Page 1

PORTFOLIO

banushSHYQERIU Barch. March.

2009


Curriculum Vitae 1. Master Thesis: SYNERGIC SPACES - MOSQUE 2. The Berlin Mosque - Design Studio 3. Competition - Gerhalde - Streiff Architects - Switzerland 4. Davos: The sun city in the high mountains - Design Studio 5. Stassfurt: Exhibition Centre - Design Studio 6. De Luxe Villa - Bachelor Diploma 7. Competition - Arbon - Streiff Architects - Switzerland 8. Competition - Krauchthal - Streiff Architects - Switzerland


1. Master Thesis: SYNERGIC SPACES - MOSQUE Excerpt from Chapter IV


MASTER THESIS Mosque as Community Centre

Mosque as Place of Education

Banush Shyqeriu SYNERGIC SPACES - MOSQUE

Mosque as Place of Worship

Thesis Master: Prof. Dr. Ing. Andrea Haase Second supervisor: Mag. Arch. Matias del Campo

Dessau 2009


Banush Shyqeriu SYNERGIC SPACES - MOSQUE


MASTER THESIS Thesis type: Written Thesis Title: SYNERGIC SPACES - MOSQUE Subtitle: Generative principles for Mosque Design through cross-disciplinary Approach Context: Berlin

Candidate: Banush Shyqeriu Submitted to Anhalt University of Applied Sciences DIA – Dessau International Graduate School of Architecture, Germany 26 July 2009

Thesis Master:

Prof. Dr. Ing. Andrea Haase Mag. Arch. Matias del Campo

fist supervisor second supervisor


Chapter IV MOSQUE 'CRISIS' – DISCREDITING THE MOSQUE AS REPRESENTATIVE BUILT FORM 4.1 Approach adopted 4.1.1 Relevance of Architectural History – the Mosque Typology 4.1.1.1 Typology and Generic Forms 4.2 Searching for Universal Inspiration' Sources – Searching for a Meaning 4.2.1 Arabesque - Islamic Patterns as a Real Potential for Mosque' Visual Language 4.2.2 The Meaning of Ornaments in the Architecture of the Mosque 4.2.2.1 The First View - the Perenialists' Approach 4.2.2.2 The Second View - the Ornamentation as Pleasure Oriented 4.2.3 Method Adopted - Islamic Ornaments as 3D Components in the scope of Advances in Design and Emerging Technologies 4.2.4 Criteria for Selecting Islamic Patterns as a set for Developing 3D Components 4.2.4.1 Islamic Patterns' Catalogue - Geometrical Islamic Patterns - Vegetal and Floral, and - Islamic Calligraphy 4.2.5 Methods, Tools and Techniques used to Create 3D Components from Islamic Patterns – Arabesque 4.2.5.1 From Typology to Novel Topological Blending 4.2.5.2 Reinterpreting the Dome – Organic Architecture 4.2.5.3 Material Performances and Architectural Effects


Exploring the Architecture of the Mosque spatially and temporally through out the Muslim world, despite a vast diversity, we can clearly identify the spirit of the uniqueness of these Mosques, which is derived form the spirit of Islam itself – the purity, simplicity and humbleness. The breakage of this Spirit lead to what we identified as a ‘crisis’ of Mosque as Institution and representative built form. By channelling the Mosque in its eternal idea, where the meaning, purpose, role and beauty are integrated and embedded towards the community development, the Mosque set its position in the peak of Muslim World for its role, purpose and as a ‘panel’ to express the highest creativity and beauty in Islam. Moreover, understanding the generic nature of transcendent forms, surfaces, and patterns, create a new sense of visual beauty worthy of Islamic culture 60 . By freeing itself of any representation of living things, Islam gave a real constrain to the development of an art and architecture relied on pure inspiration, meaning, geometries, patterns and forms derived from nature. A wide alphabet inspired and derived from nature, created a whole grammar and language which universally spread and come to be accepted as a unique creation of the Muslim World spatially and temporally.

