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A Healing In Columbia BALTIMORE

JEWISH TIMES

April 20, 2012 Nissan 28 5772

A Real

Class Act

$1.25

Dr. Paul D. Schneider looks back on his career at Krieger Schechter Day School.

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042012

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Cover photo of Dr. Paul Schneider by Justin Tsucalas

Contents

April 20, 2012 Vol. 325 No. 8 Candle lighting 7:38 p.m.

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In The Beginning e Seen, Your Say ...

8

Opinion Editorials, Opening oughts, In My Opinion, From is View, Charm City Diary

Justin Tsucalas

Local News

38

Creative License

16

News Briefs

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Getting A Read On Carson Dr. Ben Carson talks candidly about the Carson Scholars Fund and his latest book.

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Responding To A Crisis Healing service in Columbia to serve as a balm for trauma victims.

26

Who Needs a Lord Rabbi? With Jonathan Sacks retiring, British Jews are mixed on the relevancy of a chief rabbi.

Features 30

Wonder Kids Musical prodigies play for keeps in wartime story ‘Wunderkinder.’

A Real Class Act Dr. Paul D. Schneider looks back on his career at Krieger Schechter Day School.

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Notes Of A Jazz Man

David Stuck

Justin Tsucalas

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48

Dinner Dash

43

A Wondrous Approach Green home furnishings store and website give consumers healthier options.

Arts & Life 47

The ‘It’ List

48

Food Dinner Dash

51

Live Green

54

Community Beshert, Milestones, Obituaries

David Stuck

58

17

Amazing Marketplace

‘A Wow’

Baltimore Jewish Times (ISSN 0005-450X) is published by Route 95 Publications LLC, 1040 Park Ave., Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201. Subscription price is $50 in-state; $57 out-of-state. For subscriptions, renewals, or changes of address call 410-752-3504 (Baltimore) or 1-888-257-8558 (toll free). Periodical postage paid at Baltimore MD and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Baltimore Jewish Times, 1040 Park Ave., Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201. Published 52 times a year.

jewishtimes.com

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Compiled om assorted news and wire services

{Hollywood Hookup} Graham Whitby/Allstar/Newscom

Here, Finally “Mad Man” creator Matthew Weiner, a Baltimore native, will come out with his feature film directorial debut titled “You Are Here,” reports Variety. The movie will reportedly star Owen Wilson, Zach Galifianakis and Amy Poehler. The flick is about a pair of slacker 30-somethings. “This movie has been my passion for eight years,” Weiner, 46, told Variety. “I can’t wait to get started because the movie is about everything I care about and I’m tired of reading it out loud to my friends.”

Nothing says romance is in the air and extreme desperation for attention better than a good, old-fashioned, inexplicable elopement. That’s exactly what talk show host/actress/producer Ricki Lake and her fiancé, Christian Evans, did for no discernible reason recently. Ricki, 43, and Christian, 40, ran off and eloped, tying the knot in a secret ceremony in southern Cali that, frankly, very few people really cared about. “It was a beautiful moment I will never forget,” Lake told People. Lake’s previous marriage to artist Rob Sussman resulted in their two sons, Milo, 15, and Owen, 10.

William Levy

Taking It Off! Hunky Cuban-American actor/model William Levy is turning heads these days on “Dancing With e Stars.” In a recent abs-baring salsa number with Cheryl Burke, Levy, 31, demonstrated why the Latin world has been wise to him for a while. “William knows the ladies love us, but they love him a little bit more because he took his clothes off,” fellow contestant Donald Driver told People. “I haven’t taken my clothes off yet. I’m going to pace myself and talk to the

When Screenwriters Attack Here’s some breaking news — Mel Gibson is (allegedly) an anti-Semite. OK, so maybe that’s not breaking news. But in a letter to the media, screenwriter Joe Eszterhas (“Showgirls,” “Basic Instinct”) charged that the actor/filmmaker “hates Jews” after Warner Bros. rejected Eszterhas’s screenplay for Gibson’s movie about Chanukah hero Judah Maccabee. The letter accuses the Gibber of not really wanting to make the film. “I’ve come to the conclusion that the reason you won’t make ‘The Maccabees’ is the ugliest possible one. You hate Jews,” Joe wrote. In fact, the Hungarian-born Eszterhas contends that

Gibson only got in on the flick so he could “convert the Jews to Christianity.” (Ouch.) In a response printed in the Los Angeles Times, Gibson countered that the script was delivered too late and the draft was “substandard.” “I have been working on this project for over 10 years and it was publicly announced eight years ago,” Mel wrote. “I absolutely want to make this movie; it’s just that neither Warner Brothers nor I want to make this movie based on your script.” Summed up Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center: “Jewish history will be better off without Mel Gibson playing Judah Maccabee.”

wife and if the wife agrees then I will take it off.” Roshon Fegan, the youngest competitor, said Levy’s exhibitionism “makes it personal. … I’ve got my eye on William and whatever his secrets are — working in the gym, superduper protein shakes — I’m gonna get me some muscles.” Says the modest William: “To come to this country and receive this kind of love from people you don’t even know, it’s amazing.”

Mel Gibson

Ki Price/ZUMAPRESS.com

PNP/WENN.com/Newscom

Ricki’s Runaway

SUN/Newscom

Ricki Lake

Matt Weiner


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Justin Tsucalas

Your Say… Hadassah’s Wellness

The April 13 article “Mural Magic” inadvertently did not mention that Boy Scout Troop 1299, according to the troop, had the highest participation level of any group in the project, which has Upper Park Heights Jewish, Latino and African American youth working together.

We were pleased to see the column about Robyn Talesnik’s efforts to bring wellness programming to Ft. Garrison (“Dining With… Robyn Talesnik”). Hadassah of Greater Baltimore offers the GoGirlGo program to elementary schools in the Baltimore area, and tailored the curriculum specifically for the needs of the Ft. Garrison community. We have enjoyed working with Robyn and the other volunteers at Ft. Garrison who were involved in facilitating the program. Anyone interested in offering the program at their school is welcome to contact the Hadassah office for more information

On Mike Wallace Regarding Alan Feiler’s column last week on the late Mike Wallace, “A Tip Of The Trench Coat,” for a wellresearched book discussing the Soviet Jewry movement, I sincerely recommend Gal Beckerman’s recent book, “When They Come for Us, We’ll Be Gone: The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry.” It was published in 2010 and is a fascinating and detailed account of what was going on here and what was going on in Russia. This is a must read for anyone interested in the subject. Irwin Weiss Baltimore

Laurie Weitz President, Hadassah of Greater Baltimore

Survival Tips The April “Insider” features the timely story, “Sprint to the Finish Line,” describing how parents and kids are gearing up for the end-of-year race. anks to the BALTIMORE JEWISH

Robyn Telesnik

TIMES for presenting practical advice to parents when they especially need it. The survival tips accompanying Rona Sue London’s article were provided by Loren Walsh, MA, and Shoshana Storch, LCSW-C, of Jewish Community Services. Gail Lipsitz JCS Public Relations Coordinator

Mike Wallace

Globe Photos/ZUMAPRESS.com

Shande Soup Manischewitz should be ashamed of sponsoring the creation of a vegan chicken soup (“Dishing It Out,” April 13). The words “Mod Matzoh Ball Soup (Pareve)” should not be in the same sentence. There are two real chicken soups : one with noodles, the other with matzoh balls, with the occasional addition of “kosher.” Nothing was created but another vegetable soup! “Modernizing” real chicken soup with roasted vegetables and eliminating chicken is an affront to the bubbies and mothers who made real chicken soup.

