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free ■ DEC/JAN 2011 No.144 ■ Celebrating the Life and Times of the LOCAL Community

Season’s Greetings

Wishing all readers, their families and visitors, a peaceful and joyous holiday break. May you enjoy the best the Far North Coast has to offer and, above all else, the rewards of an harmonious community.

Green and growing: School kids set up shop with Garden Club help, page 21

Christmas Eve 1980: Town wasn’t always cute – in fact it was a bit of a hole, page 12

Horses for courses: Another great Show with fun for all ages and interests, page 14


Kitchen and Bathroom Showroom 10am -5pm Mon til Fri

Editorial

Saturday by appointment

Bangalow Industrial Estate Dudgeons Lane Ph: 6687 2275

www.cchomemakers.com

Cover photo credits: Christmas Wreath from the Garden by Christobel Munson; BPS Garden Day by Judy Baker; Bangalow in the 70s courtesy Terry Bleakley; At the Show by Brigitte Zeisig. This pic: Santa comes to town by Judy Baker.

Bangalow’s

Heartbeat

Summer sun Over lunch in the Moller Pavilion during the Bangalow Show, we were chatting about sunburn – how to treat it, how to avoid it. As kids, I remember my mother putting slices of tomato and cucumber on our scorched hot pink backs as we were packed in like sardines in the back of someone’s ute on the way home from the beach. A friend said how just a whiff of coconut oil brought back memories of summer sunbaking and seaside holidays. These days the wiser option is to steer clear of the burning rays and just to cover up. As the year-end winds die down, the

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www.heartbeat.net.au PO Box 132 Bangalow NSW 2479 Editors: Christobel Munson 6687 2244 Stephanie King 6629 1644 Email: editors@heartbeat.net.au Advertising: Di Martin 6687 2592 Email: advertising@heartbeat.net.au Design: Niels Arup narup@bigpond net .au

rains stop and the temperature and humidity rise to bring decent beach or poolside weather, the pace of life slows down from that relentless pre-Christmas frenetic pace. We’re now starting to think about having the time to unwind on hot relaxed days, eating yummy summer prawn and mango salads, ice tinkling in long cool drinks, hanging out with friends and family as we wind up 2010 and contemplate 2011. In this issue, our writers have each nominated places they take visiting friends as they flock to the North Coast for their holidays. Lyn Plummer has given thought to what we’ll eat for The newly refurnbished A&I Hall was looking its dazzling best for festive meals, and we’ve the first day of the Show. As soon as the scaffolding was removed, scoured the main street of Michael Malloy and Sue Holm made sure that everything was spick Bangalow to find the sort and span. Better than Botox.  Pic by Judy Baker. of decorations that set the mood for the season. The dedicated team at Bangalow’s Heartbeat wish our readers a pleasant and peaceful holiday season, and an exciting and fruitful year ahead. We’ll be back in February 2011 with the next instalment.  Christobel Munson

DISCLAIMER. This news-letter is published by Bangalow’s Heartbeat Incorporated PO Box 132 NSW 2479. Hon Editors Stephanie King; Karen Jordan, Hon Sec/Public Officer Terry Adcock. Membership is open to all adult residents of the ‘2479’ postal district.This Thenewsletter opinionsis expressed individual contributors are not necessarily by the Editors and other members DISCLAIMER. published byby Bangalow’s Heartbeat Incorporated PO Box 132 NSWshared 2479. Hon. Editors Christobel Munson, Stephanieof King, Hon Sec/Public Officer Helen Wilson. Membership is open to all is adult residents of the 2479 postal district. The opinions expressed by individualInc. the Association committee. While every reasonable effort made to publish accurate information, Bangalow’s Heartbeat contributors are not necessarily shared by the Editors and other members of the Association committee. While every reasonable effort is made to publish acceptsinformation, no responsibility forHeartbeat statements expressed. accurate Bangalow’s Inc. made acceptsor no opinions responsibility for statements made or opinions expressed. Printed by Pristine Publications. BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


ABOUT OUR TOWN

Keep Bangalow’s Heart beating: We need your help!

Exhausted members of the Heartbeat Team.

Bangalow’s Heartbeat is actively looking for more players to join our team. We need people with a variety of skills, not just writers. Volunteers are needed to edit the magazine, proof-read, design, deal with incoming messages and other admin, distribute copies, as well as understudying and contributing to vital key roles. Working on Heartbeat offers newcomers – or long-time residents – a fabulous way to

plug into the 2479 post-code area, both town and hinterland life, and a way to become constructively involved in our community. A small dedicated team produces our popular monthly publication, but, as in any volunteer group, if too few people do too much work, they burn-out. We’re trying to avoid that. Outside documenting the life and times of the 2479 community by producing the monthly magazine, the aims of Bangalow’s

Heartbeat are to help the community of Bangalow become more cohesive, caring and stronger; to be able to influence and record how the area develops in social, cultural, commercial and environmental ways; and to move into the future, recognising both its heritage and its responsibilities to future generations. If you would like to jump in and join our team, please email editors@heartbeat.net.au

Bangalow

The Hinterland Specialists

Wishing you a Merry Christmas a n d h a p p y 2 0 11 19a Byron Street, Bangalow www.eldersbangalow.com.au

6687 1500 NOVEMBER 2010 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

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W H AT ’ S H A P P E N I N G ?

Is our new Shire DCP really updated? The latest Byron Shire Development Control Plan 2010 has been on public exhibition for 28 days and public submissions close on 2 December 2010. This draft DCP is an amalgamation of all existing Byron Shire DCPs into one plan to comply with changes to the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979. In view of imminent developments in various parts of Bangalow, it might be reasonable to expect that Chapter 12 – which deals with planning controls in Bangalow – might have deserved some updating. At the very least some of the references to the Pacific Highway Bypass and its impacts, now over 10 years out of date, could have been replaced by new controls relating to ameliorating the impacts of the new highway and the proposed (and still under debate) highway interchange

at Bangalow. This is especially pertinent as three of the new development areas are close to the new highway. The DCP still displays (on page 32) the 1991 map of Bangalow! Council is still preparing draft DCPs for each of the six development areas in Bangalow, as reported in our last issue. How and when these get embraced within the new draft DCP 2010 for the whole shire remains to be seen. Some of the issues that came up in the public meeting are different from, or not embraced by, the dated standards in the Draft DCP 2010. These include community-preferred block sizes (a minimum of 700 square metres rather than the 600 square metres apparently favoured by council staff) and a publicly owned vegetation buffer between new developed areas and established residences. It is to be hoped that council will defer adoption of the draft

DCP (or at least the Bangalow chapter) until the individual development area DCPs are finalised to the community’s satisfaction, and their requirements embraced in a truly up-todate shire-wide DCP. An outcome of the recent debates about Bangalow’s future has been that a number of residents are considering the reestablishment of a Bangalow Progress Association to provide a focus for residents to meet, debate, negotiate and lobby on the town’s burning issues. These currently include the new development areas, the use of developer levies, the provision of bike and pedestrian paths, as well as the highway issues of the interchange, noise and vegetation loss, and other such matters. Your correspondent will continue to observe and report on this initiative, still in its early stages.  Tony Hart

LATE NEWS ON ‘NO INTERCHANGE’ CAMPAIGN Despite Bangalow sending the NSW Parliament a 1015-signature petition to stop the RTA’s proposed Bangalow Interchange, the Roads Minister continues to support it – and to fail to reply to Bangalow’s letters! He has claimed in response to our tabled questions in Parliament that “the interchange at Bangalow must remain as it forms an integral part of the incident management system for the proposed tunnel at St Helena Hill.”