Patterns and ornaments inspired form nature and developed in a unique way through the use of geometry created across centuries what is now being known as Arabesque, Islamic Patterns and Islamic Ornaments, which created a definite visual language possessing both vocabulary and grammar. A thirty seven ceramic tile alphabet capable of generating infinite packing configurations throughout the history of Moorish Architecture. © Photography by Jean-Marc Castera Source: Douglis, Evan ‘Autogenic Structures’ Taylor&Francis, Oxon, 2009 IMAGE: © Carmen Redondo/CORBIS

The Vocabulary of the mosque according to Ardalan61 reveals the aesthetic concepts and models of the parts of the mosque, constituting the forms, surface, patterns, colour selection and materials. While Grammar relates to various systems of organising these parts into a coherent whole within the framework of Islamic concepts of place making. Parts of the vocabulary and grammar have achieved, through accretion and evolution, highly charged symbolic meanings, while other parts of the language are very regionally bound. 61

Ardalan, N., 1980, “The Visual Language of Symbolic Form: A Preliminary Study of Mosque Architecture”, J.G. Katz (Ed.), Architecture as Symbol and Self-identity, Philadelphia: Aga Khan Award for Architecture


4.2.1 Arabesque - Islamic Patterns as a Real Potential for Mosque’ Visual Language Islamic Ornamentation with its meaning and formal expression reveals one of the universal elements consisting both grammar and language for the Mosque both in the internal space and its representative visual expression. The application of ornamentation consists of elaboration in materials through geometrical techniques of tiling, multiplication, modularity and dispersion of the Ornament, which can be found across the Architecture of the Muslim world through a distinctive grammar and language. A

B

C

D

E

Direct strapwork and girih-tile construction of 10/3 decagonal patterns.

IMAGE: Š Adam Woolfitt/CORBIS

Source: www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 315 25 February 2007

The alphabet and grammar of the Islamic Ornamentation can be explored for their immense tectonic capabilities and used to generate an infinite new visual language for the Mosque architecture. Architecture of the Mosque inspired from the universal legacies of the past, the premise of the present and the future advances in design and emerging technologies. Through its relevance as one of universal elements of Mosque Architecture, Ornamentation has a deep meaning that kept it alive and spread it world-wide, what is that meaning or there is more than one meaning? This we are going to explore briefly in the scope of the Architectural History temporally and spatially and in the scope of Eternal Idea of the Mosque as Synergic Spaces.


4.2.2

The Meaning of Ornaments in the Architecture of the Mosque

Islamic prayer requires no tangible object, such as an icon or a statue, to induce a sense of divine presence and serve as a support for worship. Visual engagement is therefore unnecessary. The Mosque reveals little correspondence between Muslim prayer ritual and the Mosque form (Kuban), hence Islam itself is prescriptive in behaviour, not in form (Grabar). In this work we will set a critical approach to the views on ornamentation used in the Muslim world and specifically in the Architecture of the Mosque. 4.2.2.1 The First View - the Perenialists’ Approach Symbolism, the perennialists argue, is the most appropriate approach for comprehending the inner meanings of traditional art and architecture and for penetrating deep into their worlds of spirituality and metaphysics. In summary, the perennialists, approach the question of artistic production from the viewpoint of creative imagination and religious inspiration. They focus primarily on the ideas, rituals, and cosmology within the matrices of which an artefact is produced, rather than the historico-cultural conditions that facilitate such production. 62

Metaphysical Order, Pattern of proliferation according to Ibn Arabi.

62

The third stage of manifestation according to Ibn Arabi (MS. 1328).

Samer Akkach, ‘Cosmology and architecture in premodern Islam : an architectural reading of mystical ideas’ New York, 2005


4.2.2.2 The Second View - the Ornamentation as Pleasure Oriented Here we bring two statements and conclusions of two prominent architects and historians of Islamic Architecture: “Ornament is the ultimate mediator, paradoxically questioning the value of meanings by channelling them into pleasure.” Oleg Grabar, ‘The Mediation of Ornament’ “Norms of beauty in the Arab-Islamic culture were autonomous, pleasure-oriented, and independent of moral and religious criteria”. Doris Behrens-Abouseif, ‘Beauty in the Arabic Culture’

Our work maintains the position that Ornamentation in Islamic arts and architecture has certain level of ambiguity due to several implications and tendencies to give meaning to it. Moreover we inherit a sharp distinction through the potency of our recent Modernist past; of what is ornament and pure structure.