Ki Price/ZUMAPRESS.com

Joseph Trost Baltimore Longer versions of these letters and additional ones submitted are at jewish times.com. Click “opinion” on the left and then “letters to editor.” Send letters to editor@jewishtimes.com.

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Editorials

At the front of Dr. Paul D. Schneider’s desk rests a small sign that reads, “One who dares to teach must never cease to learn.” For Dr. Schneider, Krieger Schechter Day School’s headmaster for the past 29 years, that adage is a guiding principle and phrase to live by. “It so speaks to me,” he tells the BALTIMORE JEWISH TIMES. “I believe in it completely in my heart.” In this week’s cover story, Dr. Schneider is profiled as a Jewish educator of the highest order. For nearly three decades, he has devoted his life to bringing the depth and scope of Yiddishkeit to local day school

students. With an infectious smile, a quick mind and a glint in his eye, he has earned the love and respect of his students as well as colleagues, staff and the school’s highly devoted and active parent body. At the same time, Dr. Schneider has earned a reputation in the Jewish community at large as being a particularly strong orator and spiritual leader during the High Holiday season. His “Stulman Family Service” at Chizuk Amuno Congregation, which in past years has had a waiting list, has drawn a strong following, largely due to Dr. Schneider’s

poignant sermons, haimish manner and tenacity for creating a warm, intimate milieu. His fans and admirers are legion, which is no small feat in an age when cynicism toward spiritual leaders often seems to rule. We say mazel tov to Dr. Schneider on a job well done for 29 years, and we wish him much success in his new role as Chizuk Amuno’s “education rabbi.” We encourage young people contemplating a career in Jewish education to consider this gentle, amiable man as a paragon of what a Jewish educator — and a mentsch and a role model — should be.

The Recurring Pollard Dilemma The painful and controversial case of convicted spy Jonathan J. Pollard is in the news again. Calls to have him released from a federal penitentiary have come in recent days from major Jewish figures, such as Israeli President Shimon Peres, and from prominent Jewish organizations, such as the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations and the Union of Reform Judaism. They join an impressive array of former U.S. officials who have also urged Pollard’s release, including former CIA director James Woolsey, and former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and George Shultz. Pollard, a former civilian U.S. Naval Intelligence analyst, received a life sentence without parole in 1987 for passing reams of documents to the Israeli government without U.S. government permission. He also accepted tens of thousands of dollars for the act. Pollard unquestionably committed treason. He sold top secret information to a foreign government, albeit a friendly one. His life sentence, however, came as a surprise, since he expected to receive a substantially lower sentence under the terms of a plea agreement his counsel negotiated. Pollard has now been incarcerated for more than 25 years. On Passover Eve, Pollard was rushed to a hospital outside the Butner Federal Correctional Complex in

8

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

North Carolina in which he has been incarcerated, due to a still unspecified emergency condition. This past Sunday he was released from the hospital and returned to prison. With Pollard clearly ailing, should he be released? To his backers, Pollard has spent an excessive amount of time in jail, while others convicted of similar crimes served far less severe terms. Those backers urge his release, so that he can deal with his declining health with his wife, family and friends at his side. For others, Pollard should never see the sun rise outside of prison walls. He is a traitor, they declare, whose actions are rumored to have led to the death of many U.S. agents abroad. In truth, only a handful of people know the facts of the Pollard case, and they cannot talk publicly about them. The U.S. government continues to designate portions of Pollard’s file as top secret. Thus, its more than quarter-century-old contents cannot be reviewed or debated by the public, and the precise facts of his case cannot be known. But reports seem to indicate that the current state of Pollard’s health is not good, and that his health is declining. Since we don’t know the facts of Pollard’s offenses, we cannot take a position on challenges to the severity of his sentence. But if his crime of

treason is the same as others convicted of the same offense, one must wonder why those offenders were released after lesser terms of incarceration, while Pollard has been relegated to a life sentence already exceeding 25 years. If in fact Jonathan Pollard’s health is deteriorating, forcing him to die in a federal penitentiary achieves very little. On the other hand, a convicted criminal should not be released from custody simply because he is deathly ill. Showing mercy for one’s enemy at a time of that enemy’s weakness reflects the confidence and courage of a true leader. On the other hand, a strong and committed leader must act in the best interests of his country even in the face of strong emotional concerns. We don’t envy President Obama’s dilemma in dealing with the latest round of the Jonathan Pollard debate, especially in this partisan election year. Whatever his decision, we encourage the president to explain his decision in clear and understandable terms, which we are sure he can do without compromising security concerns. On this issue which is fraught with mystery and mixed emotions, there is one thing that is clear: How President Obama chooses to deal with Jonathan Pollard’s situation will be another test of the president’s leadership.

Justin Tsucalas

A True Jewish Educator


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BALTIMORE

JEWISH TIMES

Baltimore Jewish Times Vol. 325 No. 8 April 20, 2012

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be the religious news story of the day, thanks to Gov. Mitt romney’s presumed capture of the 2012 GoP presidential nomination, but it’s dealing with Evangelical Christians that American Jews still need to get a better grip on. A new poll does not ooze optimism. The 5.2 million to 7.3 million of us (depending on how you count) still have a massive distrust of the estimated 60 million plus of “them.” In Baltimore, the issue is seemingly irrelevant; the Evangelical community is small and has little of the political clout it has in other swathes of the country. still, in national affairs, Jewish leaders are striving to strengthen ties to this very large and diverse community they keep meeting in the state and national halls of power. As reported by the Forward, only one in five American Jews holds a favorable view of those aligned with the “Christian right.” not all Evangelicals are in this category, but a very strong majority are and they oen are the self-labeled “Christian Zionists” now integral to pro-Israel efforts. so how is it that the Public religion research Institute survey reveals Jews giving Mormons (with just under 5 million or so adherents in this country) a much stronger 47 percent favorable rating? And how is it that we put Muslims at 41.4 percent on that scale and the Christian right at 20.9 percent? not surprisingly, the general population flips that around, giving Evangelicals — who, of course, are in that poll — a more favorable rating than Muslims and Mormons. e political implications in this voting season are clear. romney — once a Massachusetts moderate republican — is busily espousing positions

that upset the largely domestically centrist/liberal American Jewish community. It’s a problem for Jewish republicans, although the wedge issue of Israel will continue to dominate their appeal in seeking fallen Democrats. (While the orthodox community is more open to the GoP agenda, it is growing, but still likely no more than 20 percent of the national Jewish community.) What to do? For starters, conversation is the logical step. It occurs here through both the Baltimore-based Institute for Christian and Jewish studies and the Baltimore Jewish Council’s religious “trialogue” with Jews, Muslims and Christians. But surely we need more, which is why the congregational programs of such groups are both so fascinating and necessary. e issues for Jews are well-known — concerns about proselytizing or funding groups that do so, about efforts to “Christianize” America and about attempts to blur the fuzzy lines separating religion and state. Then there is a conservative political agenda wrapped in the mantle of religion (which some liberals do as well) on issues such as pro-choice versus pro-life. Perhaps we should start with what we can do, simply avoiding what we cannot. As rabbi David saperstein of the reform movement noted in the Forward, social issues such as global warming and the fight against sex trafficking are ripe common agenda items. In working on them locally and nationally, we will create candid relationships that will break the proverbial barriers. en when the time comes to oppose one another on an issue — it’s inevitable — we will do so without truculently battling via the contentious media circus that defines today’s public conversations. JT