As a result, the Bangalow citizens who signed the original petition and the Chamber of Commerce are planning a sustained media campaign against the interchange, leading up to the March 2011 state election. It’s likely to be a last ditch effort to prevent trucks (and all highway traffic in the event of a tunnel incident) being diverted onto Bangalow Road near the Bowlo, which would cause traffic paralysis.  Ian Hay

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local news

Beyond Zero Emissions Launch

Late in November the Lismore Climate Action Network staged the Northern Rivers launch of a national plan to solve Australia’s climate change challenges by converting the country’s energy supply to 100 per cent renewable by the year 2020. Known as the Zero Carbon Australia Stationary Energy Plan, it is the result of a research collaboration between the University of Melbourne’s Energy Institute (www.energy.unimelb.edu.au) and a nonprofit group called Beyond Zero Emissions (www.beyondzeroemissions.org). The fully-costed plan has been designed by a broad coalition of engineers, academics and industry experts and uses proven existing renewable technologies. More than 100 people have been working pro bono on the project. The claim is that it can be built and operational within a decade, resulting in zero carbon emissions being produced in Australia. It has been endorsed by a number of eminent scientists, energy experts and independent thinkers such as Australian Living Treasure, Sir Gustav Nossall. Outlining the plan was Mark Ogge, from the Beyond Zero Emissions group in Melbourne, supported by a range of local speakers. Lismore Mayor Jenny Dowell opened the event, which was chaired by Gordon Fraser-Quick, Southern Cross University’s Alumnus of the Year 2010. Cr Dowell noted that Lismore had the highest take-up of solar energy of any postcode in Australia, having installed nearly three times as many solar panels as any other postcode, bar Sydney’s Olympic Village. As Mayor, she was very concerned about our reliance on coal and oil fields and motor vehicles but hoped that, necessity being the mother of invention, good people would rise up to deal with the problems of Climate Change. “The BZE plan aims to reduce our emissions with different technologies, but we as a society lack political will. It needs a push from the grass roots, which is what the BZE plan is about.” Mark Ogge explained that the plan was

Key speaker Mark Ogge.

based on using 60 per cent concentrated solar thermal energy, using molten salt to maintain the heat absorbed by day in sun-attracting mirrors, and 40 per cent wind power. (See http://zerocarbonplan.org for details.) Huge facilities utilising the solar technology are currently installed in Spain and China. Interestingly, he noted that the plan was ‘jobs rich’ and well within Australia’s productive capacity. In essence, Mr Ogge noted that Australia’s choice for power in the future was between using 20 tons of brown coal or one square metre of mirror to create the same amount of energy. Other speakers included Robert Rosen, an ethical and sustainable investment advocate, who said that there needs to be an environment where long-term investors could have confidence in stable government

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policies, rather than the current stop-start policies of both federal and state governments. “Governments can plan an effective derisking role that’s needed right now,” he said. He pointed out that the Northern Rivers region has long taken a leadership and pioneering role in the development and take-up of alternate energy, citing the Mullumbimby hydro-electricity plant, and Rainbow Power in Nimbin. An 18-year-old student, Johanna Qualmann, made an impassioned plea as she gave the young person’s point of view. “Australia pumps out 170 tonnes of carbon dioxide per person per annum, more than all of Europe, and number eight per capita in the world. Germany is already using 15 per cent renewable energy, with less sun than Australia, while we use only four per cent. We want the same quality of life that you have had. We deserve a future, too.” The regional organiser of the 100 per cent Renewable Energy campaign network, former high school headmaster, Tony Gleeson, said change comes from the people. “I grew up on an unhealthy diet of cowboys and Indians where, at the very last minute, the cavalry always rides up and saves the day. But we’ve got to realise that, today, we’re the cavalry. The BZE plan gives us hope that 100 per cent renewable energy is possible. But change won’t happen unless ordinary people take action. “Our job is to make it more painful for the politicians to ignore us than the fossil fuel industry. People love using renewable energy, preferring to use it than burning fossil fuel unnecessarily. What we need to do is get organised locally so that government understands what we want.”  Christobel Munson

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community noticeboard

Clarification

To clarify an item in THE BIZ column last month, Bangalow Naturopathics, established by Sue Daly and Kaye Shadbolt over 10 years ago, is indeed for sale. The business is located in historic Bangalow House. Though Sue and Kaye are hoping to move on to other ventures and interests, after the sale they are happy to assist the new owners, consulting or otherwise, if required.

ADFAS News

1. The Byron Bay and District ADFAS is in recess until 28 March, 2011. The new Committee is busy planning for next year with a wonderful series of lectures coming our way. We hope to have next year’s program available in time for the Xmas Party. Meetings will continue to be at the A&I Hall, Bangalow but the lecture will be at the new time of 6.30pm with supper to follow. Early Bird memberships for 2011 are available. 2. Christmas Party for members and friends on the Moller Pavilion verandah, in the Showgrounds, on Saturday 11 December, 5.30-7.30. A great opportunity to catch up with all of your ADFAS friends and pick up next year’s program of lectures. RSVP cazzabul@ bigpond.net.au before 8 December 2010 or phone 6684 4996.  Carole Gamble

Bangalow Garden Club

At the November AGM Margaret Byrne from Rosebank was elected President for 2011. Gwen Weir from Eureka is Secretary and Kath Amor is Treasurer. They will be supported by a willing committee who take up various roles and responsibilities. A very active and successful year was concluded with the Christmas Lunch at The Byron at Byron Resort. The first meeting in the New Year will be on Wednesday 2 February at 1.30pm in the Anglican Hall.  Helen Johnston

BPS Fund-raiser

It was odd socks aplenty at Bangalow Public School as students raised $500 for the clown doctors at Lismore Base Hospital. Students, parents and teachers dressed up in their silliest socks in recognition of long time supporter Michael Malloy who has been ill recently. We wanted to do something for Michael in recognition of what he does for us. Michael is always wearing odd socks when he visits us, and this is what gave us the idea. He himself came up with the idea of donating the money to the Lismore Base Hospital clown doctors – a group dear to his heart. The school’s P&C supported the cause by organising a fun performance called ‘Journey to the Centre of the Earth’, and prizes were awarded to students and teachers who had the best odd socks.  Peter Flannery

Art Awards

Two local students from Byron Bay High School have had their HSC artworks preselected for the prestigious ‘ArtExpress’ event which showcases some of the most outstanding student works in the Visual Arts course. For Kalinda Whitchey of Bangalow, and Luke Oliver of Knockrow, it comes as very exciting news. Kalinda’s work is a series of paintings entitled ‘Dreamscapes’ and Luke has produced welded metal sculptures with the title ‘Imagination of my Backyard’. Sue Holm

Bowlo Report

We now have Monteiths Apple Cider and Carlton Premium Dry on Tap. To celebrate we are having a Monteiths Mufti Bowls Day on Sunday 12 Dec from 9.30am. The $15 entry includes green fees and lunch. There will be prizes and a seafood tray raffle. Christmas is coming and we are having our big hamper raffle with 26 prizes, drawn Friday 17 December at 7.30pm. Tickets at

MOBILE LIBRARY At Bangalow School every Saturday morning 9.30am -11.30am

BEESLEY & HUGHES

Open 8am5.15pm

LAWYERS of BANGALOW

Owen Hughes: Principal Solicitor Cassandra Bennett: Solicitor • Richard Makarewicz: Paralegal www.beesleyandhughes.com.au

