE WHITE ROCK/SOUTH SURREY PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT SHOPPERS HOME HEALTH

VANCOUVER

411 SENIOR’S CNTR SOCIETY AIM MEDICAL IMAGING AMICA AT ARBUTUS MANOR ARBUTUS LONG TERM CARE ARBUTUS MALL BARCLAY MANOR BC WOMEN’S HOSPITAL BRITANNIA 55+ CENTRE BRITANNIA LIBRARY BROADWAY BURRARD WALK-IN BROCK HOUSE SOCIETY CARE MEDICAL CENTRE CAVELL GARDENS CENTRAL MARKET CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS COMMUNITY CENTRE CHAMPLAIN HEIGHTS LIBRARY CHOICES MARKET CITY SQUARE FAMILY PRACTICE City SQUARE SHOPPING CNTR COAL HARBOUR COMM CNTR COLLINGWOOD HOUSE COLLINGWOOD LIBRARY

CROFTON MANOR DENMAN COMMUNITY CENTRE DENMAN MALL DIAMOND HEALTH CARE CNTR DOCTORS OFFICE DOUGLAS PARK COMM CNTR DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTRE DUNBAR PUBLIC LIBRARY S.U.C.C.E.S.S \ SOCIAL SERVICE CENTRE FALSE CREEK COMM CNTR FIREHALL LIBRARY FRASERVIEW LIBRARY FROG HOLLOW NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE GF STRONG REHABILITATION CENTRE GRANDVIEW TOWERS GRANVILLE ISLAND MARKET GRANVILLE MEDICAL CLINIC GROUND FLOOR MAILROOM HARO PARK CENTRE HASTINGS COMMUNITY CENTRE HASTINGS PUBLIC LIBRARY JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE JOE FORTES LIBRARY KENSINGTON COMM CNTR KENSINGTON LIBRARY KERRISDALE LIBRARY KERRISDALE SENIORS CENTRE KHATSAHLANO MEDICAL CLINIC KILLARNEY COMMUNITY CENTRE KILLARNEY MARKET KITSILANO NBRHD HOUSE KITSILANO PUBLIC LIBRARY KIWASSA NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE LANCASTER MEDICAL SUPPLIES LANGARA FAMILY YMCA LIFEMARK HEALTH CENTRE LIFEMARK PHYSIOTHERAPY LITTLE MOUNTAIN NBRHD HOUSE

MACDONALDS PRESCRIPTION AND MEDICAL SUPPLIES MAPLE MEDICAL CLINIC MARPOLE COMMUNITY CENTRE MARPOLE LIBRARY MEDICAL CLINIC MERCATO MALL MID-MAIN COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE MT PLEASANT NEIGHBOURHOOD HOUSE NORTHERN SOUND HEARING O’KEEFE SENIOR LIVING APRTM OAKRIDGE CENTRE OAKRIDGE LIBRARY OAKRIDGE SENIOR’S CENTRE PERSONAL MOBILITY PLATINUM CARE RAYCAM COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW COMMUNITY CENTRE RENFREW PUBLIC LIBRARY RICHMOND/VANCOUVER HEALTH UNIT RILEY PARK COMMUNITY CENTRE ROUNDHOUSE COMM CNTR ROYAL CENTRE MEDICAL SHANNON OAKS SHOPPERS DRUG MART SHOPPERS DRUG MART HOME HEALTH CARE SIDNEY MANOR SINCLAIR CENTRE SOUTH GRANVILLE PARK LODGE SOUTH GRANVILLE SENIORS CNTR SOUTH HILL LIBRARY SOUTHVIEW HEIGHTS & TERRACE ST PAUL HOSPITAL STRATHCONA COMMUNITY CENTRE STRATHCONA LIBRARY SUNRISE SENIOR LIVING TERRACES ON SEVENTH