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In My Opinion Kenneth Lasson

Presidents And Pundits â&#x20AC;&#x153;He tHat wOuld lIve in peace and at ease, must not speak all he knows, nor judge all he sees.â&#x20AC;? Benjamin Franklinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s astute aphorism is largely ignored by both pundits and politicians, which is both understandable and unfortunate. Columnists and tv commentators make their living by rushing to judgment. Presidents should know better. long gone are the respected journalists of yesteryear â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the justifiably honored likes of edward R. Murrow, walter Cronkite and tom Brokaw â&#x20AC;&#x201D; now replaced by broadcasting blowhards such as Bill Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly, Sean Hannity, Keith Olbermann and a host of others. Nowadays, Rush limbaugh can utter sexist slurs with impunity, Chris Matthews can jerk his knee against anything Republican, wolf Blitzer can breathlessly report exit polls as if they were declarations of life-changing events. and nobody rushes to judgment faster than al Sharpton. the Right Reverend obviously learned nothing from having been on the wrong side of the facts in the tawana Brawley and duke lacrosse team rape cases â&#x20AC;&#x201D; grievous rabblerousings for which he has never apologized. Instead, he has the lingering gall (again long before hearing all the evidence) to call for a massive demonstration against a Florida township and the man who shot and killed teenager trayvon Martin. Sharpton vowed to stage â&#x20AC;&#x153;a full blown occupation of Sanford, with tents and everything until [authorities] either arrest George Zimmerman, or arrest us for praying for his arrest.â&#x20AC;? a sitting president, one might think, would have a better idea of what to say and when to say it. On the Martin tragedy, Mr. Obama could and should have done little more than oďŹ&#x20AC;er his support for a full and fair investigation. Instead, he oďŹ&#x20AC;ered this: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I had a son,

heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d look like trayvonâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; thereby underscoring how the issue prejudicially aďŹ&#x20AC;ected him on a personal level, and not in his more objective and appropriate role as the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief law enforcement officer. weeks earlier, the president had weighed in on how the Supreme Court, which had just heard arguments for and against the affordable health plan known popularly as ObamaCare, should decide: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am conďŹ dent the Court will not take what would be an unprecedented, extraordinary step of overturning a law that was passed by a strong majority of a democraticallyelected Congress.â&#x20AC;? that is precisely what the Supreme Court is charged with doing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; testing the Constitutionality of laws duly passed by Congress. the courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power to strike down such laws has been recognized since Marbury v. Madison in 1803. Prof. Obama, who taught Constitutional law at the university of Chicago, knows better. He certainly appears well in control of what he says and what he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. For example, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been totally unresponsive â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not even oďŹ&#x20AC;ering the courtesy of a reply â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to personal requests by Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netan-yahu and President Shimon Peres for clemency toward Jonathan J. Pollard aî&#x2020;?er nearly three decades of imprisonment and recent serious hospitalizations. Consequently, Mr. Peres is under enormous pressure at home not to accept the Presidential Medal of Freedom, for which Mr. Obama recently nominated him. where is his sense of presidential propriety on that? You can bet that Benjamin Franklin would have been more diplomatic. JT Kenneth Lasson, a law professor at the University of Baltimore, writes monthly for the BALTIMORE J EWISH TIMES

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From is View Meredith Jacobs

Our Other Stories PassoVer is particularly hard. Her mother’s family was taken during their seder. only her mother survived; age 21, she had a blood type desired by the Nazis. she was taken to auschwitz, but never given a number. Mindy Weisel’s father also was at auschwitz. He had a number. When liberated, Mindy’s parents were sent to Bergen-Belsen, now a displaced persons camp. ey met. ey married. Mindy was born there. Now, Mindy is a renowned artist. Her most famous piece incorporates her father’s number. at first, the number outlined swaths of color. she then painted over vibrant paint with black. she calls it “the destruction of beauty.” once, after lecturing to medical students about the painting, a student

told her she was wrong. e work, he said, was about the “survival of beauty” for even though the paint attempts to black out the color, bits break through. as an editor at a Jewish weekly, i’m more aware of the year’s flow than ever. We just finished writing about Passover and now turn to Yom HaShoah. at the seders, we told stories about our enslavement and persecution. in every generation, we are told, every Jew must know this story. it’s not for fear that we could again be enslaved but so that each of us understands what we overcame to be here. several years ago, i read edgar M. Bronfman’s book “Hope, Not Fear.” He argues that we should stop trying to motivate young Jews to connect Jewishly through fear. rather, we should inspire. Help people want to be Jewish because they are proud of their Judaism

and all that it means. i remember thinking “Yes!” if only we show people what it really means to be Jewish, to really be a light to the nations, to grab the mantle of social justice! This is how our grandchildren will be Jewish. en i met Weisel, and i realized the stories are not about the destruction of beauty but about the survival of beauty. e stories are not about fear, but about hope. she shared a sentiment i had heard from others touched by the Holocaust. “i feel like a vehicle, like a vessel. i was born into blackness, but my life was a gi,” she said. she explained that because she had been given this gi, this life, it was her duty to pay it back — to give back, and help wherever and whenever she could. is was about life. and hope. and

joy. and beauty. so like the stories of Passover, we must retell the stories of the Holocaust. Because they remind us that even in times when darkness threatened to erase our people, bits of color escaped and beauty survived. Before i le her home, Mindy pressed a small piece of glass into my palm. shot through with streaks of yellow and red and her mother’s favorite cobalt, it was one of 18 pieces she had made. she knew, she said, who each piece should go to when she met them. i keep it on my desk and every so oen, press it between my palms. it reminds me which stories are important to tell JT Meredith Jacobs is managing editor of our sister publication, the Washington Jewish Week.

