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BALTIMORE

JEWISH TIMES

$1.25

October 5, 2012 19 Tishrei 5773

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‘THE RIGHT STUFF’

New Executive Director Jakir Manela wants to ‘ignite Jewish passion’ at the Pearlstone Center Story begins on page 26

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

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On The Cover: The Pearlstone's Jakir Manela and his family. Photo by David Stuck.

Contents

October 5, 2012 Vol. 328 No. 5 Candle lighting 6:25 p.m.

Opinion 7

Opening Thoughts

8

Editorials

10

From This View

12

Your Say…

15

Shlugging Kaporos

16

Philanthropic Pioneers

Local News

ON THE COVER

26

‘The Right Stuff’

As Goldseker Foundation CEO steps down, JT examines its successful history

20

Dashing Prices Online consignment shop offers great deals for parents of young children

24

Not Your Bubbie’s Bingo Pikesville Bingo seeks to attract younger fan base

National & International News 32

A Growing Concern Jewish community continues to be concerned over Iran’s nuclear threat

Arts & Life 35

22

Worth The Schlep Community calendar Oct. 5 to Oct. 12

Baby Teeth

36

Life In The Fast Lane

41

Man On A Mission Italian Pianist revives music created in concentration camps

43

Way Back When: Colts’ Jewish Roots ‘Catholic’ Jim Irsay embraces what his father soundly rejected

Photos by David Stuck

Community

18

45

Beshert

46

Milestones

48

Obituaries

50

Amazing Marketplace

Clear Communication

Baltimore Jewish Times (ISSN 0005-450X) is published by Route 95 Publications, LLC DBA Clipper City Media, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Subscription price is $50 in-state; $57 out-of-state. For subscriptions, renewals, or changes of address call 410-902-2300 (Baltimore) or 1-888-809-0085 (toll free). Periodical postage paid at Baltimore MD and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Baltimore Jewish Times, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Published 52 times a year.

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Compiled om assorted news and wire services Gene Simmons {Hollywood Hookup}

Edon Pinchot to Play the GA

Scarlett on Broadway

Apega/WENN.com

Scarlett Johansson

Scarlett Johansson will return to the New York stage in January in the Broadway revival of Tennessee Williams’ “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.” The 27-year-old actress and model will play Maggie the Cat, starring next to Benjamin Walker. “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” tells the story of Maggie, who escapes poverty to marry the wealthy Brick Pollitt (Walker) but is unhappy with her new lifestyle. Johansson’s last Broadway performance was her turn in “A View from the Bridge,” a role that earned her Tony Award for best supporting actress. In her new role, Johansson is following in the footsteps of legendary actresses Elizabeth Taylor and Natalie Wood.

Jeff Frank/ZUMA Press

“America’s Got Talent” semifinalist Edon Pinchot will be in Baltimore in November for the General Assembly of the Jewish Federations of North America, the JFNA announced this week. The teen sensation, who wore a yarmulke during his run on the reality show, is listed as a speaker for a plenary session titled, “For the Good.” Speaker? Hopefully he’ll be breaking out the pipes, too.

Gene Simmons Wants You To Study — In Hebrew Gene Simmons, Kiss bassist and ‘Family Jewels’ star Gene Simmons, or Chaim Weitz, went back to his roots by publishing a video with a personal message to Israeli students at the World ORT-affiliated Shifman High School in Tirat HaCarmel, near Haifa. Simmons was born in Haifa but went to school in Tirat

HaCarmel. In the video, Simmons starts with a little Hebrew — it was pretty impressive, despite some minor grammatical errors — and switches to some words of encouragement for the students to stop being lazy and start working hard, so they can be great rockers like him. Or at least get a good job.

Mel Brooks Curses Out Jerry Seinfeld

Jerry Seinfeld, with wife Jessica Sklar

Newscom.com

The legendary comedian and filmmaker Mel Brooks and fellow funnyman Carl Reiner met up with Jerry Seinfeld for Seinfeld’s Web show “Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee.” During a take from the filming, we catch an earful from Brooks, still extremely unhappy — 15 years later — over Seinfeld’s decision to end his popular NBC sitcom. Taking a page from Betty White’s playbook, the 86-yearold Brooks makes his point by dropping about half a dozen F-bombs. Seinfeld tries to defend himself by comparing it to gambling — the longer you play, the more you’ll end up paying. Reiner intervenes, saying that he refused to continue “The Dick Van Dyke Show” despite a serious pay increase. In response, Brooks quips, “He has the same disease!”


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Opening oughts Maayan Jaffe

OK, brace yourselves. My inner hippie is about to unleash. It’s not a great secret, but behind the business suits, high heels and best practices lays a free spirit. On the weekends, I wear Birkenstocks (well, really they are the Israeli version, Naots). I listen to Bob Marley. And whenever I visit e Pearlstone Center, I bubble over with a connection to the universe and nature and all things primal. It’s true. I can’t help myself. As I drive up the narrow windy roads, breathe in the fresh air, look out at the orchards and the rows of veggies in the farm, I want to garden. I want to meditate. I want to put on a flowered, flowing skirt, listen to Shlomo Carlebach and dance. I am on fire because of the amazing beauty of God’s creations all around me. It’s not just a retreat center or a farm; it really is a spiritual place. Pearlstone, for me, is a place for selfreflection. The grounds make me feel rejuvenated. It’s magical. And every single time I drive out of Pearlstone, I leave with a gigantic smile on my face. I had this same experience when I went to interview Pearlstone’s new executive director for this week’s cover story. He’s a pretty granola guy, Jakir Manela; he planted his wife’s placenta under a peach tree. But aer only a few months at the helm, he’s showing tremendous promise. Jakir, it seems, can make astute hiring decisions, can think like a marketer and fundraiser — strategically — and can handle the politics of nonprofit management. He’s planting the seeds for another successful decade in Reisterstown. Our community is very fortunate to have e Pearlstone Center. Where else can you say a blessing over food that you planted and harvested — or that was planted and harvested by someone like you? Where else in Jewish

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Baltimore — in America — do you have the opportunity to as fully integrate your physical, social, spiritual, Jewish and ecological selves?

Where else can you say a blessing over food that you planted and harvested? No where … except for on Sukkot. e holiday of Sukkot is almost over. Sukkot is a time when we — quite literally —immerse ourselves in nature; the sukkah helps us appreciate the beauties of nature that God created. e holiday serves as a refreshing deviation from our predisposition to materialism by emphasizing the importance of nature and subservience to God, as well as compassion and hospitality. Sukkot is a great teaching holiday. While enjoying a meal with my children this Sukkot, I asked them what surprised them during their time spent outside — any new realizations about nature? What did they learn to appreciate? After they each gave their answers, my son asked me to answer the question, too. “You know what Sukkot teaches me,” I said to Shlomo. “It teaches me to appreciate you.” On Sukkot, outside, with no electricity, no telephone, computer or other distractions, I can be relaxed with my family, alone with the people I care most about, at one with them and with God. This is an incredible — imperative — feeling. But alas, in a few more days we’ll all go back inside. It will be a whole year until the next Sukkot. In the meantime, I guess I’ll visit Pearlstone … JT Maayan Jaffe is JT managing editor mjaffe@jewishtimes.com

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My Inner Hippie

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Editorials

Children of Violence

UN Photo/J Carrier

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas addresses the U.N. General Assembly.

Missed Opportunity It is hard to think of a good reason for any organization that claims to represent American Jews to turn down a chance to meet with Israel’s chief potential peace partner. But representatives of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, the Anti-Defamation League and the American Jewish Committee did just that — they declined to attend a Sept. 25 meeting between American Jews and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. The meeting, attended by 10 Jewish organizational leaders, was under the auspices of the Center for Middle East Peace, which was represented by its director, Robert Wexler, who is a top Jewish surrogate for President Obama. Also at the meeting were Peter Joseph of the Israel Policy Forum and Alan Dershowitz, the Harvard legal scholar and a leading defender of Israel, who is floating a plan for the Palestinians to return to peace talks with Israel. To be sure, we disagree strongly with much that Mr. Abbas said a few days later, when he addressed the U.N. General Assembly. But we never expected

8

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

him to sing Hatikvah to the world body. And, in light of Abbas’ negative comments about the Oslo accords before his visit to the U.N., we understand why those invited might have hesitated to meet with him. But, in our view, those concerns are exactly why it is so important that U.S. Jews, with our strong attachment to Israel, take every opportunity to exchange ideas and opinions — as Jews and as Americans — with the Palestinian leader. The goal is not to make him a Zionist, but for him to understand where we stand, and why. It is not every day that American Jewish leaders and their national organizations are invited to meet with Israel’s chief potential peace partner. is was a rare opportunity to exchange ideas and perspectives, and the moment was missed by a number of important Jewish organizations and their leaders. We can ill afford to miss such opportunities as the environment in the region continues to deteriorate. And it makes us wonder what the refusing organizations thought they had to gain by not attending the meeting. e only thing they guaranteed is that their voices weren’t heard.

Children act more violently when they’re exposed to a steady stream of violence. This generalization was given specificity and detail by a recent study on the effect of sustained exposure to political violence on Israeli and Palestinian children. The results suggest that even if the two peoples succeed in reaching a negotiated settlement in the near future, it will be an aggressive, traumatized generation that inherits the peace. The multiyear study was conducted by a team of Israeli, Palestinian and American researchers and was funded by the National Institutes of Health. The results were published in the journal Child Development. It was the first such concurrent study of both Israeli and Palestinian children. Not long before the study was published, a group of Israeli teenagers beat a Palestinian youth unconscious in West Jerusalem. Some of the attackers were as young as 13. The incident, which some called a “lynching” for its ferocity, shocked Jews and Israelis. But the study found that younger children are “more susceptible than older children to the effects of witnessed violence.” And although the Jerusalem attack may have been exceptional, the researchers found that exposure to political violence has a general tendency to lead to aggression at school, at home and in the community, with the result being a disrupted society. While Palestinian youth have a greater risk of being exposed to violence, Jewish Israelis are also affected. There is a “constant reminder to the child that his life is under threat,” said Israeli researcher Dr. Shira Dvir Grossman, adding that a child doesn’t have to live in an area hit by rocket fire from Gaza to be affected by it. Israeli Arabs were also part of the study. They showed lower exposure to violence than either Jewish Israelis or Palestinians. The study shines a light on a vulnerable population and shows how children are the indirect victims of conflict. It also gives us a glimpse of a possible, chilling future in which violence is the accepted norm and peace becomes unimaginable. We need to think about that.


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BALTIMORE

JEWISH TIMES

Baltimore Jewish Times Vol. 328 No. 5 October 5, 2012

Publisher & Chief Operating OďŹƒcer

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Executive Editor

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Managing Editor

Maayan Jaffe

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Director of Design & Production

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Sta Photographers

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Art Director

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Assistant Art Director

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Art Department

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Director of Sales & Marketing

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Subscriptions: 1-888-809-0085 OďŹƒce: 410-902-2300 Display Advertising: 410-902-2337 ClassiďŹ ed Advertising: 410-902-2326 Editorial Deadline: All public and social announcements must be received Wednesday, nine days prior to desired date of publication. Please include name, address and phone number. Acknowledgments and unveilings cost $14 for each appearance. ClassiďŹ ed Advertising Deadline: Monday, noon Display Advertising Deadline: Tuesday, 3 p.m.

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From î&#x201A;&#x160;is View Rabbi Susan Grossman

The Abortion Debate

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Many years ago, something went wrong late in a friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pregnancy. If the dying fetus continued to grow, it would either kill her or damage her ability to have other children. She asked her father, a respected scholar and Orthodox rabbi, what to do. His decision: She should have an abortion to protect her life and health. She did. Today, she is the mother of several happy Jewish children. Her fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision was based not on parental concern but on rabbinic precedent. We Jews cherish all life, a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, a motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Rabbinic law permits, and sometimes requires, abortion to protect a motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life and health. Under rabbinic law, a fetus is potential life, not human life. Until birth, it is considered part of the motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body without an independent legal identity. While the yardstick for permitting abortion may rise as a fetus reaches viability, a motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life always takes precedence under Jewish law. That is why the current debate about abortion should be so disturbing to us in the Jewish community. It is bad enough that a growing body of legislation inserts government into the most private decisions of personal health and conscience, undermining the separation of church and state we Jews have thrived under here in the U.S. Each year, more states pass legislation requiring unnecessary medical procedures before a woman can receive an abortion. î&#x201A;&#x160;e Virginia ultrasound bill, originally requiring a trans-vaginal ultrasound, ultimately passed requiring an external ultrasound. In Congress, H.R. 1179/S. 1467, which almost passed attached to Transportation Authorization Bill S. 1813, would have permitted pharmacists freedom of conscience to deny women contraception. What about our freedom of conscience to receive contraceptives? Birth control

is permitted under rabbinic law, particularly to protect the life and health of the mother. î&#x201A;&#x160;e most disturbing trend, though, is legislation like Congressâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; H.R. 212 that extends to a fetus, beginning with conception, the legal and constitutional privileges of personhood. î&#x201A;&#x160;ere are no exemptions for the life or health of the mother. No exemptions for rape or incest. Abortion, contraception and most in-vitro fertilization (IVF) would become criminalized. Consequently a mother would have less legal protection than the fetus she carries. A woman who miscarries could even be tried as a murderer. In practical terms, such legislation would also deny Jewish couples the ability to have their own children by making illegal IVF, where it destroys fertilized eggs. It would mean a Jewish doctor treating a mother carrying a wanted pregnancy but facing imminent kidney failure, the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain or similar emergency (all real cases faced by the Johns Hopkins high-risk obstetrics specialists with whom I have consulted) would have to let the woman die on the table or face murder charges since only an abortion could save her life. SacriďŹ cing the mother for her fetus is not the Jewish answer, even according to the strictest interpretation of Jewish law. Just the opposite: We are obligated to save the motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life even at the price of destroying her fetus. To be required to do anything else would compromise our freedom of religious faith and moral conscience. JT

Rabbi Susan Grossman is spiritual leader of Beth Shalom Congregation in Columbia and a member of the Conservative Movementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Committee on Jewish Law and Standards for which she wrote the decision, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Partial Birth Abortion and When Life Begins.â&#x20AC;? The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the Baltimore Board of Rabbis or its members.


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From is View Autumn Sadovnik

School And Family Partnership One Friday, my son dashed from his classroom, thrilled to have the Shabbat basket. This preschool tradition connects school and home by sending Shabbat items and a journal to record Shabbat experiences home with one child per week. The children see it as an honor. My husband, the more experienced Jewish parent, was out of town, and I was on my own for this event. The kids set the Shabbat table. They also assigned places for the bears that live in the Shabbat basket. We then drifted into our routine until late Saturday afternoon. At that time, Noah announced it was time for Havdalah. Havdalah? I knew what Havdalah was, but having not done Havdalah myself – ever– I was at a complete loss.

We had Shabbat dinner weekly, and Havdalah wasn’t part of our routine. I pulled every Jewish book off my shelf searching for answers. If it was in English, it wasn’t there. If it was in Hebrew, I had no idea because I couldn’t read it. I felt (inaccurately) like a failure. Not wanting to fail him, I went online and searched for Havdalah guidance. Herein lies one challenge of Jewish education and education in general: the shared responsibility of educating children. We as parents cannot assume our children do “all their Jewish” at school, only to come home and live a life completely devoid of Jewish value or tradition. As educators, we cannot assume every parent remembers or knows how to use the opportunities we provide. We have a responsibility

to live Jewishly at home and bring context to the learning taking place in the classroom. While every child may or may not use algebra homework we dutifully practice around the table as adults, we do hope they will use their Jewish learning to strengthen, comfort and guide them. Should we not make an investment as we do with academic skills? If I didn’t know how to use a particular math strategy, wouldn’t I ask the teacher? The Shabbat basket is one model of school-family connection. It has its limits and must be used by the parent effectively. One research-based conclusion is to never make assumptions. Had the Shabbat basket contained a guide with directions and a list of brachot (blessings), I could have confidently managed the experience while

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learning with my children. I can gratefully say the classroom teacher and school director were fully receptive to my suggestion. My responsibility as a parent comes not only with the participation in school activities, but the willingness to ask for what I need to know. I can’t be afraid to say, “I don’t know the brachah for this.” Jewish identity is more than what we learn in a classroom. It is also about a rich tradition of the family and the home and our relationships with people and the world at large. We must bring Jewish life home from the classroom. Schools and parents are partners in raising Jewish children. JT Autumn Sadovnik is the director of professional development at the Center for Jewish Education.

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Your Sayâ&#x20AC;Ś 469, /6<9:

î&#x192;Ťe following letters reďŹ&#x201A;ect the opinions of our readers. î&#x192;Ťe Baltimore Jewish times strives to run all letters to the editor as space provides. î&#x192;Ťe publication edits only for grammar and clarity. Please send your letters to editor@jewishtimes.com.

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Pikesville )DUPHU²V 0DUNHW Every Tuesday June 5²November 13

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

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For a list of vendors please visit www.pikesvillechamber.org/farmers_market.php

î&#x201A;&#x160;e last few weeks were quite unfortunate and very telling for the Democrat Party, which has long claimed a lock on Jewish voters. it continued to assume that american Jews would support the party through hell or high water. î&#x201A;&#x160;is time, though, american Jews had a rude awakening. î&#x201A;&#x160;e weeks began with news stories claiming that iran had been promised, by the obama administration, that the U.s. would not help israel in any attacks on iran if iran agreed to not to attack U.s. ships and interests. another news story came out claiming that the obama administration had asked the Palestinian arabs not to declare a Palestinian arab state until aî&#x2020;?er the presidential elections. Both of these news stories were denied by the administration. a short time later, Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie wasserman schultz falsely claimed that the israeli ambassador had told her that the republican Party was not a friend of israel. wasserman schultz at first denied she made this claim but reversed her position when an audio tape of her statement surfaced. the matter worsened when the israeli ambassador flatly denied ever making this statement and went on to say that israel would never involve itself in U.s. partisan politics. later, at the Democrat Convention, it was revealed that the party platform had been changed from prior


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Democrat platforms and that there was no statement strongly supporting Israel or stating that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel. Once President Obama was caught in this matter, he claimed that the removal of pro-Jerusalem position from the Democrat platform was simply a clerical error. In an attempt to save face (and votes), the Democrat leadership introduced an amendment to the platform at a televised and public meeting of delegates. Party leaders assumed that this change would be a “sure thing” ��� that the delegates were sure to overwhelmingly approve the change. e change required a two-thirds voice-vote approval. Shockingly, the Democrat delegates strongly rejected the pro-Israel/pro-Jerusalem position. Even though it appeared that possibly more Democrats voted against Jerusalem than for it, the moderator falsely claimed that two-thirds of the voice voters supported Jerusalem and passed the amendment before an angry crowd. Clearly, Jews and others who support Israel and Jerusalem have had a rude awakening. The Democrat Party has made extreme changes since the years of FDR, JFK and LBJ. This is clearly not the Democrat Party of our fathers and mothers. Howard Hyman Jamison, Pa.

