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Contents

28 Obituary - Jill Tweed

APRIL

19 Lucy Tulloch

Contents

31 Review

4

News

9

District Council

31

Review The Bell Inn

32

Wine with Robin Shuckburgh

35

Cookery

36

Bampton Library

37

Bampton Bush Club

11

Parish council

13

Local Notices

14

Don Rouse’s Ramblings

17

Interiors with Nicola Priestly

19

Coaching for Life with Lucy Tulloch

20

Gardening with Di Bray

40

Bampton School

22

Gardening Club

41

Bampton Youth Club

26

SPAJERS Update

42

Classified advertising

33

West Ox Arts

45

Useful numbers

46

Diary

27

Bampton Opera

28

Obituary - Jill Tweed

29

Obituary - Tim Tomlin

38

Sports - Cricket - Football

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News

Welcome to the Spring issue of the Beam. Following, what felt like the longest January ever (I’m not a big fan of winter  it was followed by the first  day of spring feeling like I lived in the artic circle, thanks to the Beast from the East. Still, I know one person who made the most of it - our local plumber, who attended over 40 emergency boiler calls on the Friday - myself included - and much appreciated - thanks Joe.

Council, more funding has been issued to try and solve the terrible state of this county’s roads - it can’t come too soon. On the upside it would appear to have helped another village blight speeding - I’m not sure which is worse!

Lots to talk about in this issue starting with everyone’s favourite subject - dog poo! For some reason full poo bags are being hung in trees awaiting collection (supposedly by the owner on the return from the dog walk). However, either dog walks are taking a lot longer than I remember when I was an owner (this pair of bags pictured were there for 2 days) or its just an excuse for being lazy and feckless. Either way I think I can speak for all dog and non dog owners who like a walk - this new style of ‘pick your own’ needs to stop.

Finally, Bampton lost two notable residents during the past few months, Jill Tweed and Tim Tomlins. I had the opportunity to get to know Jill’s work in detail, two years ago when Jill asked me help her with a book about her life’s work. Fitting for a man of steam, Tim’s funeral was quite a show, with several large steam engines processing through the village to take Tim to St Mary’s. His son David was at the wheel and allowed me to photograph the occasion for the Bampton Archive.

Our next ‘hot topic’ must be the potholes... so bad they inspired a cover for this issue. According to our District

I’m very pleased to say we have a new contributer to the Beam Lucy Tulloch, who will be using her skills as a business and life coach to help us all ‘sort our lives out’ - and she volunteered - it’s not often I can say that!

One last thing - if you are new to Bampton - take a look at how to enter the Shirt Race, new teams are always welcome. - James

Deadline for all submissions in the next issue is July 1st 2018

Beam Information Editor James Wildman editor@bamptonbeam.co.uk Contributors – April 2018 Di Bray, Don Rouse, Anna Pitt, Nicola Saward, Nicola Priestly, Lucy Tulloch and Robin Shuckburgh. Advertising James Wildman editor@bamptonbeam.co.uk Designed by Wildman Design www.wildmandesign.co.uk Printed by The Manson Group Contact details Bampton Beam Dairy Farm House, Buckland Road, Bampton, Oxfordshire OX18 2AA Email: editor@bamptonbeam.co.uk

www.bamptonbeam.co.uk The Bampton Beam is published three time a year and is delivered free to all households and businesses in Bampton and surrounding villages. Contributions are always welcome, please email editor@bamptonbeam.co.uk. No responsibility is accepted for any errors and the views expressed do not necessa e ect those o the ed to . ©Bampton Beam 2018 Bampton Beam is published by Wildman Design Ltd and holds the copyright to all information it publishes and on the Bampton Beam website. No content may be reproduced or distributed without the consent of the Editor.

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News

Patrick Strainge Butchers

Gold at national Smithfield Awards 2018 Bampton business Patrick Strainge Butchers is celebrating after winning 4 Gold Awards in the UK’s most prestigious competition for craft butchery products – The m th e d a ds. he e ent h ch s he d annua b the u d o utche s recognises and rewards the excellent products that are being produced by their membe s ho a e some o the e best butche s n the count .

Patrick Strainge Butchers picked up gold in 4 categories for the following products: “Old Traditional Sausage”; “Spiced Plum Sausage”; “Smoked Back Bacon”; “Unsmoked Back Bacon” and 2 silver for their: “Bampton Royals (sausages)”; “Pork and Chicken Pie”, all of which are available from their shop at Bridge Street, Bampton OX18 2HA. Artisan butchers from across Britain were eco n sed n 18 cate o es h ch an ed om ad t ona o k ausa es u e s Pies and Bakery to Ready Meals and Gluten Free Products as well as Beef and amb p oducts om cot and a es and n and. he a a ds e e ud ed b nd by an independent panel of food and meat industry experts at City of Glasgow College and were announced by BBC broadcaster and food expert Nigel Barden at the award ceremony on 7 February at Stationers Hall n ondon.

Ollie Weaver Butchers said:

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at ck t a n e

“We feel really honoured by these awards. Throughout the year, we strive to maintain the standards we have set ourselves which range from the health and welfare of the animals through to the requirements of our customers. These awards reflect the entire team effort here at Patrick Strainge Butchers to manage our customers’ expectations of us in the provision of high quality meats and associated products.” Nigel Barden said: “Everything I’ve witnessed about the Q Guild of Butchers convinces me it’s an outstanding institution, representing some of the finest butchers the United Kingdom has to offer. The welfare of the animals,

whose meat they sell and the farmers who rear them are of primary concern and in turn the customers who purchase their wares. Combine these with apprentice schemes and top-flight in house training and you produce leaders in their industry. I’m honoured to be involved with the awards and look forward to celebrating those who are at the zenith of the butchery profession.” Mark Turnbull ha o the Butchers commented:

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“The Smithfield Awards are always a celebration of butchers who are the top of their game, combining traditional skills and knowledge with innovation; great taste with immaculate sourcing. The 2018 award winners demonstrate this superbly. These butchers are custodians of a proud tradition of local artisan butchery and I’m delighted to celebrate their success.”

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News

News from your MP Robert Courts MP

Going Green By Anna Pitt

m lo ing the Blue Planet Effect Ne er be ore has plastic pac aging had so much attention But I’m noticing that people are sometimes deciding to ditch single use plastic in favour of other forms of single use packaging, which can be more carbon intensive to produce. Paper, glass, and compostable packaging are undoubtedly less damaging to the ocean. But all packaging comes with its own issues (read more at leftoverpie.co.uk). The real way forward is to ditch those things you can do without altogether by switching to reusables. Here are my top 5 easy switches: Stra s …either refuse or get a reusable, dishwasher-proof stainless steel straw.

As

e nd oursel es ell into the Ne ear loo or ard to all that has to offer am ery optimistic about the coming year as carry on or ing hard and doing the ob that lo e being your ember o Parliament 2017 was a busy year but with so much achieved, locally and nationally. We have seen a deal struck by the District Council and Government to complete the rollout of high-speed broadband and not one, but two ground-breaking new p ans o affo dab e hous n n ou d st ct. 15m as secu ed o Ox o dsh e n the ud et h st and oca ounc s a e pu su n a numbe o d ffe ent options for improvements to local transport infrastructure, such as the County Council’s recent Housing Infrastructure Fund bid. Furthermore, we have secured mo e suppo t o Ox o dsh e s hea thca e such as 3 8 800 mo e to he p th winter pressures) and in my particular interest area of mental health. O cou se as e e the e s mo e to do. cont nue to pa t c pate u n the discussions over primary care for Witney and the surrounding area. Work continues on our plans to improve local transport infrastructure, including campa n n o ma ntenance o ks on the 4095 th ou h ampton n particular. I want to see improvements in broadband matched by improvements in mobile signals, to make it easier for local businesses to grow and thrive. I want to do all I can to support our NHS and education systems as they continue their outstanding work. Rest assured these are only a e o my aims or the year ahead there is any issue you ish to raise ith me please do email me at: robert robertcourts co u ould greatly appreciate hearing your ie s

Bags you can buy or make lightweight reusable net bags for your fruit and veg and reusable shopping bags are plentiful and equally easy to make your own. In Bampton we can even take our own tubs to buy meat at the butcher and we can reuse our egg boxes too. A reusable ater bottle will save you money and be kinder on your health and the planet. e no the do n ide o drin and don’t be ooled b flavoured ater milkshakes or fruit juices as they can be just as bad or worse. Bottled water has a carbon footprint 1000 times greater than tap water in a reusable bottle. Cling lm – it is a nightmare to use anyway, so ap or a lidded container or a plate that t over the top of the bowl. Clean tea towels are also a good thing to cover food with as they prevent the ood rom dr ing out eep o an flie or other creature and top the ood rom sweating. a ea ay coffee – break that habit and you would save a fortune, but if you really can’t then make your savings bit by bit with a reusable co ee cup an outlet no o er mone o our co ee i ou bring our o n cup If you are not quite ready for reusables yet, you can still do your bit by making sure you recycle all the plastic packaging you can. In the UK we recycle 58% of our plastic bottles. That means that a whopping 42% get discarded in the general waste and in the hedges and ditches of our countryside. In West Oxfordshire you can recycle all your plastic bottles and their lids as well as plastic tubs, food trays (even the black ones) and plastic wine corks by putting them in your household recycling bin with the blue lid. Switching to brands using recycled packaging helps to keep the value of recycled plastic high. Switching to compostable packaging helps too but only if you then put it in a home compost!

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in brie

NOTICE

n an ne passed a a at obe House on 25th December 2017, aged ea s. o n a tne o a . Much loved Mum to Tammy and Matthew. Nana to Rachel and Emma. The family wish to thank very everyone for the cards, letters, messages of sympathy and donations received in n s memo o he me s esea ch and Cancer Research UK.

Battle’s Over

On 11th November 2018, the UK and its friends overseas will mark the day 100 years ago, when the guns fell silent at the end of the First World War. Oxfordshire County Council is playing ts pa t n emembe n the sac ce of millions of men and women by joining in Battle’s Over, a unique series of events involving organisations and communities the length and breadth of our nation and in many countries abroad. For more information visit: brunopee co u

News

News from St Mary’s - Bampton We are no in the th month o the Church s nterregnum period hich necessarily ollo s on rom the retirement o our much lo ed and respected icar the Re a id Lloyd at the end o September During this interregnum period, which is customarily a year, the churchwardens in the Parish are responsible for the day to day running of the churches and the coordination of ministerial support for services, weddings, baptisms and funerals in the Parish. They have been meeting regularly during this interregnum period in Parochial Church Council (PCC). The PCC comprises the Churchwardens of the e hu ches n the a sh h ch a e ocated n ampton. ston an e d e and h ffo d. a sh o e document has been agreed to provide support material to advise new applicants for the vacant post. Advertisements are in place in the Church Times and on its website for the vacancy. All being well, and given numbers of

applicants a new incumbent to the post can be anticipated to take up the post by September this year. Regular Church Eucharist and family services are held at St Mary’s Church, Bampton at 10:30am on Sunday mornings, and are maintaining very satisfactory levels assisted by the friendly coffee athe n s that o o each se ce. The volume of Church visitors, many from around the world, continues to rise inexorably given the international interest in the Downton Abbey TV series currently being shown in many countries. The Do nton bbe effect s st b n n a record number of weddings to St Mary’s Church, 14 for 2018 and 13 planned for 2019, and we are receiving also an encouraging number of enquiries for infant baptisms to be held in our lovely Church. Thank you – Douglas J Clare Churchwarden St Mary the Virgin Church. BAMPTON

Magic happens when young and old come together at Bampton’s Bush club he Nursery children rom Bampton C o E Primary school ent along to isit local retired residents at their ee ly lunch club The club is held in the Old School Community Centre which provided the perfect platform for both old and young to come together and take part in a fun and active musical session. The Nursery children, aged between 2 and 4yrs, walked from Bampton Primary school through the village to meet up with the local retired residents. The children and residents sang a range of traditional songs with a food theme. Du n the mus ca east oun and old shared instruments and used bubbles and games to move to a range of music from the 1940’s and 50’s to the present day. Following the musical session, the children and residents shared some refreshments kindly provided by the Bush Club. he teach n staff at ampton of E Primary and Nursery School

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encourage the children to value all ages in our communities, from the very young to the very old. Supporting and strengthening contacts between these older adults and their community can ha e nc ed b e bene ts o oun and old. Even older adults with memory loss or cognitive limitations can still enjoy a visit, even if they don’t remember it later, and younger children learn how to nte act th peop e ho a e d ffe ent than themselves, subsequently helping to reduce any fear they may have of older adults. Moreover when young

and old come together it provides an opportunity to receive and give unconditional and unbounded love and attention and be involved with people who are two or three generations apart. While a single visit is a truly valuable experience for the children and will no doubt brighten the day for older adults, Bampton Nursery children aim to plan regular ongoing visits, which would be e en mo e bene c a he u se ch d en and staff be etu n n e soon and are already looking forward to their next visit.