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012


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Charm City Diary Michael Olesker

Jews, Italians â&#x20AC;&#x201D; You Know BeCause last week was Passover, we naturally went to sabatinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant in little Italy. each year, in the warm spirit of the season, the restaurant puts away the standard garlic bread and instead serves up complimentary garlic matzoh for Jewish customers and any others with sophisticated taste buds. For all discerning eaters, this matzoh is so delicious that it will raise a question of biblical proportion: î&#x201A;&#x160;e ancient Hebrews were in such a big rush to leave egypt and spend 40 years wandering the desert, they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pause for a moment to add a little garlic and butter to their matzoh? they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t figure out: this matzoh by itself is so dry that it will lead all future generations, gathered around their seder tables, to compare its taste to dried-up parchment? at sabatinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, owners Vince Culotta and Renato Rotondo have been serving up garlic matzoh at Passover for years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good-natured culinary gesture to their many Jewish customers. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a reminder: america is the great melting pot, where we cross-fertilize the best of each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cultures. take, for instance, a night of vast eating at sabatinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some years back. at the table were Culotta and Rotondo, plus the racetrack handicapper Clem Florio, the great actor Vincent Gardenia, and me. Florio was the oddsmaker at Pimlico Race Course for years. He and Gardenia were family friends since theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d both performed as child actors in an Italian-american troupe in New York. Gardenia was fresh oďŹ&#x20AC; his triumph as the Italian father in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moonstruck.â&#x20AC;? He was here to play the feisty old Jewish man, Nat Moyer, at the Mechanic î&#x201A;&#x160;eatre in Herb Gardnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wonderful play, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Not Rappaport.â&#x20AC;? the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the difficulties of

aging, and of dealing with adult children who think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re smarter than their parents, and of living in troubled big cities. this dinner at sabatinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s was a chance to talk about an aging Italian man â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gardenia â&#x20AC;&#x201D; playing an aging Jewish man. â&#x20AC;&#x153;î&#x201A;&#x160;is is no problem at all,â&#x20AC;? Gardenia said between bites of baked rigatoni. â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Jews and the Italians â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the same people.â&#x20AC;? around the table, all heads nodded in agreement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;the same strong sense of family,â&#x20AC;? Gardenia said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;î&#x201A;&#x160;atâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the heart of it, right there. everything stems from that. and the same sense of passion, the sense of living life with the emotions turned up.â&#x20AC;? More heads nodded. In the american mix, it sometimes takes us a while to recognize our common humanity. We tend to settle down in packs, to find comfort and security in those with our own ethnic background. the great common denominators pull us out of our shells: the public school experience, cheering at the ballpark for the same teams, joining hands to back a political candidate. But america is also a place where we acknowledge our differences and pull the best stuff out of each other â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an ethnic dance, a song, a culinary delight, whatever â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and learn to share it. thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sweetness of the garlic matzoh at sabatinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gesture of goodwill to Jewish customers. and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one ethnic group telling another: look what a nice thing we get when we mix a little of your culture with a little of ours. JT

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Light reads for the Jewish soul

{Weird News}

“ ” Speak Easy

“That my mother is Jewish is no small disclosure when you are from Egypt, no matter the year.”

Adrian Neville/Robert Harding/Newscom

— Model/actor Omar Sharif Jr., grandson of the 79-year-old, Egyptian-born screen icon of the same name, coming out about being gay and half-Jewish in an article in The Advocate

"He helped probably through secondary causes for the Jews to escape and continue. It is interesting through these secondary causes probably no people in history have been punished the way the Germans were. It is a terrible mystery."

Real Chasidim — Well, Sort Of reports the newspaper. She signed up, it is said, “to give voice to people who are often ignored — and to help her budding acting and modeling career.” Perhaps always mindful of the outreach agenda of observant Jewry, she adds, “My main purpose is to create a positive Judaism.” Oh, and she adds, “And it would be a really good opportunity for me to get my face out there.” Only in America, bubbie, only in America. — Neil Rubin

wordup

0.5

Grams of fat in one piece of gefilte fish, according to nutrientfacts.com

14

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

— Cardinal George Pell, head of Australia's Catholic Church, when asked in a debate why God allowed the Holocaust to happen. He later apologized for the comments after being criticized by Australian Jewish groups.

“I get very Jewish with the fire coming down.” — Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine, joking with contestant Erin Willett on this week's broadcast of "The Voice" about his concern over fireworks exploding around her during a performance of Adele's "Set Fire To The Rain"

{Snapshots}

Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland [JMM 2005.36.139]

As the always entertaining New York Post declared, “Move over, Real Housewives of Beverly Hills — the Real Hasidim of New York are coming to reality TV.” Seems some Haredi Jews are saying shalom to their lifestyle and want to talk about their harrowing tales in the new docudrama “Shunned.” (Alas, Harrison Ford and Kelly McGillis are not yet scheduled for guest appearances, a la “Witness.”) On this show, one of the shunned is 30-year-old Pearlperry Reich, and she’s amid a nasty divorce and custody battle for her four kids,

Road Trip: Three unidentified members of the Maryland Free State Post 167 dine during a trip, the Concord Safari, in 1989. Can you identify anyone in this photo? Contact Jobi Zink, 410-732-6400, ext. 226 or jzink@jewishmuse ummd.org. To see more of the Jewish Museum’s extensive collection and find out who has been identified in past photos, visit http://ow.ly/2QOgZ .


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Make a Contribution • Get Involved • Leave a Legacy 410-727-4828 • www.associated.org

042012

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News Briefs

‘How Lucky I Am’

Brian Grossman (center) accepts the Eileen Marks Memorial Scholarship.

This year’s Eileen Marks Memorial Scholarship went to a Pikesville High School senior with a strong interest in community service who plans to continue that commitment with a career in the Navy. Brian Grossman was honored with this award Tuesday, April 17, at the annual Pikesville Business and Community Recognition Awards ceremony held at North Oaks Retirement Community. The scholarship goes to a PHS senior who best expresses in an essay what community service will mean to him or her in the future. In his piece, Grossman writes about his volunteer work over the years, including being a companion while in his middle school years to an 8-year-old autistic boy, and interning at the Wasserman Gait Lab of the Rubin Institute of Advanced Orthopedics at Sinai Hospital where he assisted the lab’s head with analyzing gait problems in patients, primarily children

with cerebral palsy. The experiences made an impact on a young man who says in the future he wants to continue to volunteer in special education. Grossman, who has been accepted to the Corps of Cadets program at Virginia Tech next year, plans to pursue an engineering and physics degree. He also expects to enroll in the Navy ROTC program and ultimately to use his degree in the U.S. Navy. Grossman’s PHS English teacher, Sara Reisner, calls the senior a “really terrific young man who has grown and developed as a student — gaining confidence and a sense of self over the past two years.” For his part, Grossman says, “I realize how lucky I am with the opportunities I’m given. What really sticks out is for me to see everything my parents do for me and how much they have helped me.” — Rochelle Eisenberg