THUNDERBIRD COMM CNTR UBC HOSPITAL VANCITY - FAIRVIEW VANCITY - KERRISDALE VANCITY - POINT GREY VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY VGH EMERGENCY VANCOUVER AQUATIC CENTRE WEST POINT GREY COMM CNTR WEST POINT GREY PUBLIC LIBRARY WESTEND SENIORS NETWORK WHOLE FOODS YMCA COMMUNITY SERVICES MOUNTAIN EQUIPMENT CO-OP

WEST VANCOUVER

AMICA AT WEST VANCOUVER CLEAR CHOICES HEARING GLENEAGLES COMM CNTR HOLLYBURN HOUSE INGLEWOOD CARE CENTRE PARK ROYAL SHOPPING CNTR S SUPER-VALU WEST VAN MEMORIAL LIBRARY

WHITE ROCK

ABC RESTAURANT PACIFIC CARLTON SAFE BATHING CENTRE SAVE ON SCOOTERS SENIOR SUPPORT SERVICES SUNNYSIDE MANOR PENINSULA RESORT RETIREMENT LIVING WHITE ROCK COMM CNTR WHITE ROCK LAWN BOWLING WHITE ROCK LIBRARY WHITECLIFF RETIREMENT LIVING HEALTH EXPRESS

RECOMMEND A DISTRIBUTION LOCATION NEAR YOU! Senior Living is looking for convenient, high traffic distribution locations throughout the Greater Vancouver region. If you know of a place of business or activity centre that would be a convenient location for interested readers to pick up our magazine, let us know.

Email: office@seniorlivingmag.com Phone: 1-877-479-4705 NOW DISTRIBUTED AT ALL PHARMASAVE STORES THROUGHOUT BC.

VANCOUVER ISLAND EDITION DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE ISLAND VANCOUVER EDITION DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE MAINLAND

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

25


FOREVER BY WILLIAM THOMAS

The Fashion Industry – sleight of hand and hemlines

I

wonder at what point the world of fashion became a and a grey kimono coat inspired by Brunello Cucinelli is runaway runway joke for ordinary people. Cuffs/no $245.” Wouldn’t that kimono coat be a hundred bucks less cuffs, hemlines up/hemlines down, collars open/but- if “Tony the Tailor” had inspired it? I’m looking at a photo spread in the Toronto Star’s fashton-down collars/no collars, hoodies not hats, pantyhose and Spanx, short boots/high boots, pumps/ballet slippers, belly ion section with three suits that were uniquely designed, custom-fitted, image consulted, linearly flattered and chanbutton blouse/long shirt blouse, low waist/empire waist. No bra/push-up bra? Padded bra? Okay, that one has nelled by George Clooney, and I swear I’ve seen these some historical significance because before the padded bra, clothes on the rack at Moores. In another shot, the slim male model is wearing a black trench coat by Haight & Ashbury Kleenex was a part of the full-bosom look. Designers are desperately running out of ideas on how but I’m betting the label reads “Army & Navy.” And the quote from the deto cosmetically alter clothes so signer that explains this “somthat stylishly naive people keep bre and yet subtle” line of fashbuying new outfits with every I wear shorts until it snows ionable menswear: “I have an change of season. and whites until Christmas, alluring dark quality that’s mysHave you read a fashion terious.” Yeah, so does Russell article lately, featuring a parbut that’s the last gasp of Williams, but I’m not anxious ticular designer or a new line rebellion I have left. to be seen wearing the clothes of clothes? They use phrases that guy’s been modelling. like “imaging and intriguing,” The fashion models that “unique and soulful,” “vulnerable and aspiring,” “candor and subtext.” Clothes! “Emo- show these clothes look like either the cast from The Night tionally intellectual?” Overcoats that are “upscale and el- of The Living Dead or a bad ad for veganism. When they wire mannequins to walk on a runway, fashion models will egant?” A shirt that is “redolent yet intrusive?” One line of new fashion was described as “funked-up” be out of work. and I thought yeah, they nearly got it right that time. Sorry, but I don’t buy clothes that are “classically appliAs far as I can tell, the latest fashions come in two cat- quéd,” whatever that means. Nor do I shop for garments egories: smoke and funhouse mirrors. Sorry but when I because I am “this moody intellect with so much going on look at a sports coat that is “hand-painted” and “fashioned underneath.” That fact is, one big reason I buy clothes is from Pashtun blankets of Northern Pakistan then shot with to cover up what’s going on underneath, if you know what Lurex,” I don’t see a jacket. I see a racket. I mean. Remember bell-bottoms and Nehru jackets? If there was I think we could all use a stern reminder of the historijustice in crimes of fashion, those designers would be get- cal significance of clothes that dates back 100,000 years ting out of jail right about now. to the earliest days on earth of Homo sapiens. Forgive my And what about the prices? “A wool cashmere Italian arrogance here, but I was after all a history major and, if swing coat in menswear check fabric is $225; an asymmet- memory serves me, the first cave woman was swaddled in rical cashmere jacket with inventive black pleating is $225 the stretched skins of a woolly mammoth when Fred got an26