District Council

Not much of a choice - potholes or speeding! By Ted Fenton - District Councillor Perhaps the largest number of emails and comments one gets is about the current state of the roads, particularly the smaller roads. Without doubt, winter weather conditions make these worse but there is no getting away from the fact that investment in the roads has not been as high as it would be in an ideal world. The good news is that there is some improvement on the horizon. Nearly £1m has been made available by the government to help with the immediate task of mending potholes and there is a programme of road improvement in place but with nearly 4,000 miles of road in the county and many of the smaller ones built on foundations that do not meet modern standards, it will always be an uphill battle to maintain the network. Most of the work takes place over the summer months. Residents can do their bit to help by reporting potholes using Fix My Street either on its website or, if you have a smartphone, using the free app. The app is very easy to use and, if it is safe to do so, you can take a photograph of the pothole, in context to help with locating rather than just a close-up. In February the County Council will be taking delivery of a second “Dragon Patcher” to deal with potholes on an ‘inspect and repair’ basis. Not only are the repairs much longer lasting than the manually completed ones but they are also considerably cheaper and so more can be done within the budget. Conversely, where the roads are in good condition the complaints are about speeding through and between the villages. This is not a council matter but a Thames Valley Police on but there some parish councils in the area have signed up for the Community Speedwatch initiative to help the police spread their resources a little more widely and I will be encouraging others to join with them wherever possible. It is an initiative, however, that relies on willing volunteers. Social Care Of course, the greatest part of the County Council’s budget is spent on social care and especially adult social care although th s ea the e s a s n cant nc ease n the amount set aside for children’s care. Sadly, the amount of money that needs to be spent on this continues to increase and

although it is work that is largely unseen by most council tax payers it is a vital and expensive part of what the County Council does and e en n th s e at e a uent count the e s a s n cant amount o child neglect. Picking up the pieces and caring for these children is essential but expensive.

£1m has been made available by the government to help with the immediate task of mending potholes Another innovation in the County Council budget has been to allocate a small fund to each Division to be spent on the advice of each local county councillor which, although primarily intended to complement the general spending on highways can be spent within the division where it is most needed especially to top up funding on community or parish projects where necessary. It is not a large amount of money but the intention is to devolve a little of the decision making about where County Council funds should be spent to the local level. The Local Plan At District level the main work continues to be on the Local Plan. In January the nspecto ad sed that the mod ed

plan could be capable of being found to be legally sound with some further mod cat on. hese mod cat ons ha e been made and are now available for public consultation which runs until Monday 9th April and can be viewed at www.westoxon.gov.uk/localplan2031 where there is also a form available on which to submit any comments. Once the work on the plan is complete, it has been found sound by the inspector and adopted by WODC it will mean that management of the growth that is required very much passes back into the control of the District Council and that the extra housing that we need should be built where the council says that it should be built. Government’s Growth Deal most na both ount and D st ct Councils (along with Oxford City and the other District Councils in Oxfordshire) have or are expected to sign up to the Government’s Growth Deal for Oxfordshire. This is an important deal which means that Oxfordshire will receive £215 million to a ds n ast uctu e and affo dab e housing. The growth required is that which is largely already built into the adopted and emerging Local Plans across the county and despite some expressed fears does not mean extra building on top of those. Martin Barrett Lastly, many thanks to everyone who has contacted me, please continue to do so it is only by being made aware of problems that I have any chance of being able to help with their solution and my very special thanks to Martin Barrett who has guided me th ou h m st th ee ea s as a Councillor and steps down as one himself in May. After 12 years’ political service to the community he deserves a rest but I suspect that he will become just as important a pillar in his new environment. I wish him, Carole and the whole family all the very best. f WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK APRIL 2018

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Parish Council

Are you up for a Bampton Allotment? By Pauline Smith - Parish Councillor By the time you read this article the May 2018 elections will be looming on the horizon. This year all 11 places on the Parish Council will be up for determination so please do consider whether you can contribute to your community by taking on this role. To give you an idea about what this entails you can call the current Chairman on 01993 850368 but in general on top of the 1-2 meetings per month that last approximately 3 hours, Councillors are Trustees of the Recreation Ground and each one takes on responsibility for one or more of the subjects the Council gets involved in. These include planning, h h a s and b a s nanc a matte s allotments, the Council managed buildings and things like the Emergency Response Plan. If you think you would like to do this please do contact the Clerk to the Council on 01993 851870 or clerk@bamptonoxonparishcouncil.gov.uk and she will send you the relevant information about applying as and when she receives it.

Allotments

Another community activity you could take part in could lead to you reaping the e a ds o o n ou o n o e s u t and vegetables at our allotments in Station Road. Until recently we had no vacancies but we now have several plots of varying sizes available. To register your interest in an allotment please email the Clerk on Clerk@ bamptonoxon-parishcouncil.gov.uk or write to her posting your letter in the box on the wall of the Town Hall. However, before you do please think about the commitment that will be needed because you will need to sign a formal agreement to keep the plot cultivated and well maintained. Experienced allotment holders tell me that the things you need to think about are: • Time - you will need to be able to put in 5/6 hours a week, average for a quarter plot. • Hard Work - it can be very hard work to bring the allotment up to scratch and into full production and it doesn’t stop there as you have to keep weeding, watering and hopefully picking and eating! • Disappointment – it is very disappointing when your crops fail.

• Weather Conditions - the allotment site is on the north side of the village and can be rather cold and wet. • Getting there - there is limited parking off oad and eh c e access po nts into the site from the main Brize Norton/ Bampton road. This is a very fast moving road so if you intend to bring children to the site it is a point worthy of some consideration. • Costs - the Rents are very reasonable, however you will require some basic tools but £30 to £40 should get you started. There is always the option of getting one of the “Allotmenteers” to run over your plot with his or her Rotovator. • Seeds and plants - other tenants are quite helpful when they hear of a bargain going in one of the centres, or if they have a surplus of plants etc. But do not under-estimate the cost of these and other essentials such as; Fertilizers and Weed Killers, Slug Killers etc. • On site buildings – you might be lucky enough to get a good shed or even a greenhouse with your plot but if not you will need to think about putting a tool shed or locker onto your plot. • Advice – I am told there is no shortage of that just ask, it’s free!

Dog owners

A sticky footnote - Bampton is lucky to have facilities for all ages at the Recreation Ground, the Playparks and the Cemetery but the enjoyment of these is being spoiled by thoughtless dog owners who let their

dogs poo and dump chewed up sticks on the play areas, pitches and graves and then do not pick up after them. This is not only disrespectful and very unpleasant for those who have to clear it up but can also cause serious problems, not only to other dogs but also to people. This is because there is evidence that dogs not only carry E.coli and hepatitis but also eggs of a parasite called toxicara canis. The last can be passed on to humans from the faeces of an infected animal having serious consequences including blindness. These eggs are invisible to the naked eye but are sticky so can be picked up easily which is why children p a n on spo ts e ds and pa ks o n on the ground etc. are more at risk. So dog owners please do not walk or let your animal run free anywhere on the mown grass areas at the Recreation Ground, in the playparks or anywhere but on the paths in the cemetery – even if you do clean up after them. Also: • Keep them on a lead when at the cemetery and in the Recreation Ground (at least until you are in the wooded area). • Prevent your dog from fouling all grassed areas used by the public but if it does, clean it up immediately with a poop scoop and bag and dispose of in a “dog bin”. • Worm your dog properly both as a puppy and as an adult. • If your dog drops chewed sticks,make sure you pick them up and throw them back into a wooded area. Following this simple guidance will help protect the health of dogs, yourself and your family as well as the general public. Unfortunately, some dog owners have been less than helpful and even abusive when approached by members of the Council to explain that walking dogs on the recreation e d s not a o ed and as a conse uence the Parish Council is sorry to say that they have to consider a ban on dogs from the Playparks, the Cemetery and anywhere at the Recreation Ground. This is not what we want so if you are or you see dog owners being irresponsible and not controlling or picking up after their dogs please do take photos and report them – don’t let a few people spoil our facilities and your enjoyment of walking your animals. Thank you. f WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK APRIL 2018

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Local Notices Shooting Stars Football Club

4th Lechlade Annual Vintage Rally & Country Show 2nd & 3rd June 2018 O

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ommenc n at 10.00 am both da s.

hoot n sta s s a un ed ootba c ub o a es 3 and a ha ea o ds. he sess ons take p ace at ampton to n ootba ound a on the uck and oad on unda s 9 30 10 30. he ma n ocus s o the ch d en to ha e ots o un p a n ootba he ea n n the u es and a ms o the ame. he ee the e sn t a eat dea o oppo tun t o ch d en bet een these a es to ea n and p a such a antast c spo t. s a esu t the dec ded to sta t up th s ootba c ub o the oun e ones. he ha e been unn n hoot n ta s s nce o embe 016 t s o n supe e .

he ha e de e oped nto a a e oup o ch d en th much mo e e u pment a ned ecent o o n a ant om ake o an enab n us to pu chase a an e o e u pment he p n us to de e a de a et o act t es. ost mpo tant a the ch d en en o themse es. t s 3 o the st sess on to see ho the ke t then t s a u the 5 a eek but the do dea s to make t cheape o the pa ents 0 o 5 sess ons nstead o 4. ontact e ene u t s at

serene.curtis@hotmail.co.uk

Classic Cars, Classic Motor Cycles, Commercial Vehicles, Collections, Miniature Steam, Tractors, Model Tent, Classic Caravans, Craft, Fun Fair, Bouncy Castle, Face Painting, West Oxfordshire Animal Sanctuary, Parrots and much more. h s ea s

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SATURDAY ue oss un Do ho eat este n outh and. o s Danc n

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oot a es ade tands uto Jumb e ood and e eshments. a e ombo a both da s. a k n ee. 4.00 du ts. .00 oncess ons. nde 16 s ee th pa n adu t. www.lechladecollectorsclub.co.uk

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Comment

Don Rouse I

n January I was invited to Bampton Primary School to give a talk on “My time at Bampton School”. What an education it was for me! I just hope it was as good for them. When we had established that they were 8 -9 years old and that for me to compare my school days with them, we would need to go back to 1945, it became easier for me. The war was still on and during this time we had been taking our Gas Masks with us when we walked to school, occasionally we would have an exercise of a mock ‘Air Raid’ and we would all go down to the Air Raid Shelters that were right next to the School in Sandford’s Field. As I remember them they were dark, dingy and smelly. When they were pulled down the rubble was used as hard core for building up the ground at Backhouse Farm. So in 1954 when my family moved there I was involved with their remnants. All the Primary School teachers lived in Bampton and walked to school, so unlike now, the thought of cars going anywhere near the school gates did not arise. The only vehicle there being ‘Carrier Greens’ bus as he had the job of transporting the children from Lew.