Happier Endings

Kirsten Beckerman

Dr. Dan K. Morhaim

16

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

Reisterstown’s Constellation Books store will hold a tea, presentation and signing with Dr. Dan K. Morhaim on Saturday, April 28, to mark the publication of his new book, “The Better End: Surviving (And Dying) On Your Own Terms In Today’s Modern Medical World” (Johns Hopkins University Press). Dr. Morhaim is a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and deputy majority leader of the Maryland House of Delegates, a Democrat representing the 11th District. “The Better End,” which has received endorsements from Dr. Ben Carson and poet Maya Angelou, offers advice to the young, middle-aged and elderly about planning their own end-of-life care. “We are the first generation to have a say about when and how we die,” Dr. Morhaim told the BALTIMORE J EWISH TIMES last December. “People are living longer, better and surviving diseases they haven’t survived before. Medical technology is advancing fast, and people need to be aware of all the choices available to them. ... It’s not about government, insurance companies or doctors. It’s about empowering people to make informed and enlightened decisions about their care, and also to navigate the complicated legal and medical considerations surrounding end-of-life issues.” Dr. Morhaim will appear April 28 at Constellation Books, at 303 Main St. in Reisterstown, from 3 to 5 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. No reservations are required. For information, call 410-833-5151. — Alan H. Feiler

David Stuck

It’s not every day that the U.S. Congress honors a civilian — let alone a non-American — with The Congressional Gold Medal. But Monday, April 16, the U.S. House of Representatives did just that when its members passed legislation to posthumously award Swedish diplomat Rauol Wallenberg for his heroism during World War II. Wallenberg personally saved an estimated 100,000 Jews in Nazi-occupied Hungary during the Holocaust. He was later arrested by the Soviets and rumors have circulated for decades about his fate. In 1981, the now late-Rep. Tom Lantos, himself a Holocaust survivor, sponsored a bill making Wallenberg an Honorary Citizen of the U.S. That happened on Monday when Maryland Rep. Dr. Andy Harris (R-1), introduced the Wallenberg bill. Harris, who is of Hungarian descent, spoke to the BALTIMORE JEWISH T IMES about the tragedy of the Holocaust, which will be commemorated this weekend in Baltimore and around the world. “World War II was a sad chapter of European and Hungarian history — just devastating,” he said. “Yet, out of that came heroes like Raoul Wallenberg, a person who shines a light for future generations. It’s an important lesson, that one individual, standing alone, can really make a difference.” — Simone Ellin

David Stuck

Harris Hails Wallenberg


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David Stuck

News

‘A Wow’ David Stuck

Lois Rosenfield reflects on four decades heading Baltimore’s American Jewish Committee chapter.

Lois Rosenfield: “When it came time for the Holocaust, people didn’t ask if you were Orthodox. You were a Jew. ”

By Neil Rubin

Lois Rosenfield opens the front door of her Pikesville home, that everpresent smile on full display. She is ready and — as always — organized. Notes are in hand, sodas and fruit are on the living room glass table. She is telling tales of the past four decades, ones in which she helped shape the region’s history. There are so many behind-thescenes stories that the recently-retired head of Baltimore’s American Jewish Committee office has put them in a privately-produced, 87-page book called “40 Years In The Making: A Journey Celebrated.” “I was going back through my files and I couldn’t believe all of these speakers we had. This became not just a history of Jewish Baltimore but of the city and the area, and I had to document it,” she says. Rosenfield formally retired on Dec. 29, 2011, but few around town would know. She’s still at events she helped plan in her part-time job,

which quickly became a full-time passion. On Sunday, April 22, she will be honored at a private reception. She initially refused, but reluctantly relented to a private affair when told it would be an AJC fundraiser. In her book, decade by decade, she reviews a dizzying array of professional and personal events — such as meeting with Pope John Paul II, her granddaughter getting a driver’s license, visiting the Soviet Union, fighting corporate anti-Semitism, starting a Hispanic/Jewish dialogue and so much more. And all along, her extended family had — and continues to have — its Sunday night dinners. Prior to her arrival at the agency — where the Baltimore Blausteins are somewhat of a first family — the director’s spot “had been a revolving door,” she says, chuckling. Back then, the office was in the Munsey Building on Calvert and Fayette streets. On that first day in 1971, her male secretary quipped, “She won’t last six

months.” As Rosenfield says now, “He didn’t last long either.” e New York-based national office, she says, made her job easy. “They always had a set of priorities and they were right on target,” she says. “We were there first with energy and Iran, and always Israel. It was just up to the chapters and the professionals to do as much as they could.” The constants in those early years, she says, were Israel, Soviet Jewry and anti-Semitism. But what would truly shock her was terrorism. “It began with the World Trade Center [bombing in 1993] and then the Oklahoma federal building bombing [in 1994],” she says. “Who would ever think on our soil we would have terrorism?” roughout her career, two principal mentors were American Jewish Committee head David Harris, who will be at the reception here, and Shoshana S. Cardin, the trailblazing local, national and international Jewish leader.

“I think Shoshana is a wow,” Rosenfield says. “What she has done and when she spoke up and said, ‘I’m a Jew and it’s inappropriate that you are holding a meeting on Rosh Hashanah.’ … She has become a mentor, and I value her friendship.”

“Volunteering is part of my way of relaxing.” — Lois Rosenfield

As a part-time director, she somehow became one of Baltimore’s ubervolunteers — and was home at 3 p.m. weekdays for her children. She credits her late husband — a successful local businessman — her late mother and mother-in-law, and a long-time See ‘A Wow’ on page 18 jewishtimes.com

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The Officers and Board of Directors of The Sinai Hospital Auxiliary, Inc. cordially invite you to attend

The Annual Meeting • May 22, 2012, 11:30 a.m. Suburban Club 7600 Park Heights Avenue • Baltimore, Maryland 21208 REPORT OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE

As per Article IV Sections A-B of the Bylaws For Election to a One-Year Term 2012-2013 Joann Nagy Judith Mehlman Rebecca Sirody Jill Waldman

Chair Vice Chair Treasurer Secretary

Nominees for Re-Election as Directors For a Two-Year Term 2012-2013 Deborah Baer Wendy Drazin Daina Garonzik Linda Haas Negin Hariri

Marcy K. Kolodny Darla Lansman Feigi Oberstein Beverly Penn Stefanie Penn

Ellie Spind Diane Stoler Harriette Wienner Harry Zemel

Nominees for Election as Directors For a Two-Year Term 2012-2013 Debbie Effron

Judith Rosenberg

Members may, not later than fourteen days before the next Annual Meeting, and pursuant to the SHA Bylaws, provide the Board in writing with any proposed individual names and/or alternative slate of candidates for election as Directors including Officers. Such properly submitted individual names and/or alternative slate of candidates for Directors including Officers shall be included by the Board in the ballot.

042012

Respectfully submitted, Joann Nagy, Chairperson Nominating Committee Judith Mehlman, Jill Waldman, Judith Rosenberg, Ellie Spind, Debbie Effron and Joy Katzenberg

042012

The above nominees, if elected, along with those Directors whose terms do not expire at this time, Honorary Life Members and Past Presidents, will form the Board of Directors for the coming year. For more information, please call the Auxiliary Office at 410-601-5033.