Oy Vey! What happened? A source quoted in the story (“What Happened?” Sept. 14) said, “They just missed it.” But then, like e Lone Ranger, President Obama arrived at the Democratic Convention and came to the rescue of the platform to save all of mankind (and especially his own tuchus) to say, “Put in all you need to about Jerusalem and God, we’ve got an election to win, we can talk about it later. Trivial things shouldn’t get in the way of votes.” Oy Vey! Norman Wolfe Pikesville

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Mitt Romney for President “Remember that a government big enough to give you everything you want is also big enough to take away everything you have,” said Davy Crockett. “We have the right as individuals to give away as much of our own money as we please in charity; but as members of Congress, we have no right to appropriate a dollar of the public money.” Said omas Jefferson: “I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them. When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty. … e democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.” From Edmund Burk: “All that is necessary for evil to succeed is for good men to do nothing.” Said John Adams: “ere are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. e other is by debt.” Who do you think they would vote for? Mitt Romney for President! G. Schneider Ohio

Florida Has A Lot of Snow Birds They spend winters there and summers up north. Wendy Rosen is one of them. The Democratic “candidate” in Maryland’s 1st Congressional District lives in Cockeysville and St. Petersburg, Fla. She has voted in both places. ere is a national database that matches information in voter registration files, motor vehicle administrations and vital statistics from participating states. Maryland does, but Florida does not. If Florida did share its records, both states would have been alerted to Ms. Rosen’s dual registration. If Maryland deemed her active registration to be in Florida, her registration in Maryland

would have been canceled before she voted in two states. Instead, the Maryland Democratic Party alerted prosecutors to this alleged violation. Your story about Ms. Rosen (“Democrat Withdraws From 1st Congressional Race,” Sept. 14) notes that the Maryland Republican Party said it was happy to see state Democrats agree that voter fraud is wrong. e Florida Republican Party is not as vigilant. Del. Samuel I. “Sandy” Rosenberg Baltimore

Editor’s Note: Mr. Rosenberg, a Democrat, represents Baltimore City’s District 41 in the House of Delegates.

Too Orthodox I found the Sept. 14 article, “At Last, Answers To What We Really Want to Know” to have a disproportionately Orthodox orientation, including questions about restrictions on eating fruit and restrictions on looking at kohanim. David Snyder’s question “Why do men and women have to sit separately in shul?” was particularly mystifying. First, they don’t, other than in Orthodox shuls, which are the minority of shuls in this country. I remember when my own parents switched from Orthodox shul to Conservative in 1957, it was partly because they wanted to sit together as a family. Believe me, the “attraction between normal men and women” referred to by Rabbi Sander Goldberg in his answer, did not create a problem in my parents’ religious practice. Bob Jacobson Pikesville

Associated Is ‘Green and Just’ As a member of the Baltimore Green and Just Celebrations Guide committee, I was thrilled to see the wonderful coverage the guide received in the Sept. 14 issue of the Baltimore Jewish Times (“Green Baltimore”). We believe that this new book offers invaluable resources and ideas to help individuals

make sustainable choices when planning their celebrations. As manager of the Sustainability Initiative of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, I want to emphasize the instrumental role that our organization played in the construction, design and assembly of the guide. It is important to The Associated to help the Baltimore Jewish community embrace the Jewish value of preserving the Earth. Our goal is to foster a more sustainable future for our system and our community by reducing our environmental impact. is guide takes a huge step toward achieving these objectives. Aleeza Oshry Baltimore

Stop the Extremists The Muslim extremists and fundamental extremist Islamists are worse than Nazis. At the end of the war, the Nazis tried to cover their tracks, hoping they could hide their crimes. They were afraid of retribution, and they were ashamed. How do we know this? Because, like children who knew they had been discovered, they tried to lie their way out: We didn’t know, I was just following orders, etc. The extreme radical Islamists, on the other hand, have no shame about anything they have done. They do not try to hide anything. To the contrary, they are proud of their actions. is is why, at the end of the day, the German people could come back from the abyss into which they had fallen. eir shame at what they had done allowed them to rejoin civilization. The extreme Islamists have no shame. How can they be part of the civilized world? I call upon moderate Muslim imams and leaders in the Muslim community to speak out. Those who are rioting are a small minority. The moderate Muslims are not at fault and have been dragged into this horrible environment, where many of them and their families are help hostage and murdered. Rabbi Dr. Bernhard Rosenberg New Jersey

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THE ASSOCIATED Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore 5 I P V H I U G V M 1 M B O O J O H  * O O P W B U J W F 1 S P H S B N N J O H  % F D J T J W F " D U J P O  * O T Q J S J O H 1 I J M B O U I S P Q Z

Calendar of Events

Volunteer Opportunities with Jewish Volunteer Connection

Community Presentation on MIND at Home Thursday, October 11, 2012; 4:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:00 p.m. 8FJOCFSH 1BSL )FJHIUT +FXJTI $PNNVOJUZ $FOUFS r  1BSL )FJHIUT "WFOVF #BMUJNPSF Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease and related forms of dementia cause considerable suffering for many individuals and families, and the number affected is increasing dramatically. Johns Hopkins University, with support from THE ASSOCIATED: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore (whose agencies provide needed services) and other local donors, recently completed a research project designed to test the effectiveness of a community-based â&#x20AC;&#x153;dementia careâ&#x20AC;? model. The Maximizing Independence at Home (MIND at Home) study was conducted by researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Division of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neuropsychiatry. 5P SFHJTUFS WJTJU XXXBTTPDJBUFEPSH.*/%BU)PNF

Join us for the KICKOFF of the Baltimore Jewish Abilities Alliance featuring Brett Leak, nationally renowned â&#x20AC;&#x153;sit-down,â&#x20AC;? stand-up comic! Sunday, October 14, 2012; 6:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:00 p.m. 5IF (PSEPO $FOUFS GPS 1FSGPSNJOH "SUT r 3PTFOCMPPN 0XJOHT .JMMT +FXJTI $PNNVOJUZ $FOUFS  (XZOOCSPPL "WFOVF 0XJOHT .JMMT 6:00 p.m. Reception introducing the artistic and musical talents of individuals with different abilities. Light fare served. Dietary laws observed. 7:00 p.m. Keynote speaker, Brett Leak The Baltimore Jewish Abilities Alliance provides resources in the Jewish and general community for people with disabilities. Gain instant access to: - A user-friendly website with a vast network of resources and provider information - A forum for individuals and families to interact, creating a virtual community - Support services that include parent-to-parent mentoring and workshops -&"3/ .03& XXXKFXJTIBCJMJUJFTPSH FNBJM JOGPSNBUJPO!KFXJTIBCJMJUJFTPSH PS DBMM 

GefilteFest

Volunteer at Ronald McDonald House Thursday, October 25, 2012; 5:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:00 p.m. 3POBME .D%POBME )PVTF  8FTU -FYJOHUPO 4USFFU #BMUJNPSF Bring sunshine to the families of children who are undergoing medical treatment at the Ronald McDonald House. Young adults are invited to bring a dish to the house between 5:00 and 5:30 p.m. to prepare in the kitchen. From 6:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00 p.m., they serve the residents dinner and visit with them. From 7:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:00 p.m., volunteers give parents a break by running an activities hour with crafts projects, board games or a number of other fun projects. Volunteers will be asked to sign up for each opportunity separately â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to do both! 'PS NPSF JOGPSNBUJPO BOE UP SFHJTUFS DPOUBDU 3FCFDDB 8FJOTUPDL BU SXFJOTUPDL!BTTPDJBUFEPSH PS 

Lend a Hand at Senior Bingo Night Wednesday, November 14, 2012; 6:15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:30 p.m. $PVSUMBOE (BSEFOT /VSTJOH  3FIBCJMJUBUJPO $FOUFS  4DPUUT -FWFM 3PBE #BMUJNPSF Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bingo Night! Help to call the numbers, assist residents one-onone and get to know some of Baltimoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most interesting senior residents. An optional kosher pizza dinner will be available to volunteers ($3 per person) before Bingo Night begins. 'PS NPSF JOGPSNBUJPO BOE UP SFHJTUFS DPOUBDU 3FCFDDB 8FJOTUPDL BU SXFJOTUPDL!BTTPDJBUFEPSH PS 

Sunday, October 21, 2012; 10:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 p.m. +FXJTI .VTFVN PG .BSZMBOE r  -MPZE 4USFFU #BMUJNPSF Something fishy is going on with the Jewish Museum of Maryland! Join us as we dive into new, longer hours of operation with our first GefilteFest competition. Cheer on your favorite local or out-of-town chef as they compete for the honor of being crowned Baltimoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gefilte Maven. Make â&#x20AC;&#x153;spice artâ&#x20AC;? with Old Bay Seasoning, read fish tales and watch fish films. Crafts, music and cooking for the whole family. 'PS NPSF JOGPSNBUJPO BOE UP SFTFSWF ZPVS TQBDF WJTJU XXXKFXJTINVTFVNNEPSHFWFOUT FNBJM SDZMVT!KFXJTINVTFVNNEPSH PS DBMM  FYU 

The Baltimore Jewish Council and THE ASSOCIATED present

The 2012 Presidential Election: A Debate and Discussion

Nowhere to Hide: Why Kids With ADHD & LD Hate School and What We Can Do About It

Tuesday, October 23, 2012; 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, October 28, 2012; 9:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30 a.m.

Chizuk Amuno Congregation 8100 Stevenson Road, Baltimore

8FJOCFSH 1BSL )FJHIUT +FXJTI $PNNVOJUZ $FOUFS r  1BSL )FJHIUT "WFOVF #BMUJNPSF Dr. Jerome Schultz, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nowhere to Hide: Why Kids With ADHD & LD Hate School and What We Can Do About It,â&#x20AC;? will talk about how the stress of ADHD and LD can negatively impact learning and behavior. With over 30 years of experience in neuropsychology and education, Dr. Schultz of Harvard Medical School presents practical strategies that effectively reduce this stress and give children a better home and school life. Space is limited. 3FHJTUFS OPX BU XXXTIFNFTICBMUJNPSFPSH FNBJM STWQ!TIFNFTICBMUJNPSFPSH PS DBMM 

Maryland Attorney General, Douglas Gansler, representing President Barack Obama, will debate and discuss issues with Former Maryland Governor, Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr., representing Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. Admission is free and open to the public, but reservations are preferred. 'PS NPSF JOGPSNBUJPO BOE UP SFTFSWF ZPVS TQBDF FNBJM CKDSTWQ!CBMUKDPSH PS DBMM 

Find us online at:

Learn more at www.associated.org/getinvolved.

 r XXXBTTPDJBUFEPSH

100512

If you need help, we can help you. If you can help, please do.


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Local News

Shlugging Kaporos More and more people seem to be embracing the custom of “shlugging kaporos” … not with money, but with a live chicken. This year, there were several synagogues throughout Baltimore that offered those interested in relinquishing their sins the opportunity to do so by spinning a chicken over their heads. On Tuesday, Sept. 25, erev Yom Kippur, chickens and a shochet (ritual slaughterer) were on-site at Ohel Yaakov Congregation on Glen Avenue to experience the mitzvah. All chickens were donated to charity after the event. — Maayan Jaffe — Photos courtesy of BaltimoreJewishLife.com

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Activists Rally Against Using Chickens for Kaporos The Alliance to End Chickens as Kaporos hosted two demonstrations in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Sept. 23 and 24, to protest and eliminate the use of chickens in kaporos ceremonies. The events were held on Eastern Parkway, between Kingston and Albany avenues in front of the Brooklyn Jewish ChildSren’s Museum. According to a release by the alliance, “Chickens suffer terribly in kaporos rituals. They suffer in being callously held with their wings pinned painfully and injuriously backward and in being packed in crates, often for days, without food or water leading up to the ritual. They suffer in being slaughtered and handled as if they were inanimate objects, unworthy of kindness, mercy or respect.” Last year, the Alliance rescued 121 chickens from kaporos. The alliance is a project of United Poultry Concerns, which was formed in New York in 2010. Concurrently, Agudath Israel of America reissued its Rabbinic statement, first published five years ago, calling upon the community to exercise care

regarding the custom of kaporos, ensuring the practice was conducted in a manner that ensured that proper standards of kashrut, cleanliness and humane treatment of animals, as defined by halacha, Jewish law. The statement included what the organization calls the “Kol Korei,” which included the following excerpt: “Halachic authorities have long pointed out the need for special care to be taken during the kaporos process that the chickens be slaughtered and processed properly, especially on erev Yom Kippur, when many shochtim [slaughterers] spend long hours shechting large volumes of chicken. … A proper hashgocha [oversight] will oversee all aspects of kashrus throughout the entire process, including the proper handling of the chickens prior to shechita, so as to avoid fractures or other defects that would render the chickens treif. …” The statement also noted that rabbis would be on hand to ensure the health and safety of both the live and slaughtered chickens. — Maayan Jaffe


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Local News

Philanthropic Pioneers The years have “flashed by,” said Dr. Timothy D. Armbruster, president and CEO of the charitable Morris Goldseker Foundation of Maryland Inc. Armbruster announced last month that he will step down from his role after what will be 34 years, in the summer of 2013. Sharna Goldseker, a member of the foundation’s board of directors, is heading up a search committee to find Armbruster’s successor. She told the Baltimore Jewish Times that Goldseker is working with Russell Reynolds Associates to conduct a national search. There is not yet a formal job description for the position. “We are working on that,” said Sharna Goldseker. “What I can tell you is that we are looking for someone to set the direction and course for the philanthropy efforts of the foundation on the grant-making and asset-allocation side. The person will oversee the investments of the assets. We are looking for someone to lead the board and staff. The president helps set the course for the foundation, as Dr. Armbruster has for the last three-plus decades.” Sharna Goldseker said that the foundation has been fortunate to work with someone like Armbruster and that she personally has benefited from his expertise. “He has been a mentor and someone from who I have learned a tremendous amount,” she said. Sharna Goldseker, a great niece of foundation founder Morris Goldseker, 16

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

a real estate business tycoon, broker and philanthropist who passed away in 1973, grew up engaged in the philanthropic world, at the feet of her father and mother, Sheldon and Shelley Goldseker. Sheldon serves as the chairman of the foundation. “I was certainly inspired to work in philanthropy through the work I saw at the Goldseker Foundation growing up,” said Sharna Goldseker, who serves as managing director of 21/64, a nonprofit consulting division of Andrea and Charles Bronfman Philanthropies specializing in next generation and multigenerational strategic consulting for families. “I take great pride in the impact [the foundation] has had in Baltimore.” That impact is unique actually, according to leaders in the field of philanthropy. Abe Wasserberger is an expert in philanthropic giving who currently serves as executive vice president of development at The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore. He explained that through much of the first half of the 20th century economic and social discrimination against Jews was a problem in virtually every U.S. metro area. Jews stuck together and gave together in order to preserve and strengthen their sense of self and community. “Giving then was a personal expression of self-identity. Jewish philanthropy ensured a Jewish future,” he said. “Jews gave as a means of self-expression and communal self-preservation. In

David Stuck

As Goldseker Foundation CEO steps down, JT examines its successful history By Maayan Jaffe

the latter half of the last century up to today, Jews no longer feel threatened in America, and therefore their philanthropic behaviors no longer rely on giving for self-identity. Today, Jews give to general causes that move them.” Wasserberger said that Morris Goldseker was an innovator for his time — in many ways, including with his philanthropy. The Goldseker Foundation, although it was founded by a Jewish family, is not considered a Jewish foundation. The foundation was one of the first to focus on advancing the causes of the Greater Baltimore region, independent of ethnicity, race and religion. “I think he had a special place in his heart to strengthen our [ Jewish] community, but he also knew the

Sheldon Goldseker (left) says Dr. Timothy Armbruster’s successor will continue the foundation's legacy.

Jewish community had a responsibility to repair the world,” said Wasserberger. “This is a family that has lifted the entire community based on the dream, vision and resources left by its founder.” Sheldon Goldseker echoed Wasserberger’s sentiments. He said that Morris Goldseker left several provisions in his will, which the family has followed in their philanthropic endeavors. One was that the foundation could operate only in the Baltimore metropolitan area. Secondly, Morris wanted to help disadvantaged people rise up in education and housing — social issues, community issues. And in leaving that mandate, he ensured that the foundation would be broad-based.


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â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the latter half of the last century up to today, Jews no longer feel threatened in America, and therefore their philanthropic behaviors no longer rely on giving for self-identity.â&#x20AC;?