Coorabell Hall

All welcome to the Coorabell Hall Christmas party on Sunday 5 December, 4pm–7.30pm. BBQ and kids games, Santa is arriving at 5pm. Open mic from 5.30 so please bring along your guitar, your voice and your friends for a great community party. See www.coorabellhall.net  Wendy Gray

Heritage House

All through December we will be selling special Christmas fare like chutneys, etc. Why not put together a special Tearooms goodies hamper 
as a gift for someone special or for yourself? Looking forward to 
seeing all our usual suspects joining in on the fun at our party (see back page). Warm wishes, seasons greeting and many blessings for this special season and into the new year. We will re-open on Wednesday 19 January and there will be a special Australia 
Day breakfast on the 26 January, 2011.
  Wendy Grissell, Trish Bleakley and Lyn and Jodie McKinnon

Music Scholarship

From 16-21 April, 2011 there will be an opportunity for two Bangalow students to attend Sunwater and Stanwell Winter Music School, in Rockhampton, Queensland. The prestigious school is restricted to secondary students from Queensland, but by special arrangement with the school’s Artistic Director, Paul Dean, there is an opportunity for

Heritage House Tearoom open 10am to 3pm Wednesday - Saturday Booking (p) 6687 2183

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Bar. Santa will visit the kids on Sunday 19 at 1.30pm. Free lollies. Contact the Bowlo to put your names down and talk to staff for further details (nudge nudge wink wink). Bistro News: Book your Christmas Function with Dani from the Bistro on 6687 1235. Puddings will be available late December. New Years Eve at the Bowlo with Retrovirus playing from 8pm, see page 19. Free Entry and Courtesy Bus available. Caroline Nolan

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BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT 66BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


two local students to attend. (Paul Dean is also the Director of the Bangalow Music Festival). The Bangalow Lions Club and Chamber of Commerce are each offering a scholarship valued at $1150 to cover travel, tuition, accommodation and meals (at the Rockhampton Girls’ Grammar School) and incidental costs. The scholarships are named the ‘Sandi Dean Music Scholarships’ in memory of the late Sandi Dean, a much loved Bangalow community identity and tireless worker for the Lions Club. To be eligible, students must be enrolled in 2011 in a secondary school (Government or non-Government) and reside in the 2479 area. Application forms and further information have been sent to head music teachers in all local secondary schools or can be obtained locally from Michael Malloy on 6687 1081. Applications close on Friday 11 February 2011 and must be sent to PO Box 159, Bangalow 2479. For further information: www.southernxsoloists.com Michael Malloy

Red Cross

The ladies of Bangalow Red Cross would like to say thank you to the community for their support throughout the year and wish everyone a Merry Christmas. As a small group we work hard to provide the produce for our stalls and it would be a great help if in the coming year more people could donate plants, baked goods, jams or chutneys for our street stalls. After seeing all the entries at the show I can see there are some very good cooks around! For any information phone 6687 2828 or see me at Charlottes Parlour.  Charlotte Clark

Sk8 Park

Our next meeting is 14 December at 7pm at the Bangalow Bowlo. Come and join us and have your say. Note change of time.

Next meeting: working towards a DA for the SK8 park; incorporating the AGM for the BPA; watch out for the new SK8 park logo. The Christmas raffle is on sale; don’t miss out on buying your tickets! It will be drawn on Christmas Eve. Contact: bangalowsk8park@ gmail.com or Jeremy Edmeades 0407 109 209; Jane Reffell 6687 1640.

Spiritsong

Spiritsong presents choral music to soothe the soul in the hectic days before Christmas, from Henry VIII to Bach and Elgar. Plus a musical setting of the nonsense words of Edward Lear’s Owl and the Pussy Cat, and a stocking full of gorgeous Christmas music. Spiritsong, based in Bangalow, is a mixed voice choir under the musical direction of local musician, Warren Whitney. The date is Thursday 2 December, 7.30pm at All Souls Anglican Church – the ‘jewel in the crown’ of Byron Shire’s architectural delights – where sound is enhanced by the church’s acoustics. Tickets are $10 at door, school children free. Enquiries 0429 185 361. Christine McNeil

Newrybar News

Dinner and movie night at the Hall on Saturday 4 December, 7pm, at an all inclusive ticket price. Select a dish when you book a ticket: chickpea and vegetable curry or chicken and vegetable curry (both served with rice raita, chutney, salad) or spinach fetta pie, salad, home made sauce, plus dessert. BYO. The movie is the classic John Cleese A Fish Called Wanda. Tickets at $25/head from 6687 8443, or ianduncan@linknet.com.au All proceeds go to Hall improvments. The new commercial-grade kitchen in the hall was officially opened by Marie Flick and Edna Hayter at a ceremony on Thursday 25 November. More in the February edition of Heartbeat.  Ian Duncan

For emergency flood and storm assistance

132 500

NOVEMBER 2010 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

Cracking the ‘Top 100’

Bangalow resident, travel writer Kim Wildman, is excited to learn that she has made Tripbase’s list of their 100 Favourite Travel Writers from around the globe. Listed at No.78, she is “chuffed to even make it on a list that includes such great travel writing heavy hitters as Abbie Kozolchyk, Amanda Castleman, David Atkinson and Rolf Potts.” Kim says: “It may not be a Pulitzer or even a Walkley, but as a freelance writer who spends numerous hours locked in a study tapping away on a laptop, it’s a great honour to be recognised by such a highly acclaimed travel site.”  Christobel Munson

Scout News

Bangalow Scouts had a successful response to their call for kids to give Scouting a trial. Eight girls and three boys came to see what Scouts is about and some have been invested. Exciting news is that they have four prospective Joey Scouts who have been having fun for a few weeks. To open Joey Scouts in Bangalow they need a minimum of six children and two adult leaders. Joey Scouts is the first Section of Scouts, for boys and girls aged 6-8 years. A trained Joey Scout Leader guides a Joey Mob of up to 20 boys and girls as they learn to share and care for each other in a social environment. It’s more than school as it extends each child’s understanding of the world around them. Joey Scouts is about having FUN! Unfortunately Bangalow Scouts missed out on a camp at Meerschum Vale due to the wet weather. All the activities planned for Air Land and Sea camp at Harwood were also washed away, but Bangalow Scouts stuck it out and stayed for the duration while all of the other groups went home. What a tough mob! The next scout event is the Christmas Party on December 7. All scout information is available from Jenny Holden 6687 2047.

North Coast Bookkeeping Services For all your Bookkeeping requirements including BAS, QuickBooks or MYOB ph: 6687 2604 Ian Holden fax: 6687 2893 7 Rosewood Ave, Bangalow book001@bigpond.net.au Member of Australian Bookkeepers Network

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FOOD

a north coast diary Belinda Jeffery’s new cookbook is a celebration of local food and the changing seasons and produce of her Byron Shire home.

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The first question to ask Belinda is why does she use local produce in her recipes? And her answer is simple: “Because I live here. And, also, why wouldn’t you? It’s such beautiful produce, and so fresh. When you buy from the Farmers Markets, it’s just been picked. “One of the joys of living here is to be able to speak with the farmers who grow the food or who make the product. There are lovely positive reasons for cooking with local food. “I buy tomatoes from Hugh and Heather from Hayters Hill, and love Heartbread’s Big Bertha Sourdough. Toasted, it’s really good. Note: We have had to cut some of Belinda’s mood-setting words. Apologies. Get the book! Belinda Jeffery will be appearing at Peppercorn Kitchen in Lismore on 4 December from 1pm for book signing and afternoon tea, and at Mary Ryan’s Bookstore in Byron Bay on 11 December from 3.30pm.