SENIOR LIVING

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


EX

Remember your vacation. Not the medical bills. U S I V E OF F CL

ER

gry at Barney because he was always peeking at Wilma while she did jumping jacks down by the river. Also, clothes became very useful during the Ice Age. Hard hats were all the rage during the Stone Age and tiedyed, psychedelic ugly-as-sin clothes became very popular during the Age of Aquarius. We think. Nobody from the ’60s can remember that era, and all written records used the language of peace signs and happy faces. I think I see where the fashion industry is headed. Designers have created every unnecessary change from top to bottom and the only place they have to go now is inside out. A bustier used to be an undergarment and now it’s used as an outer top. Just a word of warning for men: Superman may look great wearing his gotchies on the outside, but that’s probably not a good look for you. So yeah, I dress for comfort, according to the temperature, and with a mild sense of occasion. I aim to be presentable. I also wear shorts until it snows and whites until Christmas, but that’s the last gasp of rebellion I have left. I know I could be arrested for wearing my Harris Tweed jacket in public, but that’s just the kind of maverick I am. Plus, it’s warm and goes well with my jeans. No, unless you are intentionally dressing to get laughs like, say, Lady Gaga or Chuckles The Clown or Don Cherry, keep it simple: clean and comfortable in colours that would not clash with a crossing guard’s vest. Here’s to the fashion industry, where SL every night is Halloween.

MEMBERS SAVE 7% The last thing you want to bring home from your vacation is a huge hospital bill. So next time, take along BCAA Travel Insurance and bring back something other than debt. Plus, buy online and save an additional 5%. For more information or to purchase, visit bcaa.com/travelinsurance, call 310-2345, or stop by your nearest BCAA Office. Insurance is sold through BCAA Insurance Agency and is administered by North American Air Travel Insurance Agents Ltd. d.b.a. Travel Underwriters, a licensed insurance broker. 11th Floor 6081 No 3. Road, Richmond, BC Canada V6Y 2B2. Insurance is underwritten by Industrial Alliance Pacific Insurance and Financial Services Inc. and certain Lloyd’s Underwriters, severally and not jointly.

William Thomas is the author of nine books of humour including The True Story of Wainfleet and Margaret and Me and The Cat Rules. For comments or ideas, visit his website at www.williamthomas.ca WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

27


A Pizza Garden

Community

BY CHRIS HERBERT

O

n Vancouver’s Westside, they’re riding the rails. Locals of a certain age may recall that for more than 50 years, following its incorporation in 1897, the Vancouver and LuLu Island Railway Company or “the interurban” as it was known to Vancouverites, transported commuters along the Arbutus corridor from downtown Vancouver to Steveston. The rusted ribbons of metal are still there, but it has been more than a generation since the clang of the trolley’s bell announced the train’s arrival. To the casual observer the interurban line may appear abandoned, but it’s still inhabited by a community of gardeners. This narrow strip of land is sandwiched between East and West Boulevards south of 49th Avenue. Guarded by a scarecrow in Reebok sneakers and a sun-faded Salt Lake City 2002 T-shirt, there’s an eclectic collection of gardens. Some are roughly hewn from the fields of Queen Anne’s lace, a lofty white flowered weed that threatens to choke