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been supportive of Comprehensive Housing and Assistance Inc. over the last two decades. The Goldseker Foundation paid for the study of elderly in Upper Park Heights that eventually led to the Weinberg senior housing facilities. The money, of course, has been instrumental. However, Sheldon Goldseker said his family has tried to keep a low profile and does not want public accolades. However, he does hope the foundation is looked upon as instrumental to the professionalism of our area foundations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we started out, grant making wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t very professional,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In some ways, we are like the silent philanthropists, because it is not about publicity but about pioneering philanthropy, being professional and helping Baltimore and the people of Baltimore.â&#x20AC;? Now, as Dr. Armbruster is stepping down, Sheldon Goldseker said he is confident that while the CEO of 34 years will be missed, his replacement will be able to step in and continue the Goldseker legacy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be someone who has the expertise and the leadership skills to do the job,â&#x20AC;? said Sheldon Goldseker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each new person brings new ideas and new approaches, and we will be open to that.â&#x20AC;? JT

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;He established a [grant] selection committee in his will, and the committee was comprised of the presidents ex oďŹ&#x192;cio of three organizations: The Associated, Morgan State University and Johns Hopkins University. He felt those three broad-based organizations represent the community as a whole,â&#x20AC;? said Sheldon Goldseker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He felt and we feel that what could be more Jewish than to be philanthropic to everyone.â&#x20AC;? Sheldon Goldseker said he is seeing the value of his uncleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision today as a younger generation of philanthropists emerges. He said those people of the Generation X and Generation Y era are interested in looking beyond the â&#x20AC;&#x153;core needs of the Jewish community.â&#x20AC;? Each year, the Goldseker Foundation distributes between $3 million and $4 million. Among its most wellknown gifts are those granted to the Baltimore Community Foundation, which it has helped grow from a one-trust, $2.5 million foundation in the mid-1970s to a foundation of roughly 500 trusts and around $150 million. Also, it was instrumental in the formation of the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, of which Sheldon Goldseker was the first president. In the Jewish community, Goldseker does give an annual allocation to The Associated, and it also has

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Clear

Communication

Dr. Ira Kolman (left) explains to David Weis how the new Baltimore Hebrew hearing loop device works.

Baltimore Hebrew project reaches out to hearing impaired By Ron Snyder Rachel Dubin has long wished she could fully enjoy services at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. Dubin, 35, has severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and hears through two cochlear implants. For years, the only way she could follow along with the service was to watch the reader’s lips while trying to read along. at all changed on Rosh Hashanah. It was during the holiday that Dubin, along with many other hearing-impaired congregants, took full advantage of Baltimore Hebrew’s newly installed hearing loop system. The hearing loop works by transmitting audio from a public address system directly to telecoil-equipped hearing aids and cochlear implants. 18

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

e telecoil functions as an antenna, relaying sounds directly into the ear without background noise just like Wi-Fi connects people to the Web, said Dr. Ira Kolman, a congregation member and an audiologist who was one of the main donors that made the system possible. “We have many members of our community who have trouble hearing services, even with hearing aids, and we felt like we needed to do something to allow them to fully enjoy coming to services,” Dr. Kolman said. Baltimore Hebrew comptroller David Weis said the congregation examined several options before settling on a telecoil system, which most of those with hearing aids today can use fairly easily. According to the

Hearing Loss Association of America, 69 percent of all hearing aids dispensed in the United States today have telecoils. “It’s important that we try to be sensitive and responsive to those members who have a disability,” Weis said. “e technology is there, and we saw no reason we shouldn’t do this. We hope this is a research not just used by our congregation, but by the community at large, who can use our building to host meetings and other community events where those with hearing impairments may be present.” The Baltimore Hebrew hearing loop project, which also was made possible through donations from congregation member Betty W. Cohen and the Selma T. and Joseph Wagner Fund, was installed in the sanctuary,

Straus Social Hall, Hoffberger Chapel, Dalsheimer Auditorium and Goodwin Center. The congregation also purchased several portable transmitters for people whose hearing aids are not compatible with the system. Dubin, who has been attending Baltimore Hebrew all her life, said the difference was amazing, as she can now just turn on the telecoil in both her implants and hear the rabbis and cantor during the services. “This means so much to the congregation members with a hearing loss,” Dubin said. “They don’t have to go ask an usher for an assistivelistening device and try to make it work with their hearing aid or cochlear implant, and they don’t

David Stuck

Local News


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Seasons Hospice and Jewish Community Services are offering

COMMUNITY BEREAVEMENT GROUPS For anyone mourning the death of a loved one

David Stuck

— Baltimore Hebrew Comptroller David Weis

have to self-identify as a person with a hearing loss. … e new loop means that BHC is committed to communication accessibility. is is very important to me and to others with hearing loss. As a lifelong member of BHC, I am very proud of my congregation for being so welcoming and accessible.” Reaching out to those with hearing loss is an issue that continues to resonate with many in Baltimore’s Jewish community. This includes Rabbi David Kastor and his wife, Tchia. The Baltimore couple has worked with Our Way for the Jewish Deaf and Hard of Hearing to assist Jews with hearing loss for the last 17 years. Our Way, an agency of the Orthodox Union, developed nearly a dozen booklets that include signs for various Jewish prayers and holidays. The latest was “Signs of Sukkos,” which presents key visuals for Hebrew terms using American Sign Language for the blessing of dwelling in the Sukkah, along with the Hebrew text and the English transliteration, according to an OU news release. “I really enjoyed knowing that the deaf community would benefit from it and enable them to celebrate the Jewish holidays in meaningful ways

according to their own needs,” Tchia Kastor said. Rabbi Eliezer Lederfeind, national director of Our Way, said Baltimore’s Jewish community has been at the forefront in working to ensure that those who are deaf and hard of hearing can fully participate in all areas of the religion. Rabbi Lederfeind said this includes the work of Rabbi Mordechai Shuchatowitz of Agudath Israel, a parent of hearing-impaired children whose research of hearing aids and cochlear implants led to interpretation of halakha to ensure people could use their devices during holidays and Shabbat. “It’s so important that we find ways to include everyone who wants to participate,” said Rabbi Lederfeind, who was born to deaf parents and has two deaf daughters. “There is wonderful work being done in Baltimore to help those that are deaf and hard of hearing feel connected.” JT Copies of the booklet may be obtained by contacting: Our Way, Orthodox Union, 11 Broadway, New York, NY 10004, Rabbi Lederfeind at 212-613-8234 or ourway@ou.org. Ron Snyder is a JT staff reporter rsnyder@jewishtimes.com

8-week series begins October 11, 2012

For more information and registration, Groups will meet at Jewish Community Services, call Jewish Community 5750 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore. Free of charge. Pre-registration is required. Services 410-466-9200 JCS is an agency of THE ASSOCIATED: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore.

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Alison Sopher’s online consignment store boasts almost 7,000 clothing items.

‘Dashing’ Prices

Online consignment shop offers great deals for parents of young children

By Ron Snyder

Alison Sopher was amazed at how quickly many of the people she knew with small children would get rid of their clothing. The children, she said, grew so fast that there were many cases where the child would wear an expensive outfit just once or twice before it no longer fit. “It seemed like such a waste,” Sopher said. That observation played a role in the Pikesville native’s decision to launch DashingBee.com — an online consignment store — a little more than a year ago. The business was spawned after Sopher, 34, a married mother of two boys, participated in consignment sales as a consignor and conducted her own live sales. She realized how big a market there was for consignment shopping. “In this economy, it can often be expensive to buy clothes for children, 20

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

especially when they outgrow them in such a short time,” Sopher said. “This is a great way to get a great deal on quality clothes.” Sopher said her business is growing at a fast pace despite little marketing outside of social network sites (her site has 1,200 Facebook fans) and mentions on mommy blogs. She currently has about 7,000 clothing items, which she meticulously catalogs and hangs along racks in her basement. The items, she says, have come from across the country and as far away as Italy. To most, Sopher added, offering clothing to a consignment shop is an easy way to make a few extra dollars without the hassle of hosting a yard sale or setting up shop at a flea market. “People’s schedules are so hectic today,” Sopher said. “Many people are just looking for a way to get rid of the

clothes, and this gives others who can’t afford high-end items the chance to get a great deal.”

“I know I’m getting something that’s been taken care of and that’s important.” — Dashing Bee customer Clare Bever

Clare Bever can attest to that. The Baltimore attorney said she has bought dozens of items — and saved hundreds of dollars — buying clothes for her 2-year-old son, Christopher, on DashingBee.com. Bever said purchasing high-end

clothes at retail price just isn’t worth it when her son outgrows clothing so quickly. She added that she has even bought larger-sized clothing and put them away for when her son gets older. “I’ve dealt with other consignment shops but never bought from any of them because the price wasn’t right or the quality wasn’t there,” Bever said. “That’s never been the case with Dashing Bee. I know I’m getting something that’s been taken care of, and that’s important when you don’t actually get to touch the item until it’s shipped to you. I’m just amazed at the variety of items they have.” Sopher said collecting the inventory is the easy part. The rest of the business can be very labor intensive. Once someone consigns an item, she prices it anywhere from 50 to 75 percent off the retail price. Then she, along with help from husband Brad,

Justin Tsucalas

Local News


catalogs the items and uploads their photos to the site. Items can then be tracked online by those who consign them. Sopher said an item is placed on the site for 90 days before being discounted 50 percent. The price would then be discounted again for an end-of-season clearance sale. Any items remaining after that are donated to a local charity. Any profits from clothing sold are split 50-50. For Sopher, Dashing Bee might be a lot of work, but it’s the perfect business while she has young children. Working out of her home allows her to schedule work hours around her kids, and updating the website can be done at any hour. Sopher said her setup is much like many other traditional Jewish home businesses of prior generations that are well-known in the Baltimore area. “I remember picking out my bat mitzvah invitation from a lady who had stacks and stacks of samples in the basement of her house,” Sopher said. “Her business worked mainly through word of mouth. anks to the Internet, Dashing Bee is like the 21st century version of those businesses.” JT

According to a 2007 Nielson study, clothing and accessories were the second most popular item purchased online. According to the study, 36 percent of online shoppers around the world purchased clothing and/or accessories in a three-month time period. And according to a 2008 survey, more than 85 percent of the world’s online population has used the Internet to make a purchase — increasing the market for online shopping by 40 percent since 2006. Worldwide, more than half of Internet users make at least one purchase online per month, according to Nielsen.

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BABY

Teeth Young boy’s passion grows into thriving career

22

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

tabs on his pupil’s development. Any time Winter, still a patient, came back in for cleanings, they would go over his progress in school. They’d talk about what he was learning in the classroom as well as what specific procedures were challenging him at the time. roughout Dr. Becker encouraged Winter, advising him to spend additional time practicing in the lab. Winter was still in school, but Dr. Becker already knew he was grooming not only a budding addition to his practice, but also a potential successor. “Greg is the only patient that I’ve ever had over the years that’s expressed an interest and followed through on it by spending his free time seeing how the office works, watching the procedures, trying to learn what we do,” Dr. Becker, 57, said. “I said to myself, ‘Well, if he’s going to be a dentist and decides on general dentistry, this is someone I would like to carry on the baton for the practice.’” Dr. Allan Dworkin of Cross Keys Dental Associates said the prospect of dental patients sprouting into dentists is becoming a growing trend. He attributes it to the increased level of comfort patients feel within the office, due in large part to the advancements in dentistry over the years. “It’s because, frankly, they see how they went through being a patient in our office, and it wasn’t threatening or intimidating; they enjoyed their dental experiences,” said Dr. Dworkin.

Dr. Steven Becker welcomed Dr. Greg Winter into his practice this summer.

In his 40 years of dentistry, he said he has had 14 patients enter the dental field. “This sounds like a profession where doctors have a good time going to work, and we can enjoy a nice livelihood at the same time,” he said. For Dr. Winter, the prospect of becoming a dentist always appealed to him. He relishes the opportunity to interact with patients, work with his hands and take part in different forms of problem solving. That part of the trade came intrinsically. However, even after only two months on the job, one can tell that Dr. Winter is steadily picking up on the approach displayed by his boss. Both take a mountain of pride in what they do. “I can see a lot of myself in Steve,” Dr. Winter said. “You are doing work in somebody’s mouth. I want to be proud of my work and what I do for my patients. I want them to be satisfied, as well. I got that from an early standpoint.” Pleasing patients isn’t the only thing the doctors have in common.

David Stuck

Fieen years ago, Greg Winter walked into Dr. Steven Becker’s dental office as a patient. Two months ago, Dr. Greg Winter walked into that very same office as a partner. While several dentists can maintain they’ve encouraged and mentored their former patients into joining the dental field in some capacity, very few can boast they’ve molded a client into a co-worker. By inducting Dr. Winter, a patient of his since 1995, into his practice, Dr. Becker has done just that. Starting in late July, Dr. Winter, 28, joined Smiles by Becker, the Ellicott City dental office where he not only visited as a patient, but realized his desire to work in general dentistry. With a doctor and a nurse for parents, Dr. Winter knew from an early age that he wanted to pursue a career in medicine. Dr. Becker helped make which field a fairly clear-cut choice. Aware of his fascination for dentistry, Dr. Becker allowed Winter to shadow him on multiple occasions in the office. As a teen, Winter got a firsthand look at procedures like putting on crowns and conducting root canals. He got to see how a dental practice functioned on a daily basis and how the dentists, hygienists and front desk staff meshed to provide the best service for their clients. When Winter went off to the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Dr. Becker made sure to keep

They also share a birthday (Dec. 21), and astrology enthusiasts would assert that that coincidence is the driving rationale behind them possessing similar personalities in the office. Both speak gently and succinctly. Drs. Becker and Winter enter the office with a strong sense of focus yet are capable of sharing a chuckle with one another when the time is right. In terms of their interactions with patients, Dr. Kimberly Ford, who’s been with Smiles by Becker for eight years, can already draw comparisons between the two. “ey have a very calming demeanor about them,” Dr. Ford said. “They are both very friendly, so they make patients feel they are more like friends than in a clinical type of situation. It makes people feel very at home.” In addition to helping their patients, Drs. Winter and Becker have undoubtedly benefited each other. Dr. Winter can approach Dr. Becker when it comes to asking about traditional dental techniques. “He knows what works and what doesn’t


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PERFECTLY DESIGNED

work at this point. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still in that stage,â&#x20AC;? Dr. Winter said. Still, Dr. Becker graduated dental school (University of Maryland) in 1979 and opened his practice in 1983, and since then in the dental world, some things have changed. The elder dentist is relying on his new addition to bring with him some of the new tricks of the trade that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learned during both dental school and two years of residency in Pennsylvania. Dr. Winter also will look to help foster a new, younger patient base and to train in dental services the office does not yet offer, all in an effort to further strengthen the practice. Having known Dr. Winter for so long, Dr. Becker is enjoying watching his former apprentice evolve in the professional realm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you see somebody that directed you want to make sure that you are encouraging the right things and that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing the right things. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost like a parental pride,â&#x20AC;? Dr. Becker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He seems to be doing pretty well at the time. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out marketing and networking in different areas. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finding more dates or patients. I think it might be more dates.â&#x20AC;? JT David Snyder is a JT staff reporter dsnyder@jewishtimes.com

Situated on the beautiful Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Campus, this well-designed community offers an active, worry-free lifestyle for seniors 62+ and persons under 62 with disability. 7iÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;LiĂ&#x20AC;} *Â?>Vi] Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;i ºÂ?>ViÂť Ă&#x152;Â&#x153; Li vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; Ă&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192; Ă&#x20AC;i>`Ă&#x17E; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153; iÂ&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x17E; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC; Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;] Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;`iÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â?Ă&#x17E; >Â&#x2DC;` Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x17E; >VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i° /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}] Ă&#x153;iÂ?Â?Â&#x2021;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;>LÂ?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;i`  VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E; Â&#x153;vviĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192; Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192; Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E; LiÂ&#x2DC;iwĂ&#x152;Ă&#x192; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x2022;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} i>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x17E; >VViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i Â&#x153;v >Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i½Ă&#x192; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;VÂ&#x2026; Â&#x201C;i`Â&#x2C6;V>Â? v>VÂ&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; >Â&#x2DC;` Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;V>Â&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192; >`Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152; `>Ă&#x17E;V>Ă&#x20AC;i° Additional features include: U -ÂŤ>VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192; vwVÂ&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E; E "Â&#x2DC;i i`Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C; ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192; U /Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC; -iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192; U i>Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;vĂ&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x17E; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;V>ÂŤi` Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192; U >Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} /Â&#x153;}iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC; *Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C; U >Ă&#x20AC;}i Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} ,Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C; U "Ă&#x20AC;}>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;âi` -Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â? VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; U "Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;-Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;i Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;Vi -Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i

U Â&#x2C6;LĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E; >Â&#x2DC;` Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x192; ,Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C; U Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x2022;>Â? Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;}iÂ&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E; *iÂ&#x2DC;`>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192; U "Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;-Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;i >Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E; >VÂ&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; U Â?Â? 1Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x2022;`i` U Ă&#x201C;{Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC; Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;}iÂ&#x2DC;VĂ&#x17E; >Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2DC;>Â&#x2DC;Vi E -iVĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E; U VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i ,iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC; U Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x20AC;i}>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} ­iÂ?ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192; *Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;ÂŽ

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NOT YOUR

BUBBIE’S

BINGO Pikesville Bingo seeks to attract younger fan base

SAM HARTMAN enjoys spending time with her grandmother, Dot Bach. If she can win some cash at the same time, that’s even better. That was the mindset Hartman, 16, took recently during a trip to Pikesville Bingo. She and her brother, Andrew, 19, were ready to try their luck on one of more than 20 games during the outing. “It’s just fun, especially if you win,” said Hartman, who came down from Dallastown, Pa. “It’s easy to play and doesn’t cost a lot to get involved.” Getting a younger crowd out to play bingo is something Pikesville Bingo owner Jonathan Sindler is working hard to do. The Pikesville native said the game is much different, and more modern, than most people realize. “There’s no one cranking a ball pit around and posting numbers on a board,” Sindler said. “It’s all about technology and interaction now.” For just $19, Sindler said, players can come out with a chance to win from $1,300 to $3,000 on a weekday and up to $4,000 on Saturdays. Numbers are drawn electronically just like with the Maryland Lottery, and all the cards are bar-coded, which makes cheating impossible, Sindler said. He added that players don’t even have to purchase traditional bingo cards anymore. Now, players have the ability to utilize a computerized 24

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

bingo card that automatically keeps up with the game and even alerts them if they win. “It’s really one of the best bargains in gambling today,” said Sindler, 38. “The lottery is over in just seconds, and you can go through $20 on a slot machine in minutes. But with bingo, you’re guaranteed several hours of fun, and the odds of winning are infinitely better.” Sindler is passionate about the bingo business, something he has been involved in for more than 20 years. He started out sweeping the floors of the bingo hall, located in the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Department, during his senior year in high school in 1991. Sindler eventually handled many other jobs for Pikesville Bingo, including serving drinks, working in the kitchen, calling numbers and serving as manager. He bought the business in 2004 and runs it with the help of his mother, Sherry, and brother, Brian, along with about 15 employees. “There’s such a tremendous social atmosphere here, and the camaraderie is unreal,” said Sindler, who is also an instrumental music teacher at Cockeysville Middle School. “It’s just a lot of fun, and it’s not just for older people. It’s something really the whole family can do.” Also of note, Sindler said, is that all proceeds generated from Pikesville Bingo go directly to charity as required

Justin Tsucalas

By Ron Snyder

Owner Jonathan Sindler calls the game.

by Baltimore County law. Pikesville Bingo, which was established in 1974, makes its money through management fees charged to its sponsoring charities: Jewish War Veterans Post 117, the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Department and the Lansdowne Volunteer Fire Department. Sindler said attendance can vary from 20 people on a slow day to 100 on a busy day. However, attracting new players is becoming increasingly difficult for a variety of reasons. This includes not being able to play on Sundays in Baltimore County and being limited in payouts compared to Baltimore City. “I’d like to see more universal regulations when it comes to bingo in the area,” Sindler said. “Baltimore City allows for bingo to be played on

Sundays and can offer more to their winners, where we are limited to $3,000 during the week and $4,000 on Saturday. Plus, there is so much more competition in the gambling business now.” The competition Sindler is referring to is the proliferation of casino gambling in Maryland and neighboring states. Already, Sindler is going against slots casinos at Arundel Mills, Perryville and Ocean Downs in Maryland, with up to three more being considered in the near future. Also, there are already multiple casinos with slots and table games in Delaware and Pennsylvania. In addition to the glitz the casinos bring, Sindler said, they can also serve alcohol, which he cannot. Still, Sindler said there are several


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upsides to a night of bingo, including relatively no cost, better winning odds and its close proximity. “We have a guaranteed winner for every game,” Sindler said. “You could be playing the slots all night and no one may win a big jackpot.