Sweet & Salty Toffeed Macadamias

Makes about two cups (300g) Ingredients 1–2 tablespoons macadamia oil (or light olive oil) 280 g shelled macadamias

(whole or halves are fine) ½ cup (110 g) caster sugar 1½ teaspoons regular salt 2 teaspoons freshly ground cumin seeds ¾ teaspoon freshly ground coriander seeds 1 tablespoon caster sugar, extra 1 teaspoon sea salt flakes

By the way, if you want to double this recipe, it’s best to make two single batches in separate pans. I know it seems a bit of a hassle, but if you lob them all in together the nuts tend not to caramelise properly. • Line a large baking tray with baking paper and set it aside. • Heat the oil in a large, heavy-based frying pan over medium–low heat. When it’s warm, tip in the macadamias and shake the pan about to coat them with the oil. Reduce the heat to fairly low and sprinkle the ½ cup of caster sugar evenly over the nuts. Now, cook the nuts, stirring constantly so they don’t burn, until they’re golden brown and the sugar has caramelised to form a darkish toffee. You need to watch the nuts like a hawk as once the sugar starts to colour, it can go from golden to burnt rather rapidly; I find I usually

Festive Food

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Once again summer has arrived and we can look forward to enjoying many relaxing meals. This is the time to eat outside on verandahs and decks, or under shady trees. Summer also brings visitors and guests to our homes, so we are often taking them to our favourite places. Barbeques and picnics at the nearby beaches and creeks are always popular, and a great way to entertain visitors and to show them our local area. We’re fortunate to live where there is an abundance of fresh produce. From the land we have beautiful and tasty vegetables and fruit, locally grown beef, pork, chickens and ducks, and locally produced cheeses, muesli and coffee. We also have access to a wide range of seafood including fish, prawns, oysters and scallops. As the festive season approaches planning begins on the Christmas menus, whether for breakfast, lunch or dinner – or all three meals for the hungry ones! It’s interesting to see how Christmas food

Lyn Plummer gives us a taste of

has changed over the years. And how some traditions have remained with many families. Breakfast For many, Christmas breakfast includes fresh fruits, yoghurt, muesli or cereal. Yoghurt also goes well with a compote of dried fruits such as apples, prunes, figs, peaches, pears and sultanas cooked in orange juice and port with cinnamon sticks. To follow there are usually eggs with ham, bacon or smoked salmon. Lunch Some families still prefer to have their traditional hot lunch: roast turkey, chicken, duck or pork with all the trimmings of roast vegetables and gravy. This is usually followed by hot plum pudding with brandy sauce. The old method of using suet and tying the pudding in a cloth is still used by some families. Custard, cream and fresh fruit salad are also popular. As Christmas is usually very hot many others opt for a cold lunch, or else a mix of cold food and hot (often barbequed).

BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


The Country Cookbook by Belinda Jeffery is published by Lantern, an imprint of Penguin Books and the RRP is $59.95. Photography by Rodney Weidland.

have to adjust the heat a bit too. Although I say cook them until they’re golden brown, don’t worry if some are darker than others – it’s nigh on impossible to get them evenly browned (I certainly never do) and the darker ones taste just as delicious as their lighter counterparts. • While the nuts are cooking, mix together the regular salt, cumin, coriander and extra tablespoon of caster sugar in a large heatproof bowl. As soon as the nuts are ready, add them

to the spice mixture and toss them about so they are thoroughly coated in it. • Now scrape them out of the bowl onto the prepared tray and separate them as best you can with a wooden spoon, as they tend to stick together. Sprinkle them evenly with the sea salt and leave them to cool and set. • Once they are completely cool put them into a jar and seal tightly, then squirrel them away where no one can find them too easily!

what her family and friends will be eating this Christmas.

Nowhere is our changing menu more marked than with the increased popularity of seafood. Prawns, oysters and smoked salmon are often served simply with lots of lemon wedges, or dressed up in a range of salads. Prawns, and other seafood such as fish, scallops and calamari, can be marinated and cooked on the grill. Marinades might include Thai – flavours of lemongrass, ginger, chilli, lime juice and fish sauce, Japanese – mirin, soy sauce and sesame oil or Middle Eastern – Moroccan spices and preserved lemon. The Webber, or similar, is used to roast

NOVEMBER 2010 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

pork, turkey or chicken or even ham. Lamb is a popular roast for many, with the meat marinated in garlic, lemon, mint or rosemary. Terrines using meat, chicken or layered vegetables can also be included on the table, along with any number of colourful salads making use of local produce, especially mangoes and avocados. Desserts to follow might include traditional plum pudding, trifle, pavlova, ice cream pudding with dried fruits, cherries and nuts or fresh fruit salad. For many, a late afternoon siesta or swim is also part of the traditional Christmas day. Dinner Some families have their main meal in the evening, but for those who have had a huge lunch, a nibble on leftovers (after a suitable recovery time!) is about all they can manage. The most important aspect of Christmas day meals, and the festive season, is that they are a pleasure to be shared with family and friends in relaxation and celebration.

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GOINGS ON ABOUT TOWN

deck the halls!

Edelweiss Santa $11, Edelweiss Moose $12, from Wax Jambu.

Along with the bells and holly, ‘tis the season for some jolly decorations from our local retailers. We present a small selection from the gorgeous variety available. And when it comes to gifts, there’s nowhere else you need to go. Story and photography: Niels Arup

Free-standing cut out Christmas tree $39.95, from Heart of the Home. Pack of 6 Gift Bags $9.95, from the Post Office.

BANGALOW HERITAGE BUILDING

• • • •

Extensions and renovations Garages and home ofces Restoration specialist Retreats and studios

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Decking and pergolas Dairy bale conversions Cubby Houses Licenced builder

Phone Charles : 0429 010 876 Email: howdenferme@activ8.net.au Builders Licence No: 217606C PO Box 624 Bangalow NSW 2479

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BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


Partridge for a pear tree $40, from Mi Casa Tu Casa

Surfin’ Santa $5.95, Packs of 6 cards $15.95, from Charlotte’s Parlour.

Bib for bub $10, Tea Towel $12, from the CWA.

Door hanging $31.25, made locally by Marilyn Hopf, at Textures at Bangalow. Handmade Wall Tiles $26 ea., from Designbank. Inflatable Rolling Reindeer $28, from Little Peach.

Heart $5.95, Jewelled Egg $10.95, from Red Ginger. Nov.90x60.pdf

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h i s to ry ta l e s

The past is a different country, bu Around the time John Denver and Elton John were kicking off their careers, what was happening in Bangalow? Not much apparently. Young people referred to town as Bangahole and these photos from the 1970s provide clues why this name was appropriate. Whilst it is amazing to compare photos taken early in the 20th century with the leafy thoroughfare the main street is now, it is interesting that the transformation was not continual, or one of sustained improvement. By the 1970s the commercial hub was best described as utilitarian, providing necessary services to (mainly) rural locals, and not out to attract tourists or daytrippers. Even though town was bisected by the Pacific Highway, traffic had not yet grown to be the nuisance it was in the years leading up to the 1994 bypass. It would appear that the only street greenery was the parsley on chops in the butcher’s window. The main street seems devoid of people, suggesting locals may have preferred staying home to listen to their Perry Como records rather than lounge around sipping on a latte. There may have even been a cow or two to milk. The preservation of so many wonderful buildings was probably unintended – and possibly demoralised the town arsonist who appeared to give up when brick buildings replaced timber ones. The general economic downturn, decline of dairying and existence of the highway, all helped deter the developers who may have demolished these beautiful facades. It’s a reminder that the fortunes of a town fluctuate, but in Bangalow there has always been a Show, and for a long time a Christmas Eve carnival and other important events, services and committees. And that, I suppose, is because remarkable people work hard for their town no matter what it looks like. Terry Bleakley

Byron Street reconstruction

Byron Street 1982

The Readings bridge construction 1976

HAMMOND & ASSOCIATES Civil & Structural Engineers BYRON SHIRE

Civil, commercial, industrial & domestic projects Ph 6680

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7510 www.hammondassoc.com.au

BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


t would you want to live there?