A scarecrow in Reeboks stands guard. 28

SENIOR LIVING

the life out of the tender young plants, while other garden plots are painstakingly maintained. Neat rows of vegetables and flowers behind cedar picket fencing are marked with the name of the yet-tosprout crop. Handwritten signs identify early tomatoes and sweet-tasting basil, the beginning of a pizza garden. There was a time when every Vancouver backyard boasted a vegetable garden. Kids would make excursions into the neighbours’ yard after dark to liberate a fresh carrot or a red-cheeked apple. Today, all along the interurban tracks, there is a bounty of tempting crispy green salad fixings, vine-ripened fruit and multihued flowers. The gardens are as varied as the gardeners who tend them. There are families, community groups and individuals like Sue and her canine sidekick. As she tends their garden, Sue shares that the cool spring produced less-than-desirable results. A couple of plots away, three generations of one family grow berries so lush that the man picking raspberries deep within the thicket is nearly invisible. He picks the berries for his parents, his way to thank them and show his daughter the gardeners’ ways. “As a gardener, no matter how much you think you know Mother Nature will prove you wrong,” he says and adds with a touch of gardeners’ optimism. “But there is always next year.” A lesson he learned from his parents – a lesson now being passed along to the next generation. “Take some of these with you,” says an older Italian lady in broken English. She gardens in a faded sundress and straw hat, her weathered hands cradling blood red Roma tomatoes fresh from the vine. Much to the chagrin of her neighbouring gardener, the old lady’s corn is also almost ready for harvest – one WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

of the vagaries of nature and the green thumb. “Everything she touches grows,” Ursula points out. Ursula is a little camera shy but more than willing to share her gardening wisdom. She shrugs and complains the bees haven’t been visiting her garden this year. Ironically, just steps away a hive is alive and buzzing. Ursula has been working her plot for a decade and can‘t remember a summer like this one. To a passerby this place may appear to be a community garden. To those who spend time bent at the waist, their neck red from the sun and their fingernails forever soiled, this is a garden community. A community of carefully nurtured seeds or much-loved plants pooled with fellow growers, or freshly picked tomatoes proudly shared with a stranger. This is a garden where, like life, the important lessons are learned from parents and grandparents – not with words, but by getting hands dirty and waiting patiently for the results of consistent effort. Gardens change with every season. Rich red rhubarb matures as tender sunflower seedlings emerge from their soil bed sheltered from the cool night air by milk jug greenhouses, soon to stand guard over the late summer garden; followed by orange pumpkins and wintering onions. The sun is warm as more gardeners arrive to tend their plots; no doubt, they will stay to weed and prune until dusk. For those who decide to visit, whatever time of day or season, start with a walk along the tracks. Stop and talk to a gardener or two. Most times, they will be happy to engage in dialogue about their favourite fruits and vegetables. In part, it’s a relief for them to stretch their well-worked backs. Stay as the sun goes down over the rooftops before the walk home. Stop along East Boulevard to smell the sweet-scented nectar of the honeysuckle vines with one of the resident hummingbirds.


� ����

��� ������������ ���� �� �

Photos: Chris Herbert

����������������������������������

The Pizza Garden sign identifies a basil and tomato garden.

A day spent in this garden community will leave visitors with some great memories, new acquaintances and, with a little bit of luck, a handful of vine-ripened tomatoes without SL having to wait ‘til after dark. Getting There: Take the #49 bus or the #16 Arbutus bus to 49th and West Boulevard and be sure to wear a comfortable pair of shoes for touring the interurban gardens. For more information about plot availability, call City of Vancouver’s Social Planning department at 604-871-6031 and ask for Wendy Mendes.