As the Eternal Idea of the Mosque as Synergic Spaces derived from Islamic sources, the ornamentation with religious meaning finds no place, as Islam is not about merely forms but is prescriptive in behaviour. We should look to the Ornamentation as a universal legible feature of Muslim architecture by mining its potentials to develop a new and still legible visual language for the Mosque as representative built form that would bring a tangible solution to the representative ‘crisis’ of the Mosque. If ornamentation is to fully return from its banishment, it will only do so as an internally generated feature essential to the expression of the whole. More bluntly, it needs to be autogenic. Further, recent discourse requires a complete separation of the word decoration from the word ornament: one is understood as externally applied and extrinsic, while the other is understood as constitutive and intrinsic. Nominations of decoration are often associated with a cynical interest in kitsch, whereas ornamentation is usually a preliminary term in the pursuit of unadulterated architectural expression. 63 What method can be used to develop the ornamentation further in the expressive language of the Mosque, is it the traditional crafts?

Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, IMAGE: © Walter Bibikow/JAI/Corbis

Carved Pillar at the Palacio de Generalife, Granada IMAGE: © Radius Images/Corbis

Dome of Mihrab in Mosque of Cordoba IMAGE: © Werner Forman/CORBIS

The traditional crafts that form the beauty and the spirit of Architecture in the Islamic world can survive in the contemporary world only if reframed in the scope of advances in design and technology. Only treating the Islamic Ornament in the scope of its potentials to become autogenic will bridge its ambiguity and in the same time provide a new universally legible language for the Mosque as representative built form.

63

Douglis, Evan 'Autogenic Structures' Taylor& Francis, Oxon, 2009


4.2.3 Method Adopted - Islamic Ornaments as 3D Components in the scope of Advances in Design and Emerging Technologies Global technology is shaping the architectural discipline into a distributed, multidisciplinary, and collaborative profession responding to a rapidly changing telecommunications industry. These alterations within the profession have been occurring with such rapidity that their theoretical implications have yet to be fully realized. 64 The most recent techniques not only assist in the virtual forming of architecture, but also bring out the heterogeneous behaviour of the digital material, according to Manuel DeLanda: Form is no longer something static imposed on the outside on structure with homogeneous properties or a behaviour that can be assimilated by the characteristics of solid modelling, but is rather influenced by the properties of the tools used, under the form of the singularity of the digital material. Therefore, it brings out the generative processes and their possibilities connected to the concepts of interactivity, modifiability and evolution among the principals. 65 Theoretically, parametric design processes, as an interrelation or organization of parts within a flexible complex entity, employ an evolutionary approach combined with computational strategies. 66 Modular development approach collapses what seems now to be an artificial separation of structure from ornament. 67

Contemporary Architecture Practice - The Wall of the Future Source: www.psfk.com 64

Tierney, Therese, ‘Abstract Space: Beneath the media surface’, New York, 2007 Ibid., pp. 17 66 Ibid., pp. 19 67 Douglis, Evan 'Autogenic Structures' Taylor& Francis, Oxon, 2009 65

Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia Image: Š Yang Liu/CORBIS


Though ornament and structure have been recognized as important architectural features since the early days of architectural history, the difference between the two was never fully realized as a meaningful difference until the late nineteenth century. As Anne-Marie Sankovitch insightfully points out in her discussion concerning the Gothic cathedral St. Eustache: Structure is the recessive, unrecuperable, unstable presence that finally we cannot work back to; ornament becomes all that we can clearly see, but we can never remove it, see past it, without destroying the structure, which is essential. They are both (here but do not coexist in the simple oppositional way that so many modern texts would have us believe.' The Modular development in architecture through the repetition, multiplication and dissolution of form, structure, ornament and skin, as systems that act upon each other is being widely supported by the emerging technologies in digital fabrications. The aim of this work is to set up a conceptual framework for Mosque representative language in this scope of advances in design and emerging technologies. By adopting a method of creating 3D components resembling the 2D Islamic patterns, applying and testing them in creating skin, structure and space for the design of Mosque as Synergic Spaces. Moreover the use of these approach in the scope of the overall cross-disciplinary approach will bring tangible solution to the discourse on identity and symbolism, cultural attitudes toward a specific style or historicist approach - hence together with the conceptual design framework for spatial organisation of the Mosque as institution – it will bring a very solid and grounded solution for the overall Mosque’ ‘crisis’ as institution and representative built form. The work will proceed through the criteria we set for selecting Islamic patterns, to be carried on through a method of transforming them into 3D components.