“IT’S NOT JUST FOR OLDER PEOPLE.”

With the bigger lottery games, you have a better chance of being struck by lightning than winning the big one.” Mary Cohen is one of Pikesville Bingo’s many loyal players. The Pikesville resident said she plays several times a week and always has a good time. “It’s just 10 minutes from my home, and there are always fun people to interact with,” she said. Other regular players at Pikesville Bingo include Barbara and Lucky Harris. The Catonsville couple take a bus from their apartment just about every day games are held. They also have had a run of good luck during the last year. Barbara, 67, said she won $5,000 between last December and this past July. Lucky, 69, said he won about $3,700 over the last year. “We try to never miss a day,” Barbara said. JT Pikesville Bingo, located at 40 E. Sudbrook Lane, is open Monday and Friday (7:30 p.m.) and Tuesday and Saturday (12:30 p.m.)

Ron Snyder is a JT staff reporter rsnyder@jewishtimes.com

100512

Justin Tsucalas

— Jonathan Sindler

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

Justin Tsucalas

Cover Story |


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‘THE RIGHT STUFF’ New Executive Director Jakir Manela wants to ‘ignite Jewish passion’ at the Pearlstone Center By Maayan Jaffe

Justin Tsucalas

There is something special about the Pearlstone Center. So wrote Pearlstone President Ilene Vogelstein in an email last weekend. “Whether an individual or group comes to Pearlstone for an immersive retreat, a daylong meeting, a simacha or a program on the farm, their experience ignites a passion and a personal transformation not found in other Jewish or secular experiences,” Vogelstein said. “It may be one of the few places where the diversity of our community comes together and lives in harmony.” e Pearlstone Center, formerly known as the Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center, is growing — no pun intended. roughout the summer of 2011, Pearlstone underwent a strategic planning process that resulted in a new mission and vision for the center, which first opened in 1988 as the Jack Pearlstone Institute for Living Judaism. en, explained P.J. Pearlstone, the center’s first vice president, it was an institute with no walls or any facilities. In 2001, the Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center was built. “We were an empty vessel, with no programming of our own,” said Pearlstone. As time went on, however, the center began to fill itself with programming to create its Jewish soul. First, there was Passover at Pearlstone. Then, six years ago, in 2006, Kayam Farm was born. Today, in large part due to the influence of the farm on the center, Pearlstone is not just a conference and retreat center, it is a platform for innovation, a hub for impactful, inspirational and environmentally friendly experiences. Consistent throughout this transformation was one man, Pearlstone’s new executive director, Jakir Manela. Manela took reign on July 1, 2012, almost five years to the day in which he and his wife, Netsitsah, moved into a log cabin on the premises, had their first child and bore the fruits of what today is a 6-acre farm feeding several hundred people. Colleagues describe Manela as “passionate” and “charismatic.” Rabbi Aaron Frank, who has worked closely with Manela for the last several years through his synagogue, Netivot Shalom, and various farm projects, said he was “immediately

taken by [Manela’s] energy, creativity and positive outlook.” “Jakir has excellent leadership skills and has proven that he is able to translate his vision into reality,” said Frank. “He meets people of all ages and levels of Jewish commitment and helps them grow in their own way.” Mentors like Ken Gelula of Comprehensive Housing and Assistance, Inc., describe him as “fun to be around.” And his friends say it is rare to see such vision and strength in a young person. “This is someone who has so much potential,” said Shoshana Shamberg, the person Manela described as his “first friend in Baltimore.” “We have journeyed a long way with the Manelas, and we have seen very positive changes,” Shamberg said. However, the decision to place Manela at the helm of the ever-budding Pearlstone Center was not an easy one. Only 30 years old, Manela was a final candidate in a very long and drawn-out search for a new executive director. Michael Hoffman, chief planning and strategy officer for The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, said, “The Pearlstone job was hard to fill. … Jakir does not have 30 years experience, but he possesses the innovative spirit needed to take the retreat center to the next wonderful chapter in its existence.” Manela questioned whether he should apply. He said the center was at first looking for someone with more of a hospitality background, someone with more formal management experience. “I recognized that the board was not really expecting me to apply [for this job], but I said to myself, ‘I feel ready, and I don’t want the window to close.’” When Manela applied, he admitted upfront, “I don’t have all the qualifications. But I asked, ‘how long do you think it would take me to get up to speed?’ I never had to question if, just when,” he said. His lay leaders put their trust in him. “Jakir stepped into the role of executive director with limited experience. He understood that and immediately began to find mentors and courses that would help him in the areas both he and I felt he needed it most,” said Vogelstein. “Jakir


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Jakir Manela described his first year at Pearlstone as “great and awesome and scary.”

‘Jakir was the farmer, the educator, the program coordinator — we had a baby, and it was insane.”

Justin Tsucalas

— Netsitsah Manela

What Qualities Do You Need to Become an Executive Director? According to Michael Hoffman, Chief Planning & Strategy Officer for The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, the following are the five key factors the organization looks for when seeking an executive director for one of its agencies: • Vision • Highly effective management skills • Development professionalism • The ability to steward and engage lay leaders • The capability of serving as a community relations professional, “the face of the agency”

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

is the right person at the right time to lead us and ensure we accomplish our mission and reach our vision.”

A Seed Was Planted Fifteen years ago, Manela could not have pictured himself in his current role. Though he grew up in a traditional household in Potomac, Md. — the family went to synagogue on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, lit Chanukah candles and had a Passover Seder — he said he went to Hebrew school and hated it. “Aer my bar mitzvah, I was like, ‘thank you!’ and I then I walked away from the organized Jewish community,” he said. Manela was ready to write off Judaism, when his sister convinced him to travel to Israel the summer of ‘99, before he left for college. It wasn’t a particularly religious trip, Manela recalled, but it was somehow one that “lit me on fire, shot me out of a cannon.” “I became interested in religion. I asked my dad if we had a New Testament [at home] that I could read. He said we didn’t, but we had a Chumash. So I started reading it,” he recounted. “I read the whole Chumash — I just read through it. … I started going to minyan, and by the time I

was ready to declare my major at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, it was in Hebrew, Jewish studies and global environmental studies.” Manela got involved with Hillel and Jewish and Israel advocacy. One year, the school sent him to the Charlotte B. and Jack J. Spitzer Hillel Forum on Social Justice. There was an environment track. “I just remember, while we were all sitting there listening to this speech, in burst 20 hippies with guitars. And everyone got up, and they were dancing. I was sold,” Manela said, his face lit up. “And then the next day there was a scientist describing the climate change crisis and loss of biodiversity, specifically focusing on coral bleaching. She was presenting sound science but with such moral conviction and righteous indignation. It was amazing to me, this nexus of passionate activism and vibrant spirituality.” He went back to Wisconsin and founded “WEJI,” the Wisconsin Environmental Jewish Initiative, and he wrote his college thesis on Judaism and ecology. Like many young Jewish hippies, he then went to work for Teva Learning Center at the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center after he graduated. “I got out of the car and within the first 10 minutes I met my wife,” he said. e couple spent the 2004-2005 year bonding in the center’s vibrancy and the Shabbatot, which Manela described simply as “amazing.” They grew in their commitment to Judaism, to the environment and to each other. But when the year ended, Manela did not have a job. He followed Netsitsah back to the D.C. area, where she also is from, so she could take a position with the Martin Buber Summer Youth Kibbutz. He did Tai Chi and read some good books. Then, in 2006, he got the call from Pearlstone.


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Free Advice This is the advice colleagues and friends are offering Jakir Manela: “Maximize the lay-professional partnership. … Nurture your staff.” — Michael Hoffman

“Don’t be afraid to admit you are wrong. Hire carefully. Keep your passion for the Jewish community and Jewish traditions at the forefront of your work.” — Ken Gelula

“You shall create the balance that you seek.” — Netsitsah Manela

David Stuck

Jakir Manela, with wife Netsitsah and sons Shama (left) and Lev, says “things are unfolding just right.”

‘The Year We Survived’ “When we first heard about Baltimore, we said, ‘Baltimore? Really?’” recalled Manela. But his wife said it was truly a no-brainer. e couple was living together, but aside from Netsitsah’s small salary for her work with the youth kibbutz, they had little finances. “e idea of moving out to Pearlstone to have a blank slate and a creative leadership position for Jakir — for both of us — and to actually get paid, it was like, ‘yeah,’” she said. Manela started commuting to and working at Pearlstone in the fall of 2006. The couple moved into their log cabin in January 2007. Manela had only one season of farming experience. “I knew a lot about education. But what was I going to do? Talk about the one piece of corn I could get to grow?” So he took a horticulture class. And he trained with Jack Gurley at the Calvert’s Gift Farm in Sparks, Md. “ere was this pink protractor,” recalled Netsitsah. “We spent all this time with Aaron Shamberg [owner of Deep Roots Organic LandCare] in his garage/workshop looking at maps and planning and plotting what the farm was going to look like. We used the pink protractor to put the green house in the right place, where the sun would fall.”

That first year, Manela managed to grow 3,500 pounds of food; 2,700 people came out to see the farm. But behind closed doors it was “great and awesome and scary,” he said. “I got pregnant that first year and we were moving there. We got there and we got married, and I had Lev [the couple’s oldest son], and it was this one-man show,” Netsisah recalled. “Jakir was the farmer, the educator, the program coordinator — we had a baby, and it was insane. It was a lot of hard work, lots of hours and very little sense of how we could balance anything.” Said Manela: “I think about it as ‘the year we survived.’” And each year since has been better — more balanced. The stories are incredible.

Life on the Farm It’s a sweltering September morning and Manela is standing in the middle of what he calls “the fertile crescent,” an area he plans to develop at the Pearlstone Center by planting fruit trees and raising turkeys, sheep and llamas. He describes a soonto-be scene, where the animals and foliage will nearly touch the windows of the retreat center and guests will be able to truly experience the beauty

of the land on which they sleep, study and meet. Manela’s eyes somehow shine through the lenses of his glasses, tinted tan by the blazing sun. He is on fire talking about the farm. He recalled the season that the goats were sick and the vet prescribed shots for them. Each day, he would come to the goat pen and wrestle with them in order to inject the medicine into their tucheses. He told the story of a young student who came to one of the various summer camps on the farm. She had a fear of vegetables and never consumed them — raw or cooked. Manela, aer one trying evening when she panicked at the site of pizza sauce, took her down to the farm. “I showed her the tomato rows, and she picked tomatoes and ate them. You should have watched her face change. She said a bracha and tried more and more. It was amazing,” he said. He recounted the big national gatherings and the realization that “this place really contributes to Jewish thought and leadership.” He noted the weddings — “so special,” and the highlight of each day, looking at the farm, walking off of it at sunset, being on the land. “Six months after moving here, two weeks after our first son was born, we planted his placenta under a peach tree on the farm. Three years later, we had Lev’s upsherin [3-year-old hair-cutting jewishtimes.com

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Rebecca Copeland The new mission for those at Pearlstone is “to ignite Jewish passion.”

Events and Guest Services Director

Morris Panitz Program Director

Josh Rosenstein Kayam Farm Director

Rachel Siegal Finance and Development Director

Wendy Schelew

ceremony] under that tree,” said Manela. “Our lives were so uncertain when we moved here, but with each passing season, it feels more and more grounded and special — that somehow things are unfolding just right.”

Sales Manager

Margaret Miller Office Manager

Dale Griffiths Maintenance Manager

Pearlstone Center Board of Directors Ilene Vogelstein, President Adam Baumwald Sheldon Berman Jason Fair Josh Fidler Ricky Gratz Ben Greenwald Jessica Grossman Amy Gross Michele Lax Pacy Oletsky P.J. Pearlstone Richard Pearlstone Tara Posner Michelle Rosenbloom Leonard Ross Robert Roswell Beth Sellman Eli Schlossberg Erika Pardes Schon Kenny Schwartz Rachel Steinberg Warschawski

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

A New Dimension Today, Manela spends little time in the fields. Instead, he said, he is excited about the weekly and monthly experiences of bringing his staff and board together. He said he feels them coming together for a common purpose. Vogelstein said they hired Manela because he lives their vision — he embodies their vision. “Jakir has a higher calling in terms of his purpose in life,” said Hoffman. “He lives by this environmental agenda, not because he wants to make the Earth a better place, but because he makes the connection between the Jewish values and foundation that lead us to live a life that is environmentally sustainable and friendly. … It is his calling to infuse that sense of Jewish purpose into as many members of our Jewish community as possible.” Menela knows, however, that accomplishing his goals will not be an easy trek. He said he is challenged with achieving work-life balance for himself, but also with how to properly care for his staff. He said the staff are the foundation of the center, the reason it has been successful up until now, and “we have to do right by them. ey deserve real compensation, benefits and a workplace that is integrated, healthy, positive and a safe space to speak your mind.” He said to do that on a small budget is challenging. “e challenge is how to make a startup into something more long term and viable. I used to ask this and that question of others, ask them what we are going to do. Now,

others are asking me,” he said. “I hope to find answers.” Manela said there will be several changes unveiled in the coming months — or years. The first is what he calls “the integration piece.” The new name, the Pearlstone Center defines this change. “We are building an internal staff community,” he said, noting that as the internal community is built, the center will also undergo a new, external branding, determining whether or not it makes sense to keep its three arms — the retreat center, the farm and the programmatic arm — named as separate entities or branded simply as the Pearlstone Center. The food service will also change. “We want the sustainable farm to have implications on what we do at the retreat center. The food should reflect our values — it should be healthy, sustainable and delicious,” Manela said. And, in the long term, there are several capital building projects Manela would like to see. He talked about a multipurpose farm annex, a place to process vegetables, eggs and culinary mushrooms, as well as a goal of having a creamery to produce cheeses and yogurt. “I took this job because I know what it means to be an environmental steward; this land, this community has taught me so much these past six years. We have grown close to this land, to this climate, to these rhythms. I learned this piece of land, these crops,” he said. “Now, I want to build the Pearlstone Center in new and different ways, and on more levels. Our new mission is ‘to ignite Jewish passion.’ With this facility and landscape as our canvas, that is what we will do — together.” JT Maayan Jaffe is JT managing editor — mjaffe@jewishtimes.com

Justin Tsucalas

Who Will You Meet When You Visit Pearlstone?


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International News By Ron Snyder

A Growing Concern

UN Photo/Jennifer S Altman

Jewish community continues to be concerned over Iran’s nuclear threat

Iranian President Ahmadinejad speaks out against Israel at the U.N. General Assembly on Yom Kippur.

CHIZUK AMUNO’S RABBI RONALD SHULMAN made his stance on Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad very simple: “He’s a fool. But he is a fool that has to be taken very seriously.” That sentiment is shared by many in Baltimore’s Jewish community. Local leaders believe that the threat of war between Israel and a nuclear Iran is real if definitive action isn’t immediately taken by the international community against Tehran. Ahmadinejad solidified people’s fears with his Sept. 26. Yom Kippur speech at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. His remarks included inflammatory words against Israel, the United States and the European Union. He reiterated the stance that Israel should be wiped off the map. The U.S. and Israeli delegations boycotted the speech. e next day, Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu responded with a speech to the U.N., making clear that the international community needs to ensure that Iran does not move further along in their uranium enrichment

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

program. He drew red lines on a time bomb demonstrating where Iran is with its program today and where it will be within the next year if nothing is done. “At this late hour, there is only one way to peacefully prevent Iran from getting nuclear weapons – by placing a clear red line.” Netanyahu told the U.N. “Red lines don’t lead to war; red lines prevent war.” While presenting the drawing, Netanyahu showed that Iran has surpassed the level of developing low-enriched uranium. e next stage is enriching weapons-grade uranium. e final stage will be when it creates an actual weapon. “By next summer, at current enrichment rates, Iran will finish the medium enrichment rates; from then, it’s only a few months, or weeks, before they have enough uranium for a bomb,” Netanyahu told the U.N. It wasn’t clear what impact the rhetoric at the United Nations would have on world opinion, on the U.S. stance on Iran or on American votes for president in November.