��������������������������������� ����������������������

������������������������������������ ����� ���������� ��� ����������� ��� ����� ����� �������� ���� ����� ���� ����� ���� ���������� ������� ����� ���� ��� ����� �������� ����������� �������� �� ������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������ ��������� �������� ��� ����� ���� ������ �� ����������� ��� ������ �������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������

SNOWBIRDS OUT-OF-COUNTRY MEDICAL INSURANCE

ALSO —

Trip Cancellation Insurance 16 Different Insurance Companies CALL 1-888-831-9338 OR 1-877-482-7381 Please call Mon - Fri between 8am and 5pm or visit our website at www.travelguardian.ca

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

29


BBB Better Better Better Better

Business Business Business Business

Bureau Bureau Bureau Bureau

SCAM ALERT

BY LYNDA PASACRETA

Keeping Your Gold Transactions Golden

W

ith the price of gold at an all-time high, many people are looking for opportunities to sell their gold jewelry for quick cash. As tempting as it might be to sell off unwanted gold, it is important to practise due diligence. This year alone, BBB has received more than 500 complaints against gold, silver and platinum dealers. This number is well on its way to reaching and surpassing 2010’s 581 total complaints against such dealers. Whether you choose to sell your gold through an online venue, at a home “gold party,” or at your local jeweller, you need to be on the lookout for not so reputable sellers. Many of the complaints BBB receive stem from false advertising and delivery issues. Most often consumers are dissatisfied when they realize the appraised value of their jewelry is far less

than what they thought their gold was worth. BBB recommends following these tips to ensure a “golden” gold transaction: Find a trustworthy appraiser. For an appraisal, if possible, go to someone locally whom you know and trust. Always check with BBB first at www.bbb.org. BBB suggests obtaining two or three appraisals to compare prices, prior to any sale. The true price of gold may not be what you receive. If gold is worth $1,700 per ounce, you aren’t going to be paid $1,700 for every ounce of gold you have. Ask what you will be paid (if an online company, make sure you ask for specifics and give details on items you’ll be sending). Understand that the ounce quote is for pure gold only. Don’t let jewelry of different karat value be weighed together. Some dealers will weigh all jewelry together and pay you for the lowest karat value. Separate your jewelry by karat value before attending a gold party. Don’t let anyone steal your diamonds from gold pieces. Single gold stud earrings might be worth $5 or $10, yet diamonds in the earrings can be saved and may be worth much more. Know the terms and conditions when sending items by post. Make sure your items are insured when being shipped, so if they are lost you can recover the value. Obtain appraisals prior to mailing items, so if they are lost you have proof of their value. Check the company’s policy as to what they will reimburse if they lose your product. Many limit their liability. Make a list of the items included in the package, keep a copy for yourself, and put a copy in the envelope. Take a picture of the items you are sending, including any identifying marks. Ask about the company’s guarantee if you are not satisfied with the price offered. Can you get your product back, if you return the cheque? Many companies melt down the items in 10-14 days. And remember, all that glitters is not always gold. Be realistic about your expectations. A piece of jewelry may have more sentimental value to you than it does monetary value to an appraiser. SL Lynda Pasacreta is President of the Better Business Bureau of Mainland B.C. www.mbc.bbb.org To contact Lynda Pasacreta, e-mail president@mbc.bbb.org

30

SENIOR LIVING

WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM


Photo: Jason van der Valk

ASK

Goldie

BY GOLDIE CARLOW, M.ED

Dear Goldie: I have a little problem over responsibility – not my own but my grandchildren’s. Whenever they visit, I am very happy to see them, but problems arise. Recently, my grandson visited for a weekend. It is difficult to comprehend why he is so untidy. He leaves clothes, books and food wherever he spends time. I know his parents have taught him responsibility, but he seems to be so careless. What do you suggest? –W.C. Dear W.C.: This problem requires good communication. Invite your grandson over and have a talk about the situation. He is probably unaware that any problem exists. Bringing it to his attention will likely change his habits. The important point here is to maintain a pleasant relationship with your grandson. Many seniors do not have that good fortune. Dear Goldie: I recently moved into a care home and feel that I made a good choice. However, there is a little annoyance with one resident, which requires change. One lady is just too friendly! Every time I make an appearance, she comes running to help me. I really don’t require assistance but she insists on doing everything. It makes me very uncomfortable, but I can’t seem to persuade her that I am self-sufficient. What can I do to stop her? –A.S.