4.2.5 Criteria for Selecting Islamic Patterns as a set for Developing 3D Components These criteria are set from the various implications in the Islamic patterns, relevant spatially and temporally and specifically for our method of treating them. These criteria include: - The patterns should be universally legible as Islamic Patterns spatially and temporally, - Potentials to reveal the third dimension, as superimposed set of layers, - They should reveal high Structural and Tectonic potentials, - Potentials of Variations within the same family, - Potentials of Tiling and Diffusing in modular multiplicity, - Potentials of Redundancy and Performance in different geo-climatical contexts. 4.2.4.1 Islamic Patterns’ Catalogue These criteria were applied for three categories of Islamic patterns: 1. Geometrical Islamic Patterns 2. Vegetal and Floral, and 3. Islamic Calligraphy

Geometrical

Vegetal/Floral

Calligraphy

After selecting the set of Islamic patterns through the derived criteria, we would adopt methods to transform these 2D patterns into 3D components.


Catalogue of selected Islamic Patterns Mining Tectonic Potentials


4.2.5 Methods, Tools and Techniques used to Create 3D Components from Islamic Patterns – Arabesque Finger exercises – hand models were first made to test the material performance (in this case rubber sheets, textile and rubber foam) in terms of deformations, flexibility, plasticity and even colour saturation in the form.


Considering the Arabesque as a set of superimposed layers, was developed a method to find the generic geometry that consist the intricacy, strictness, beauty and tectonic potentials of the 2D Islamic Patterns. By disintegrating the pattern into layers, unfolding the generic layers, we derive the geometrical entities to be used for composing and transferring them into three-dimensional components. The criteria set for this technique was that, first of all the 3D component should resemble the generic pattern, hence be legible as a Islamic Pattern, the second main issue was the associative and connective potentials of the 3D component for an associative/blended ‘population’ of a component on a surface. The first experiment was with a very familiar geometrical pattern, based on highly complex geometrical and numerical logics, the reinterpretation of the pattern is achieved through disintegrating it into generic outlines, which outlines were treated as filled surfaces, and multiple outlines were offset inside the boundary of outline, to create a multilayer redundant system. This system was mirrored, and by folding technique the adjacent layers were connected in space to create an intrigue component that resembles the generic pattern. By using digital tools which automate repetitive tasks – population, multiplication, deformation, association, blending and scaling – an intricating system appears, by dissolving the ornament into structure, interacting material, skin, form and space, into a monolithic whole.


The same geometric pattern was then transformed and smoothed into a more organic shape, and the same technique was applied to generate the component and populate it into a surface.


Smoothed-generic parts of the Islamic pattern

Reinterpretation of the Islamic pattern

Folded component - Neoprene Hand model


Sequence of folding the layers of the generic Islamic pattern

Desolution of colour and form


Formation of tectonic geometrical entity

Mining assembly potentials - population the component


Modernist systems of thinking and their concomitant regularizing planning devices-grids, lattices, stems, and fixed branching systems-produced excessive standardization. 68

By adopting the hypostyle hall for crating Mosque space, the components can be used as fabricated units: roof-column clusters. This would create a non-hierarchical spatial organisation, reminiscent to the Prophet's Mosque. Structural webbing of the components in a slight variation with deformative techniques would be used to create deep threedimensional topological surface. Hence, the same family of component can be transformed differently through various techniques, from flat to topological surface.

68

Douglis, Evan 'Autogenic Structures' Taylor& Francis, Oxon, 2009

Modular unit cluster: four unit assembly Fabricated units: roof-column clusters


4.2.5.1 From Typology to Novel Topological Blending In our previous chapters we discussed the Mosque Typology in the Scope of Architectural History and its present relevance. Our conclusion was that a formal approach to categorize Mosques in a certain group or derive generic forms through their reoccurrence spatially and temporally, discredits the Mosque into symbolism and into stylistic approach, and moreover is against the Eternal Idea of the Mosque. Here we explore the approach on Mosque representative ‘crisis’ not through typology but rather through Topology. Transforming the two-dimensional profile of the Islamic pattern into a deep three-dimensional topological surface creates deep and intricate embedded expression and detailed intricacy in the formation of inner spaces. The geometrical entities deform and dissolve into a deep ornamentation, in something beyond the superficial applications of incidental décor. Where structure ends and ornamentation begins is no longer clear. 69

69

Douglis, Evan 'Autogenic Structures' Taylor& Francis, Oxon, 2009


Islamic Calligraphy transformed into 3D structural Component, blended into skin, form and space


4.2.5.3 Material Performances and Architectural Effects

The following component resembles a floral ornament, derived through rotation, mirroring and folding of the generic elements. After superimposing the elements, a multilayered per formative components is derived, which can perform for adjusting the cavities for light intensity and filtering as well as ventilation control.