“What a wonderful job the new team behind our Community Shop is now doing. They are providing a terrific service to the community as well as raising a lot of money to help all the clubs and organisations ” Similar to today, when the children could do ‘joined up’ writing we were allowed to use pens. However our pens were of the traditional nib and ink type, no ballpoint pens in those days. The ink was mixed by the children using ink powder and water, with this mixture the  hildren would then fill all the in  wells in the  classroom, always a good skive for the ‘teacher’s pets’! I managed to do it once, though I cannot imagine how I managed that. Miss Hobbs must have been in a very forgiving mood that day. The children were more fascinated than shocked by my tales of punishment. How Miss Hobbs caned me across the hand 53 times in 3 years, though not the one that I had to write with, that really got them thinking. Yes caning was quite normal then. When ‘Crusty’ Owens became our new Head Master, Barry Taylor was one of  the first boys to  et  aned by him and showed off  his  swollen hand with great pride, like a war wound and was feted as a hero. I was fascinated by the questions that they asked at Question Time. The first one always  reates debate where ever you are.  s  Bampton a Town or a village?” Their main points being, it has a Town Hall and Market Square and yet it has a Village Hall. After quite a bit of discussion it was obvious that there were two trains of thought and my analysis was that the youngsters from the parents who were not born and bred in Bampton and are here because they chose Bampton as they’ve always wanted to live in a village. These children obviously thought that it is a village.

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Whereas the view from true Bampton born and bred children were that it is a Town and they were obviously very proud to claim it as such. I must admit that I, just like these parents, always at the mere mention of the word Bampton, stick my chest out with pride as it is a Town, Our Town. Though I have to confess that I’m not Bampton born and am often reminded of it by true Bamptonians even though I’ve been here since 1943 and spent my life promoting it. The Carterton Lions have already been active in Bampton this year. With the help of supporters from the Morris Clown, Talbot and the Youth Club, the Lions have supplied some giant Easter E s so that a lot of  money  ould be raised for the benefit of   Asthma UK (The Talbot); Air Ambulance (Morris Clown) and of course our wonderful Youth Club. The Bampton Beavers approached the Lions for assistance with purchasing a shed for storage purposes and I am pleased to say that their application was successful. The Lions raise money by organising local events, similar to the monthly Car Boot Sale, which they hold on the Carterton Re reation field every last  aturday in the month,  pril till  September. This enables them to help local charities as well as worthy causes in the area. Bampton is in their catchment area. Contact our Secretary Rosemary Calcutt for further details. Speaking of Charities, what a wonderful job the new team behind our Community Shop is now doing. They are providing a terrifi  servi e to the  ommunity as well as raisin  a lot of   money to help all the clubs and organisations that are striving to make Bampton an even better town to live in. Never has so much money been recycled for such worthy causes. One of the biggest concerns for people in this area is the conditions of our roads with its abundance of Pot Holes. I have pointed out in the past about the mystery of the OCC Highways sending out men, materials and equipment to repair one hole and leave the one that is right next to it. Well it is a mystery no more!  have now been  iven the answer by none other than the offi ial  Inspector of Pot Holes for Oxfordshire Highways. Due to caring members of the public from Bampton who had written, not only to the Highways Authority but also our Member of Parliament, about the terrible condition of the road through Lew the Inspector responded by paying us a visit. I approached her with the hope of using my very best ‘charm offensive’ to see if I could persuade her to draw a white line around the lot and repair it in one block, some 20 x 3 metres in size, so that would make a stronger and longer lasting repair. But no, I was given an in depth explanation as to why this is not possible. You see there is this criteria whereby a hole has to be of a certain depth and  over a spe ifi  area.  f  it doesn’t meet it by one millimetre  it doesn’t qualify. The fact that by the time the men get there to carry out the work, the size of the hole will have increased by more than that re uired by the offi er is irrelevant. I do hope that within my life time we shall be able to return to some sort of rational thinking by those in authority. f


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Interior Design

Art to make a house a home Something I see time and again that makes the impression of ‘home’ rather than ‘house’ is when artwork is hung on the walls.

W

ithin your home, artwork is your personal exhibition of what you love and find beautiful and  interesting enough to see daily, whether that is pride in your  hildren’s prolifi  paintin s,  an amateur work, a reproduction of a classic or an investment from a gallery. It gives an insight in to the owner’s personality that the walls and house naturally inherit too – hey presto, it’s a home! Generally, fewer people are moving house. HM Revenue and Customs UK Property Transactions Count showed that the number of residential property transactions with a value of £40,000 or above dropped in 2017 rather than continuing the annual trend since 2013 to increase in number. I am seeing lots of redecorating, re-imagining of space and growing families deciding to extend their homes for more space. Blank walls abound! Newly built houses, such as the CALA Homes development in Bampton, will gradually be personalised and transformed as those charmless blank walls become a stage and as the new plaster and paint smell fades the houses takes on the identity of the new owners.

prints. We have the Community Shop in Bampton and Arthur’s Attic to visit, as well as many opportunities to rummage and explore in Burford, Witney, Faringdon, Lechlade and Oxford.

WHAT TO BUY f you are settin  out to find pie es then  the sources can be almost as varied as the art itself. Unless looking solely for an investment, this is a time when it is important to buy what you love and what you find interestin , arrestin , amusin , or  that brings you joy. Since 1973 we have been lucky enough to have exhibitions and the work of artists for sale in the centre of Bampton from the gallery of West Ox Arts above the Town Hall opposite Co-op (see www.westoxarts. com). Similarly, Oxfordshire Art Week opens studios and homes as mini-galleries annually (this year, from 5th to 28th May 2018 www.artweeks.org). If you are unsure, then take the opportunity to talk to the artist or exhibition curator about what you are looking for and what you might like so they can share their expertise. Antique and vintage shops will often have a stash of old maps, naive or risqué early to mid-1900s postcards, and botanical

HOW TO CREATE A DISPLAY When it comes to framing, any artwork that is valuable, precious or fragile is best handled by a professional. Nick of Westbrook Framer’s on Bampton’s Bridge Street will be able to help with bespoke framing requirements (call 07768035458). Large pin-boards are worth painting and then using to provide an informal surface for arranging cards, photographs, cuttings and postcards - those mementos that make us happy. If you decide to frame items yourself then frames can be readily purchased online from the giants of Dunelm Mill, Habitat, Ikea and John Lewis. I have found great success from the effect of using ‘raw’ timber frames that you can DIY paint to complement a wall colour and mount card in a similar tone that shows off the image itself. Little Greene Paint Company and Paint & Paper Library (both available from Relics of Witney) have paint in various shades of the same colour that can translate brilliantly from emulsion

www.highmoordesign.co.uk

Above: Coloured mount card. Left: Wall of framed prints from John Lewis.

on the wall to a satin on the frame. I’ve also challenged clients’ assumption that white and grey walls are best by proving that a colour, such as muted green, will provide a very successful background for art. FINALLY, ON THE WALL If you are mounting a single piece, then the best approach is usually to centre it on the wall horizontally and place it at eye-level when standing. If you have a collection of similar pieces - and the necessary space - I find people prefer the effe t of  a row to  a montage. This requires at least GCSE maths to calculate the spaces from the orner of  the wall to the ed e of  the first  frame and equidistant spacing thereon, a task to be undertaken only with great patience if working in a team! Finally, a montage collection is still a charming and popular way of presenting a group of smaller pieces. To protect your plasterwork, rather than hammering in a nail for the hook, it is a good idea to place a small piece of masking tape where the hole is required and then use a very fine drill to pass throu h the plaster  layer before knocking in the pin. A screw and rawlplug (especially for heavier items) is often the best approach. If in doubt, ask a professional and always take necessary health and safety precautions, including a check to avoid electrical wires or plumbing pipes. Happy hanging! f WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK APRIL 2018

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Coaching for Life We welcome Lucy Tulloch to the Beam team. A business and life coach, Lucy will be suggesting ways to ‘sort our lives out!”

Comparing ourselves to others

I

am really delighted to be given the opportunity to write for the Beam. I have enjoyed reading it over the years and I love to hear about life in Bampton and the surrounding villages. This year I elebrate 1  years of  livin  in  lanfield with  my husband, two children and the latest adddition, our dog. My work as a personal and business coach enables me to work from home which in turn has enabled me to get more involved in village life which includes writing for local publications. This is the first of  a series of  arti les   will be writin   to share with you my expertise on personal development to create positive change in your personal and professional lives.

“Comparing ourselves is not a helpful thought process and it leads to unhelpful behaviours. The drive to compare is as strong as the drive to eat or drink according to leading psychologists.” Comparing ourselves to others, we all do it  Even the most  onfident of  person  has moments of self-doubt fuelled by their comparison with others. Not only do we look at others and think they are smarter, thinner, funnier, more or anised, finan ial  more secure, live in a nicer/bigger home etc but we also compare ourselves to those who we think aren’t quite up to our standards. We do this because it helps to build our own self onfiden e and self worth. The drive to  compare is as strong as the drive to eat or drink according to leading psychologists. Comparing ourselves is not a helpful thought process and it leads to unhelpful behaviours. Social media is the worst offender. It enables us to see images or read posts of happiness, perfection, and success. Social media is here to stay so how do we manage our unhelpful thoughts and beliefs of others?

www.lucytullochcoaching.co.uk 3) Comparisons create competitive relationships When we start comparing ourselves with others our friendships turn into ones of rivalry. It stands in the way of making human connections, empathy, consideration, and fun.

How can we turn a negative thought into a more helpful positive one?

Here are 3 reasons why comparisons are not helpful: 1) Others so called perfection is probably not real. We all have bad hair days, shout at the kids or uff  a presentation.  ur friends and  colleague may post news of their new job but fail to tell us about the 10 interviews they had beforehand which weren’t successful. 2) Life isn’t fair! It may be that others have access to more help and support juggling the kids whilst they work. It may be that others have more disposable income to upgrade their car each year or take two holidays. It may be that someone has a skill which has enabled them to start their own business and work for themselves. It is what it is. It isn’t a re e tion of  a la  of  hard wor ,  ability, or commitment on your part.

1) Compare yourself in order to set realistic goals If by comparing yourself to others it gives you motivation and gives you ideas and life goals, it can be really helpful. But there is a balance to be had. By raising your selfawareness to keep yourself in check this can be a force for good. 2) Choice We all have a choice about how we think and behave. When life doesn’t feel fair, we can choose to accept this reality and let it go, rather than hanging on to the feelings it creates. 3) Build relationships by supporting their success By building trust with our friends we will build relationships which are far more honest and open. This will undoubtedly lead to an awareness that their life isn’t perfect. In celebrating each other’s successes and supporting each other during challenging times, the friendship is far more rewarding than the perceived need to have achieved more. In the next edition I will be focussing on how we  an in uen e our own happiness. f WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK APRIL 2018

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Gardening with Di Bray

Greetings from Lechlade! First steps... Starting here in the winter time has been useful - it has forced me to take some time to just look at the garden, and really think about the changes I’d like to make.