Israel’s Right to Exist In Baltimore, the Jewish community felt the impact. Rabbi Shulman, for example, took Netanyahu’s words very seriously. He said the long-term security and existence of Israel needs to remain of utmost importance to America’s Jewish population and believes Iran poses an imminent threat to that. “You have to take a demagogue at his word,” said Rabbi Shulman on Ahmadinejad. “is is an issue that needs to be at the forefront of all Jewish people’s minds in America.” Among the claims Ahmadinejad made during his stay – which also included several interviews – is that Israel has no Middle East roots and should be “eliminated.” Ahmadinejad also accused Israel of “bullying” the U.S. over the alleged threat of an Iranian nuclear weapon. “Iran has been around for the last 7,000, 10,000 years,” Ahmadinejad told reporters last week. “ey [the Israelis] have been occupying those territories for the last 60 to 70 years with the support and force of the Westerners. ey have no roots there in history.”

Ahmadinejad’s hard-line stance on Israel and his disregard of the U.N. — Tehran has ignored six resolutions regarding the halting of its nuclear program since 2006 — means even tougher actions need to be taken against the country, said former Israeli Ambassador Dore Gold, president of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, during a recent Jewish Federations of North America leadership briefing. “It’s necessary for us to make it very clear to the Iranians that if they go the next step … they are crossing a line the West will not tolerate. … If we continue the way we are going, the Iranians will cross the nuclear finish line, and we will have a nuclear Iran,” he said. e call was also sponsored by the Jewish Council of Public Affairs. Baltimore Jewish Council Executive Director Dr. Arthur C. Abramson echoed Gold’s sentiments. “Iran is not just a threat to Israel but a threat to the U.S. as well,” Dr. Abramson said. “His rhetoric this week is a little more subdued, but he’s still saying the same things, and his views are as harsh as ever.”


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Those actively monitoring the situation, including Baltimore Zionist District Vice President Jay Bernstein, who was instrumental earlier this year in pushing the Maryland state government to pass legislation barring any person or company that invests $20 million or more in Iranian energy enterprises from receiving state contracts, said the U.S. boycott did not go far enough. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just outrageous that Ahmadinejad was even allowed to speak,â&#x20AC;? Bernstein said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why should the U.S. allow him to come to this country and the U.N. give him a platform to speak just so that he can spread his radical hatred on an international stage?â&#x20AC;? The tensions between Israel and Iran have spilled over into U.S. presidential politics. Obama and Netanyahu have clashed in recent months over how to move forward in dealing with Tehran, although Obama has not ruled out military force if necessary. Obama told the United Nations in his speech on Sept. 25 that the U.S. would prefer to resolve the Iranian nuclear weapon threat through diplomacy but that time is not â&#x20AC;&#x153;unlimited.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make no mistake: A nuclear-armed Iran is not a challenge that can be contained,â&#x20AC;? Obama told the U.N. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would threaten the elimination of Israel, the security of Gulf nations and the stability of the global economy.â&#x20AC;? Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.), a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has co-sponsored a resolution, which calls on the U.N. to take action against Iran for inciting genocide against Israel and the Israeli people. The resolution also calls for â&#x20AC;&#x153;an International Criminal Court investigation of Iranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaders and full implementation of sanctions to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons. It also reaďŹ&#x192;rms the United Statesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; support for Israel,â&#x20AC;? according to a recent Senate news release. â&#x20AC;&#x153;President Ahmadinejadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s threats to

082611

UN Photo/Jennifer S Altman

Harsher Actions Needed

jewishtimes.com

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“I PR AC TICE MY FAITH HERE ... AND MY POKER FACE .”

A Growing Concern om page 33

David Kates has one of those smiling faces you see all over North Oaks. Living in this community does that to people. But, if you’re face to face with him in a poker game, you learn that David’s expression doesn’t reveal the hand he is holding. On the other hand, if you’re hearing his singing and scriptural reading at the weekly Shabbat* services held here, you know exactly how he feels about his faith.

‘wipe Israel off the map’ and Supreme Leader Khamenei’s call ‘to kill all the Jews and annihilate Israel’ are not only hateful, they violate one of the most serious crimes under international law,” said Cardin in a statement. Jeffrey Goldberg, a national correspondent for e Atlantic and Bloomberg News said during the Federation conference call that it’s critical for Israel and the U.S. to work out their differences, especially if Obama is re-elected. “Israel needs us in order to survive; the U.S. does not need Israel to survive,” Goldberg said. “It’s incumbent on the prime minister that this relationship works better than it has. That said, there is plenty of blame to go around [on both sides].”

Life at North Oaks offers so many ways to be connected and to be the authentic you. Please call one of our residency counselors at (410) 486-9090. They have helped hundreds of people make great senior living decisions.

Mixed Feelings The United States’ stance in dealing with Iran is a hot topic among locals. Sam Snyder, 57, is a retired Baltimore County paramedic, told the Jewish Times that he thinks Iran needs to be stopped and believes they are working toward obtaining nuclear weapons. At the same time, Snyder, a Democrat, believes Obama’s measured approach is correct. “You can’t just go in and start launching nuclear weapons at them,” Snyder said. “They need to be stopped, but the region is already so unstable that you want to be able to stop the threat of nuclear weapons while not starting World War III in the process.” Jon Herbst, a Republican, believes a harsher response is needed with Iran. e 35-year-old attorney was insulted that Ahmadinejad was allowed to spew his anti-Israel views on Yom Kippur, and he is convinced simple diplomacy won’t work. “I’m not sure what should be next, but a more severe stance by the U.S. needs to be taken,” he said. JT

725 Mount Wilson Lane | Pikesville, MD 21208 | www.NorthOaks.net | (410) 486-9090 100512

*all faiths welcomed

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

Ron Snyder is a JT staff reporter rsnyder@jewishtimes.com


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Worth e Schlep Community calendar for Oct. 5 to Oct. 12

Maryland women’s basketball coach Brenda Frese will be in Glen Burnie Oct. 9.

Provided

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Friday 05

Saturday 06

Sunday 07

Monday 08

Sugarloaf Festival: Handmade creations on sale. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., 2200 York Road, Timonium. Contact: sugarloafcrafts.com.

The Sukkah Party: Music, drinks, refreshments and fun in the Sukkah. 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., B’nai Israel Congregation, 27 Lloyd St. Baltimore. Cost: $5 cover and optional nonperishable food item for our food drive. Contact: biyabaltimore.org/ ticketsdonations.html or biyabaltimore@gmail.com.

Heart Health Screenings: Include blood pressure and cholesterol checks among other tests. 9 a.m., Northwest Hospital, 5401 Old Court Road, Randallstown. Cost: $20. Appointments are required. Contact: 410-6019355.

Jewish Legal Services Clinic: JCS offers free legal information, advice and referral services for Jewish individuals with limited income. 7-8:30 p.m., Jewish Community Services Building, 5750 Park Heights Ave. Contact: 410-4669200 or info@jcsbaltimore.org.

Tuesday 09

Wednesday 10

Thursday 11

Friday 12

Pikesville Farmers Market: Fruits, vegetables, jewelry and more. 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Office Depot, 1630 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville.

CineFest 2012: ‘Pinchas’ & ‘Strangers No More’: The second (‘Pinchas’) and third (‘Strangers No More’) films of CineFest 2012. 7:30 p.m., Owings Mills JCC, 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave., Owings Mills. Contact: Marilyn Zvili at 410-5593510 or mzvili@jcc.org.

Hospice and Bereavement Groups: Eight-week series begins for anyone mourning the death of a loved one. 7:30 p.m., Jewish Community Services Building, 5750 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Free, but preregistration is required. Contact: 410-466-9200.

Women’s Consignment Sale: Sell old clothes and/or and purchase new ones at up to 70 percent off the retail price. 9:30 a.m. Contact: sites.google.com/site/ marylandfashionexchange/home.

Evening with Maryland Basketball Coaches: Have dinner and meet the Terps’ Mark Turgeon and Brenda Frese. 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Michael’s Eighth Avenue, 7220 Grayburn Drive, Glen Burnie. Cost: $45 per ticket; $40 per person for table of 10. Contact: 410-727-1539, ext. 3033 or WhitneyE@BabeRuth Museum.com.

For a complete calendar listing, visit jewishtimes.com.

— Compiled by Ron Snyder jewishtimes.com

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Arts &Life |

1981: Graduates from college, begins working on cars full time

The Michael Levitas Track

1977: Enrolls at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla. 1987: Opens up gas station in Glen Burnie, serves as workshop

LIFE IN THE FAST LANE Pikesville resident grateful he gets to ‘play with cars’ for a living By David Snyder

36

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

Michael Levitas has been infatuated with all kinds of cars since well before he could actually see over a steering wheel. His foyer mantel displays framed pictures of his wife, his kids and his cars. A Porsche enthusiast, he says the sports car is designed for a sole purpose: having a really good time. He should know. Levitas, 54, has been immersed in the vehicle for nearly two decades as

a professional race car driver and as the president of his state-of-the-art race shop. Competing in Grand America Road Racing, Levitas, revving up to speeds as fast as 180 mph, has claimed 30 top-three finishes, including 12 victories, since 2001. In 2006, he and his race team captured the Rolex24, a day-long endurance race many consider to be the pinnacle of Grand-Am racing.


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Meanwhile, he’s combined his automotive passion with an engineering background to spearhead TPC Racing, a name widely recognized by the international Porsche community. The auto shop in Jessup specializes in developing and selling parts designed to make the German-made brand drive faster and handle better. TPC boasts clients from Saudi Arabia to Japan and even Israel. Levitas spoke with the JT about

Page 37

1995: Starts racing Porsche as an amateur driver

1999: Wins first Grand-Am race as a pro

1997: Goes professional as a Porsche driver

2002-2006: Boasting three cars, TPC Racing wins 26 races as team

how grateful he is for his success and explained physical grind that goes into driving a race car. He also tackled the obvious question: How does a Jewish guy from Pikesville ends up working on cars for a living?

LevItas: It didn’t really happen completely on purpose, but I’ve had an absolute love affair with cars since I was a kid. My father had been in auto salvage business, so I was exposed to

cars my entire life. I was at the salvage yard all the time. At w hat age did you st art going?

I started going with my father when I was 9 years old. I would play with the cars, and by the time I was 12 I was actually starting to build cars out of different parts. I used to literally take two cars and put them together and make one. By the time I had my first car, I was already changing engines constantly.

David Stuck

36-40-racecar:Layout 1

When did you go from the junkyard t o the race track?

Out of high school, I went to work in the family business and stayed doing that for about a year and decided, really by a neighbor’s advice, to go to college and get a great education. I went to an aviation university because I also loved airplanes. I went Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. At the time they had two campuses. ere was one in Daytona Beach and See Life In e Fast Lane on page 38 jewishtimes.com

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Life In e Fast Lane om page 37

one in Arizona. I ended up deciding on Daytona because I thought it would be way cooler to be at the beach than in the mountains. … It was a really great place for me to learn a lot more and understand the foundations of it and get into engineering. How did airplanes get you into auto racin g?

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

While I was at school the [Daytona International] Speedway was at the back entrance of the college. Every day I was at the speedway watching any testing with the race cars and started to really fall in love with the racing side. I found myself working on cars while I was at college. Right out of college, I did a lot of work for Nissan and Mazda’s racing for International Motor Sports Association road racing. at’s where the sports cars were. You’d see incredible sports cars. I le Riddle in 1985, and it was the end of the turbo era. e automotive side needed people with an aviation background because the automotive people didn’t have the proper education for the turbo supercharging.

but I was setting myself up for what was to become my involvement in racing. Where w as your break in becoming a race car driver?

My break came in 1987. I opened a gas station so I’d have a base to work out of. I started to work on Mazdas, Nissans, preparing cars. I had a real big love affair with Porsche cars. I saw them at the racetrack, and they were just an incredible car company, and they had a fantastic product. … I wanted to go pro in 1997 to see how I measured up against the rest of the world. In 1999 I started racing a [Porsche] 9-11 full time. Can you describe the thrill you get from racing?

I use it as an excuse to say it’s a testbed for what I get to do, but in reality I absolutely love it. I love competition. I just love measuring myself up against what other people are trying to be the best at. I absolutely love the thrill of putting on a helmet and engaging in wheel-to-wheel action. It’s quite exciting. To do it is beyond exhilarating. It’s truly an amazing sport.

So what y ou studied helped get you involved in auto racing because that ’s what they needed at the time?

Are the phy sical rigors of auto racing underst ated?

It was all pre-emptive. I didn’t know it,

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physical attribute of it is unbelievable. You are using every bit of energy that you have, every bit of focus, concentration. e amount of mental energy you use on the track is unbelievable. It’s like playing chess at speed. Describe your facility in Jessup.

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We do that because you may be a customer of ours, but the majority of customers come to us to enhance their car — to make it that much better in handling. Our customers are Porsche enthusiasts. Occasionally I’ll get the call, ‘What does this do to my warranty?’ The utility of a Porsche car is a sports car. Not the warranty. If you want a warranty, get a minivan. If you buy a sports car, you get it to only do one thing — have fun. So basically you’re dealing with Porsche fanatics like y ou rself?

Absolutely. My job, if I had to typify it, I’m not actually busy, I spend my day playing with cars as a living. People pay me to play with cars and I’m grateful for that.

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My love affair with it has not changed from when I was a kid. I can’t really see the day that I don’t drive a race car. I’d say I’ve got at least got another 15- to-20-year shelf life. JT

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| Arts &Life

MAN ON A MISSION Italian Pianist revives music created in concentration camps By Ruth Ellen Gruber

TRANI, Italy — Francesco Lotoro resurrects the music of the dead. Since 1991 the Italian pianist has traveled the world to seek out and bring to light symphonies, songs, sonatas, operas, lullabies and even jazz riffs that were composed and oen performed in Nazi-era concentration camps. “This music is part of the cultural heritage of humanity,” Lotoro, 48, said after a concert in Trani, a port town in southern Italy that featured surprisingly lively cabaret songs composed in the camps at Westerbork in the Netherlands and Terezin (Theresienstadt) near Prague. The concert formed part of Lech Lecha, a weeklong Jewish culture festival in early September that took place in Trani and nine other towns in the Apulia region, the heel of Italy’s boot. “When I started seeking out this music, my interest was based on curiosity, on passion,” said Lotoro, who was the festival’s artistic director. “I felt that someone had to do it — and that someone was myself. Today it has become a mission.” Lotoro has collected original scores, copies and even old recordings of some 4,000 pieces of what he calls “concentrationary music” — music

written in the concentration camps, death camps, labor camps, POW camps and other internment centers set up between 1933, when Dachau was established, and the end of World War II. In the 1990s he formed an orchestra to perform the pieces, and in 2001 he began recording the compositions. A selection was released earlier this year in a 24-CD boxed set called “KZ Musik,” or “The Encyclopedia of Concentrationary Music.” (KZ is the German abbreviation for concentration camp.) Some of the pieces have long been known, including music by several prominent composers who were interned in Terezin. The Nazis used Terezin, a ghetto concentration and transit camp, as a propaganda tool, allowing cultural life to develop. Other musical pieces, however, had been long lost or totally forgotten until Lotoro deciphered, transcribed and arranged them. Many compositions had been jotted down in notebooks or scribbled in letters or on scraps of paper. In the Pankrac prison in Prague, the Czech composer Rudolf Karel scrawled music on sheets of toilet paper. “People continued to create despite being in those places,” Lotoro said.

Francesco Lotoro introduces a concert of cabaret music composed in concentration camps during Lech Lecha, a Jewish cultural festival in Trani, Italy.

“These composers felt that the camp was probably the last place they would be alive, and so they made a will, a testament. “They had nothing material to leave,” he said, “only their heart, only their mind, only the music. And so they left the music to future generations. It is a great testament of the heart.” Jews who were killed in the Shoah wrote most of the music that Lotoro has collected. But his collection also includes pieces by Quakers, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Roma (Gypsies), political prisoners, homosexuals and others held in camps and prisons as far afield as Asia. He also has music written by German officers and troops in POW camps run by Allied powers and

music written by American GIs held captive by the Japanese. “Everybody made music, wrote music,” Lotoro said. “Because, you know, music is a social phenomenon. You can be a musician as an amateur; you can improvise, you can play the harmonica. Of course, there are the great composers and musicians. But music is all of this, from amateur to professional.” Lotoro, who lives in the town of Barletta, near Trani, and teaches at a music conservatory, believes he is descended from Jews who were forced to convert to Christianity centuries ago. He was drawn to Judaism as a teenager; he and his wife formally converted in 2004. But Lotoro said this was not the See Man On A Mission on page 42 jewishtimes.com

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Man On A Mission from page 41 reason he began his search for the lost concentration camp music. “Of course, as a Jew, I now feel that this is a mitzvah; it is something I have to do,” he said. “But I think that if I had not become Jewish I would have done this anyway.”

“MUSIC IS A SOCIAL PHENOMENON.”

His first foray to seek out music came long before his conversion. It was a 1991 trip to Terezin, where imprisoned composers such as Viktor Ullmann and Gideon Klein — both killed at Auschwitz — had written works, such as Ullmann’s opera “The Emperor of Atlantis,” that already had become part of the international musical repertoire. “I started there because I thought it would be easier,” Lotoro recalled. “But from Terezin I went on to research other former camps in the region, and at the end of three weeks I had to buy another suitcase to bring home all the material I found.” Since then he has scoured antiquarian bookshops, catalogs, archives, libraries, museums, private collections and other holdings in more than a dozen countries for traces of lost music. Along the way he has amassed a trove of 13,000 items: scores, notebooks, papers, diaries, microfilms, photocopies, photographs, 42

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

Photos Ruth Ellen Gruber

— Francesco Lotoro

Dancers celebrate outside the 13th-century Scolanova synagogue in Trani during Lech Lecha.

recordings and other material that he continues to sift through, catalog and sometimes reconstruct. He hopes to load all the pieces he has found onto a digital database for posterity. As part of his research, Lotoro has consulted with scholars who specialize in the music of the Holocaust and also has interviewed some of the few surviving musicians as well as relatives of those who perished. But he has carried out most of the work on

his own. “It is yet another testament to Italian creativity — the ability to address such global issues from a relatively ‘remote’ place, and as a single-handed initiative,” Francesco Spagnolo, an Italian musicologist who is the curator at the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life in Berkeley, Calif., said. Much of Lotoro’s work also has been self-financed. Although he has received some grants over the years,

he said he had gone into debt and even taken out a second mortgage on his home to cover costs. Still, Lotoro said, he must continue. “I cannot stop because if I stop, all the research stops automatically,” he said. “And how many works are still out there that I haven’t found? How many works am I missing? How many will I be able to save?” JT Ruth Ellen Gruber writes for the JTA Wire Service.