Byron Street 1972

Abracadabra 1970

Station Street 1977

GNF bangalow (02) 6687 2833 www.gnfrealestate.com.au

NOVEMBER 2010 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

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local events

ANOTHER GREAT SHOW

This year’s 111st Show was a winner all round. Even though the rain was at times relentless, and it was muddy underfoot, it didn’t seem to dampen the spirits of the happy folk who thronged through the gates. The spirit of competition was alive and well: from the battle of the breeds in the cattle arena to the feathered friends in the Fowler Pavilion and the tasty fight over Tarts and Apple Pies. Despite the bad weather leading up to the day, the flowers on display were bountiful and glorious, though the stone fruit and some of the vegetables were a little diminished. What a grand tradition for this town to have. And how perfect that the Show Committee has the vision to come up with a program that is so inclusive.  Pictures by Judy Baker and Brigitte Zeisig

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BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


bang book advert

25/5/10

8:24 AM

Health & Wellbeing

Page 1

AESOP ANNICK GOUTAL PARFUMS PARIS MODE MILLER HARRIS ROBERT PIGUET ACQUA DI PARMA EAU D’ITALIE L’ARTISAN PARFUMEUR PENHALIGONS SAVON DE MARSEILLE MISSONI NESTI DANTE LYIE VAN RYCKE PARIS ME AND RO AESOP CLAUS PORTO SOAP JULIETTE HAS A GUN LAURA MERCIER COSMETICS DR HAUSCHKA BANGALOW PHARMACY 23 byron street bangalow 2479 tel 02 6687 1104 email bangalowpharmacy@bigpond.com PROFESSIONAL ADVICE. PRACTITIONER ONLY VITAMINS. COMPOUNDING SERVICE.

PROFESSIONAL MASSEUSE for Women’s Health Margot Hays - Registered Nurse Remedial Massage Therapist Muscle Manipulation Scenar Therapy Phone: 6687 2988 Ear Candling Mobile: 0412 394 932 Foot D-tox Spa

Liz Thomas : Libbie Nelson Ryan Huxley : Clare Connolly

NOVEMBER 2010 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

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Health & Wellbeing potential plus ouline ad.pdf

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bangalow chiropractic • Applied Kinesiology (AK) • Total Body Modification (TBM) • Sacro-Occipital Tech (SOT) • Neuro-Emotional Tech (NET) • Neuro-Organisation Tech (NOT)

James Whittle Wholistic body balancing using low force techniques

6687 0522

4 Granuaille Rd Bangalow

Cherie Dryden

Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) Accredited Nutritionist (AN) Rebates Available Enquiries & Appointments Mobile 0439 765 047 E cherie@chewsnutrition.com.au W www.chewsnutrition.com.au

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Clinic Locations

South St Professional Rooms 1 South Street Alstonville Bangalow Medical Centre Lot 1 Ballina Rd Bangalow

BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


B U T W A I T, T H E R E ’ S M O R E …

Megan Kearney: Holistic Vet

At last! Ever since Megan Kearney first visited the Northern Rivers, doing her practical experience for her veterinary training, she’s wanted to live here. For the past four years she has been visiting patients as a mobile vet. Now her dream has finally been realised and she’s excited to see the completion of her veterinary hospital on Ballina Road, Bangalow. This is a purpose-built clinic with full surgical and hospital facilities. Using a local architect and builder it uses natural light and flow-through ventilation. Visitors on the Open Day, on 28 November, saw the large overnight care rooms for dogs and cats, two consulting rooms, preparation room and surgery. Those who missed are welcome to ask for a tour. Megan’s interest in an holistic approach has led to studies in many areas of animal and human health. When she first qualified, she went to Alice Springs and Cootamundra to general practices. Then followed 14 years in Britain working in mixed equine and small animal practices. With an interest in herbal medicine Megan enrolled at the College of Phytotherapy, East Sussex. During her 500 hours of clinical work with human patients Megan discovered she enjoyed working with people as well as animals and she treats both humans and animals with herbal medicines. Next came studies at the Royal London Homeopathic Hospital. This three-year course required vets to do extra veterinary modules. Working with a vet whom did acupuncture sparked further studies at the University of Bristol. Acupuncture is helpful for musculoskeletal problems, particularly for dogs that can’t tolerate antiinflammatories. It’s also good for cats with kidney failure to improve their quality of life. Integrative medicine (the holistic approach) is in the best interest of the animal. Treatment may start with antibiotics, then probiotics. After orthopaedic surgery, acupuncture can be beneficial. After traumatic accidents, homeopathic medicine may be combined with drugs for shock. The practice sees many animals with chronic illnesses coming to the end of life. There’s a lot that can be done to improve their quality of life and make their passing as good as possible. Since moving to Bangalow Megan has seen many animals with skin problems. It’s flea heaven and scratching can cause infection. Many dogs have allergies and can benefit from changing diet and homeopathic preparations. It sounds a very busy practice but Megan also finds time to teach postgraduate courses in homeopathic and herbal medicine and is president of the Australian Holistic Veterinarians. The opening of the new clinic and surgery fulfils a dream and Megan hopes it will be a place where animals and humans are happy to come. Judy Baker

DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

Nashua News

There were many curly questions to challenge the participants at the annual Nashua Community cricket day. The quiz, coordinated by India Nash, was a big hit and kept the spectators involved in plenty of action to match that happening on the historic cricket pitch (which is usually known as a Trimble cow-paddock). It was a great mixer and opportunity for swapping of stories for all ages. In the game of cricket, the SavinsTaylor team took home the shield again – Ray says it has a very nice spot in his house and he’s not keen to give it up. But I hear the Trimble-James team has other plans. With the score now two-all, next year will be interesting! Once again Elders Bangalow sponsored our community day, and even put up funds for the ‘hit the sign competition’. The Junior winners of the Nashua writing and photo competition were announced. Congratulations to India and Will Nash for their entries. Photo prizes went to Mikayla Savins, Brigid Czislowski and Roy Czislowski. It was a fabulous community celebration. Enjoying the present, while honouring the past. Perfect really.  Jacinta Lithgow

bowling business

Throughout November, twilight bowls at the Bowlo has featured familiar faces from many of Bangalow’s business houses. From 5.30 each Wednesday, business house teams enjoy a friendly evening challenge between themselves. While enjoying the hospitality of the Bowlo they laugh at their attempts to overcome the vagaries of lawn bowls and their biases and cope with variable evening breezes that affect the course of carefully targetted bowls. The Business House Twilight Bowls is a joint initiative of the Bowlo and the Men’s Bowling Club, and contributes financially to both the Club Ltd coffers and to greens upkeep expenses. Everyone is welcome to go along and see the prowess of your pharmacist, your orchardists, your medicos, your local real estate agent, your newsagent and your post mistress. A similar, hopefully bigger, competition is planned for late January and any business wishing to join the fun should contact Gerry Swain. If they do, perhaps we might also see on the greens our doctors, our restaurateurs, our hairdressers, perhaps even our designers, our lawyers or our firemen. It is many years since Bangalow had accredited bowls coaches. Now, anyone who feels the need can rest assured that skilled and sympathetic coaching is available from the Men’s Bowling Club. President Gerry Swain and Treasurer Tony Hart were recently successful at a Bowls Australia coaching course and are now fully accredited Bowls Australia Club Coaches. Anyone seeking individual tuition, or anyone wanting to try lawn bowls, should give either Gerry (6687 1142) or Tony (6687 0607) a call to arrange sessions. It is hoped that this will encourage new bowlers as well as iron out a few problems of existing players and perhaps, make Bangalow more competitive in the District pennants competition.  Tony Hart 17