I

now know for example, that I’m going to have a long term battle with couch grass, bindweed and ground elder, and as an or ani   ardener that means  lose  uarter fi htin   on a regular basis! The garden is seven times longer than it is wide and east facing, with a shed and deck at the far end for the evening sun and a small paved area at the house end for morning coffee. It is largely laid to lawn with very little planting. That late sun already tells me that I’m going to have to put in a path if I don’t want a natural, muddy one to form in the grass, as I regularly make my way up the garden to my all important shed. However, because the garden is narrow, I want to avoid having a path that goes in a straight line up the middle; I’d like to give the impression of width by having the path undulate a bit and be off centre. I also knew almost straight away that some existing planting would have to go - I would have to be as hard hearted as I always tell others to be! Above: Amelanchier grandiflora ‘Ballerina’ Close to the house was an Right: Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ old and obviously diseased plum tree that had endured some misguided pruning over the years and was now in a sad and sorry state. Alongside it were a large Rosemary bush and an equally imposing Ceanothus. Both are shrubs that I have some affection for but both would have had to be pruned very hard to fit their  allotted space, so hard in fact that it’s unlikely they would have ever recovered their beauty. The decision, though tough, was the ri ht one, with mu h more li ht now fillin  the  it hen and  a good view of the garden now visible from the kitchen table. The wood from the plum proved to be so unwell that it was as light as cork. The logs now form a, hopefully, insect friendly pile by the shed. The garden has been untouched for quite a while and now

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that the plum and friends have gone, I am left with very little inherited planting. In the back garden there is just an overgrown Hebe pinguifolia, an Hypericum, a Spiraea japonica, a large Eunymous ‘Emerald Gaiety’ and two robust climbing roses - both yellow and planted at either ends of the garden. The Euonymus has been a very welcome evergreen presence through the winter, the Hebe too, but it is leggy and will need a hard prune in the spring and may not survive the onslaught either aesthetically or physiologically! I’ve pruned both the Hypericum and the Spiraea hard and taken a lot of old and dead wood out of the middle to introdu e some air and li ht. Both should benefit  as both can be rejuvenated by taking down almost to ground level if necessary. I have done some new planting but am trying to be disciplined whilst I form a planting plan, so only the plants that I know I wouldn’t want to be without have gone in the ground. That includes Daphne odora ‘Aureomarginata’ for soft evergreen form and wonderful scent close to the house, and by the back door, Rosa ‘Mme Alfred Carriere’ for an almost thorn free rose to drape over the wall. I’ve always wanted an apple tree so now have two - Bramley’s Seedling for apple pie and Ellison’s Orange for munching! Two other small garden trees : melan hier  randi ora  ‘Ballerina’ for blossom, autumn colour and winter structure and Malus toringo ‘Scarlett’ for garnet foliage and extra pollination. For the emer in   ower borders  I’ve planted primroses, foxgloves, snowdrops, grasses and rudbeckia, all kindly donated from gardens that I love or brought with me from my old Bampton garden. owever, as   finish writin  and loo  out on a fro en  February garden, any more planting still seems a long way off! For now, I think I better continue planning the garden and dreaming of those spring days ahead when everything seems possible and you’re sure that ALL plants will thrive! f


Gardening Club Bampton Gardening Club s Annual Sho ill be held on Sunday August in Bampton illage Hall The schedule is printed opposite, the show is open to all – members and non-members, adults and children. Everyone is welcome. Membership is now due for renewal. Please List o Challenge Cups rene at a coffee morning or you can contact Cup Richard West on We ill al ays Lady Anne Montague Cup elcome ne members to the gardening club Jack o ne emo a up ce es dent s up s m th up We are relaunching the best kept allotment competition otta e s up for the Bampton allotment holders so if you would like to eane ammond ose o enter please speak to one of the committee members at a mond a o up the coffee mo n n o ou can contact cha d est on dne onstab e up 01993 778414 Andrew Pierce Cup Do t oud up en dams up Percy Bowerman Cup 1. The show is open to members and non-members. Albert Tanner Cup Anyone may enter any class, irrespective of age. Nellie Temple Cup 2. Only one entry is allowed per entrant, per class. Win Woodley Cup 3. Exhibits must be the property of the exhibitor, Henry Bone Cup unless otherwise stated in the schedule, and must John m th up have been in their possession for at least 6 months e th eed up The Beam Cup (cooking classes excepted). ank o ett up 4. n p e ma be thhe d o mod ed exh b ts a e henne up cons de ed un o th o the p e offe ed. osebo 5. All exhibits are to be staged between 9.00 and 11 am e at e up on the morning of the show. ad athbu up 6. No exhibit may be removed after it has been staged ace tsh e up until the cups have been presented. hambe s e ate n ood e ha en e up 7. While the Committee will take every care of the ett dams up exhibits, it will not be held responsible for loss or

Allotment competition

Rules

damage.

8.

nt ud ed as most dese n effo t must not ha e been awarded a prize.

9. Children wishing to exhibit in adult class will have to pay normal fees please remember if they entry in the ch d en s c asses the a e

A arded or

Overall points unne p est n ho Jud es O n ho ce ost Dese n ffo t n ho ass 1 4 oses ass n e ose ass eet peas Class 8 – Carnations ass 11 actus dah a ass 14 Deco at e dah a Class 15 – Gladioli Class 16 – 3 Chrysanthemums Class 17 – Chrysanthemums 1 specimen bloom Class 21 – Busy Lizzie Class 22 – Begonia ass 5 ucumbe s ass 9 unne beans Class 41 – Vegetables on a tray ass 5 4 o e a an ement ect on 1 o e a po nts ect on o e a po nts ect on 3 o e a po nts ect on 5 o e a po nts ect on 6 o e a po nts ect ons 5 6 o e a po nts st best o e 4 c ass econd best o e 4 ass ass o ce o e cup

Please note Bampton Gardening Club s Annual Sho is open to all members and non members adults and children E eryone is elcome Entry orms or the Sho ill be ta en at Bampton illage Hall on Sho ay August bet een am and am A ternoon Opening pm Presentations pm Re reshments Ra e Entrance p

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BAMPTON GARDENING CLUB

SHOW SCHEDULE – 26 August 2018 Section 1: GARDEN FLOWERS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. . 8. 9. 10. 11. 1 . 13. 14. 15. 16. 1 . 18. 19. 0. 1. .

Roses x 3 Single Rose bloom oses o bunda x 3 a o ds x 5 an a et oa x 5 eet peas x 5 an co ou a nat ons d anthus x 3 n othe o e x 5 an a et Dah a cactus b oom x 3 Dah a pom pom up to 5 mm x 3 Dah a pom pom o e 5 mm x 3 Dah a deco at e x 3 ad o sp kes x h santhemums x 3 sp a h santhemums spec men b oom x 1 pec men b oom an a et on o e n p ant n a pot max actus n a pot max us e n a pot max e on a n a pot o e n max Othe o e n p ant n a pot max no ce o e c ass an bod not on a the o e sect on

45. 46. 4 . 48. 49.

Section 4: LONGEST & HEAVIEST VEGETABLES 50. 51. 5 . 53. 54.

on est unne bean ea est potato ea est on on eak e etab e ea est a o

Section 5: FLOWER ARRANGING & CRAFT 55. 56. 5 . 58. 59. 60.

st p e n

61.

Section 2: VEGETABLES

6 .

3. 4. 5. 6. . 8. 9. 30. 31. 3 . 33. 34. 35. 36. 3 . 38. 39. 40.

ad shes x 5 an a et ucumbe an a et th sta k x 1 on omato x 5 che ed o e o th ca x omato x 5 ed o e o th ca x ou ette x an a et unne beans x 5 ench beans x 5 eet oot x 3 th 3 tops a ots x 3 an a et 3 tops On ons x 3 as o n th tops On ons x 3 d essed ha ots x 5 d essed abba e an a et th stem otatoes h te x 5 an a et ashed otatoes co ou ed x 5 an a et ashed ab e ma o max 15 n othe e etab e a o e etab es 5 a et es o each ot to exceed 18 b 0 o 45 x cm 41. e bs x 5 1 stem o each n ase

63. 64.

an ement o o e s and o a e dep ct n edd n ou uet 18 b 18 45. cm b 45. cm an ement o o e s om ou o n a den 18 b 18 45. cm b 45. cm an ement o o e s not exceed n 4 n an d ect on ate co ou o o not s ned unmounted not to exceed 4 e enc o cha coa sketch not exceed n 4 s e unmounted not s ned hoto aph co ou ed dep ct n o e o o e s not exceed n 4 unmounted not s ned hoto aph b ack and h te an sub ect not exceed n 4 s e unmounted not s ned tem o an sma and kn tted a ment not mach ned open to e oem ent t ed eta s no mo e than 10 nes not s ned ma tem o c a t not u n tu e

Section 6: COOKING & BEVERAGES 65. 66. 6 . 68. 69. 0. 1. . 3. 4.

cto a spon e emon D e baked n a sma 1 b oa t n u t scones x 5 u che not to exceed n an d ect on Deco ated cup cakes x 5 Ja o am Ja o e Ja o ma ma ade Ja o chutne o p ck e ott e o an othe be e a e

Section 7: CHILDREN’S SECTION - under 15 5. D a a p ctu e o a an ma 4 6. ake a e etab e monste . Deco ated scu ts 5 8. n atu e a den on a d nne p ate

Section 3: FRUIT 4 . 43. 44.

pp es x 3 cook n ums x 3 an a et ea s x 3 an a et ackbe es x 5 th sta ks p ate o an othe u t

aspbe es x 5 th sta ks on a sauce o sma d sh huba b x 3 pu ed st cks 1 t mmed ea pp es x 3 desse t

Entry form Entry ee: Non members:

rst entry or each subse uent entry one item per class : Senior Citi ens: p Children under : REE

Name:.....................................................................................

Age i under

:.................

p

embers:

p

el:....................................................................

Ring classes entered: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 Total no. classes entered:.................

Entry fee due:.................

Member: y / n.................

Exhibitor no.:.................

Please note, no additions to entries can be made once form has been entered WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK APRIL 2018

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SPAJERS

Get ready for the Shirt Race A Update by Lynne Pointer

Another Successful Autumn with the ire or s and Bon re Night Josie s ra and the ummer s our around the houses and hostelries o the illage all contributing ell to our unds This meant that we were able to continue the Christmas Box to our members and put on a short Shopping Trip to Swindon on a snowy day in December. This trip was quite an adventure. For most of our members it was the icy footpaths and pavements in between home and the Market Square pick-up point that were the problem, rather than the the roads. Once again we had excellent service from Baker’s Coaches, who, although knowing us well, still agree to take us out on our “jollies”. A grant from The Community Shop in Bampton was also welcome. Thanks also to those of you who shop at the Co-op and Asda in Carterton. Both of these have included us in their Local Charities schemes and have recently given us contributions. This is much appreciated. All those pennies do add up.

ui Night

Our Spring season starts with the ANNUAL QUIZ NIGHT on Friday April 13th in the Village Hall, doors open 7:30 for a prompt start at 8 pm. The start time allows most o k to ha e suppe at home st but not bring a picnic hamper along. Ticket Price of £30 per team of 6 includes nibbles. A Paying Bar is available

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for wine, beer, cider and soft drinks, and may we remind folks that because of the terms of the licence, this is not a Bring Your Own drinks occasion. Questions and answers are shown on Scottie’s very own “Laser Display Board” (though sadly lovely scorer Samantha is once again unavailable), which makes it so much more enjoyable than the old shout above the conversations way we used to have to do it . It would be great if we had some from our new townsfolk in the new houses on Quick Row, Shergold Road etc as John Quick was our founder. A good way to break the ice and get to know each other. Please contact our Secretary 01993 851930 for more information or to make a booking.

Shirt Race

After this we will be gearing up for The Shirt Race on Saturday May 26th this year. Last year’s arrangements worked very well, so we expect to run the same course and road closures this year. Remember that roads immediately around the Market Square will be closed from approximately 18:45 to 20:00 on the night. he d e s ons a o t affic to sk t the centre of the village, but you will not be able to drive into the Market Square. As always this wonderful, unique event depends upon a good supply of Stewards.

There will be a meeting for these Friends of Spajers helpers in the week leading up to the event, and if you would like to join them please get in touch with any committee member. We are as ever grateful to those who supply and pour the drinks at the stops. a e t ckets be so d b Jos e and others before and during the event. o the bene t o ne es dents n the village here is a reminder of the Shirt Race Rules and Regulations. New residents are welcome to enter, but might like to bear in mind that Paddington’s Aunt Lucy ecommends ens b e ea s to atch st to see what they are letting themselves in for.” To enter just turn up on the night in the Market Square, where our stewards will remind you about the important safety aspects of the races, before the start. You take part at your own risk, but our planning beforehand and the Stewards on the night, have ensured that we have run a safe race for many years now. We aim to keep it that way, so please; Parents look after the Little Ones and Everyone take note of the Stewards Instructions.

Fancy Dress

If anyone is stuck for ideas for Fancy Dress this year then I am sure I can help them out, for a small donation to SPAJER funds of course. This is because a friend recently offe ed me a e da s o nte sun on the Costa del Sol which coincided with Nerja


Shirt Race Rules

Here is a brief reminder of the rules, and whether you would qualify for a prize or not. • Competitors enter in pairs ith one pram/conveyance between them, one inside and one pushing.

Carnival and “The Burial of the Sardine”. Imagine a procession led by a drum band all swaying along to an irresistible pasodoble beat, followed by a variety of family and club groups dressed fancifully in mainly black but with many a head plume and enlivened by lurex, stars, shiny frills, ounces and eathe s. en the t n tots n the am oups a e u out tted. Spanish is not good enough to discover whether some of the Fancy Dress had particular references or if that family just happened to have nine large clocks to hand?