18

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

‘A Wow’ om page 17 housekeeper for making it possible. A large volunteer role came with the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, where her presidency included five search committees. “Volunteering is part of my way of relaxing,” she says. So many times her efforts in the general community paid off for Baltimore Jews, she adds. When she chaired the board of the Salvation Army, Soviet Jewish refugees were flooding into the area. The Jewish Family Services simply ran out of furniture for them. So she called the Salvation Army’s major here and asked for help. “You know what?” she says. “He rode the truck himself to the families that needed furniture and gave it to them.” The now-late Charles “Chuck” Hoffberger, a leader in international Jewish organizations, once asked her to invite local captains of industry to learn about Israel. Rosenfield tapped her fellow Salvation Army board members to meet at the Center Club. “I’m going to say no to Charles Hoffberger?” she asks rhetorically. “We had the top people there.” Along the way, she befriended Francine Hooks, wife of long-time NAACP head Benjamin Hooks. In 1991 the AJC sought names for a full-page advertisement in The New York Times asking the United Nations to repeal its infamous “Zionism is Racism” resolution. She sought Benjamin Hooks’ signature. “I called the office and Francine answered and said, ‘If you’re calling to ask, the answer is yes,’ ” Rosenfield recalls. “We had a friendship and trust; it was not just me, but the AJC.” Rosenfield also found herself fighting anti-Semitism at home. She recalls a public school speech therapist who could not make meetings her principal purposely scheduled on Jewish holidays. “He would say, ‘Ms. So-And-So is not here today. She must not think this meeting is important.” Well, the woman’s sister was involved with AJC.

The Rosenfield File Professional: American Jewish Committee Baltimore chapter head, 1971-2011 Family: husband, the late Mark Rosenfield, sons Jimmy (married to Laura Bilney) and Stuart (married to Vicki Wolf), three grandchildren (Emily, William and Daniel) Selected Volunteer Roles: National Council of Jewish Women, president; Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, president; Towson State University College of Fine Arts and Communication, chairman of the board; Salvation Army (Baltimore), chairman of the advisory board; Baltimore American Red Cross, board member; Colombo Savings & Loan Association, board member; numerous other committees, boards and volunteer roles.

She called Rosenfield. e matter was resolved. As for Baltimore Jewry, with the growth of Orthodoxy here, she identifies strengthening intra-communal ties as a need. “I don’t like when I hear Orthodox or the ultra-Orthodox community say they don’t consider our rabbi at Baltimore Hebrew a rabbi,” she says. “When it came time for the Holocaust, they didn’t ask if you were Orthodox. You were a Jew.” Do non-Orthodox Jews have something to learn as well? “I hear people form all strains of Judaism say they really respect when they see the Orthodox families together on Shabbat and observing and upholding the religion,” she says. “I hear the positives more than anything else. ... People have to feel open and listen and accept that we are one.” Anyone who knows Rosenfield quickly learns that a relentlessly positive attitude drives her successes. As she says, “I was blessed with a gift, which is my vision. When someone talked about a project, I could see the end of it. That’s why I don’t get rattled, and darned if it didn’t usually work out that way.” JT


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News

Getting A Read On Carson By Simone Ellin

Dr. Ben Carson talks candidly about the Carson Scholars Fund and his latest book.

Dr. Ben Carson has another bestseller on his hands. The iconic director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital’s new book, “America The Beautiful: Rediscovering What Made America Great” (Zondervan), was released in January and hit The New York Times bestseller list by February.

20

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

Dr. Carson was dressed in scrubs and sneakers, smiling and offering a warm handshake, putting me right at ease. Tell me about your new book?

I wrote it because, well, I’m a bit of a history buff and I saw the nation metamorphosing in a regressive direction that was taking America away from its founding principals and away from the sources of its greatness. We have always been a “can-do” nation where people took care of one another, and we are becoming a “what can you do for me nation.” It is my hope that this book will wake up people and remind them what the world was like before this nation came on the scene and what it was like afterwards. e other issue I address with some vigor is “political correctness.” Our most important tenets are freedom of speech and freedom of thought. Now we’ve come through the back door and taken it away. Political correctness prevents people from talking about where they are going. For instance, it is

Dr. Ben Carson:

Dr. Benjamin Carson: “I’m blessed by God and in the right place at the right time.”

not politically correct to talk about “traditional family” because “who’s to say what makes a good family?” But 70 percent of babies born out of wedlock are born into poverty. When we can’t talk about that, we can’t have a meaningful conversation. Let’s talk about the Carson Scholars Fund.

My wife and I would go into schools and we’d see all these trophies for sports but nothing for academics. When eighth graders were given a standardized test and compared to children in other countries, American children scored only 21st out of the 22 countries tested and at the bottom of the heap in math and science. It was devastating. If they’d have been

Justin Tsucalas

Recently, I met with Dr. Carson to discuss his new book, the Carson Scholars Fund (which will host its 16th Annual Awards Banquet on April 29) and a variety of other topics. His renowned accomplishments in medicine and philanthropy, and as a bestselling author, are well-documented. In fact, he was the subject of the film “Gied Hands,” based on his first book by the same name and starring Cuba Gooding Jr. In 1994, Dr. Carson and his wife, Candy, founded the Carson Scholars Fund, a nonprofit organization that awards students for outstanding academic and humanitarian achievements. Many of those local scholars are from Baltimore’s Jewish community. The Carsons also have opened reading rooms throughout the U.S. where children can discover the joy of reading, including at Wellwood Elementary and Pikesville Middle School. Given Dr. Carson’s celebrated reputation, I’ll admit I was a bit nervous about meeting him. But when he entered his office where I was waiting,

tested on sports figures or the Kardashians, we would have blown them away. So my wife Candy started the Carson Scholars Fund in 1994. e fund awards students from fourth to 11th grade who achieve at a higher academic and humanitarian level. Students must have at least a 3.75 GPA (although most have 4.0) and must have demonstrated significant involvement in the care of others. How are Carson Scholars Honored?

First-time Carson Scholars receive a $1,000 scholarship to be applied toward the scholar’s college education. They also get a medal, a certificate and a trophy nameplate for his or her school just like the


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Provided

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trophies for sports, and an invitation to an awards banquet. Why did you choose not to make the program needs-based?

Because it is geared to encourage all students, regardless of financial assets. These people are going to lead our nation. We need them. By giving them attention for their achievements, they create a ripple effect and remove the stigma of being smart. And teachers have told us that the average GPA of students in a class goes up when there is a Carson Scholar in the room. Tell us about the reading rooms program.

Now, the rooms exist in all 50 states. A lot of the Reading Rooms are in Title 1 Schools, where kids come from homes with no books and schools with no libraries. So the reading rooms give them access to

books. They’re all designed to be places where kids want to spend time. Each one has a theme. There’s one downtown by the water that looks like a pier. It has music with ocean sounds. In the beginning the kids are given prizes and incentives to encourage reading, but aer a while they realize they want to read for the sake of reading. What’s been your proudest medical achievement so far? The Siamese twins separation?

The proudest moment for me is every time I walk out of the operating room to the family, and they’re worrying to death, and I can say, ‘Your loved one’s OK. They’re awake and asking for you.’ Is it a lot of pressure being you?