Explore Together

Dear A.S.: It sounds like you have tried to discourage this lady, but she still insists on helping. Perhaps it is time to speak to the manager before matters escalate. I am sure changes can be made. If you mention that you would need to consider moving, the manager will doubtless attend to the matter immediately. Good Luck! SL Goldie Carlow is a retired registered nurse, clinical counsellor and senior peer counselling trainer. Send letters to Senior Living, Box 153, 1581-H Hillside Ave., Victoria, BC V8T 2C1. Senior Peer Counselling Centres (Lower Mainland)

Where to go today? Perhaps a boat trip on the Harrison River to see eagles nesting, or a scenic trip to a lavender farm in Langley? Maybe a drive to Whistler to experience the Peak to Peak gondola? So many choices... At The Summerhill we get Out and AboutTM together in our state-of-the-art, kneeling, easy access bus to explore new places, and revisit places we have not been to in years. What would you like to do today? Explore with us at The Summerhill. Call us for a personal tour.

New Westminster 604-519-1064 North Vancouver 604-987-8138 Burnaby 604-291-2258 Richmond 604-279-7034 Vancouver West End 604-669-7339 Coquitlam – Tri-Cities 604-945-4480 Vancouver Westside 604-736-3588

135 West 15th Street (off Lonsdale) North Vancouver | 604.980.6525 www.the summerhill.ca Part of Pacific Arbour Retirement Communities

Where good things come together. WWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

OCTOBER 2011

31


THANKS, BUT NO THANKS!

I

often wonder if this old world we live in will be here 70 or so years down the line. If we haven’t destroyed ourselves by then, I wonder what it will be like. Children just born and not yet born will be the seniors then. But will senior have the same meaning as it does today? Technology is advancing so rapidly that it is tripping over itself. Maybe, in 2075, men and women will live to be 150 or 200, and even then not be considered that old. Who knows what the future will bring? Perhaps brain transplants. Maybe body shops will be literally “body” shops. Get old, and have the old brain transplanted into some new scientifically manufactured body. A 70-, 80- or 90-year-old brain into what looks and responds like a 20year-old body! People might go to a body showroom – just like we do for cars today. The wealthy, of course, will be able to buy the most streamlined. They will be the beautiful ones – the handsome ones. The mid-class will be next, and then the economy class. There will probably be used body lots where you may be able to get a real deal on a “near new” body or a body that only went to church on Sunday and then contemplated at home for the rest of the week. I guess if that ever happens, seniors will become extinct! Canes and walkers and scooters will only be found in museums with holograms showing how we got around on them, with the audience tittering 32

SENIOR LIVING

behind their hands and whispering, “How archaic?” The future won’t have any fat people like me. I mean who in their right mind would want their brain transplanted into an overweight body? All men will probably look like Brad Pitt or Arnold Schwarzenegger; and the ladies like Jennifer Aniston or Marilyn Monroe or Sophia Loren. I don’t know if anything like that will ever happen, but if it does, I’m glad I’m not going to be there! I like being a senior. I like my memories. I like the challenges I was faced with and the obstacles I overcame. I like the truths I learned and the mistakes I made that proved what those truths were. I like the contentment of acceptance and the clarity of what I can change and what I cannot. I like being at peace. The winter of life, I find, is a good season. Perhaps even the best season! The springtime of life from birth to 20 is a time of play-acting and experimentation and self-indulgence. The summer, from 21 to 40, is filled with more self-indulgence, but with dares, challenges, and a little make-believe. Pretending we are adults when we don’t always feel or act like adults. From 41 to 60, the autumn, I think is a time of realization and trepidation. Youth begins to fade and energy is at a premium. Anger and disbelief reign at the first hint of wrinkles, fading eyesight or a thickening waist. Then comes winter, when acceptance of things we cannot change beWWW.SENIORLIVINGMAG.COM