Ne

and bistros, its own personality and a great community feel unlike other nearby places. Remind you of anywhere you know? It struck me that though we are on the fringes of the Oxford Leiden Link, through our always cheerful Don Rouse, if Bampton ever wanted to twin with anywhere else then Nerja would be a good place. Just like us Nerja relies on locals volunteering and stewarding their events. an thanks to a ho he p us n sett n up, taking down and making sure that spectators and participants in our events alike have a fun and safe time. We hope

eams are al ays

At various points in the procession other bands break into a funereal tune on brass instruments and the procession members weep and wail, mopping their eyes with black-edged hankies behind their black veils. All because they are leading a 6 foot high image of a sardine rearing up on its ta . t s mounted on a b ack coffin on a bier carried along by 6 young men in black tail coats and top hats with long black ribbon streamers. This year’s sardine looked particularly lugubrious and seemed all too aware of the fate awaiting it as it was borne down to the black painted boat on the beach next to the bon e and e o ks . Nerja is a well frequented tourist town but still has a large local population, good bars

elcome

that those of you who steward the Shirt Race will come along again this year, and that we can all enjoy ourselves and keep long-standing traditions alive.

Membership

embe sh p o J s s open to an one who is 65 years or more old and has lived in Bampton, Lew or Weald for at least six months. et n touch th ou embe sh p sec eta Jeff Dando on 850643 but remember to ask them before putting anyone other than yourself forward for membership. Your personal data will only be used in accordance with the 1998 Data Protection Act and these details will not be shared.

he Chariot e ent is or more than competitors and only uali es for a Fancy Dress Award.

he classes are : Junior or Children under years

• ntermediates aged

to

years

• Seniors •

nder age competitors ill be supplied with soft drinks; Seniors have the choice of beer or soft drinks.

• One hal pint is to be drun at each stop by one of the competitors, alternately. No spillages. • One person stays ith the conveyance which must be stationary at the Drink Stop. • Cups must be ept and are counted at the nish • n the Junior Race only those ho have completed the course without any assistance will qualify for an award. • At the line up all racing pairs ill be in the ront ran Chariots at the rear. he Ste ards may decide to ary the order or the way in which the races are started, depending upon the number of entrants on the night. he Judges decisions at the inish are Final. WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK APRIL 2018

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West Ox Arts

West Ox Arts - Finding your forte By Diana Homer, Trustee

On passing the Bampton Town Hall you may have noticed our colourful entrance, I am sure it must have caught your eye, also the TV just inside the doorway. We hope this encourages you to come on up and experience the vibrant and bustling community within. The TV gives up-to date information regarding the Gallery, but of course experiencing it yourself is much better. There is a lot going on at the moment, with interactive presentations and workshops designed to involve anyone with an interest in the arts or, indeed those of you who would like to experience something new. This April there is a joint exhibition by Sally Wyatt and Nicki Heenan expressing their passion and absorption in their chosen landscapes. In Beyond Observation texture and colour play a major part in their work. If you would like to learn something of their techniques, drop into the Gallery and discover when they will be talking about their paintings and giving workshops. How often do you have the opportunity to hear directly from an artist or, indeed, to see them demonstrating their techniques? The opening reception on Saturday April 7th would also give you the opportunity to meet them both. In May the Gallery is hosting an exhibition as part of Oxfordshire Artsweeks Festival. Artsweeks, as I am sure you are aware, is a countywide programme of exhibitions, which involves private studios and larger venues open to the public. This year the C21 group, with 12 regular members, and one of the longest established art groups in the

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county, is exhibiting with us. They have held exhibitions in Oxford, Woodstock and the prestigious “The Gallery” in Cork Street London. Individual members have exhibited as far a e d as ance and Tokyo. C21 paint exclusively in oils and share a passion for colour, tone and composition creating a sense of harmony in the exhibition. Again, you have the opportunity to discuss the work with the artists and they will give advice on all aspects of painting. The Gallery opening times will be extended to accommodate the increased footfall during this period and will be in line with other studios open to the public. Why not take a tour of Brampton’s art scene? You will be bowled over by the amount of talent there is within this community. June brings us the Brunel Broderers with their exhibition Underpinning 11, previously exhibited in Bath but extended for this exhibition. It will include an interesting interactive exhibition “Connections” This consists of postcards sent between the members of the group to each other,each of whom altered it in some way before

resending. You are invited to join in and alter cards thus making “Connections” of your own, ensuring that the “Connections” will grow. There are six artists taking part in the exhibition working with textiles in a wide variety of ways. Each artist has taken her own ideas to make a collection of textile related work, and when put together in the exhibition, “they show a fascinating variety of form and inspiration.” C21 engage with the public and you can enjoy a talk about their group or the work that is on show. Also there will be a workshop and demonstrations so p ease d op n and nd out hen t s a happening. Why not come to the opening reception on June 2nd? Our new programme is designed to welcome as many of you as possible to this lovely gallery in the middle of Bampton. It is a delightful place where you can meet other people and enjoy both learning and taking part in activities without having to travel a a e d. he e s a host o ta ent ad ce and p act ca he p on offe . Just d op n and nd o extend ou o te. est Ox ts s a registered charity, which aims to promote all forms of art – painting, craft, sculpture, photography and any other art related activity. Do come and join in.f


Bampton Opera

Cinderella

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n 1993 what was then called the West Oxfordshire Arts sso iation ave birth to a surprisin  enterprise, at first  named Bampton Summer Opera. Opera is always a faintly mad undertaking – inevitably bound to lose money (given its high costs), and complex in the extreme in its marriage of music and theatre and all the  ompli ations that mi ht involve.  The very first  production in 1993 was Handel’s idyllic mythological story Acis and Galatea, and the ideal spot to stage it in Bampton proved to be the lovely garden of the Deanery. In organising this we wanted to keep prices low and to make it accessible – we decided to perform entirely al fresco and we asked the audience to bring their own garden chairs, a custom we still maintain and which adds to the delightful informality of the experience. 25 years on, the company (which was soon re-born as Bampton Classical Opera to indicate its emphasis on music from the late 18th century) is still going strong, spurred on by the highest artistic standards and ever-broadening critical reputation, one of the most respected small opera groups in the UK. For many years, in addition to the Deanery, performances have also been given at the wonderfully extravagant venue of estonbirt  hool in  lou estershire  thin  of  a ma nifi ent  Downton-Abbey style mansion with fabulous grounds) and in the Baroque splendour of one of London’s leading concert halls, St John’s Smith Square. Many other notable venues and festivals have featured along the way, including the prestigious Cheltenham and Buxton Festivals, Oxford’s historic Holywell Music Room and London’s hallowed Wigmore Hall. All-in-all that’s a pretty remarkable achievement!

This summer marks our 25th Anniversary and we are celebrating with two family and child-friendly operas, both an absolute delight, and as always brin in  some of  Britain’s finest youn  professional  singers to Bampton. In July we will be giving what we believe are the first ever performan es in this  ountry of  a fantasti  fairy tale  opera of Cinderella, by a once-famed but now unjustly forgotten Malta-born composer, Nicolo Isouard. Written in 1810, Cinderella was once hugely popular and is now rightly being rediscovered, with other new productions this year in New York and Malta. It’s both comic and poignant, with the familiar fairy-story set to the loveliest melodies imaginable – a treat for the ear and eye in our sensitive and beautiful production. Performances are on Friday and Saturday 20 and 21st July at the Deanery Garden, where once again we are indebted to Linda and Peter Ferstendik for hosting us, as they have done ever since 1994 when they moved into the Deanery. Tickets are on sale now from Anthony Hall (01993 851142) or online at www.bamptonopera.org and, as always, we offer a small quota of free tickets to Bampton residents who are newcomers to the opera and who otherwise could not afford to attend – please just ask Anthony. Children’s tickets are half-price and we really hope that Cinderella will work its magic on a younger audience. To follow that, at Christmas, we’re staging Menotti’s Amahl and the Night Visitors, a moving and different setting of the Nativity story: this short and beautifully melodious opera will again be very familyfriendly. The Bampton performance follows one in London, and will be on Friday 21 December in St Mary’s Church – tickets will be on sale in the autumn. - Jeremy Gray

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Obituary

Jill Tweed Sculptor aka Jill Hicks from London By Philip Hicks

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ill and I moved to Bampton in 1990, we had friends in the village and this led us to our move. We found our future home in the Buckland Road where we had garden space to set up our studios, mine as a painter, Jill as a sculptor, and we have lived and worked there ever since. Jill sadly died last February, but I know she would have joined me in expressing our gratitude to the many people in Bampton who made us so welcome and became good friends. I remember too we gave a summer garden party a year after our move, as a gesture of thanks to our new friends, and we had over 60 people there! I am now leaving Bampton and am going to live with my son David near Guildford where I will also be closer to my daughter in London but cannot go without mentioning the quality of care and service we have received from all at our Bampton surgery which became more and more important to us as ill-health affected our lives. Also our village library, Patrick Strainge, John Temple, Tony Scott at Budgens, and others who contributed so greatly to our quality of life here. Bampton really does look after people. Jill knew her own worth as an artist but she had an innate modesty, and I believe that not many people realised they had a sculptor of some renown working here in the village. Her work, forms a complete entity in itself, but divides naturally into four main categories, all of which proceed in parallel throughout her career. Firstly her drawings, she was a master draughtsman (trained at the Slade) and produced a stream of drawings throughout her life. These ranged from quick sketches of great vitality and movement, throu h to lar er, more finished wor s for publi   exhibition. Many of these were ambitious in her quite abstract use of colour. She also made related editions of lithographs and woodcuts. Then there were her portrait bronzes, where again she was a master, the bulk of these were done in London, but two major pieces she did in Bampton. She made a large head and shoulders of the retiring headmaster of Kings School Canterbury, Cannon Anthony Philips, which stands proudly in the School Hall and was commissioned by the navy to make a posthumous portrait of Admiral Lord Fieldhouse, commander in chief of the Falklands war. This was to stand outside in a park in Gosport, and Jill insisted it should be x1.5 life size in order to make its mark in such a place. She worked from a video made by the Navy which gave her all round views of her subject and which she  ould free e frame whi h   thin  was a first.  he had a  reat  gift for achieving a likeness without losing the vitality of surface so characteristic of her sculpture, Epstein comes to mind.

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Thirdly she never stopped making her own ‘private’ sculptures. These ranged from small table pieces to larger life-size ones. The subjects were animals, birds and the, mostly male, nude human form, but the underlying subject throughout was vitality of movement. Finally   ome to her  rander wor s. The first one was an over  life size horse and rider commissioned by the Royal Military Police for its headquarters in Chichester, she made this in a studio she rented in Surrey near the foundry which would cast it, driving daily there and back directly from London. It was a great success and unveiled by the Queen. Once in Bampton a further eight large public sculptures were commissioned over the years, several of which she won in open national competitions, all of them made in her Buckland Road studio. Jill took her role as a sculptor for public spaces seriously, and researched thoroughly into the areas concerned making sure that her sculptures had real relevance to their sites. This was an important reason for her success and interestingly, so far as I know, none of them have been vandalised. One of my favourites is a horse galloping over a bridge, commissioned by the Hampshire County Council as a gift to Basse-Normandie whom they are twinned with in France. It stands around 4m high in a public park in Caen and looks splendid. It was presented as part of the D-Day celebrations. Jill has also held solo exhibitions of drawing and sculpture, many of them in London’s West End, she was a fellow of the Royal British Society of Sculptors, and indeed sat as a council member of the Society for many years. In short Bampton has been the place where the major part of Jill’s creative life has been lived, and may I say my own, as I have produ ed paintin s here for around fifteen solo shows, eleven  of them in London’s West End. Time passes, Jill is lost to us, but her work lives on. I am moving away but will never forget the great times we had here and the friends we made. So thank you, Bampton, for having us. f


Obituary

Tim Tomlins Last November Bampton said farewell to Tim Tomlins who moved here in the early 1960s. He was born in Sussex in 1936 and as a young man travelled to Australia. A man of many talents, he could turn his hands to many things from general building to bird breeding but his great love was steam engines. Over the last 40 years and often assisted by his son David he esto ed s x en nes and t s tt n that he made h s na ou ne to t a s hu ch b steam the en ne d en b h s son David. A fuller tribute to Tim will be published in the next issue of the Beam.