I’d say there’s probably more pressure on the people around me. I don’t sit

Local Jewish students who have benefitted from the Carson Scholars Fund abound. David Hamburger of Reisterstown, a 10th grade student at Pikesville High School, has been a Carson Scholar every year since sixth grade, when he was nominated by his principal, Mia Talarigo, at Pikesville Middle School. “When I was first nominated I was very grateful for the opportunity,” he David says. “I was also honored and kind of Hamburger surprised since I was relatively new to the school.” David says he is appreciative of Principal Talarigo, as well as Louis and Phyllis Friedman, who sponsor the scholarship programs at schools such as Pikesville Middle and High School. “It provides an opportunity to meet other like-minded people outside of sports or other extracurricular activities,” he says. “It is nice to be nominated once, but to be consistently recognized and to have a goal of meeting those high standards each year just multiplies the fun.” JT

See Carson on page 22

— S.E.

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Tom Hall, Music Director

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“Political correctness prevents people from talking about where they are going.” — Dr. Benjamin Carson

Carson om page 21

around thinking about it — what’s on the agenda. Personally, I don’t believe I’m a great person. I’m blessed by God and in the right place at the right time.

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others with reading. New Zealand recently expressed interest in the reading room program. Judaism talks about tikkun olam, repairing the world. That seems to summarize your life.

I share that value in spades. To whom much is given, much is required. I’ve been given a lot, and it is not a burden to give it back. JT

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Laura Seaberg, an eighth grade student at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School, was selected as the school’s Carson Scholar this year. The Mount Washington resident says her essay on competition earned her the opportunity to apply. She also has an excellent academic record, has assisted her school librarian and participated in social action projects with her synagogue, Beit Tikvah. “Other kids should definitely go for it,” she says. “There are lots of people competing, but you can do it if you really apply yourself and write a good essay. It’s a great feeling!” JT

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

Crisis

Healing service to serve as a balm for trauma victims.

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For Leslie Rosen, the comparisons were way too close. She had just emerged from Passover, the story of the Jewish people’s Exodus from Egypt and the Pharaoh. ey were 40 years in the desert. Rosen couldn’t help but remember that it had been about 40 years since the final time her uncle molested her as a child growing up in Potomac. Her mitzrayim, her Egypt, was the molestation itself, and the impact it had on her life, and still does. Rosen, the dean of general studies at the Shoshana S. Cardin Community High School in Northwest Baltimore, has escaped from her “Egypt” but is still, as she put it, “wandering in the desert,” toward hopefully what will be her freedom. She will be among the speakers on Sunday, April 22, at the Howard County Board of Rabbis’ healing service, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Oakland Mills Interfaith Center for “Listen, Believe, Respond. A Jewish Program Of Healing For Trauma Survivors And e Entire Howard County Community.” Along with the rabbinical board, co-sponsors include the Jewish Federation of Howard County and the Shofar Coalition, an agency of the Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore. e program is open to the public. Rabbi Sonya Starr, spiritual leader of Columbia Jewish Congregation, hosted a similar event about a year ago. This time, she wanted to expand exposure of the issue of molestation and the secrecy.

“Our goal is to give voice to the survivors of domestic violence and sexual violence,” said Rabbi Starr. “is is a way of saying to our community that when we are silent, we condone this behavior. ... We have a moral and ethical responsibility to people who deserve our support and our help.” Lisa Ferentz, founder of the Institute for Advanced Psychotherapy and Education Inc., said that such services give “abuse survivors the opportunity to get back their voices, and to have the reparative experience of others bearing witness to both their pain and their resiliency.” She adds, “Traumatic experiences can be magnified by the intrinsic dynamics of betrayal, secrecy, silence, shame, isolation and self-blame. The very notion of a healing service breaks the cycle of silence and allows survivors to feel supported and less alone in their experiences.” Rosen said she will have two audiences in mind while speaking. The first, she said, are people who were never abused but who have a high

“Listen, Believe and Respond, A Jewish Program Of Healing For Trauma Survivors And The Entire Howard County Community” will be held Sunday, April 22, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Oakland Mills Interfaith Center, 5885 Robert Oliver Place in Columbia. For information, contact Elaine Witman of the Shofar Coalition at 410-843-7582.


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her speech made her feel less alone. “is woman was so relieved that there was someone who was talking about the same experience,” said Rosen. Elaine Witman, the Shofar Coalition’s director, said that survivors who are giving the gut-wrenching accounts of their own personal experiences at healing services do so because “they want to make sure that what happened to them does not happen to others. And if it does, they want to make sure that those people are not alone, that they are not isolated by shame and denial, and they are not re-victimized by silence.” For Rabbi Susan Grossman, spiritual leader of Columbia’s Beth Shalom Congregation and a national leader in the Conservative movement, the issue of abuse very much needs to be addressed in synagogues. “On one hand, our goal is to support the victims and let them know that they are not alone,” she said. “We want to provide them with support and healing. “Another goal,” she added, “is to educate the community so that individuals who can be supportive can also become advocates to assist and help, and even intervene in appropriate ways, so we can eliminate domestic violence and abuse in all of its forms.” JT Phil Jacobs is the editor of the Washington Jewish Week, the sister publication of the BALTIMORE J EWISH TIMES.

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level of concern because someone they know has been impacted. “e goal here is to raise their awareness even more and to make people understand that this is real,” she said. “When a person stands before you and tells her story, there is a reality you, as the audience member, must confront.” She compares it in terms of hearing a Holocaust survivor speak. “To have a survivor speak changes the dynamic for the audience because here is a real person that I am actually seeing,” she said. “This is not just something I saw in a history book.” Her second audience, she says, are the people who have been affected by sexual abuse either as victims or as persons with knowledge of another’s abuse. For them, she hopes to build a feeling of solidarity that “you are not alone.” Aer a recent healing service speech, Rosen tells how a female audience member came to her in tears. e two hugged for many minutes while the audience member sobbed on Rosen’s shoulder. “She had been abused by her uncle, just like me,” said Rosen. “Her entire family didn’t realize anything and adored this man. She had never spoken about it, but the uncle just died and she was expected to go to the funeral. It was very traumatic for her, especially the eulogies. Everyone thought that he was such a great guy.” e woman told Rosen that hearing

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Behind e Headlines

Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks: For 21 years, he has become an eloquent and prolific representative of English-speaking Jewry.

