Issuu on Google+

Marissa Holliday English ACE 8­9                                                                            Moment/Dialogue piece.  We walked into the auditorium. Seats full of people, all roughly my age. A quick  walk up a few stairs, and a shuffle into our seats and we were ready. Ready for what was,  or was not about to come our way. All of the directors had been called to the front to be  recognized, but one director in particular was acknowledged for a different reason  entirely. The discussion of this issue was inevitable. Our beloved band director would be  departing us next year. While slowly walking back to his seat the chaperones quietly  murmured “Is he crying?” “I don’t know. I can’t tell is he?” With a sniffle, and a  reassuring smile, he took his seat and prepared for the ceremony. It started with the choir  portion of the competition. From men’s choir, gospel choir, treble choir all the way to  mixed choir.  Band and wind ensembles were next to be announced. They slowly moved  through the various groups and schools. Each school standing and cheering with every  thing they had in them every chance they got. “Can they cheer any louder?” asked a  friend sarcastically. “I think I might just go deaf if they keep this up.” The announcer  giving out the next award said “In section 6 with a superior rating, and the first place  trophy…” “Holy jeeze” I said. “That’s crazy…I envy them” “Now onto outstanding soloist awards…” A friend sitting nearby nudged me with  her elbow. “That’s you” she said with a grin on her face. “No. I don’t think so. I didn’t do  well enough to deserve anything” Starting to look slightly irritated now, she said “You  better get an award. If you don’t then those judges don’t have any idea what they are  doing.” Calmly sitting in my seat, I listen to the announcer list the outstanding soloist  awards one by one. “The flute soloist in Sedona from Mohonasen High School…” At  first I didn’t realize what had just happened. All I knew was all of my peers were  cheering me on and telling me to stand up and walk to the front. “Marissa, that’s you!”  I  walked slowly and awkwardly at first, then sped up a bit because I thought I was walking  too slowly. Then I started to slow down again because I thought I might look like I was  rushing. 


I finally made it to the front without tripping. That was my ultimate goal for the  moment. “Congratulations” said the man holding out a trophy, proceeding to place a  metal over my head. With an astonished look on my face and sound in my voice, I was  able to spit out a “Thank You very much.” Walking back to my seat, I looked up and saw  all of my friends clapping and smiling. I sat back down and I heard a quiet “I told you  so.” I turned my head, smiled, then looked away. While walking back to the buses  immediately following the ceremony, a friend picked me up and spun me around, “I am  so proud of you!” Instead of being shy and embarrassed, I was proud and ecstatic. I went  to a quiet spot to get away from all of the commotion of the days events, took out my cell  phone and dialed the key pad. A calm voice answered the phone. “Hi mom. You’ll never  guess what happened today…”


moment with dialogue