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Way Back When M. Hirsh Goldberg

The Colts’ Jewish Roots The recent passing of Art Modell, the beloved Jewish-born owner of the Ravens, is a reminder that pro football in this town has had two-and-a half Jewish owners. Two-and-a half ? The first was Carroll Rosenbloom, who in 1952 organized a group to buy the faltering Dallas franchise and bring it here. Under his stewardship, the renamed Baltimore Colts went on to an astonishing 15-year achievement from 1957 to 1971 with three NFL championships, no losing seasons and a record of 138-59-5. Included was winning “The Greatest Game Ever Played,” a 23-17 sudden-death victory over the New York Giants in 1958. The second Jewish owner was, of course, Modell, whose Ravens won the Super Bowl in 2001. So who was the ‘half ’ Jewish owner? Robert Irsay bought the Colts in 1972 and moved them secretly, in the middle of the night, to Indianapolis in March 1984. His teams in Baltimore had 12 losing records and a sorry record of 78-1401-1. Irsay was known and reviled as a man of abusive behavior, driven to reportedly alcohol-induced rages against players, government officials, business associates and family members, especially his father. At the age of 30, he had a major falling out with his father and never talked to him again. He also was known as a liar, especially about his background. Irsay said he was born a Catholic. But it eventually emerged that his parents were Jewish immigrants from Hungary, who had raised him and his siblings as Jews. Irsay denied all this, saying his father was his stepfather and pointed out he married a Polish Catholic and raised his children as Catholics. In a 1986 Sports Illustrated article that first broke the story, a vice president of one of Irsay’s companies

TANNEN MAURY/EPA/Newscom

‘Catholic’ Jim Irsay embraces what his father soundly rejected

Jim Irsay acknowledges that "my Jewish heritage did have an influence on me."

was quoted as speculating that “after Bob left his father, he began trying to deny his Jewishness.” Irsay’s son, Jim, has run the team since his father’s death in 1997 in a totally different manner. He has long recognized and apologized for his father’s abusive ways. The difference in the father and son’s behavior and the results achieved has been striking. Under the son’s leadership, the Indianapolis Colts have become among the most successful franchises in the NFL, winning a Super Bowl and becoming valued at $1 billion. Jim’s Jewish background was long hidden from him. He did not discover his Jewish roots until he was 14, when someone told him he had Jewish relatives. His mother then confirmed his father was Jewish, Jim said in a 2007 interview with the Jewish website ynetnews.com. “I was raised as a Catholic, but Judaism is a significant part of who I am,” he said. He went on to learn “a lot about my heritage.” “There is no doubt that my Jewish heritage did have an influence on me. As a kid, I didn’t have the chance to experience the ceremonial side of it, but

I was certainly intrigued with the Jewish tradition and its values, and it had a significant role in my spiritual growth,” he noted. Jim Irsay’s desire to learn more about his Jewish connection resulted in his discovering an astonishing fact. The family name was originally Israel. “I was born as Jim Irsay ... but from what I’ve found out, I have reason to believe that when my grandparents came to Ellis Island their family name was Israel.” Robert Irsay/Israel’s problem with Judaism may have been a result of his dramatic break with his own father, according to Jim. “The fracture was so deep that I think if my grandfather had been Catholic, my father would probably have converted to Judaism.” JT

M. Hirsh Goldberg is a public relations consultant and the author of five nationally published books as well as commissioned family biographies. His email is mhgoldberg@comcast.net.

jewishtimes.com

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

Sukkot is synonymous with impermanence. The sukkah itself is a temporary structure, exemplified by the schach fashioned from cut branches or bamboo. The lulav and etrog, too, are procured each year, fresh green and yellow representing the bountiful harvest for which our ancestors prayed during this season of fertility. The aravot (willow branches) are perhaps the best example of just how impermanent things can be since anyone who purchases his/her own lulav understands that these are nearly impossible to keep fresh throughout the length of the festival. Our sages also selected the literature of Sukkot with an eye toward the ephemeral. Each year on Shabbat of Sukkot we read Kohelet (Ecclesiastes), who relates: “I multiplied my possessions. I built myself houses and I planted vineyards. But all is naught” (2:4). He opines that life is “futile” (1:2) and ein kol hadash tachat hashamesh, “there is nothing new under the sun” (1:9). As we sit in our sukkah, which by definition must be open to the sun and the elements, we have an appreciation for the impermanence of things, how so much in the world withers and eventually is no more. This is why the Torah reading for Shabbat Hol Hamoed Sukkot is so striking. Because, the sedra, which mentions Sukkot explicitly only at the end, makes abundantly clear in its earlier narrative that God is the ultimate exception to the rule of impermanence. e scene: Moses has just convinced God not to destroy the Jewish people. Moses is feeling pretty good, perhaps even a bit cocky. He calls out to the Holy One: “Oh, let me behold Your Presence!” (33:18).

But God makes clear that no one can see the Divine face. Instead, Moses must remain in a cleft of the rock while God passes before him. What is it, then, that Moses perceives? God’s “achorei,” God’s wake, the imprint resulting from God’s presence in the world. This is the paradox: God endures, but our perception does not. The world is in process — ever evolving, as crops, materials and people are born and pass away, are created and destroyed — and we take some comfort in the notion that God leaves an impression. But even this impression seems to fade like a footprint that, exposed to wind, water and time, begins to melt back into its surroundings. If the natural world is a place where we only fleetingly see the result of God’s creative power, what lasts? The answer comes in the very next verse of our Torah portion, where God instructs Moses to “carve two tablets of stone like the first” (34:1). Torah lasts. Parchment and ink wear out over time. Even the stone on which the Ten Commandments were inscribed can be broken and fade to dust. But the word and will of God, these endure beyond their material garments. Sukkot, like Kohelet, reminds us that life ought to be enjoyed because none of us can predict how long things might last. Torah reminds us that life’s enjoyment is no hedonistic pursuit but a holy one since holy words and ideas are etched into the very fabric of the universe. JT

Rabbi Daniel Cotzin Burg is the spiritual leader of Beth Am Synagogue.


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rude to cancel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the least interested I had ever been on a date,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew I wanted to date Jodi exclusively.â&#x20AC;? Jacob was different from the other guys Jodi had met. Many shied away from her because of a speech diorder. Jodi stutters. But for Jacob, it was not a factor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We get along perfectly, because I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a lot to say,â&#x20AC;? said Jacob, a relationship banker with M&T Bank. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By the time she speaks, I can think of something.â&#x20AC;? Jacob finds Jodi entertaining, thoughtful and, of course, pretty. They enjoy watching sports together, going out to dinner and movies and traveling. Jodi, a correspondence specialist with Bill Me Later/PayPal, finds Jacob funny. About a year into their relationship, thoughts of marriage entered Jodiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mind. For Jacob, who is slightly younger, it took a little longer before his purchase of an engagement ring. Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan was to propose with both families out to dinner. Instead,

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Timothy and Michele (McCloskey) Shirah were married on June 23, 2012 at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. Debra Slayton officiated. Michele is the daughter of Howard and Sabrina Friedman and Michael and Julie McCloskey and granddaughter of Samuel Nass and the late Lucille Nass. Timothy is the son of James and Debra Wiles and grandson of Otto and Yvonne Alberg. e maids of honor were Allyson Luckman and Allison Alexander, and

the bridesmaids were Jamie Grandizio, Julie Hess, Sarah Raifman and Alexis Haycra. e best men were Donald Smith and Travis Huff, and the groomsmen were Ben Warnock, Tyler Caskill, Mac Oul, Patrick Nolen and Josh Wiles. Timothy and Michele met at college while attending James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va. Timothy works at McCormick and Co., and Michele is a first-grade teacher at Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School. e couple honeymooned in Costa Rica and currently resides in Timonium.

Now serving recipes, restaurants, Kosher tips and kitchen tricks. Every Friday in the new JT.

46

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

McMichael —Lambert Carol Stern McMichael of Merion, Pa., announces the marriage of her son, David Stern McMichael, to Evan David Lambert, son of Linda Seaman Lambert, of Owings Mills, Md. The ceremony took place at the Mayflower Hotel on July 6, 2012, in Washington, D.C. Rabbi Elissa Sachs-Kohen of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation officiated. Standing up for the grooms were Elizabeth Joan McMichael and Eric Schulman. e wedding party also included Meredith Larrabee, Sara Sherman,

Jeffrey Lasser, Becky Silberman, Kelsey Young, Bradley Mighdoll, Monique Lubaton and Emily Heimsoth. Witnessing the ketubah signing were Eric Schulman and Philip Fink. Evan and David are 2010 graduates of the University of Maryland. Evan is the grandson of Benjamin Seaman and the late Helene Seaman. David is the grandson of the late Horace and Joan Stern of Elkins Park, Pa. After a honeymoon in Spain, the couple now resides in Orlando, Fla., where Evan is a reporter for WKMG Channel 6 News.


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Special Anniversary

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This film is rated R. Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian. No purchase necessary. Supplies limited. Two tickets per person. Each ticket admits one. Seating is limited and not guaranteed. Employees of promotional partners are ineligible. Decisions final.

On Sept. 28, 2012, Dotsie and Sheldon Sherman (formerly of Baltimore) celebrated 65 years of marriage with loving family and friends in Deerfield Beach, Fla., where they currently reside. Their children, grandchildren and great-grandchild wish them only the best for this glorious milestone. argothemovie.warnerbros.com

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Thank You, Child Trauma Network: From left, Janice Goldwater of Adoptions Together and Betsy Krieger and Karen Kreisberg of the Zanvyl and Isabelle Krieger Fund receive an award for their investment in building the capacity of the child welfare community in Baltimore City through the establishment of the Child Trauma Network. The award was presented at the Association for Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children (ATTACh) luncheon, part of the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual conference, which ran from Sept. 19 to Sept. 22 at the Sheraton, Inner Harbor.

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Around The Block: Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School celebrated the start of fall with its annual block party. On Sunday, Sept. 23, more than 800 people turned out to enjoy a catered barbecue, amusement-park rides, pony rides, arts and crafts, a silent auction and vendor displays. Pictured is Beth Tfiloh third-grader Lexi Hariri, who is enjoying a pony ride.

jewishtimes.com

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Obituaries

Pikesville • 3765 Old Court Road 410-602-6292

Sunday deliveries available EdibleArrangements.com

082611

Items sold from these locations are kosher certified only when bearing the Star K (pareve) or Star D (dairy) label.

A

W.S. TEGELER Monument Co. Div. of Tegeler Enterprises, Inc. 410-944-0300

MONUMENTS, MARKERS, BRONZE MARKERS, CEMETERY LETTERING

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we can help.

042505

The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives and diminishing suffering from cancer throughresearch, education, advocacy, and service. It is one of the oldest and largest voluntary health agencies in the United States, with over two million Americans united to conquer cancer through balanced programs of research, education,patient service, advocacy, and rehabilitation.

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR Israel ? When it’s 6 p.m. in Baltimore, it’s already tomorrow in Jerusalem. Keep up 24/7 @jewishtimes.com.

48

RABINOWITZ — On September 27, 2012, RUTH D. (nee Engel); wife of the late Laurence Rabinowitz; mother of Wendy ( John) Hagerty and the late Nona Debra Rabinowitz; sister of Edith Goldman and the late Ralph Engel; cherished grandmother of Matthew, Jillian and Ellen Hagerty. Interment at Hebrew Young Mens Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society 100 Painters Mill Road, Suite 800, Owings Mills, MD 21117.

GENENDLIS — On September 25, 2012, SAUL; beloved husband of Elaine Genendlis (nee Strauss); dear father of Mona (Philip) Canter and Robin (Leo) Korotki; loving grandfather of Ariel Canter and Matthew Korotki. Interment at Mikro Kodesh Beth Israel Cemetery, 6700 Bowleys Lane. Please omit flowers.

RIVKIN – On September 24, 2012, ROBERT MARK; beloved husband of Jeanne Rivkin (nee Woodward); father of Richard (Brandy) Rivkin, Faye Rivkin (Marcos Vera) and the late James Michael Lloyd (and his fiancee Laura Doan); brother of Rabbi Bruce (Brocha) Rivkin and Alan (Ilene) Rivkin; grandfather of Christopher Lloyd, Briana Coghill, Alanna Rivkin, Ashlyn Rivkin and Nicholas Lloyd. Interment at Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the American Lung Association, 211 E. Lombard St., #260, Baltimore, MD 21202.

OKUM — On September 27, 2012, ALFRED J.; husband of the late Fanny Mae Okum (nee Neuburger); loving father of Dr. Margi E. Okum, Teddy L. Okum and Dr. Gary S. Okum; cherished brother of the late Murray Okum; devoted brother-inlaw of Arnold and Elke Neuburger; loving grandfather of Kelli, Kevin and Samantha Okum. Interment at Bnai Israel Cemetery, 3701 Southern Ave. Please omit flowers.

No matter who you are,

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ANDRES — On September 23, 2012, DR. REUBIN; beloved husband of Amelia Andres (nee Cristol); devoted father of Julie (Allen) Schwait, Clay (Katharine) Andres, Laurence Andres (Sharon McNamara) and omas Andres; devoted brother of the late Dave Andres and Norman Andres; loving grandfather of Daniel Schwait, Timo, Guthrie, Hattie, Wells, Shaina and Rachel Andres. Interment is private. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Shriver Hall Concerts, 3400 N. Charles St., Suite 105, Baltimore, MD 21218.

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

SETZER — On September 25, 2012, MIRIAM (nee Cohen); devoted wife of Isadore Setzer; cherished mother of Barbara Setzer and Wendy ( Jeffrey

Vock) Setzer; cherished sister of the late William, Larry and Jacob Cohen; beloved grandmother of Tami Goldfadim, Syeira ( Jason) Anthony, Bron (Nena) Goldfadim, Zoe Vock and Benjamin Vock; adored great-grandmother of Madalyn Anthony. Interment at Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. Please omit flowers. WEINER — On September 28, 2012, ARTHUR; husband of the late Diane Weiner (nee Bentz); former husband of the late Merelyn Paul (nee Brozer); loving father of Terry (Thomas) Pribble; grandpop of Andrea (Matthew) Gwin; great-grandpop of Jack Thomas Gwin; dear brother of Morton “Chick” Weiner and the late Sidney, Bernard and Rose Weiner. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Interment at Beth Tfiloh Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the Baltimore Humane Society, 1601 Nicodemus Rd., Reisterstown, MD 21136 or the American Cancer Society, 8219 Town Center Dr., Baltimore, MD 21236 or Gilchrist Hospice Care, 11311 McCormick Road, Suite 350, Hunt Valley, MD 21031. To help keep you continually informed, the BALTIMORE J EWISH TIMES is updating obituaries frequently on its website. Please visit jewishtimes.com/ Milestones/obituary.stm.

Community

Beth El Presents World-Renowned Cantors More Advocacy for Campus Coalition Beth El Congregation will present the Cantors’ Concert on Sunday, Oct. 21 at 7 p.m. in the Offit Auditorium at Beth El Congregation, 8101 Park Heights Ave. The concert will feature internationally acclaimed Cantor Gideon Zelermyer from Montreal and Beth El Cantor Thom King. Cantor Zelermyer has been the hazzan of Congregation Shaar Hashomayim in Montreal since 2004. He has performed for many of Canada’s leading political figures and is in great demand worldwide as a concert artist. Cantor King has been the cantor at Beth El Congregation since 1997. He also has performed internationally, both as a cantor and in opera and musical theater. Advance tickets are $10 for members and $15 for nonmembers, $18 at the door. For more information, call Yvonne Pentove at 410-484-0411 or emailYvonne@bethelbalto.com.

After a decade of Israel advocacy leadership and on-campus programming, the Israel on Campus Coalition is ushering in a new era of advocacy with the launch of Ask Herzl, an online project that will help students and professionals develop and implement more effective strategies on their campuses. Ask Herzl (AskHerzl.com) allows students and professionals to share strategies, programs and resources that have been effective on their campuses with each other and the wider Israel community. Users will be able to rate the quality of programs and help identify the best activities for all who visit the Ask Herzl site. Ask Herzl will be available to anyone involved in Israel programming, and users can submit resources for the Israel community to see, share, critique and “like.” For more information, visit israelcc.org.


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Community

Summer Camp For Science, Technology The Reform Movement has announced the first Jewish specialty camp for science and technology. The new Union for Reform Judaism camp, called the URJ 6 Points Science Academy, will open in the summer of 2014 in Boston and serve as many as 600 campers in grades 6-10 over three two-week sessions per summer. The URJ 6 Points Science Academy will build on the growing interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and serve as an on-ramp into Jewish camping for unaffiliated and currently unengaged Jewish families who have not been attracted to the classic Jewish summer camp model. For more information, visit urjcamps.org.

‘Uncle Pete with Kids’ at Rainbow eatre Rainbow Theatre at Slayton House in the Village of Wilde Lake, Columbia continues its season series with a special performance by “Uncle Pete with Kids” on Friday, Oct.12 at 10 a.m. This unique and energetic musical performance is for the whole family. Advance tickets are $5, $6 at the door (exact cash or check only). For more information, call 410-730-3987, email wlevents@columbiavillages.org or visit BrownPaperTickets.com.

L.A.’s Judy Wexler at An Die Musik Los Angeles vocalist Judy Wexler, whose third CD, “Under a Painted Sky,” was released last year, will be performing at An die Musik (409 N. Charles St.) on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 8 p.m. Appearing with her will be pianist Mark Soskin, who has performed or recorded with a diverse group of musicians such as Sonny Rollins, Joe Henderson, Tony Williams, Sheila Jordan and Stanley Turrentine. For more information, visit andiemusiklive.com.

This year’s Maryland Home and Garden Show will run from Friday, Oct. 19 through Sunday, Oct. 21 at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. The event will highlight the most creative ideas for fall projects and holiday decorating, plus provide a weekend of entertainment and education. Tickets are $9 for adults, $7 for seniors, $3 for kids ages 6-12 and free for children under 6. Admission is also free for active military as well as police and fire employees with proper ID. For more information, visit mdhomeandgarden.com.