Diffused Light

Ventilation


The next component represents a floral Ornament, derived through the folding technique from a single layer. After the folding and superimposition it becomes multi layered, where certain layer can perform for adjusting the cavities for lighting and ventilation.


2. The Berlin Mosque - Design Studio


Urban CONCEPT Opening The Berlin Block

Break,

nge,R

Rearra

eshap

Releas

e

gative

ing Ne

s

Space

Rearrangement, Space and Volume Küllyie - Enclosure Vs. Closure ‘No Hazard’ Place

Cr

os

sa

sf oc

al

Po ni t

l sure Co

Closu

re


Functions - conceptual


Situation


Floor Plans

Basement / Parking

Ground Floor

First Floor

Second Floor


Section through Mosque


Visualisations


Structure


Skin and sructure


Mosque Interior/Prayer space


3. Architectural Competition Architectural Office: Streiff Architekten, Z端rich Projetkwetbewerb Schulanlage Gerhalde St. Gallen


Situation

694

6 9 4 .3 6

6 9 3 .9 5

6 9 3 .8 0

6 9 3 .8 1 5

6 9 3 .8 0 6 9 2 .7 4

6 9 3 .0 0

SCHULHAUS

6 9 2 .9 5

6 9 2 .6 0 6 9 2 .4 2 6 9 1 .9 0

6 8 8 .0 0

HARTPLATZ

SPIELPLATZ

6 9 1 .3 5 6 9 2 .0 4

6 8 7 .6 1 6 8 7 .6 0

6 8 7 .5 0

6 8 8 .3 3 6 8 6 .9 9

6 8 7 .0 0

TURNHALLE SPIELWIESE

6 8 5 .6 0

6 8 5 .6 0

6 8 4 .0 0

SCHÜLERGARTEN

N

6 8 6 .0 0


School and Sport hall - Ground floor C

WIESE

B BETONMAUER HECKE HAINBUCHE

PFLƒ STERUNG 3 0 VELO GEDECKTE

ASPHALT KASTANIEN

Treppenlift WC M 5.4 m2

WC K 5.2 m2 HFL

GRUPPENZIMMER 23.8 m2

CHAUSSIERUNG BIBLIOTHEK/ MEHRZWECKRAUM 120.3 m2 PFLƒ STERUNG

RASEN

KLASSENZIMMER 76.1 m2

KLASSENZIMMER 76.1 m2

WIESE/ STRƒ UCHER

C

FESTKIES SICKERFƒ HIG SITZSTUFE GEDECKTE PAUSENINSELN

BALLFANGITTER

BALLFANGITTER

HARTPLATZ

KASTANIEN

WIESE/ STRƒ UCHER

STRAUCHBEPFLANZUNG

+ 0.6

+ 0.50

GERƒ TERAUM 18 m2 WEITSPRUNG

± 0.00 = 687.00

WIESE

BETONPLATTEN

A

SPIELWIESE

-1.40 FOYER -1.40 = 685.60

OFFICE 8.6 m2 - 1.40

OBSTBƒ UME

SCHÜLERGARTEN

WIESE

CHAUSSIERUNG

CHAUSSIERTER WEG

CHAUSSIERTER WEG

B HECKE HAINBUCHE

BA LL FA NG ITT ER

+ 0.64

BALLFANGITTER

AUSSENPFLEGEGERƒ TE 12.5 m2


C

C

School

LAGER Reserve 8 m2

IV-L WC 5.2 m2

WC HW 7 m2

L-P 2.5 m2

KÜCHE MIT VORRATSRAUM 21.8 m2

MASCH. 13.1 m2

WC K 5.7 m2

WC M 6 m2

HFL GRUPPENZIMMER 25.1 mq

FSA 76.6 m2

KLASSENZIMMER 76.8 m2

KLASSENZIMMER 77.8 m2

C

C

LAGER HW 18 m2

- 4.60

Basement 2

HAUSWART 23 m2