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Review

The Bell Inn - Langford Re-opened at the end of 2017 it was time for the Beam to return - Nicola Saward

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ovely, talented and skilled tradesmen – two plumbers, a carpenter and an electrician - all local - doing magic things to our house last week meant 48 hours without hot water and heatin  and we needed little en oura ement to find a warm  and cosy pub for lunch. The reopening of The Bell at Langford towards the end of last year was extensively covered in local newspapers, and in January 2018 it received perhaps the ultimate accolade when Giles Coren writing in The Times described one particular dish as “not just the best mouthful of the year but the best mouthful of my life”. Peter Creed and chef Tom Noest spent nearly twelve months looking for a pub and when they found The Bell, a seventeenth century pub which had closed in 2016, they realised that it had the potential they were looking for. Wonderful location, traditional features, good outside space and as a bonus eight hotel bedrooms, which are currently being refurbished and will be available soon. We arrived early and were able to choose a table quite lose to the fire  which unfortunately was being temperamental and sulked and smoked for a good thirty minutes before eventually producing the warmth we were seeking. It also turned out to be an excellent vantage point allowing us to see what other people were ordering! Peter and Tom have used their experience to produce a menu which is a mix of traditional and modern but that rather bland statement doesn’t do justice to a menu which is more than a bit special. I started with a deconstructed rarebit which arrived with toasted home made sour dough soldiers for dipping and my companion opted for the devilled kidneys which had just the right amount of heat. The people at the table next to us opted for a delightful looking dish of smoked eel, parsley, caper, green bean and shallot salad having snacked on the garlic, parsley

and bone marrow  at bread whi h  iles  oren raved about. Other tables were ordering the spectacular pizzas, cooked in the wood fired oven usin  home made dou h proved over a two day  period.  ain  ourse  hoi es in luded pub favourites su h as fish  and chips, cheese burger and steaks as well as a beautiful Torbay Sole; local Bibury pigeon served with bacon and lentils; and a delicious looking rabbit, bacon and prune pie to be shared between two.    had the beer battered fish  and home cut fries and the batter was  risp and the fish fresh and  a ey. e finished with traditional and  unremarkable desserts, sticky toffee pudding for me and rice pudding for my companion. Alternatively we could have chosen from a selection of Neal’s Yard cheeses. The wine list is varied and well priced with a reasonable selection of wines available by the glass. It was nice to see some more unusual wines on offer such as Chateau Musar 1999 from the Bekaa

Valley in Lebanon. Beers and ciders include Cotswold 3.8, Cotswold IPA, Amstel, Guiness and Hooky and Sharps Orchard Cider. It was certainly an extremely popular choice for lunch on the day we visited, with the majority of tables prebooked and a number of casual diners happily prepared to wait with their drink for a table and with the arrival of warmer weather I am sure that the seating area outside will be a popular choice. Car parking space is a little limited but there is parking out on the road as well. The loos are lovely and sparkling though there are a couple of steps to be navigated on the way. If I had a complaint it is that the 4 tables for two are a little bit close for comfort and it was hard not to become an involuntary eavesdropper. f WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK APRIL 2018

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Wine - Robin Shuckburgh

The Rosés are stirring You may not think it whilst the “Beast from the East” sends inches of snow and incredibly icy conditions to Bampton, but spring really is on the way. As soon as the snowdrops appear each year, my mind turns to the wonderful prospect of delicious Rosé wine.

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or decades these wines have been improving. New fermentation methods, great competition from South Africa, Chile and many other countries and at last a lifting, at least to some degree, of the hellish snobbery that surrounds wine, has seen Rosé develop from a sort of compromise drink for those who don’t really like wine to a much appreciated delicate alternative to white wine, drunk equally by men and women. Used as an aperitif or paired with white meat and fish, some of  these wines vie  successfully for a position in anyone’s cellar.

Styles vary of course. The Americans still like their rosé sweet, or at least too sweet for my taste, but following the example of Provence and the Rhone valley, many producers from around the world are making delicately dry rosés which, to me, are one of the joys of the season. Occasionally, of course, rosés from areas like Tavel in the Rhone, and some of the nearby regions are meatier and heavier, and these really are quite something, but they are expensive and for the benefit of   this article we’ll look closer at the lighter spring wines with, perhaps, a glimpse of what they can do in South Africa.

Les Vignerons Grenache Merlot Rosé 2106 £7.89

These wines are not meant to last; either in the cellar, or once opened. The 2016/17 vintages are the ones to look for, and make sure you consume within a maximum of two days of opening the bottle. Have a wonderful spring. By the time this is published I imagine the Beast will have died and the miserable disease-ridden winter will be just a distant memory. For those many of you who have suffered from winter illness this year I wish you well and suggest you fortify yourselves with some delicious spring wine to help fend off the bugs in future. f

Rosé Pays D’Oc, Vin de France 2016 £5.49

from the Oxford Wine Company

from the Bampton Co Op

For every day this lovely wine takes some beating for value. The use of the Rhone grape Granache lifts it and gives it structure but it remains light and clean with a strawberries and cream feel. At 12.5% it allows you to take less notice of how much you are drinking. I have a feeling quite a lot of this will pass through the Shuckburgh household this spring.

On the odd occasion in the winter when I have needed cheering up I have popped to the Coop in Bampton and picked up a bottle of this rosé. It has a pretty deco label and is entirely unpretentious but I really enjoy it. It’s a very good example of how modern fermentation methods have improved wines like this. 12%? Well it hardly touches the sides.

Jordan Chameleon Dry Rosé, Stellenbosch 2016

Furleigh Estate Sea Pink, 2016

£11.75

from the Oxford Wine Company The grapes for this wine are destemmed and crushed and then macerated on the skins for between 1 - 3 hours before being pressed. After settling for 2 days, the wine is then racked and inoculated with local white wine yeasts. Plummy Merlot combined with summer-berry flavours of Shiraz add complexity to this dry fruity rosé. It’s a versatile partner to seafood and Asian dishes. At 13.5% it has a bit more beef to it. Quite a serious wine.

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£12.99

from the Oxford Wine Company Furleigh Estate is set in the stunning Dorset countryside, just five miles from the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. Those dinosaurs who wandered this land millions of years ago have laid down their bones to make the perfect soil to grow world-class still and sparkling wines. The estate was established in 2005 when Ian and Rebecca Hansford purchased the farm and meticulously turned it into the world-class vineyard and winery it is today. Wonderfully fruit driven dry rosé with almost a sweet and sour feel about it and the most fruit I have ever tasted in an English rosé. Delicious - and very moreish!


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Cookery Seasonal recipes from Riverford Organic Farmers

Guy’s kale hash METHOD This is a real treat on a cold day. You can use any cabbage or sliced Brussels sprouts in place of kale here. To make a complete supper, top with a poached egg.

1.

anch the ka e n a a e saucepan o bo n a te 1 m nutes o cu 3 m nutes o ca o o ne o 30 seconds o ed uss an . D a n e e esh n co d ate and d a n a a n. uee e out excess ate and chop ou h .

2. Heat the oil in a large frying pan, add the chorizo

INGREDIENTS

and cook o e a med um heat o 5 m nutes unt ust sta t n to b o n. emo e the cho o th a s otted spoon and set as de. dd the on on to the cho o at n the pan and cook ent o 10 m n utes unt so t. dd the potatoes and a c tu n up the heat to et some co ou on the potatoes and cook o 5 m nutes tu n n the potatoes unt b o ned a o e .

• 300 ka e st pped om ts stems ca o o ne o o cu a e best o th s ec pe but ou can use ed uss an too 1 tbsp o e o 300 cho o chopped 1 on on chopped 500 cooked potatoes cut into 2cm dice a c c o es c ushed • Salt & black pepper

3.

etu n the cho o to the pan th the ka e educe the heat and cook ent o a u the 5 m nutes unt e m xed and tho ou h heated th ou h. eason and se e.

Baked potatoes with cheesy kale filling These vegetarian baked potatoes hit that magic spot somewhere between decadent and worthy. They make a great simple and inexpensive midweek dinner and can be easily adapted to your kitchen contents: use chard or spinach if you have this in your veg box instead of kale, or use a smoky cheese such as Gruyère in place of cheddar. METHOD 1.

eheat o en to 00 as 6. ut the potatoes in a baking dish and prick a e t mes th a sha p kn e. ub the potatoes with a little olive oil and sprinkle over some sea salt, to help the skin c sp up.

2.

ake o about 1 hou s mo e o ess depend n on the s e o ou potatoes unt the ns des a e tende nse t a sha p kn e and the outs des n ce and c sp .

3. While the potatoes are cooking, boil the

ka e o 4 m nutes. D a n e esh n a bowl of ice cold water, drain again, then pick the leaves away from the stems d sca d the stems and chop the ea es.

4. When cooked, remove the potatoes from

the o en. ea e unt ust coo enou h to hand e then s ce off the tops se e th the potato o the cou d be a che s pe k .

5.

s n a teaspoon scoop out most o the ns des be n ca e u not to b eak the sk n. ash n a bo add n o the cheese and the chopped ka e.

6. eason

th sa t and peppe . poon the m xtu e back nto the potatoes. p nk e o e the est o the cheese.

7.

ake o anothe 15 0 m nutes unt o den and bubb n .

INGREDIENTS

• 4 bak n potatoes about 50 300 each • Olive oil • 50 cu ka e cabba e or chard • 150 st on hedda grated • Salt & pepper

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Bampton Exhibition Foundation ou am et n touch th the u sa Office b ma n ma on1 5@bt nte net. com.

Base for the Bampton Community Archive

New Chair for the Bampton Exhibition Foundation.

Gerald Mills has stepped down as Chair after 10 years. He has to be thanked for providing sound and steady leadership du n a d fficu t phase o the bu d n . ho t a te h s e ect on as ha a st uctu a su e po nted out the need o u ent epa s and t s to e a d s c ed t that th s cost and mpo tant o k as p anned and u comp eted ensu n the sa et o the bu d n o man mo e ea s.

What does the Exhibition Foundation do?

o those not am a th the xh b t on oundat on t s the membe s ho mana e and ma nta n the O d amma choo on beha o the o d de pa sh o ampton. he e a e n ne t ustees no under the new Chair of David Hawkins: th ee nom nated b ampton a sh ounc t o b ston a sh ounc one

b

e a sh eet n one b Ox o dsh e ount ounc p us one co opted membe and the ca o ampton act n as ex offic o.

Landlords to the Library

he xh b t on oundat on act as and o ds to the Ox o dsh e b a e ce th the ca e and upkeep o the bu d n be n the st ca on an ent ece ed.

Bursaries for young people in Bampton

n ent mone ema n n s used o sma educat ona xh b t ons o bu sa es o oun peop e es dent n ampton unde the a e o 5. O e the ea s these bu sa es ha e taken man o ms om he p n to bu spec a st e u pment such as mus ca nst uments and c oth n as e as educat ona books ap ea and t a e expenses out a d bound t pe cou ses and man othe th n s. ou th nk the cou d he p ou o a membe o

he O d amma choo is also the base of the ampton ommun t ch e and the a e cu ent und a s n to c eate a pe manent home o the o an sat on on the uppe oo o the bu d n . h s s a b unde tak n as t e u es the e nsta at on o a ne sta case the o d one ha n been emo ed n the 1960 s due ts dan e ous cond t on.

What does the Community Archive do?

he ch e as set up 15 ea s a o th the a m o cata o u n and eco d n e n ampton. ake a ook at the ne ebs te h p bamptona ch e.o to et a bette idea of their work.

Would you like to help?

ou ha e a b t o spa e t me the ch e ou d o e to hea om ou espec a ou cou d he p n the shop n the O d amma choo he e ou meet Do nton s to s om a o e the o d. O ou ou d ke to he p ampton ba uppo t then p ease et n touch details are below.