Mount Clare Museum Seeks Volunteers Do you enjoy 18th-century history and the decorative arts? Do you want to meet new people while building your own public-speaking skills? If this sounds like you, apply to be a volunteer interpreter at Mount Clare Museum House in Baltimore. Volunteer interpreters provide visitors with meaningful museum experiences. Schedules are flexible and require two days a month. For more information and to apply, visit mountclare.org or call Liz Otey at 410-837-3262, ext. 105.

Get Kids Gardening! A great way to get kids started in the garden is the national Bonnie Plants 3rd Grade Cabbage Program. It’s free to any third-grade classroom in the country, and teachers can register at bonniecabbageprogram.com. In 2002, Bonnie Plants initiated the 3rd Grade Cabbage Program with a mission to inspire a love of vegetable gardening in young people. Each year, Bonnie trucks more than one million free O.S. (oversized) Cross cabbage plants to third-grade classrooms across the country. Teachers distribute 2-inch plants with instructions, provided by Bonnie, for students to carry home and grow. At the end of the growing season, teachers select a class winner, and that submission is entered in a state scholarship drawing worth $1,000. For more information, contact Green Earth Media Group at 203-292-8820.

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Full-Service Catering Now Available Contact Joe or Mark at 410.484.7775 We also deliver to Columbia, Annapolis & surrounding areas.

jewishtimes.com

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LEGAL NOTICES Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice to Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

WE share WITH FRIENDS.

Estate of (169930) Leo John Nelson Notice is given that RICHARD L. NELSON, 1615 Chestnut St., Whiteford, Maryland 21160, was on September 11, 2012 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Leo John Nelson who died on August 10, 2012, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 11th day of March 2013. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. RICHARD L. NELSON Personal Representative GRACE G. CONNOLLY Register of Wills for Baltimore County, Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204-4403.

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Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

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&YQFSU 4FSWJDF  *OTUBMMBUJPO 7IVZMRK XLI 'SQQYRMX] 7MRGI 

'"3/&/  %&3.&3 */$ 

â&#x20AC;˘ Furniture â&#x20AC;˘ Yard Waste â&#x20AC;˘ Basements and Attics

â&#x20AC;˘ Appliances â&#x20AC;˘ Sheds â&#x20AC;˘ Light Moving

www.haulawaymd.com

# $%%$

54

J EWISH TI M ES.

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

!#  $ %  #  !&# !' %# &(  $&# !% %# #$$&# $ 



  

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WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR Israel ? When itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 6 p.m. in Baltimore, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already tomorrow in Jerusalem. Keep up 24/7 @jewishtimes.com.

410-526-6000 S U B S C R I B E TO T H E

â&#x20AC;˘ Seamless Gutter â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Gutter â&#x20AC;˘ Historic Restoration â&#x20AC;˘ Repairs

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S amazing WHAT PEOPLE ARE LOOKING FOR. T

POWER WASHING

You Name It We Haul It!

NO SUBCONTRACTING 410-876-3602 www.thomasroofing.net

FREE ESTIMATES â&#x20AC;˘ 410-356-4722 â&#x20AC;˘ BERT KATZ

Residential Commercial

10% OFF For New Clients Free Estimates â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded & Insured

MHIC# 16432

FINE INTERIOR PAINTING

ARISTA CUSTOM

HAULING

FURNITURE

YAAKOV'S

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR SERVICES

ROOFING

Master Electrician

PAINTING

ELECTRIC

MARC BALOTIN

CA LL

410-902-2300 ( B A LT I M O R E

AR EA) OR

Selling? Buyers are flocking to the JTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Amazing Marketplace. To advertise, call 410-902-2326. 888-809-0085 ( TO LL

FR E E)


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•‘ ›‘— –Š‹ you’ve Šƒ† ƒ

TRAVEL / SHOWS

TRAVEL & LEISURE

EVERY DAY TO NEW YORK

ALL INCLUSIVE PACKAGE Oct. 14-18: Toronto/Niagara Falls Guided Tour. 5 Days 4 Nights. Nov. 18th: Ravens at Pittsburgh Dec. 11: Radio City Music Hall

FARE SPECIAL - ONE-WAY FARE

tough †ƒ›ǫ

ERIOR TO SUPPERIOR SERVIURS CE SU WE h NYC!

Providing uplifting programs for critically ill children. Help us help kids with cancer, Tay Sachs Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and others.

443.568.0064

CaseyCaresFoundation.org

(DIFFERENT DAY TRAVEL) Baltimore - New York: $38 New York - Baltimore: $38 ROUND TRIP FARE (SAME DAY TRAVEL) Baltimore - New York - Baltimore: $63

Charter Available for All Occasions 410.602.1704 • www.superiortours.net

ATLANTIC CITY! Trump Taj Mahal Hotel December 24th-25th

SHARE WHERE EVEN Bubbe CAN “LIKE” IT. T

Incl. Bus, Meals, Hotel & Casino Rebates. Call Marilyn: 410-486-3888 marilynspe@gmail.com The JT mistakenly listed the incorrect venue in last week’s edition. Our apologies for any confusion this may have caused.

EMPLOYMENT

Word travels fast these days – don’t let your unwired loved ones feel left out!

To share your good news in the new JT, call 410-902-2326.

443-712-1486

jewishtimes.com

55


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MARKETPLACE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES I BUY ONE item or entire estate. Cash/ Consignment. Joseph: 443-695-4707 MR. BOB’S ANTIQUES. Buying now. Antique furniture through 1950ís. $Silver-jewelry-lampsclocks-watches-complete estates. 410-371-3675

APPLIANCE REPAIR APPLIANCE DOCTOR -Repairs all major home appliances. Shlomo Roshgadol 410-358-2707.

CLEANING SERVICES SCRUB-A-DUB CLEANING, Inc. 20yrs of quality service. Bonded/ Insured. 410-667-8714. IMPRESSIVE RESIDENTIAL CLEANING: Pikesville/ Owings Mills etc. References. Saturday availability. 410-622-9192 EXPERIENCED CLEANER: No job too small. 10 yrs local experience. 443-253-5270.

ELECTRICAL SERVICES MARC ELECTRIC MASTER ELECTRICIAN LICENSED in Baltimore City, Baltimore County & Carroll County. Master Electrician in Baltimore City & County. Decorative lighting, house, power and repairs. Marc Balotin. 410-922-7081. SEE MY AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY.

RYAN HOME CARE. We are here because we care. 443-207-2648 RELIABLE IN-HOME 24/7 CARE. 25-years serving your community. Excellent references, dependable. 443-804-8887 LOOKING FOR SOMEONE to care for your loved ones? Look no further. Call Jackie 410-209-7244 QUALITY CARING CNA available. Low rates/ All shifts. Dependable. Great References. 410-493-9319

SIMCHA’S MOVING LLC. Residential and commercial. Please call 410-358-7636, 866-764-MOVE(6683)

BEST PRICES on custom blinds, upholstery, draperies. Installation, repairs, drapery cleaning. 410-526-2744

FURNITURE

PAINTING & WALLCOVERING

ARISTA CUSTOM FURNITURE: Make your design a reality! Serving the Baltimore area for over 22 years. Call Gus: 410-371-1589 SEE OUT AD IN SERVICE DIRECTORY

ARTIST HOME IMPROVEMENT painting interior/exterior, Powerwashing, drywall repair, carpentry work. License#19441. 410-282-1579

HANDYMAN

HAULING & MOVING LIGHT HAULING, MOVING: Attics, basements, garages, estates. Robert 443-739-5914/ 410-526-5805 LIONEL’S HAULING. YARD/ basement/ garage cleaning. Reasonable rates. 410-484-8614/ 443-604-4002

INTERIOR/ EXTERIOR Painting, Wallpapering, Wall paper removal, decorative moldings. Free estimates. MHIC #44233. Call Yaakov. 410-484-8350. SEE MY AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY. THE PAINT MAN INC. Interior/ exterior. Dry wall, power washing, wallpaper removal. Free estimates. 410-710-8245. FINE INTERIOR PAINTING Decorator colors, paper hanging and removal. Graduate of Maryland Institute of Art. Free Estimates. MHIC #26124 Bert Katz 410-356-4722 FELIKS LEYBENGRUB. BEST of Baltimore 2004. 410-916-2083 MHIC # 49059

PLUMBING

PROMPT HAULING. Estate clean-outs, apartments, basements, and attics. Gary 443-564-8487

MARK IOFFE PLUMBING. Reasonable, prompt, reliable. 410-356-6078 MD. Lic. 7305.

HAUL AWAY: Prompt professional affordable. Residential/ commercial. Insured/ bonded. Free estimates. SEE OUR AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY. 410-526-6000 www.haulawaymd.com

PRESSURE WASHING

HOME COMPANION CARE NEEDED CAREGIVER/HOUSKEEPER for 20 year-old autistic son, low-functioning, but well-behaved. Does not speak, but can type/read words to some extent. Husband, wife and son live in a singlefamily home in the Pikesville/Owings Mills area, with a separate au pair suite with bedroom and full bathroom. Attends school Monday through Friday. At minimum, needs to be watched after school until 6-8 PM; potentially other times. Contact: Baltimore_Family@yahoo.com

INSTRUCTION & TUTORING

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

WINDOW TREATMENTS

CASH FOR CARS. ALL MAKES/MODELS. ANY CONDITION. FREE TOWING. 443-829-5130

FOREVER FINISHED PAINTING & HOME REMODELLING: Terrific Fall pricing specials! 443-759-0886 MHIC#093879

56

UPSCALE ANTIQUE FURNITURE AND COLLECTIBLE SHOP NEEDS CONSIGNMENT MERCHANDISE. 410-702-7149

DISCOUNT DRAPERIES Rods, Verticals, Mini- blinds. Drapery cleaning, restringing, repair, installation. Norman Goldschmitt 410-358-1651

HOME IMPROVEMENT

jewishtimes.com

MR. BOB’S ANTIQUES. Buying now. Antique furniture through 1950ís. $Silver-jewelry-lampsclocks-watches-complete estates. 410-371-3675

ABBA MOVING LLC. Full service. Local/Long Distance. Insured. Free estimates. 410-281-6066

HANDYMAN- FOR THOSE little jobs the big guys won’t do! David 410-239-7455.

CARING PRIVATE DUTY NURSE OR COMPANION SEEKING WORK 7PM—7AM OR 10PM-6AM. EVENING SHIFTS. DEPENDABLE, DRIVES, ERRANDS & HOUSE CLEANING W/EXCELLENT LOCAL REFERENCES. AVAILABLE NOW! 410-523-4840

LOOKING TO BUY

ATTENTION MD BUILDERS: 263 Fullyapproved lots. Great for rentals.$9,000/lot. 732-887-9650

COMPUTER SERVICES

ELDER CARE

1950’S, 60’S, 70’S, Modern. Furniture, art, lighting, etc. Robert 410-960-8622

MOVING

IRV’S HANDYMAN SERVICE No job too small. Free estimates, prompt service. MHIC#77548. 410-486-7454

MY PC MEDIC: Mild mannered corporate IT manager by day & Pikesville’s super computer mentsch by night! Why wait in line for a geek? House-calls on evenings or weekends. Our solutions will fit your budget! *See our ad in the Service Directory. 410-929-9985. www.mypcmedicmd.com

WANTED TO BUY

GROUNDSCAPE INC. For all your lawn and landscaping needs. Fall cleanup, planting, mulching etc. 410-415-LAWN/ MHIC#126283

FOR SALE

MAJESTY CLEANING SERVICE: Residential & Commercial Cleaning. Bonded and Insured. 443-405-4055

COMPUTER SERVICES. Virus-removal, repairing, networking, installing, upgrading. Reasonable rates. Microsoft certified. Quick response. Jeff 410-484-2975

LANDSCAPING

CELLO LESSONS IN YOUR HOME: All ages, Peabody & Eastman Graduate. 410-913-2123 cellolessons4you@gmail.com

SPARKLY CLEAN PRESSURE WASHING: Fully Insured Hot-Water Pressure Washing. Commercial & Residential. We bring our own water. 410-977-9165 www.SparklyCleanPressurewashing.com

SOCIAL CLUBS LOCAL DRIVER WANTED FOR ERRANDS AND APPOINTMENTS: 410-764-0072

TRANSPORTATION EXPERIENCED MATURE WOMAN seeks position as companion/personal assistant. Excellent References. Has own transportation 443-271-4616. DRIVER-LICENSED TAXI OWNER: 20 years-experience. Professional,dependable, courteous. Airports, trains, buses, events, courier service. Credit card accepted. Sam Bach.410-302-0057. FRIENDS, FAMILY OR BUSINESS MEETUPS IN/OUT OF TOWN? LET US BRING YOU TOGETHER! ANYWHERE/ANYTIME. CALL DON SHEIN! 410-274-3620

Visit jewishtimes on Twitter.

MARKETPLACE ADVERTISING RATES

Ads cost $17 for the first ten words, each additional word is $1.50. Payment due at time of order. Charge over the phone or mail a check to: BaltimoreJewishTimes, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A Owings Mills, MD 21117

All ads are due Monday by Noon. Please call 410-902-2326 to place an ad.


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R E A L E S TAT E F O R R E N T

HARPER HOUSE: VILLAGE OF CROSS KEYS Rarely available high-rise apartment! 1BR, 1BA featuring 24 hr security, front-desk, doorman & intercom. Sunny/large windows, full size washer/dryer in apt., parquet flrs/carpeted BR. Generous closets, assigned underground prkng space & storage locker. Pools & tennis courts. All utilities included. Shown by appointment. 410-916-2838

Chai. News for people who know we don’t mean spiced tea. Every Friday in the new JT. For home delivery, call 410-902-2300.

11 SLADE APARTMENT FOR RENT Large 1 BR, 2 BA features spacious den, living room, dining room, Updated kitchen (with granite countertops) and bathrooms, all in excellent condition. Reserved parking in secured building

$1,595/month Tenant pays electric. Shown by appointment. 443-983-4557

THE RISTEAU

Penthouse. One Bedroom Condo. W/D. Balcony, skylight, indoor parking, pool, tennis, full security. At 695 & 83 $1,600/mo

410.363.6216

R OVE C S I 2009 Award RED Winning Community Voted by MMHA

PICKWICK EAST A P A R T M E N T S

A Sixty Acre Rolling Estate

Experience the feeling of coming home to our luxury garden apartments, nestled between bustling Pikesville and historic Mt. Washington. Enjoy the traditions that have always been a part of Pickwick East living.

Please accept our invitation to view our lovely garden apartments

Unparalleled Customer Service • Fully Equipped Kitchen Cost Efficient Washer and Dryer in Every Home • Dishwashers Frost Free Refrigerator with Ice Maker • Gas Cooking • Hot Water Included • Individually Controlled Air Conditioning and Heat • Trash Pick Up at Your Door • Wall to Wall Carpet • Outstanding 24 Hr Maintenance Service • Cable Ready • Olympic & Tot Pools • Tot Lot

The immediate neighborhood includes houses of worship, schools, recreation, shopping and restaurants. 1•2•3 Bedroom Apartments from $815/mo. plus utilities.

410-486-8900 Monday - Friday 9-5 Saturday By Appt Only Sunday 11-4

Rich in Tradition

All apartments feature generous living areas and spacious closets. 1BR/SOLARIUM

2BR/2BA

$925

STARTING AT

2BR/SOLARIUM

3BR

STARTING AT

STARTING AT

$1125

STARTING AT

$1025 $1225

• Heat and hot water included • Full eat-in kitchens •Washer and dryer in each unit •Walk-in closets • Cable/FIOS ready •Trash collection at your door • Large patios & balconies • Summer swimming pool membership

Rental office open 9-6, Monday-Friday & Saturday by appt.

410.484.2040 www.pomona-apartments.com

F O R S A L E BY OW N E R

D Model Master BR on 1st floor! Faces large landscaped area. Many upgrades and extras!

Greenspring East T O W N H O U S E

3 Bedroom, 3 & 1/2 Bath Skylight Wood burning fireplace

Shown by appointment.

Shown by appointment 443-802-5396

* * * * * UPDATED * * * * * PIKESVILLE HOME!

3BR 2BA Colonial with updated amenities thruout! Features large LR w/fireplace, grantite counter tops, cherry wood cabinets, porecelain floor, recessed lighting leads leading to large deck. Newer roof/windows(3 yrs). Lower level offers possible 4th BR w/Full BA! Stainless steel appliances & refinished hardwood floors thru-out. Move-in condition!

}

2 Master BR’s w/separate baths. Spacious, bright 2nd floor unit featuring new carpeting/fresh paint thru-out & large living room w/fireplace. Move-in condition w/reserved parking & community pool/clubhouse. Close to I-83 & 695 in good school district!

GREENTREE TOWNHOME!

}

FALLS GABLE CONDO

410-486-0034. rwendell@yahoo.com

$1,700/mo. 410-484-8867

7104 DEERFIELD RD, BALTIMORE, MD 21208 $210,00 w/ 5K towards closing cost.

410-800-9316 Only pre-approved buyers! jewishtimes.com

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F LO R I D A R E A L E S TAT E

Boca Lago

•‘ ›‘— –Š‹ ›‘—ǯ˜‡ Šƒ† ƒ tough †ƒ›ǫ

Condo for Rent Beautifully furnished condo. 2BR, 2BA 2nd Floor with golf view. 3 months @ $1,700/mo. Taxes paid. Pictures emailed. Call 410-363-3826

S U B S C R I B E TO

J EWISH TI M ES. CA LL 410-902-2300 ( B A LT I M O R E A R E A ) O R 888-809-0085 ( TO LL F R E E ) TH E

Providing uplifting programs for critically ill children. Help us help them.

443.568.0064

CaseyCaresFoundation.org

R E A L E S TAT E

LEN BERNHARDT ANNEN WOODS- NEW LISTING - Terrific 2 bedroom & den, 2 bath first level condo with NO STEPS & NO ELEVATOR concerns. Located in private convenient gated community.