Basement 1

OBLICHTER

-0.10

C

VERBINDUNG SPORTANLAGE

C

±0.00

LAGER Reserve 8.6 m2

WC K 7 m2

WC M 5,5 m2

SCHULLEITUNG 11.4 m2

WC K 5.7 m2

WC M 6 m2

HFL

BESPRECHUNG 30.7 m2

+0.83

GRUPPENZIMMER 25 mq

MATERIALRAUM WERKEN UND GESTALTEN 14 m2

-0.35 WERKRAUM TEXTIL 74.5 m2

WERKEN UND GESTALTEN 73,5 m2

LEHRERZIMMER 33 m2

KLASSENZIMMER 76.8 m2

C

VORBEREITUNGSRAUM 28.1 m2

C

MATERIALRAUM WERKRAUM TEXTIL 14.1 m2

Upper floor 1

Upper floor 2

KLASSENZIMMER 77.1 m2


Elevations

+ 4.45 + 3.20

± 0.00 = 687.00

-1.40

-1.40

+ 4.45 + 3.20

+ 1.00 = 688

+ 0.64 ± 0.00 = 687 -1.40 - 1.95 - 2.78

- 4.60

- 4.55

+ 4.45 + 3.20

+ 1.00 = 688 + 0.64

- 1.40

Structural Concept


± 0.00 = 687.00 - 1.14 - 2.27 - 3.34 - 4.55

HAUSTECHNIKRAUM 1 9.3 m2

GARDEROBE LEHRER 15.5 m2

STAURAUM 20 m2 - 4.60

TURNHALLE 448 m2

SCHRƒ NKE FÜR SPORTMATERIAL

GARDEROBE LEHRER + ERSTE HILFERAUM 16 m2

GARDEROBE HERREN 26.9 m2

DUSCHRAUM HERREN 16.6 m2

B

B

HAUSTECHNIKRAUM 2 15 m2

SCHRƒ NKE FÜR SPORTMATERIAL

DUSCHRAUM DAMEN 16.6 m2

GARDEROBE DAMEN 26.9 m2

WC IV 3 m2

- 4.60

PUTZRAUM 8.7 m2

3. O berge scho ss

- 4.60

GERƒ TERAUM TURNHALLE 81.5 m2

WC H 5 m2

WC D 5.6 m2

Sport Hall - Underground


Visualisations


Urban Situation - derivation of volumes


Studio ‘Davos’ Project Key Name; ‘The Bigness of Davos’ CIA Spring 2008, Banush Shyqeriu Gross Floor Area..... 5440 m2 Retail Area................1900 m2 Office Area ...............3540 m2 Parking Spaces: 14 - open parking 55 - underground parking 11 buses Horse carriages


0. Ground Floor

1. First Floor

2. Second Floor


3. Third Floor

7.Seventh Floor

8. Eighth Floor


-1. Underground floor/Parking


Detail


Facade - Negative Space


5. Stassfurt: Exhibition Centre - Design Studio


a

Hochschule Anhalt (FH) Prof. Ralf Niebergall

“Competence Centre on Mining and Mining Subsequent Consequences” In Corporation with IBA STADT UMBAU 2010

Staßfurt Presentation

By: banush SHYQERIU

11.02.2008


Visualisations


INSPIRATION, IDEA AND DESIGN CONCEPT

Tunels

Crystals

Porosity


Keyword

Tunnels Lonelyness Intimacy

Past

Mining

Tragedy

Potash History

Salt

Narrate Remembrace Impact

Soil Porosity Water

Drama

Wealth

Unconsciousness

Experience

Nature

Secure Unstable

Hidden Explicit

Shown Emotions

Implicit

Hope

Narrative Symbolism Future ‘Small Iconic’

....................???