SHOWING OFF

Visitors to Bangalow It’s that time of year again when visitors descend on us lucky folk who live on the Far North Coast. Entertaining them is hardly a great deal of trouble – but it is worthwhile planning an itinerary to ensure they get the best of this beautiful place. Heartbeat writers offer their thoughts on what to do:

walks. Ideally this can be in cooler, leafier areas of our national parks and reserves –

Christobel Munson. Once they have explored the village of Bangalow and the beaches of Byron, we like to take visitors to places like the Tumbulgum Pub Bangalow Farmers’ Market (licensed since 1887) for lunch in the beer garden, or for a Tumbulgum punt barbecue by the Tweed River. On the wall of the beer garden is a model of an 800lb groper (fish) caught in the river (half actual size) which is a great talking point. The views across the river to Mount Warning, A likely story and the atmosphere of the small river-side township are especially appealing to guests who live in big cities. There’s Minyon Falls plenty of room for children to play in a safe perhaps with a swim, and a garden environment. coffee stop on the way home. See http://www.tumbulgumtavern.com.au Minyon Falls remains a favourite. If guests Boats can be hired at the jetty, the location of a long-gone creek-crossing punt, and are fit and up to a three-hour walk, you can go house-boats are popular for exploring the right to the base of the falls, have a swim and circuit back to the lower car park. There are neighbourhood by boat on relaxed holidays. Tumbulgum is located a few km north of of course short to medium strolls around the Murwillumbah, about a 45 minute drive from top lookout for the less adventurous. Closer Bangalow. (Locals are stroppy unless you to Bangalow – towards the southern end of pronounce the name Tum-BUL-gum rather Friday Hut Road – are Killen Falls and short walks to view Emigrant Creek dam. The walk than Tumble-gum.). to the base of the falls and swimming hole is Brian Sundstrom. Given all the wonderful well worth it, but can be slippery in the wet. If you prefer beaches try King’s Beach festive season food most of us eat, I try to encourage guests to accompany me on some just south of Broken Head. A downhill walk

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through nice coastal rainforest takes you there. At low tide it is an easy walk/rock-hop back around to Broken Head. You can also walk south of the beach, particularly at low tide, but it is more difficult. These and many other walks are well documented in Bushwalking in the Rainbow Region by local expert Michael Smith. There are copies at Bangalow Newsagency.  Helen Wilson. My daughter-in-law and I love to do this when she visits. A trip to the Bangalow Saturday fruit and vegie market for luscious tomatoes and the greenest of greens is always a great place to start. Then a dawdle looking at all the shop windows with occasional forays indoors, coffee at a venue to suit. Then we move on down to the coast to the industrial estate at Byron Bay. They now have a tourist map showing the ‘crafty’ places of interest. All this then followed by lunch at Harvest at Newrybar. And an afternoon nap.  Stephanie King. We are dog people which means that most of our daytime outings involve dog walking. Top popular spots are Belongil Beach, with a swim on the side, and very locally the Clunes cemetery with its three hills of different religions. Fascinating – and great views of the Nightcaps. Have to admit a cemetery ramble is always a hit and the one in Bangalow is also beautiful. Food is the other prime concern. A special night out is best celebrated at Satiate. Hard to go past a restaurant in your own town with a hat! If you find yourself in the Bay our winning eating spots are the Top Shop for great burgers and coffee, St Elmo’s and Targa for sophisticated and delicious treats and Kinoko Japanese.

BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


artery

the arts On the twelfth day of December my true-art gave to me….so many opportunities it made my arty head spin. Don’t know about “ewes” but this year has veritably zipped past like the blowfly that just hurtled past my ear, says Marika Bryant. Only the mozzies hang in suspense! Want to share some of these opportunities with me? Read on, me arties…. For the printers: Submit your digital images of current work for consideration in 2011 PCA Print Commission – dedicated to Oz print making. Close 8 February 2011. Info: www.printcouncil.org.au For the glassyarts: Residency programs at Canberra Glassworks, for technical and artistic excellence (you have to be spesh) with a $1000 stipend, designated workspace and access to kilns, flameworking area, cold and hot shop and mould room. Sounds like my place! 15 December deadline. Info: www. canberraglassworks.com For the fiscally challenged: ArtStart funding Jan 2011 with grants for visual arts, hybrid and media arts, performing arts, music, literature – you name it they fund it (if you’re lucky). 8 March deadline. Info: www.artsartgrant.com.au For the short and filmy: Byron All Shorts Northern Rivers Short Film Competition – have you entered yet? Screening with Flickerfest three-day festival, this comp is open to Northern Rivers residents. 24 December deadline. Info: www.iQ.org.au For the arty-farty (I’m entering): Visual artists (Ballina, Byron, Lismore & Tweed) can enter the Byron Arts Classic for another stab at the $8000 in prizes. 13 December deadline. Info: www.byroncentre.com.au and artsclassic@byroncentre.com.au

For the emerging artist who wants to travel with someone else’s money (and isn’t that the best way to go?): Ian Potter Cultural Trust grant for project/travel after 13 May 2011. Got initiative and talent? Want to convert this to realising your arty dream? 31 January deadline. Info: www. ianpotterculturaltrust.org.au For the literary erect: TheFictionShelf. com website is under construction and they want your words. If you’re good, real good, and you can thrill, chill, spill the beans and trill, well, give them a go. 31 January deadline. Info: www.thefictionshelf.com For the punters: Art on the Move in situ at the Moller Pavilion on Boxing Day within the Bangalow Showgrounds (near the band). Come see artists at play! 26 December; marikabryant@hotmail.com For the volunteers: The Northern Rivers Community Gallery wants volunteers to register (reception, info sharing, staff help at launches and events, displays, curating – whatever). 31 December deadline. Info: 02 6681 6167 And in closing: The stocking-fillers – Charlatan Ink Art Prize for Vis Arts $US25K 15 Feb deadline; go to www. charlataninkartprize.com; Prometheus Foundation all forms of art media for $15K prize, 25 March deadline www. prometheusartaward.com

MUSIC

Retrovirus & Special Guests at NYE Party at the Bowlo. Come out and enjoy a fun night’s entertainment this New Years Eve at Bangalow Bowling Club. Retrovirus are back again to spread their infectious grooves to see out 2010 in retro style. They will be supported by Colin Mills, one of Bangalow’s finest and funniest musicians, with a mixture of music and comedy. Rumours suggest he may be joined by Richie Allen for a Cabaret da Desh-style reprisal. Then rock on ‘til midnight as Retrovirus take you back to the 80s, playing good old Aussie classics that will get you up on the dance floor. Expect other local musos to jump up and join in to add their talent to the show. The restaurant will be open around 7.30pm. Bring the whole family.