Bampton Library han you the Resting players o Bampton

ampton b a uppo t a e e ate u to the ampton D ama oup. Due to the p esent est n status the ha e distributed their funds to worthy village causes nc ud n ampton b a uppo t ho ha e been en 650 pounds th the e uest that poss b e the mone s spent on o an s n e ente ta nment. o atch th s space to see hat e do th th s mone . nd the e a e an ente ta ne s out the e est n o otherwise. who would like to take part in a e und a se then p ease et n touch. O if you have any ideas about what kind of ente ta nment ou ou d ke to see then a so et n touch.

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100 Club Winners

he uck nne s th s t me e e Jo Do n n 100 au ne ouse es e ams 15 a ook h st ne ate 10. nd a b thank ou to Jo Do n n ho a e he 100 back to ou unds. ou ou d ke to suppo t ou b a b pa n a 1 a month o a numbe e ou d be e happ . ontacts be o .

Who are we?

ampton b a uppo t a e 5 peop e ho o k to a se the 9 486 e u ed annua to keep ou b a open. ontact Loraine Hall (Library Manager) on 01993 8500 6 o bampton. b a @ox o dsh e. gov.uk if you would like to help. Donation

che ues made pa ab e to ampton Library Support.

Library Opening Times Monday:

.00 5.00

5.30

.00

Tuesday: c osed except o h met me te m t mes at 10.30am Wednesday: 10.00 1 .30 Thursday:

.00 5.00

Friday:

Closed

Saturday

10.00 1 .30


Bampton Bush Club h s te m e e had eat exc tement th a s t om ff cha d a as ff s ho a e a supe b pe o mance o the membe s th a spec a son o t o o some membe s ce eb at n b thda s. e a so en o ed a e success u offee o n n th o e 60 membe s uests and ends attend n . a o ne came a on and p a ed the saxophone o us a a n and as b ant. e p an to ho d one o these open offee o n n each te m so ook out o the poste s o the next one.

embe s a so en o ed a spec a m o the o onat on Da n ampton n 1953 and a s t om pup s at the oca nu se schoo . om n up e ha e some othe nte est n th n s o n on nc ud n a t p out o a spec a c eam tea a o k mo n n cott sh danc n a m sho and ou on o n ush ub t o ect. he ush ub s a bus ou sh n soc a and unch c ub open to an one o an a e oca to en o a b t o end compan a coffee and chat and a antast c home cooked unch. t s open on ednesda s du n schoo te ms om 9.45 am 1.30pm th coffee tea on a a some e ente ta nment then a esh cooked t o cou se unch s se ed. th s o a e sma cha e cu ent ust 4 pe eek. nothe cuppa and a e o o s unch. e e come an one sh n to o n us. ou nd ou se a tt e so ated o one o stuck at home o an eason h not o n us on a ednesda ou don t ha e to comm t to e e eek. e do ask that membe s must be ab e to cope th the o n pe sona needs. ee t anspo t s a a ab e o ampton es dents e u ed. he e s a p o amme o nte est n ta ks and act t es that uns e e eek and e ha e a pod at st ho comes e e s x eeks.

CAN YOU HELP? The Bush Centre is run by an army of volunteers and more helpers are always welcome. It is great fun and very rewarding. If you or anyone you know has some spare time and would like to volunteer for any of the following roles please get in touch: DRIVERS One a month e the mo n n o a te noon. GENERAL HELPERS o ma ass st on a te nate 9am 1.30pm.

eeks

COOKS pp ox mate once a month 10am

1pm.

KITCHEN ASSISTANTS pp ox mate once a month 10am

1pm.

LUNCHTIME WASHING UP te nate eeks 1 noon 1.30pm. We are limited to a maximum of 40 people but there are a few places available right now so if you are interested in coming along please contact Sally Proctor on 01993 850479.

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Sport - Bampton in the Bush Cricket Club We are fast approaching the beginning of the 2018 cricket season. In the last article we mentioned that Bampton CC had its application to enter a 2nd XI into the Oxfordshire Cricket Association (OCA) accepted. This means that e a e no ab e to offe 34 ames o ea ue c cket ac oss the season h ch uns om p 8th unt eptembe 8th ensu n that e cont nue to offe c cket to oun and old(er) people from across the area. In addition to these atu da xtu es e a so ha e a u p o amme o m d eek 0 0 st e contests a a nst oca c ubs. nte nets sta t n m d a ch at the nd ush e su e ent e om 8pm to 9pm and e hope to sta t outdoo t a n n at the ec eat on ound om ea p . ee the u adu t xtu e st be o . Ou un o s ha e been p a n c cket th ou hout the nte th ndoo sess ons at the nd ush e su e ent e and ha e a ead k cked off the nte nets at the same enue. hese a e tak n p ace om 5pm to 6pm on unda e en n s and a e open to ch d en n ea 9 and be o . xtu es ha e been a an ed unt the end o the choo umme e m. dd t ona e a e de hted to announce that e ha e met the e u ements o and been accepted onto the cket ta s p o amme o 018. s the sa s ta s cket s the st step n the nat ona path a o c cket. th un at ts hea t the p o amme a ms to nsp e ch d en a ed e to e ht to take up c cket p o de a eat st expe ence o the ame and en a e th a ne aud ence o potent a o untee s. e a e exc ted to b n ta s cket to e n ampton p o d n oppo tun t es to e come ne p a e s and the am es to the c ub. s e as th s u p o amme o c cket o a the e be a numbe o soc a e ents th ou h the season nc ud n the u n ht to k ck e e th n off on da p th n the a e a om .30pm and eathe pe m tt n e u a ba becues at the ec on da e en n s du n the season. he season cu m nates on unda eptembe 9th th ou annua end s x a s de tou nament. th a o th s oppo tun t e hope to e come ne membe s both to p a the ame and to be n o ed n othe a s such as coach n ump n sco n o ounds o k. ea and cake be a a ab e du n atu da matches to p o de an authent c and nc us e c cket n expe ence to those ho come a on to suppo t the a ous teams. e a e a end c ub seek n to p omote compet t e and soc a c cket o a a es and sexes. ou ou d ke to o n p ease contact the ub at bamptonc cket@ ma .com. And to nd out more about us please isit our ebsite http: bampton play cric et com or ust pop by and ha e a chat hen you see us out and about at the Rec

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APRIL 2018 WWW.BAMPTONBEAM.CO.UK

ixture List atu da

Apr

riendly

a

atu da

Apr

riendly

a

atu da

Apr

OCA

i ision

ou hton

a

13 30

atu da

Apr

OCA

i ision

South

at n ton

ome

13 30

atu da

ay

South

a n don

a

13 30

a

13 30

ome

13 30

ome

18 00

ome

13 30

a

13 30

ome

18 00

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18 00

OCA

i ision

atu da

ay

OCA

i ision

atu da

ay

OCA

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ay

atu da

ay

OCA

i ision

atu da

ay

OCA

i ision

hu sda

ay

id ee

tne

hu sda

ay

id ee

ooksbank

Jun

OCA

i ision

atu da

Jun

OCA

i ision

atu da

ay Jun

OCA

atu da

Jun

OCA

i ision

OCA

i ision

atu da

Jun Jun

atu da

Jun

OCA

i ision

atu da

Jun

OCA

i ision

atu da

Jun

OCA

i ision

Jun

OCA

i ision

Jul

atu da

Jul

OCA

i ision

atu da

Jul

OCA

i ision

Jul Jul Jul

atu da

Jul

OCA

i ision

OCA

i ision

OCA

South

Jul Jul

atu da

Jul

OCA

i ision

South

OCA

i ision

atu da

Jul Aug

atu da

Aug

OCA

i ision

atu da

Aug

OCA

i ision

hu sda

Aug

South

Aug

OCA

i ision

Aug

OCA

i ision

Aug

OCA

i ision

atu da

Aug

OCA

i ision

atu da

Aug

OCA

i ision

atu da

Aug

OCA

i ision

13 30

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18 00

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13 30

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18 00

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13 30

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ome

13 30

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18 00

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at n ton

South

18 00 13 30

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13 30

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18 00

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13 30

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18 00

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13 30

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a

13 30

ha bu

a

18 00

had n ton

a

13 30

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ome

13 30

n ston a pu e

a

18 00

est s e

ome

13 30

a cham

a

13 30

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18 00

a n don

unn n

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13 30

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13 30

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18 00

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13 30

a

13 30

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13 30

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13 30

d n ton

a

13 30

s n hu st

ome

13 30

a

13 30

kenn ud e Ducks Do cheste

South

enn n ton

South

a

atu da

Sep

OCA

i ision

atu da

Sep

OCA

i ision

atu da

Sep

OCA

i ision

unda

Sep

Bampton Six A Side

South

13 30

a

ston South

13 30

ome

13 30

kenn

South

13 30

a

o e cote South

a ome

ome

d n ton

id ee

atu da

13 30

kenn

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atu da

a ome

s n hu st

id ee

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ston

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hu sda

ts

ou hton

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atu da

Aug

South

id ee

uesda

e

Do cheste

id ee

ednesda

unn n

ud e Ducks

id ee

atu da

hu sda

South

id ee

hu sda

ednesda

South

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hu sda

ed c ne

had n ton

i ision

Jun

te enton Ox o d

id ee

ednesda

atu da

South

id ee

atu da hu sda

kenn

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kenn ome

10 00


Sport - Bampton United Bampton United Football Club (BUFC) is a local community run club. We play on Saturday afternoons at the sports ground (along the Buckland Road by Bampton Garden Plants) and currently have two teams in the Witney and District league.

WE NEED YOU!

We are looking to recruit players aged 16 years and over to join our reserves team. If you are interested in playing local, friendly football and want more details or wish to sign on please contact us on the details provided. Alternatively, come down to a training session at the sports ground on Tuesday evenings from 7pm.

Quiz Night

This year we will host our quiz night on Saturday 19th May in the village hall, doors will open at 7pm and the quiz will start at 7:30pm. If you would be interested in entering a team please contact us on the details shown. Teams may contain up to a maximum of 6 players and the cost of entry will be £25 per team or £5 per person. he e be p es on offe o the nn n team and unne s up and the evening will feature a variety of questions for all ages. There be a ba to offe e eshments and ast t me e so d out so book your tickets early to avoid disappointment!

Albert Radband

6-a-side football tournament

We are planning on hosting our annual tournament on Saturday th August this year so put the date in your diary We ill con rm more details closer to the event but if you are interested in entering a team in this competition then please contact us on the details provided to reserve your space. There is a cash prize for winners and runners up and it is always a fantastic day!