Stable

Mining Tunnels Underground Water


Tunnel

Wa ter

Land Subsidence Tunnel collapse

Impact Unstable Impact

Unstable

Water flood


Depicting the shapes

Tunnels/Labyrinths

Soil Porosity

Water Flood

Potash, salt crystals


6. De Luxe Villa - Bachelor Diploma


SITUATION

N


BIOMIMETICS


PRE GROWN PANEL

SUSTAINABILITY AND CONSTRUCTION


0. Ground Floor


1. First Floor


-1. Basement


Sections


Sections

Elevations


Insolation Analysis Living Room


Insolation Analysis Library and Reading Room


Visualisations


7. Competition - Arbon - Streiff Architects - Switzerland

Projektwettbewerb Neubau Sporthalle Arbon


Erdgeschoss

Projektwettbewerb Neubau Sporthalle Arbon


B

Garderobe

Sanit채tszimmer 15m2

Garderoben 142m2

Turnlehrer 72m2

Duschen 112m2

Trockenzone

Duschraum

Schmutzschleuse

Technikraum 64 m2

A

A

Aussengarderoben 140m2

Material Sportvereine

Putzraum 12m2

Innenger채teraum 240m2

B Untergeschoss

B

Regieraum 25m2

Materialraum 16m2

Haustechnik

Hauswart 21.5m2

Technikraum L체ftung und Zentrale Solaranlage 80m2

A

A

Theorieraum1 26m2

Theorieraum2 26m2 Materiallager 10.5 m2

Mehrzweckraum 80m2

Materiallager 10.5 m2

B Projektwettbewerb Neubau Sporthalle Arbon

Obergeschoss


Schnitt A-A

Ansicht S端d

Schnitt B-B

Ansicht Ost

Ansicht West

Ansicht Nord

Projektwettbewerb Neubau Sporthalle Arbon


Ansicht/Konstruktionsschnitt

Projektwettbewerb Neubau Sporthalle Arbon


8. Competition - Krauchthal - Streiff Architects - Switzerland

PROJ EKTWETTBEWERB RÜEDISMATT KRAUCHTHAL


KINDERGARTEN

RÜEDISMATT E

SCHULANLAGE

ARENA GEMEIDEPLATZ

Ta nn b

od eb a

ch

SPORTHALLE

RÜEDISMATT D

WERKHOF

MUSEUM

ANLIEFERUNG

WEHRDIENS TANLAGE

SITUATION

PROJ EKTWETTBEWERB RÜEDISMATT KRAUCHTHAL


B

582

VELOPLÄTZE

FOYER 107 m2

A

A

ARENA

RESERVE 173.2 m2

A' Benzin und Öl

Tann bode bac h

Holz

Strassenbeleuchtung

ABFALLSAMMELSTELLE 54 m2

MULDE 45 m2

Baumaterial

Signalisation Absperrmaterial

58 1

Klein- und Verbrauchsmaterial

VELOPLÄTZE EINSTELLHALLE/GARAGE 304 m2

LAGER 100 m2 5 82

Werkstatt

Kleinmaschinen

SALZSILO 45 m2

WERKSTÄTTE 30 m2 A'

WASCHPLATZ 30 m2

ANLIEFERUNG

SCHULBUS PLATZ

Reserve

B

PARKPLÄTZE

ERDGESCHOSS

PROJ EKTWETTBEWERB RÜEDISMATT KRAUCHTHAL


B STAURAUM BÜHNE 20 m2

HAUSTECHNIK 27.5 m2

HAUSWART/HAUSTECHNIK 24.4 m2

GARDEROBE 23.3 m2

DUSCHRAUM 19.4 m2

DUSCHRAUM 19.4 m2

A

A

TURNHALLE 448 m2 WC D 8.9 m2 WC IV 3 m2

GERƒ TERAUM TURNHALLE 80 m2

WC H 8.9 m2 PUTZRAUM 3 m2

WC H 8.9 m2 WC IV 3 m2

WC D 8.9 m2

LAGER 38.9 m2

GARDEROBE

GARDEROBE LEHRER 15.1 m2

PUTZRAUM 4.6 m2

GARDEROBE 23.3 m2

A'

SPORTHALLE/RESERVE UG HAUSTECHNIK/LAGER 78.6 m2

Sportha lle S IA 416 UG = 880 m2 EG = 190 m2

ZSA BEST. VERBINDUNG ZU KÜCHE

B

SCHNITT B

PROJ EKTWETTBEWERB RÜEDISMATT KRAUCHTHAL


A'

AUFENTHALTSRAUM 27.4 m2

RESERVE 176.7 m2

PUTZS. SANITƒ TSRAUM 5.4 m2 GARDEROBE H 8.9 m2

A'

A'

GARDEROBE F 8.9 m2

BÜRO 23 m2 A'

WERKHOF 1. OG

RESERVE 1. OG

WERKHOF GF SIA 416 EG = 440 m2 OG =140 m2

Res erve GF SIA 416 UG = 200 m2 EG = 210 m2 OG = 210 m2

SCHNITT/ANSICHT A

SCHNITT A'

PROJ EKTWETTBEWERB RÜEDISMATT KRAUCHTHAL


ANSICHT OST

ANSICHT SÜD

ANSICHT WEST

ANSICHT NORD

PROJ EKTWETTBEWERB RÜEDISMATT KRAUCHTHAL

Portfolio, Banush  

A short portfolio of some of my works

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