Bangalow Pumps & Irrigation Ph: 6687 1550 Mobile: 0428 871 551 Mick Rowley

Lic No: 155937C

• Pump Sales & Service • Routine Maintenance Checks • Repairs to all Brands of Pumps • Water Tanks / First Flush Diverters

SALES

SERVICE

DESIGN

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

INSTALLATION

Pots Treated Pine Quality Garden Soils Bulk Potting Mixes Compost & Mulches Sand & Gravel

225 Lismore Rd, Bangalow Ph: 6687 1520 Robyn & Ian Black - Proprietors NOVEMBER 2010 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

RF Byrne Earthmoving Construction & Paving

 Access Roads  Plant Hire - grader etc  Driveway & Car Parks  Erosion Control  Hot Mix & Bitumen Seal Phone

Dick on 6687 8418 or 0412 831 944 549 Friday Hut Rd Brooklet 2479

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c rosswor d For post-Christmas relaxation and entertainment, try our new crossword. It’s a mix of straight and cryptic with some local clues. Answers on page 23. Tell us what you think, and if you want more. Across 1. Longest road in 2479 postcode district (6,3,2) 9. Angers (7) 10. Fatter possibly (7) 11.* Every man around went back to the junction to the vacant block (9) 12. See 4d. 13. An obscure mystery (6) 15. Saint of Antioch (9) 18. *Hen and Chris Elliot changed for the better (8) 19. *You go to Planning Institute of Australia. It’s the best (6) 22. *Keith at the local coffee shop (5) 23. *Magazine with pulse (9) 25. Sideways (7) 27. *Lowers mixed directions and beads (7) 28. Selected and combined pipe organ stops (11) Down 1. Leafy area near Bangalow (9) 2. *Go in reverse to the intersection for lump of metal (5) 3. *To solve this read endlessly and upside down around the state (8) 4. 12a *Ancestral home becomes local Tea Rooms (8,5) 5. *Real organ will never leave you (4,5) 6. Father (3) 7. *I heard Bea Miles arrived and changed (6) 8. *Reverse steer under ground and welcomes (6) 14. *Grand, main, enhanced to be like Barry Humphries say (3,2,4) 16. Pleasurably amazed (9) 17. Places for keys (8)

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Compiled by Ken Porter Many thanks to Mel at the Echo and John at SCU for technical advice

USEFUL INFORMATION AND CONTACT NUMBERS AA Tues 5.30 Doug 6687 8668 Angling Club Outing 2nd Sat Ray 6687 1139 Aussie Rules Bill 6687 1485 Aussie Rules Junior Greg 6687 1231 Bangalow Community Alliance (BCA) Terry 6687 2525 Bangalow Markets monthly 4th Sun Jeff 6687 1911 Bangalow Freemasons 4th Monday 7.30pm Steve 6624 5547 Bridge Fri 12pm Brian 6687 2427 Cancer support 1st Wed 1-4pm Chris 6687 0004 Childcare Centre 7.45am-6pm Kerry 6687 1552 Cricket Club Anthony 0429 306 529 CWA 2nd Wed Sue 6687 2619 Garden Club 1st Wed Shirley 6687 1417 George the Snake Man George 0407 965 092 Groundforce Georgia 6629 1189 Historical Society/Museum/Tea Room Vivienne 6687 2183 Jazz-x-ercise Thurs 6pm Ann 6629 1041 Land/RiverCare 1st Sat working bee Liz 6687 1309 Lawn Bowls, Men Wed & Sat 1pm Ian 6687 2604 Lawn Bowls,Women Tues 9am Dot 6687 1246 Lions Club 2nd/4th Tues 7pm Roger 6687 0543 Mufti Bowls 3rd Sat 9am Lynne 6687 1823 Netball Club train 4.15 Thurs Rachel 6687 0402 Op Shop 10-3pm Sat 10-12 6687 2228 Parks Committee 3rd Tues 7.30pm Jan 6684 7214 Playgroup Tues 10am Jenni 6629 1740 Pony Club Kim Herwig 6687 8007 20

Pool Trust 3rd Wed Peta Poultry Club Hec Progress Association Ian Quilters 2nd,4th Thurs Leonie Red Cross monthly - 1st Fri Emily S355 C’mtee Heritage House Dawn Scouts Tues 6.30pm Alison Show Society Karen Soccer Club 2nd Mon 6pm Nick Social Golf every 2nd Sun Brian Sports Association 2nd Wed bi-monthly Brian Sporting Field bookings Nick St Vincent de Paul Thurs 10-11am/Catholic Hall Tennis Court Hire B&S Club Kaylene Writers Group 1st Thurs Ruth

6688 4236 6687 1322 6687 1494 6687 1453 6687 1038 6687 2442 6628 1024 6687 1033 6687 1607 6684 7444 6687 1024 6687 1607 6687 1944 6687 1235 6686 3008

VENUES A&I Hall Station St Michael 6687 1081 Anglican Hall Ashton St Russell 6687 1046 Bangalow Showgrd Moller Pavilion Karina 6687 1035 Sports/Bowling Club Byron St Lynne 6687 1235 Catholic Hall Deacon St George 6687 1969 Coorabell Hall Coolamon Scenic Simon 6684 2888 Newrybar Hall Newrybar Village Kay 6687 1324 RSL Hall Station St Charlotte 6687 2828 Scout Hall Showgrounds Jenny 6687 2047 Heritage House Deacon St Dawn 6687 2442 BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


OUT AND ABOUT

Gardening News

The Bangalow Gardening Club members have been very busy, reports Judy Baker. Members visited the Gold Coast & Tweed Orchid Fair on Saturday 6 November. This annual event at the Tweed Civic Centre is always a great display of wonderful orchids and also a chance to buy orchids and supplies. Using funds raised from the trading table held at each month’s meetings, a large bus was hired to transport over 50 members, their friends and some members of other garden clubs. The display of Grand Champion winners in each of the many orchid categories was truly spectacular and also a delightfully scented experience. After lunch at the Tweed Heads Golf Club, the bus headed home loaded down by the many purchases. A good day out!

Orchid Grand Champion, Brassia Rex ‘Sacata’

Paphiopedilum ‘Prince Edward of York’

Max Lassen reveals the secrets of potting

NOVEMBER 2010

DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

Vanda cristata

On Saturday 30 October, Ginny Giorgio co-ordinated members to participate in the Bangalow Public School’s Plant Sale day, supplying some of the potted plants, giving talks, helping the children pot up or answering gardeners’ questions. Organised by Simon Winfield, Jannine Campton and helpers, sales raised $2650 for school activities. The program included talks on topics such as worms, weeds, propagation by cuttings, and division of plants such as

Paphiopedilum ‘St Swithin’

heliconias or orchids. The children got their hands into the dirt, planting up cuttings and prizes were awarded for best potted plants. The school used some of the funds raised on a Fun Day to hire a puppeteer from the Sydney Theatre to perform and entertain. Some funds will also be used for specialist teachers for music and drama. The school is keen to get the children into ongoing gardening activities and would love to hear from anyone willing to help on a regular basis. 