Photo: Krystle Wiseman

Reflections THEN & NOW

BY GIPP FORSTER

comes tolerable enough to advise our grown children not to make the same mistakes we made and then quietly wonder how we have made it alive thus far. Some say when you become a senior, weariness becomes a way of life. Perhaps. But for me, the real weariness sets in when I think of going back and starting over in a young vibrant body, and governing it with a tired and battle-scarred old mind. Thanks, but no thanks! I like being able to look back and giggle at some of the mountains I have climbed to get here. And though bones are now brittle, they have stood the test of time, and I am still using them. Indeed, I have regrets, but not enough to think I could do it better the second time around. I may not make the same mistakes, but I would find many others to take their place. My brain may not always have both oars in the water at the same time, but it has learned to have fun and not take itself too seriously. There is safety and contentment in that. I’ll leave tomorrow to tomorrow’s children, and gather these days of being a senior around me and appreciate them; thankful for what I have and have had. My wife just kissed me on the cheek SL – what a nice way to end this.


! 95 W NO To IT Y Move U B LY

N

$9

O

& G PIN TAX HIP LE S B US CA PL PLI AP

or Not to Move?

BC

ON

I DIT

E

A Helpful Guide for Seniors Considering Their Residential Options

If you are a senior who has been wondering lately whether you should consider moving - either because you find the maintenance of your current home more difficult due to diminishing ability or energy, or you simply want a lifestyle that allows you more freedom and less responsibility - then this is the book that can help you ask the right questions and find the solution that is right for you. Advice from professionals who are experts in the area of assisting seniors with their relocation questions and concerns. A handy reference guide for seniors and their families wrestling with the issues around whether relocation is the best option. This 128page book provides helpful, easy to read information and suggestions to help seniors and their families understand the decisions they need to make.

• What residential options are available? • What residential option is right for you? • What do Independent, Assisted Living and Complex Care facilities have to offer? • How much does it cost to live in an Assisted Living residence? What subsidies are available? • If you choose to stay in your own home, what are your options and what should you plan for? • Funding sources available to seniors - tax deductions, housing subsidies, home care subsidies, equipment loan programs, renovation grants, etc. • Downsizing - Where do you start? How do you proceed? • Hiring home care services; do it yourself or hire an agency? • Legal matters - how to make sure you receive the care you desire should you not be able to communicate due to some incapacitating condition • AND MUCH MORE!!!

BOOK ORDER FORM - “To Move or Not to Move” Name_______________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________ City_________________________________ Prov ___________

___ CHEQUE (make payable to Senior Living) ___ CREDIT CARD

____VISA ____MC ____AMEX

CARD NUMBER _________________________________________

Postal Code_______________ Phone _____________________

EXPIRY DATE ________________

Email _______________________________________________

NAME ON CARD ________________________________________

____ BOOKS @ $14.87* each = $____________ *includes shipping and applicable tax

TOTAL = $_________

Mail to: Senior Living Box 153, 1581–H Hillside Ave., Victoria BC V8T 2C1

Shipping rates apply to British Columbia addresses ONLY. To have book mailed to addresses outside of BC, please call Senior Living at 1-877-479-4705 for shipping costs. Please allow 2 weeks for shipping.


������������������������������������

��

������������������������ ������������������������� Make a move to enjoy the carefree lifestyle of Resort Retirement Living. Avenir communities offer both Independent and Assisted Living suites along with unmatched affordability and flexibility. Amenities abound, including first class service, 5-star meals prepared by award winning Red Seal Chefs, enriching social activities, wellness programs and much more. Our luxury communities and spacious deluxe suites are unrivaled anywhere in the retirement industry. Come discover the Diamond Standard of resort retirement living.

All-inclusive from $2,300.

2525 King George Blvd, South Surrey

2245 Kelly Ave., Port Coquitlam

2088 152nd Street, White Rock

www.PacificaLiving.ca

www.AstoriaLiving.ca

www.PeninsulaLiving.ca

604.636.3967

604.998.1605

604.635.1775

Senior Living Magazine Vancouver Edition October 2011  

50+ Active Lifestyle Magazine for Vancouver & Mainland BC Canada

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you