Contact us

Isobel (Chairperson) – 07789533870 bamptonunitedfc@hotmail.com isobel_goves27@hotmail.co.uk

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Bampton School

Religious education

Making changes to the way we teach Religious Education at Bampton CE Primary School has been a school improvement priority this year and not just because we are a Church of England School. “RE is meaningful in any society where beliefs and values are important: it’s about getting pupils to engage with the big questions of life.” Rosemary Rivett, National Association of Teachers of RE. Our children are growing up in a multicultural society, where a wealth of opinion is available through social media. We want to equip children with the skills to be able to question and consider the values and beliefs they encounter. To be tolerant of the values and beliefs of others but also to develop their own beliefs and value system. We want children to grow up with a keen understanding of what is right and wrong, to understand the rule of law and democracy. Religious Education is not about forcing children to develop their own religious beliefs but is about educating them in what different faith groups believe and why. Religious Education is a statutory part of the National Curriculum. Our RE curriculum is designed around asking “Big Questions” and explores learning about the main Religions. In order to allow children more time to consider these thought provoking questions we have

developed a termly RE Focus Day where each class spends the day learning through exploration and taking time to discuss and re e t on their learnin . This stru ture has  replaced the short weekly RE lessons and has been well received by both staff and children. The longer sessions allow for a wealth of learning activities to take place and more time for dis ussion and re e tion.  Here are some insights in to how our RE Focus Days are going so far…… The year three class have really enjoyed exploring the ‘big questions’ of: Would celebrating Diwali at home and in the community bring a feeling of belonging? Has Christmas lost its true meaning? and Could Jesus Heal People? Were these miracles or is there some other explanation? Through each focus there have been opportunities for thought provoking discussion, watching clips, sharing different foods, art and dance opportunities. It has en oura ed us all to be re e tive, tolerant  and interested in different faiths and how each faith expresses their beliefs in different ways. Here are our responses to one of our Christmas questions:

Bampton Primary School’s PTA, Friends of Bampton School, FOBS, have had a busy time this academic year raising vital funds for our school. Our fundraising since September has so far provided a Lego workshop, some maths games resources and also there are plans for a workshop in Arts Week. Most exciting though is the huge contribution FOBS are making to the school trip that is currently being planned for years 1 – 6 to Whipsnade Zoo. As well as enjoying a day at the zoo the children will be participating n a e spec c sc ence o kshops hat better way to inspire children than to have a science lesson at a zoo! Obviously thanks for these things must be extended to our committee and of course the parents of Bampton School however our community and our local businesses play a huge part in our fund raising and for that we are eternally grateful. e ou d ke to offe a mass e thank you to The Morris Clown (and patrons) for their generosity – the money donated to the school through the change pot and h stmas a e ea s so e app ec ated and makes a hu e d ffe ence. hanks are also due for hosting our meetings – the pub setting has certainly boosted our attendance! te off the back o ou annua u n ht at the school hosted by Julian and Karen Easterbrook – the village support for this was simply fantastic – we really would like to thank you all for coming along – we are genuinely humbled by your support – I know many of you have supported this event every year for many, many, many years! Sorry to those that didn’t manage to dodge the wooden spoon this year. It won’t be long until we are selling Ducks for the now traditional FOBS Duck Race on the Late Spring (Whitsun) Bank Holiday weekend... Do look out for the race sheets and posters and come down to Mill Green to cheer on your duck! Warmest regards Hannah Scott Chair of Friends of Bampton School

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Youth Club

Get involved in your local youth club

Our Aim

Winter term

Volunteering

Bampton Youth Club operates from the local community centre on Wednesday evenings (term time only.) We aim to create a welcoming, safe and friendly environment for young people to grow in to young adults. We look at tackling issues facing the youth of today and are hoping to provide future workshops focused on everyday life that young people do not always get the opportunity to learn about e.g. savings, voting and taxes. These will run alongside our weekly session activities of arts and sports.

s e n shed 01 e had ots o un participating in activities such as card making, indoor dodgeball and mince pie baking with our volunteer Ali Foreshew.

We are always looking for extra help, particularly now with running two sessions. Duties could include help with setting up and packing away, running tuck shop, supervising sessions or providing activities. You would also get to work as part of a great welcoming team.

Sessions

s e ente ed 018 e hosted a New Years Party for everyone where e p o ded a cou se mea and competitions including the best sprout eate and ho cou d n sh pudd n without licking their lips! (This proved to be e d fficu t o some oun peop e. t was a brilliant evening and we would like to thank all of our volunteers, in particular Ann Setch who did the cooking on the evening.

• Our junior group for ages 8 – 11 years runs from 6:15pm – 7:15pm • Our senior group for ages in secondary school runs from 7:30pm – 8:30pm If you are interested in becoming a member come along to a session or contact us on the details below.

We also wanted to say a huge congratulations to one of our volunteers, o ancock ho ot en a ed to he partner Danny O’Shea before Christmas. o s a antast c o untee ho has been involved with youth club since we opened and is brilliant at running games every week and engaging with the young people.

If this is something you may be interested in or would like to enquire more please contact Isobel on 07789533870 or bampton_youth_club_1@hotmail.co.uk Alternatively, you may wish to help to gain some experience to put on your CV, become involved with your local community or need to do work experience for a college course or Duke of Edinburgh award. If so please contact on the details above.

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Useful Information St Mary’s Church Roger Preston Tel: 01993 851222 www.bamptonchurch.org.uk The Methodist Church Bridge Street Bampton Services 11.00 am Sundays Rev. Fred Ireland Tel. 01993 867301 Catholic Congregation St Joseph’s Church, Carterton Sunday Mass 9.00 am at St Mary’s Church, Bampton. Parish Priest: Father Andrew Foster Tel: 01993 842463 Bampton Library Old Grammar School, Church View Tel: 01993 850076 Renewals hotline: Tel: 0845 1202811 Email: bampton.library@oxfordshire.gov.uk Opening Hours Monday 2.00 pm – 5.00 pm 5.30 pm – 7.00 pm Tuesday Closed Wednesday 10.00 am – 12.30 pm Thursday 2.00 pm – 5.00 pm Friday Closed Saturday 10.00 am – 12.30 pm Sunday Closed Bampton School Headteacher – Miss Carol Phillips Telephone 01993 850371 Headteacher.3131@bampton.oxon.sch.uk Office.3131@bampton.oxon.sch.uk Post Office Bampton Town Hall, Market Square, Tel: 01993 851968 Carterton Police Station Monday: Closed Tuesday: 10.00 am – 2.00 pm Wednesday: 10.00 am – 2.00 pm Thursday: 10.00 am – 2.00 pm Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Police non essential call 101 Bampton Medical Practice Tel: 01993 850257 Out of hours call: 0845 3458995 The surgery is open at the following times Monday: 8.15 am to 6.30 pm Tuesday: 8.15 am to 6.30 pm Wednesday: 8.15 am to 6.30 pm Thursday: 8.15 am to 6.30 pm Friday: 8.15 am to 6.30 pm Weekend: Closed Reception is open from 8.30 am until 6.30 pm Bampton Pharmacy Opening times: Monday to Friday: 09.00 am to 1.00 pm and 2.00 pm to 6.00 pm Saturday: 9.00 am to 12.00 pm Carterton Health Centre Tel: 01993 841718

Witney Hospital Tel: 01865 904222 Open 10.00am – 10.30 pm daily Last patient seen at 10.00 pm Local hospitals • John Radcliffe Hospital Tel: 01865 741166 Headley Way, Headington, Oxford • Churchill Hospital: Tel: 01865 741841 Old Road, Headington, Oxford OX3 7LE • Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre: Tel: 01865 741155 Windmill Road, Headington, Oxford OX3 7HE • Horton General Hospital: Tel: 01295 275500 Oxford Road, Banbury, Oxfordshire OX16 9AL Environment Agency Floodline Tel: 0845 988118 Emergency Tel: 0800 807060 Thames Water Tel: 08459 200800 Citizens Advice Tel: 08444 111444 Email: bureau@wocab.org.uk West Oxfordshire District Council General enquiries Tel: 01993 861000 Out of hours Tel: 01993 705056 Recycling centre Dix Pit, Lynch Hill, Stanton Harcourt Open 7 days a week 8.00 am – 5.00 pm Thursday late night (1 April – 30 September) until 8.00 pm Oxford County Council General enquiries Tel: 01865 815 573 Highways Tel: 08453 101111 Faulty street lights Tel: 0800 317 802 Dial a ride service For information Tel: 0845 310 1111 Email: oxdar@oxfordshire.gov.uk Member of Parliament Robert Courts Tel: 0207 219 5638 robert.courts.mp@parliament.uk District councillors M Barrett Tel: 01993 202 561 T Fenton Tel: 01993 852 082 Bampton Parish Council Tel: 01993 851870 clerk@bamptonoxon-parishcouncil.gov.uk Sports Clubs Bampton Archery Club Jeff Dando 01993 850643 Bampton Badminton Club Marlene Snow Tel: 01993 850113 Windrush Amateur Boxing Club Tel: 07887 403401 / 01993 851156 Bampton Cricket Club Seniors Tel: 07778 578875 Juniors Tel: 01993 850939

Bampton Town Football Club Tel: 07789 533870 Bampton Social Netball Tel: 07780 761822 Bampton Tennis Club bamptontennis@hotmail.co.uk Bampton Weightlifting Club Tel: 07855 146949 Societies Bampton Community Archive Tel: 01993 850947 Bell Ringers Tel: 01993 850214 Bampton Library Events Support Team Tel: 01993 850076 Bampton Historical Society Tel: 01367 810245 Society for the Protection of Bampton Tel: 01993 850293 Clubs Bampton Baby and Toddler Club Tel: 01993 852438 Bampton Bridge Club Tel: 01993 842126 Bampton Bush Club Tel: 01993 850479 / 01993 851837 Bampton Gardening Club Tel: 07748 818 954 Bampton Ladies Group Tel: 07748 818 954 Bampton Theatre Club Tel: 01993 851123 Bampton Youth Club Tel: 01993 851156 Scottish Country Dancing Tel: 01993 845043 Charities Cancer Research m.cleaver606@hotmail.co.uk Friends of Bampton School (FOBS) Tel: 01993 850772 Royal British Legion Tel: 01993 210160 SPAJERS Tel: 01993 850760 The Bampton Exhibition Foundation Tel: 01993 850167 The Bampton Welfare Trust Tel: 01993 850314 / 01993 850589 Bampton Zimbabwe Project lis@lisandtonypage.com West Ox Arts Gallery Tel: 01993 850137 www.westoxarts.com Amenities Bampton Recreation Ground and Pavilion Tel: 01993 852483 The Old School Community Centre clerk@bamptonoxon-parishcouncil.gov.uk The Town Hall Tel: 01993 851870 Village Hall Tel: 01993 850289

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Diary

Date

Event

13th April

SPAJERS Quiz Night Village Hall 19:30

21st April

Gardening Club Coffee Morning 10am till 12 noon If you would like to book a table at the coffee morning please contact Richard West 01993 778414

30 April -28 June

Jane Wallis’s ‘Unseen Bampton’ Exhibition. This exhibition continues the theme of the ‘Dug Up in Bampton’ series of  exhibitions that dealt with what was beneath our feet and yet hidden from view.  The first  concentrated on artefacts, the second on coins, and the third on fossils. This time the exhibition deals with things that are present in the land, such as Earth Grids and Energy lines, yet they can never be ‘dug up’ or even seen with the human eye. Other hidden things - from our own human energy systems to the effects of Crop Circles on the land - will also feature. This is a Bampton Community Archive exhibition at the Vesey Room, Church View, Bampton, OX18 2NE.

12 May

Chipping Norton Choral Society, Concert Vivaldi - Gloria in D - Handel - Chandos Anthem No 9 - O praise the Lord with one consent Verdi - Pater Noster - Stanford - Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in C - With Oxybaroxy, Baroque Youth Strings Conductor: Peter Hunt - St Mary’s Church, Witney, OX28 4AW - 7.30pm Tickets: £15 - from tickets@cncs.org.uk , tel 07988 233299, or on the door. (Under-16s free) www.cncs.org.uk

18 May

Quiz Night 2018 Cancer Research UK - Quiz Night in the Village Hall, Bampton on Friday 18th May, Teams of FOUR (must be pre-entered) £20.00 per team. Entry forms and further information ring Doris Cleaver on 01993 850682.

19th May

Gardening Club Coffee Morning 10am till 12 noon If you would like to book a table at the coffee morning please contact Richard West 01993 778414

26th May

The Great Original Shirt Race from 18:30

14th June

Bampton Garden Plants are planning to host a ‘festival of roses’. Enjoy a rose inspired menu, drinks and a talk from a David Austin representative. More news about upcoming events will be available on our website and in our weekly newsletter.

16th June

Gardening Club Coffee Morning 10am till 12 noon If you would like to book a table at the coffee morning please contact Richard West 01993 778414

14th July

Gardening Club Coffee Morning 10am till 12 noon

27th August

SPAJERS Donkey Derby

28th August

Bampton Gardening Club Show

29th August

SPAJERs Summer Outing

3 Sept. - 28 October   J  anet Newman’s ‘Bampton Families’ Exhibition. This exhibition, also at the Vesey Room, first ran some 15  years ago, before the time that Bampton Community Archive were printing catalogues of their exhibitions, and contains a lot of new information which should prove very interesting. 3rd November

SPAJERs Fireworks and Bonfire

9th November

Josie’s Draw at The Romany

10th November

Bampton Zimbabwe Project Autumn Fair, Saturday 2018 at 10.00 to noon. There will also be a sponsored walk at the beginning of September, date to be decided later. After the coup in Zimbabwe in November, which unseated Mugabe, the two charities we support, ZANE, Zimbabwe A National Emergency, and Medicins Sans Frontieres, both of which are still very active, and necessary!

To have your event included in the Beam diary email editor@bamptonbeam.co.uk

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