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greenie of the month

Kadri Nelmes

In 1973 a van left Sydney for the Northern Rivers with Kadri, three other adults, six children and two dogs. Their mission was to buy land and set up a self-sufficient commune. It was the time of the original Nimbin Festival and the first serious migration of ‘alternate settlers’ into this area. A 68-hectare cattle and banana property at Goonengerry was chosen. It was heavily cleared, but weedy and quite run down. They moved in and started their project. Kadri summarised the next 20 years as follows: “We were very serious about self-sufficiency including methane production, composting toilets and of course lots of vegies and fruit growing. Various tropical fruits were planted for sale. While we had many successes the mission progressively became more difficult, though, with production and marketing challenges and personality differences. Members left and others came and went – most were not prepared for the consistent workload.” By 1990 Kadri was the only original left and she started a change of direction towards regeneration of the native forest. The property is adjacent to Goonengerry National Park and has two sizeable creeks with a plateau in between, where the living area is. The two creek valleys are mainly steep, rocky, red soil and were originally rainforest that had been heavily logged in the 1950s. A few mature trees remained amongst mainly dense lantana, with some camphors and other weeds. “I could hear the creeks, but had never been

able to see or get to them,” Kadri explained. Working on her own in winter, she started on a patch of lantana some 50 x 50 metres i.e. a quarter hectare. This was cut by machete, then the roots grubbed out and the dead material left as mulch. Next summer she planted native species into the ‘mulch’ and then followed

graphic design publication design illustration 6629 1644 narup@bigpond.net.au

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up with several years of weed control maintenance. “There is no point in starting if you are not prepared for the intensive follow up,” she stresses. As she gained experience and confidence, larger areas were tackled each year. Continuing with the same painstaking ‘solo technique’ some 2025 hectares have now been completed. On as a recent visit it was apparent that most of the first areas were hard to tell from native forest. They have full canopy cover with a good mix of species, which were mostly planted, with some brought in by birds, animals, floods, etc. The beautiful creeks are fully accessible (if you are fit) and have very scenic waterfalls and pools. Resident birds include iconic species such as Alberts lyrebird, Wampoo pigeon, Regent bowerbird and Sooty owl. To walk through the area is really amazing and inspirational. Kadri, who has in the past been a teacher and librarian, now divides her time between retirement hobbies and continuing the regeneration. (See picture with her current Lantana workface in the foreground and 20-year-old growth in the background). Happily, two of her children are keen to continue the regeneration when they retire. Kadri is justifiably proud of the results, but particularly “to be living with this very small environmental footprint”.  Brian Sundstrom

Affordable hairdressing in Bangalow

Bangalow Hair Room 32 Byron St, Bangalow 2479 mullo4@bigpond.com

Sue Mullens

6687 1889

BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT


OUT AND ABOUT

Going Batty

Habitat loss has brought them to our backyard trees in recent times. We only have ourselves to blame if this makes us uncomfortable. This year, particularly, the constant wet has drained flowers of their primary food of nectar and pollen while also preventing fruit setting on many of their natural food trees. When the natural food source of any animal is scarce they need to move on. It appears that smaller camps nearer food sources have set up in this time of need. The numbers will drop again this year as many of the females coming into care are not pregnant as they should be, many are starved

Publication Production magazines; brochures; newsletters

from concept to print ph: 02 6687 2607

Media Communications Copy Writing & Design allieleo@bigpond.net.au

and very underweight and could not sustain a baby. Rescues are higher this year than any other due to the animals coming lower for food. Many people trying to do the right thing have planted native flowering plants along fences – usually barbed-wire fences – where flying foxes and gliders can easily get caught up. I have seen some horrible crucifixions, and looked into many stricken faces, and hate to think of the many across the countryside that don’t get found and helped and die in agonizing pain. Please call the Northern Rivers Wildlife Carers Hotline on 6628 1866 if you see any wildlife in trouble, or for advice on how to make barbed-wire safer for wildlife. We would like to thank the many who have called and been amazed at how beautiful these creatures are when they get up close and personal. The full story of the Flying Fox can be found on www.bangalowlandcare.org.au  Liz Gander F B E C A

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Twenty years ago this month I was presented with my first flying fox baby. A friend had found it in the grass on Paddy’s Creek and rescued it from the mower flying around the park. Such a sweet little thing with huge, wondrous, intelligent eyes. I was in love. I raised that baby with the guidance of the amazing Robyn Gough and inspiration from Richard Morecroft (Raising Archie, ABC) to release stage. She was my baby and I her mum all through that summer. The love affair did not end there. My family helped raise more babies over the years but I have to admit it is a very time-consuming job, like a human baby, and I no longer take it on. My role with these animals has changed but I still come into weekly – if not daily – contact as a wildlife carer, rescuing them mostly from barbed-wire fences. These animals are often perceived by many as a pest, and evil by some people. The reality is that they are a warm-blooded mammal just as we are; they are very social and very caring of their young. The Grey-headed flying fox is a nationally threatened species – though we see a few around here – and an extremely important part of our ecosystem pollinating eucalyptus and spreading rainforest seeds. The reason I got into growing and restoring rainforest was to help these animals as well as other species to survive.

Ph: 6687 1862

Logical decorating – modern & traditional Beautiful selection of modern blinds & curtains

HYDRAULINK BANGALOW Hydraulink Bangalow is your local supplier and retailer of hydraulic hoses, fittings and componentry

1026a Friday Hut Road Binna Burra via Bangalow

BANGALOW BLINDS AND SECURIT Y

NOW AVAILABLE 24HR MOBILE SERVICE Mob: 0428 63 9988

We service the Macadamia, Agriculture, Earthmoving, Industrial and Manufacturing Industries

Phone:

02-6687 1672 NOVEMBER 2010 DECEMBER/JANUARY 2011

Grant: 0429 425 965 Peter: 0427 299 904

23 23


towntal k m our g oss i p ch i tchat wh i s p e r ru Karen Ryan, Secretary, and Mark Noble, Chief Beef Steward.

Oh, What a Lovely Show

Congratulations to Karen Ryan and the Show Committee for another great Bangalow event. So many months of hard work for just a few days of mega-fun. But so very much appreciated. Bring on 2011! See pictures p.14.

2

Spiritsong

4

Newrybar Movie Night

5

Coorabel Hall Christmas

7

Scouts Christmas

11

ADFAS Christmas

12

Mufti bowls

14

Sk8 Park meeting

18

Heritage House Christmas

24

Christmas Eve street party

26

Bangalow Market

31

Retrovirus at the Bowlo

and our Christmas raffle to be drawn. There will also be a visit from Santa. Wendy Grissell, Trish Bleakley and Lyn and Jodie McKinnon.

Heritage House Tearoom Christmas

Last day of trading for 2010 is Saturday 18, from 12 noon to 3pm. This will be a special Christmas community party day at the tearooms. The catering team and our great volunteers would like to say thank you to our wonderful Bangalow community for all their support through 2010, so we are holding the Christmas party for all the families, young and not so young. Enjoy delicious steak sangers, burgers and sausage sizzle, Wendy’s famous scones with jam and cream, delicious cakes by Lyn and special Christmas treats by Trisha. Soft drinks and juices for the kids, tea and coffee for the adults – all for the usual fantastically low prices. Games to be played and prizes to win

d e c / j a n d i a ry

Farmers’ Markets 4, 11, 18 JANUARY 19

Heritage House reopens

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Bangalow Market

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Australia Day Farmers’ Markets 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

Despite the rain, a dazzling firework display was a Saturday highlight.  Pics by Judy Baker

Wishes you all a very Merry Christmas and happy holidays! Please don’t drink & drive • Business class transfers • Airport shuttle timetable on website • Refreshments & newspapers supplied • Group transfers for up to 8 people

P: 0488 426 600

www.bangalowlimousines.com.au 24 24

BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT BANGALOW’S HEARTBEAT

December/January Heartbeat  

The Summer edition of Heartbeat, covering December 2010 and January 2011.

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