SOLD

OWINGS MILLS - Terrific 3BR, 2.5 Bath townhome in great condition.Huge super bath, carpeted walk–out family room, deck, eat–in kitchen, gas, heat & cooking. Walk–in closet & sitting area. PRICE REDUCED TO $199,900. Office 410-821-1700 • Cell 410-207-2467 • Home 410-484-0829 Search all active listings on my website at cbmove.com/len.bernhardt

Homesale YWGC Realty

MAYS CHAPEL – $269,900

T EA M R O S O F F DOLLY ROSOFF

$175,000

Summit Park REDUCED Rental PRICE!

View all listings at cbmove.com/jeanne.wachter

Ruth Maier Settle With the Best!

GONE, BUT never FORGOTTEN. T

3BR, 2.5BA

$1,700 mo. UNDER CONTRACT

Perry Hall

Gorgeous 4BR renovation

only $279,000

Call / Text 410-925-1299 Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

GRI, CRS, ABR

Exceptional home OWNER MOTIVATED

or email ruth.maier@cbmove.com 58

JEANNE WACHTER,

Home 410-484-2659 • Cell 410-978-1183

Mt. Washington

660 Straffan Dr. #401 1619 SQ feet of secured living. Top floor unit in elevator building. Prestine Condo in coveted location.

STEVENSON VILLAGE. Outstanding spacious 2BR+ 2BA ground level condo with solarium/den plus glass enclosed patio. NO STEPS to enter unit. Updated master bath. Amazing walk-in closet. Custom built ins. Immediate possession. BEDFORD COMMONS. Attractive 2BR condo. Bright & sunny DR/sun rm leading to priv. enclosed patio. Realistically priced for immed. possession. Convenient Pikesville location. VILLAGE OF DEER PARK. Attractive 3-4BR, 2/2BA townhome. Large eat–in kitchen w/ fireplace and deck. Finished lower level w/ walkout. Priced to sell!

Honor the yahrzeit of a loved one with a memorial message and photograph in the JT. For more information, call 410-902-2326.


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Marc Goldstein Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI

410-598-9900

9:55 AM

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C

STEVENSON $449,900 (WOO) 4BR/2.5BA Contemporary w/eat-in kit, 1st fl FR, big LR & DR, 2 car garage.

elebrating 25 years!

Ida Volkomich

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

410-236-1901

410-491-6524

410-978-5544

Anna Yashnyk

Gennady Fayer

Realtor, ABR, CDPE Certified Distressed Property Expert

Realtor, CDPE Certified Distressed Property Expert

443-983-0426

443-324-3280

Updated 2BR/2BA on 1.48 lush acres! Granite kit, beaut 6' walk-in shower, hdwd flrs. Balcony w/stunning view. Agent/ Owner.

VELVET VALLEY $299,900 (PAR)

Rebecca Conway

Dmitry Fayer

410-653-SOLD(7653)

Aaron Pearlman

Marina Shwartz

Realtor, ABR, GRI

Realtor

410-961-5773

410-236-1504

VILLAGE AT WOODHOLME $275,000 (MEA)

SUBURBIA $235,000 (BRA)

3BRgarageTownhousew/graniteeat-inkit,SSappls. 1stflMBRw/gardenbath,hdwds,sunroom&more!

3BR/3.5BA Townhouse w/eat-in kit, MBR suite, hdwd flrs, fin'd walkout LL w/FP. Backs to trees.

UNDER CONTRACT

PRESERVE AT MANOR WOODS $189,900 (HID)

BELLE FARM ESTATES $169,900 (BON)

FOREST GREEN $224,900 (FOR)

CANTON $209,900 (HUD)

3BR/1.5BA Rancher w/many updates! Custom kit, hdwd flrs, vaulted ceilings, huge FR. Private yard.

Updated 2BR Rowhome w/eat-in kit, sep DR, lrg BRs. Central air, exposed brick, 2 blks off the Square!

GREENSPRING VALLEY $154,900 (SPR)

ANNEN WOODS $154,900 (COB)

SLADE AVE $150,000 (SLA)

FALLS GABLE $149,900 (TYL)

JONES VALLEY $149,900 (JON)

Updated 2BR Colonial on 1/2 acre! Eat-in kit, 1st fl laundry. New carpet, freshly painted.

2BR/2BA Townhouse w/updated eat-in kit, hdwd flrs, large MBR suite, 2 patios.

Complete shop, ready to go, for beauty, nail or massage! Just under 1000SF. High visibility!

2BR/2BA mid-level Condo w/eat-in kit, sep DR, MBR suite, whirlpool tub, hdwd flrs.

2BR mid-lvl Condo w/updated kit & floors, fresh paint, fireplace, balcony & corner location!

OLD COURT ESTATES $199,900 (MAR)

4BR/3BA Rancher w/eat-in kit, 1st fl FR, MBR suite Brick Townhouse w/eat-in kit, 2 MBR w/masterbath.Fin'dwalkoutLL,hdwdfloors&more! suites, loft. Fin’d bsmt, deck, 2–car garage.

3BR/2BA Rancher w/granite eat-in kit, hdwd flrs, fin'd LL w/bath. Enclosed rear porch.

RENTAL

NEW LISTING

ANNEN WOODS $125,000 (CAN)

GARRISON RIDGE $89,900 (GAR)

2BR+Den top fl Condo w/eat-in kit, master suite, laundryinunit.Largermodel.Balcony.Gatedcomm.

2BR/1.5BA Townhouse w//remodeled kit, sep DR, 1st fl powder rm, fin'd LL.

ROCKLAND RUN $80,000 (SNO)

SHELBOURNE COURT $49,900 (PAR)

Move-in ready 2BR/2BA first–fl Condo w/open 1BR/1BAtopfloorCondow/eat-inkit,sepDR,MBRw/lrg closet.W/Dinunit,extrastorageinbldg.Balcony. floor plan, over 1200 sq ft, large balcony..

STEVENSON $2700 (BIR) 5BR/3BA Contemporary. Over 3500SF. Nice 1/2 acre property.

410-653-SOLD (7653) Office • 1-800-770-6404 Toll-Free www.nationalrealtyhome.com jewishtimes.com

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MARGOLIS, SPIGEL & TEAM

16 VELVET VALLEY CT.

$889,000

2506 STONE MILL RD.

$549,000

$429,000

1 GREENLEA DR.

$330,000

NEW PRICE

11959 LONG LAKE DR.

NEW PRICE

GREENGATE RANCHER 7125 Pheasant Cross Dr 3BR 2.5 BA with den and fireplace in family room. Totally updated-Move in condition. New windows and siding, Built-ins, flr to ceiling bay window in LR, separate office. Priced to sell at $399,900

JC

oan ohen

Cell 410-370-9154 | o: 410-653-1700 www.joancohensellshomes.com PUBLIC REAL ESTATE AUCTION

1120 RIVER OAKS CIR.

$299,999

923 LINWOOD AVE.

$274,900

1040 DEER RIDGE DR. #411

BALTIMORE COUNTY $109,900

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13TH @ 1:30PM 707 Regester Ave, Baltimore, MD 21212

410-583-5700

4BR/1.5BA SFH w/ hdwd flrs on main level & BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, full daylight attic, deck, enclosed sun porch, porch at front door, wood burning FP, detached 2 car garage, landscaped, rear entrance to bsmt, close to schools, University, major shopping mall, I-695 & bus line.

Gopal Hariani 410-977-9390

#/01234 *536758

TERMS: Deposit $4,000 due at time of sale. Cash or certified funds. 30-day settle. Visit website for additional terms & conds. * Sale on the Premises.

:;<=:>?=>?>>

19

Call Patti Spigel 410-241-9797

Amy Harlan Cindi Topolski, GRI Diane Stoler Jamie Goldberg 410-440-3479 443-838-2061 410-440-1138 410-458-9580

! #$!%&'( )!%%*($ #+,)!-.

! ! !" #$%& '()*+ (,-+ .")-& PARKE AT H

WE share WITH FRIENDS.

Friend us on Facebook for exclusive news, special offers and opportunities to win.

60

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

N 410-653-41


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Harriett Wasserman, CRS 410-458-5300 NE

W

NE

W

LIS TIN

G

LYONSWOOD SOUTH | $285,000 Randi Sopher 410-299-7222

CATONSVILLE | $575,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

HARBORVIEW | $765,000 Anne Hoke 410-935-0915

RE

DU

LIS

TIN

G

WORTHINGTON VALLEY | $1,150,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

ANTON NORTH | $929,000 Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

REGENCY PARK | $699,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WORTHINGTON CLUB ESTATES | $649,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

THE WOODS | $639,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

HUNT VALLEY | $624,000 Anne Hoke 410-935-0915

FIELDS OF SAGAMORE | $570,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

GREENSPRING | $569,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

OWINGS MILLS |$519,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

BELLCHASE COURT | $349,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

CE

D

PARKE AT MT WASHINGTON | $599,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

CONDOS STEVENSON VILLAGE - NEW LISTING - $119,900, 2BR 2BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

TOWSONGATE - $147,900, 1BR 1.5BA, Ina Leboe 443-540-3974 QUARRY LAKE BLUFFS | $344,900 Marni Sacks 410-375-9700

GREY ROCK VILLAS | $339,900 Diane Baklor 410-303-7700

GREENSPRING | $299,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

FIELDSTONE/STONEYBROOK RD | $299,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WORTHINGTON GLEN | $324,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WYNANS WOODS | $225,000 Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

UN

DE

R

RE

DU

CO

NT

RA

CT

VILLAGE OF MILL RUN|$179,000 Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

OWINGS MILLS | $224,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

CE

D

IMPERIAL GARDENS/SYBIL RD| $169,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Terry Reamer

Karen Wartzman

Marni Sacks

Randi Sopher

Sharon Mezei

Diane Baklor

MaryZimmerman

Kathleen House

Gerri Miller

443-570-7672

410-456-2477

410-375-9700

410-299-7222

443-226-5007

410-303-7700

443-845-8868

410-236-5919

410-356-3333

LUTHERVILLE/TIMONIUM - REDUCED - $269,900 2BR 2BA Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 PAVILION IN THE PARK - $209,900, 3BR 2BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 BEDFORD COMMONS - $96,900, 2BR 1BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 COURTHAVEN/PIKESVILLE - $85,000 2BR 2BA, David Pensak 410-908-2787 PAVILION IN THE PARK - $93,900, 2BR, 1.5BA. Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 THE TOWERS - $94,900 2BR 2BA Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 11 SLADE - 1BR 1BA $31,500 Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146 STEVENSON VILLAGE - RENTAL $1,275/mo 2BR 2BA Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

Renee Reamer 443-744-9610

Ina Leboe 443-540-3974

David Pensak 410-908-2787

Shaun Elhai 443-255-2052

© 2012 BRER Affiliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates Inc. Prudential the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation with Prudential. PenFed Membership is not required to conduct business with Prudential PenFed Realty. Equal Housing Opportunity.

410-484-7253 • 410-458-5300


R DA Y CE RAR & E PO ON EM ST ONT C

S

RE AC

MINI FARM OF THE WEEK

www.HomeRome.com 7

1930 JORDANS RETREAT RD. $449,944 Mini horse farm ... Idyllic 7 acres buffered by a forest of trees. Charming home with bright sunroom, central air, gas cooking granite kitchen! A bit of paradise to live and enjoy nature. 3 car garage, workshop. So much charm and so much beauty! Horses, people and pet friendly! When would you like a tour? www.homerome.com

STONE HOME

SP

T LI

COUNTRY LIVING ONE MILE FROM THE BELTWAY 415 SOUTH RD. 21208 $424,944

18 STIRRUP CT, ANNEN WOODS $194.944

TT Annen Woods townhome in SE move–in condition. Private location surrounded by lush landscaping. First floor family room with cathedral ceilings. Spacious living/dining room with two sets of new sliders to enclosed patio perfect for entertaining, relaxing and container gardening. Large bedrooms with master walk–in closet/dressing room, double vanities and separate shower. Ft Garrison School system in Gated community with tennis and pool. www.homerome.com

D T YE N LA ME DE LE

Unique solid masonry brick custom home on 3 acres buffered by Woodholme County Club. Gated secluded private retreat in Pikesville… convenient to everything. First floor master suite, open floor plan and a guest suite with kitchen. High ceilings and brick fireplace. Drive the golf cart home! www.homerome.com

R OO FL R T TE 1S MAS

K IC W CK PI

Y AD RE

O TI PA

Four level Pickwick split rarely available with a very large family room, with room for fourth bedroom. Beautiful level park–like backyard and patio. Large living room, formal dining room and eat–in kitchen with window over sink. Extra long and wide driveway for plenty of off street parking. Central air, gas heat. www.homerome.com

6811 CHEROKEE DR. $394,944

The Towers #102 C $149,944

the right way

Rome

Margaret Rome author of Real Estate

H Two bedrooms with full bath plus a powder room is a perfect size. Very bright with oversized windows and double sliding doors to the very private enclosed first–floor patio with gated locked entrance. For photos go to www.homerome.com

E UG

Very special open floor plan with huge great room addition. Luxury master bedroom suite, soaking tub, sep shower, to skylit -walk-in closet room. Gleaming hardwood floors, cathedral ceilings, sliders to deck and fenced rear yard. Gourmet granite kitchen w stainless appliances. Four finished levels with an amazing amount of space! One car garage! Immaculate move in now. WOW! www.homerome.com

IN VE MO

3303 Northbrook Rd. $299,944

SELL YOUR HOME WITH MARGARET ROME FALLS ROAD CORRIDOR 12325 FALLS RD. $589,944

GE RA

3703 CLARINTH RD. $169,944

R Eleven Slade OO FL P $49,944 H -O 8T CO Bright spacious one bedroom and den 8th floor Co-op near the elevator. Wide windows bathe the space with light. Tree top views from all rooms. Updated eat kitchen, 3 walk in closets. Move in condition. Full service with doorman and receptionist. Monthly fee includes, heat, air conditioning and taxes. Cash only contracts.

All stone semi with front and rear porch- level back yard and a one–car garage. Large rooms throughout. Separate dining room, fireplace in spacious living room. Eat–in kitchen. 3 Bedrooms and two full baths upstairs. Finished lower level paneled recreation room with fireplace, full bath and an abundant amount of storage. All new windows and doors. Needs some TLC...so help me be beautiful again! www.homerome.com

GA

Contemporary 3500' sprawling Rancher with sunroom and dressing room in the master bedroom suite. Luxury marble and glass brick master bath with walk in shower and jetted tub. Floor to ceiling Stacked stone fireplace divides the living and family rooms. Huge eat in kitchen with expanse of corian counters, center island and greenhouse window overlooking the large deck and in ground pool. Cathedral ceilings and skylights. Perfect home for entertaining with abundant parking. Please call for more details.

I HAVE QUALIFIED BUYERS FOR THESE HOMES • NEEDED...CHARMING HOME WITH CHARACTER, ACREAGE, GARAGE AND FIREPLACES (ONE IN MBR WOULD BE PERFECT) • NEEDED... GREY ROCK TOWNHOUSE WITH FIRST FLOOR MASTER, NO BASEMENT AND GOOD PARKING. • CASH BUYER FOR LARGE 4 PLUS BEDROOM HOME IN THE PICKWICK/SMITH AVE AREA. • NEEDED...ANNEN WOODS TOWNHOUSE, IMMEDIATE SETTLEMENT. • NEEDED...LARGE HOME IN FALLSTAFF OR DUMBARTON AREA. MOVE–IN CONDITION A MUST. • NEEDED...ELDERSBURG OR SYKESVILLE HOME WITH PUBLIC UTILITIES AND GAS HEAT UP TO $500K • NEEDED...2 STORY W/ LARGE YARD IN FRANKLIN OR FORT GARRISON SCHOOL DISTRICT. UP TO $500K

THINKING ABOUT SELLING YOUR HOME PLEASE CALL MARGARET ROME.

www.410-530-2400.com

Search over 50,000 active listings through my website. www.HomeRome.com • mrome@HomeRome.com ABR, ACRE, BROKER, CAP, CRS, e-PRO, GRI, PMN, RECS, SRES, CyberStar™

Baltimore Jewish Times October 5, 2012

62

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Awarded Top 1% of Real Estate Professionals in North America

Glick*Seidel A Higher Standard in Real Estate Services

Carole Glick & Linda Seidel

410-583-5700

410.409.8110 • 410.375.6532 NG LISTI NEW

OO NG S COM I

N!

PR NEW

I CE

PRICE NEW

NO PHOTO AVAILABLE WOODRIDGE

$759,000

JUST

$425,000

$329,900

CE D REDU

GREENE TREE

.5BA 3BR/2

VALLEY HILLS

$349,900

E PRIC NEW

PRICE NEW

EN T OR R SALE D MODEL OO DOGW

QUARRY LAKE HIGHLANDS

WORTHINGTON PARK

$295,000

$1,180,000

E PRIC NEW

GREENSPRING VALLEY NTR ER CO UND

O COND

ROCKLAND - GATED COMMUNITY

$599,900

ACT

FIVE SPRINGS WEST

$574,900

CUSTOM DESIGN & BUILD W/JPAUL BUILDERS VELVET VALLEY GORGEOUS CUL-DE-SAC LOT GREENSPRING WOODS OLD COURT RD. AREA ON CUL-DE-SAC.

“GREEN FRIENDLY CONSTRUCTION” WORTHINGTON HILLSIDE

$495,000

$225,000

HOME NEW

HOME D NEW DUCE E R JUST

TUFTON SPRINGS

ARLINGTON PARK

$799,900

PALADIA WAY

GREENSPRING VALLEY

$539,900

E HOM NEW

E HOM NEW

$1,350,000

WATERFORD PRESERVE

LOTS FROM $295,900

$829,990

BARONET WOODS

$929,900

WE ARE SELLING!!

D D D D L L L L O O O O S S S S PHOENIX

$434,900

STEVENSON

$345,000

SLADE AVENUE

$149,900

www.glickseidel.com Greenspring Valley/Lutherville

PICKWICK

$269,900


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We are more than the doctors and nurses, pharmacists and physical therapists, radiologists and lab technicians who work at LifeBridge Health centers. We are your neighbors and friends. We are your sons and daughters, brothers, sisters, mothers and fathers. We help and hope, teach and coach. Good health care is more than just good medicineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good people, too! LifeBridge Health people.

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BJT 100512