Who Needs a

Lord Rabbi? United Synagogue

With Jonathan Sacks retiring, British Jews are mixed on the relevancy of ‘the chief.’ By Dianna Cahn

The search to replace Britain’s powerful longtime chief rabbi has gone international, but even as resumes are gathered and interviews conducted, some are questioning whether the position is still relevant. As chief rabbi, Lord Jonathan Sacks brought international attention to the post as an eloquent writer and speaker on modern Jewish and social issues, gaining recognition as an ambassador for Jews in the Englishspeaking world. His writings on strengthening education, creating social mechanisms to counter crime and violence, and instilling moral values in society are often taken into the public policy sphere for discussion. “With Jonathan Sacks you have somebody who has the gravitas and respect of the wider population of this country as a leading spiritual 26

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

figure,” said Alexander Goldberg, a Jewish chaplain and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee’s international interfaith and community relations adviser. But Rabbi Sacks’ tenure as head of the centrist Orthodox United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth coincided with an era of sweeping decline in Jewish affiliation, particularly among the mainstream Orthodox he leads. In fact, in the 21 years since he became chief rabbi, Modern Orthodox Jewry dropped from two-thirds of Britain’s affiliated Jews to just over one-half. In a time of deepening Jewish polarization, he has been criticized for alienating progressive and secular Jews, particularly over Jewish status issues such as conversion and marriage. He is seen as leaning right,

toward the Haredi Orthodox community — which does not follow his rulings. Likewise, the Reform, Liberal and Masorti (Conservative) movements don’t recognize his authority. As Ben Rich, the Reform movement’s chief executive, says, “The current chief rabbi of the United Synagogue is a very wise counsel who has done an enormous amount for interfaith relations and is a really valuable addition to the British Jewish community. He’s very good at interfaith, but not very good at intra-faith.” Modeled after the archbishop of Canterbury, the chief rabbinate was created in Victorian times to give the monarchy a single address for British Jewry. He is selected by the United Synagogue, the governing body of the Orthodox synagogues.

At the time the post was created, 85 percent of British Jews were Orthodox. But modern-day Judaism, much like the Anglican Church, is losing ground as a uniform community. Synagogue membership here dropped from 99,763 in 1990 to 82,963 by 2010, according to the Board of Deputies of British Jews. Meanwhile, Modern Orthodoxy lost 20,000 of its 66,000 members, countered by a doubling of the Haredi community and sharp growth in the tiny Conservative community, which went from 1,226 members to 2,269 in the same period. Within the Modern Orthodox fold, there is discussion over how to breathe new life into the movement and whether the new chief rabbi should focus internally on strengthening the United Synagogue.


“He’s very good at interfaith, but not very good at intra-faith.”

United Synagogue

— Ben Rich

The Orthodox rabbinate’s rigidity on issues of conversion and same-sex marriage is alienating many young Jews by forcing them to choose between their partners, who are not viewed as legitimate under Orthodoxy, and their affiliation, he says. Meanwhile, the Conservative movement’s director, Matt Plen, says the face of Judaism is changing. “Younger people, especially ... are more willing to take Judaism on their own terms and figure out for themselves what sort of Judaism they want to have in their lives,” he says. Likewise, Geoffrey Alderman, a Jewish Chronicle commentator who belongs to the rival centrist Orthodox Federation of Synagogues, says the chief rabbinate has become “silly and expensive” because no one person can now represent Anglo Jewry. JT Dianna Cahn writes for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency from London.

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NATION (JTA) A Ponzi scheme targeting the Persian-Jewish community in Los Angeles was shut down by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. … The Jewish federation in Chicago has fired the president and executive board of the University of Chicago Hillel, citing a dispute over who controls the Jewish student organization there. … Hadassah has named Janice Weinman its new executive director and CEO as it continues to investigate three top officials for misuse of funds. … More than 200 students at Florida Atlantic University’s Boca Raton campus received fake eviction notices from a pro-Palestinian group.

042012

That leaves as a key question whether the chief rabbi can — or should — continue to try to unite British Jewry under a single umbrella. Goldberg believes the chief rabbi should be a bridge not just to other denominations but also to the unaffiliated, who “need to become conversant with the Jewish world if they are going to continue with the Jewish community.”

4/18/12

I SRAEL (JTA) Leaders of the Israeli Reform and Conservative movements sent a letter of complaint to the Israeli government charging that Israeli hotels discriminate against nonOrthodox Jews. … Israel must protect Jews around the world in addition to its own borders, IDF Chief of Staff Lt.-Gen. Benny Gantz said during a seminar for soldiers at Yad VaShem. … Fans of the Beitar Jerusalem soccer team marched through Jerusalem chanting racist slogans, a month after attacking Arab workers at a shopping mall.

I NTERNATIONAL (JTA) Israel’s navy is reportedly cooperating with its Lebanese counterpart to prevent foreign ships from approaching Israeli waters. … American author Dave Eggers said he will not travel to Germany to accept a literary prize from the Gunter Grass Foundation due to Grass’s recently published poem claiming that Israel is endangering world peace by threatening Iran. … In a letter to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, two congressmen said a medal awarded to veteran journalist Helen Thomas could hurt U.S. assistance to the P.A.

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Wonder Kids Musical prodigies play for keeps in wartime story ‘Wunderkinder.’ By Michael Fox

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The curtain rises on the riveting, rollercoaster drama “Wunderkinder” (“Child Prodigies”) in a present-day concert hall with a white-haired violinist rehearsing for her recital. e arrival of a surprise visitor catapults Hanna Reich — and us — back to 1941 and Poltava, Ukraine, where two gied children play a marvelous violin-and-piano duet for an audience of Soviet authorities and local bigwigs. e stage is set for a familiar wartime saga glossed with classical music, but German writer-director Markus Rosenmuller delivers much, much more. “Wunderkinder” will be presented next Wednesday night, April 25, at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts in Owings Mills as part of the William and Irene Weinberg Family Baltimore Jewish Film Festival. The title of the 2011 film simultaneously manages to be accurate and misleading. Abrascha Kaplan (Elin Kolev) and Larissa Brodsky (Imogen Burrell), the well-coached, wellscrubbed performers, are prodigious talents indeed. But as the war plays havoc with their ambitions and lives, the way in which they are different

from other children matters less to us than the ways in which they are the same. Up to a point, that is. Larissa and Abrascha are Jewish, which becomes a big deal after Hitler shockingly and ruthlessly voids the non-aggression pact he signed with Joseph Stalin. To the invading Nazis and some of the Ukrainians, the children’s ethnicity is their defining characteristic. That said, another filmmaker might rely on Abrascha’s and Larissa’s artistic abilities to compel us with their plight and root against potential tragedy. Rosenmuller’s underlying theme, expressed without a single line of dialogue, is that every child is promising and innocent, and war’s greatest horror is that the casualties include children. While Jewish viewers will identify with Larissa and Abrascha, it’s a strong-willed German girl, Hanna, who propels the movie in key early sequences. A few years younger than the prodigies, and not as accomplished musically, she succeeds in pushing her way into their friendship. Hanna’s father is a former Olympic


skier dispatched by a Berlin brewery to open and run its lucrative Poltava operation; her mother is an enthusiastic Hitler supporter. e Reichs (an apt name for geographical interlopers) get on fine with the Ukrainians until the German attack makes them instant enemies. The Brodskys and Kaplans come to their rescue, ferreting them from one hiding place to another. When the Nazis arrive and occupy Poltava, the Reichs are returned to their comfortable former status. Soon enough, it is their turn to intercede on behalf of their Jewish friends. The Nazis possess a deranged sense of culture and art filtered through unthinking anti-Semitism, embodied by the SS officer who rules with a loathsome smugness. The gulf between civilization and barbarism, a recurring theme in countless war movies (both pulp entertainments and nuanced morality plays), ultimately

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plays out in the cruelest fashion imaginable. Relative to the vast number of Holocaust films set in Poland, Germany and, in recent years, France, only a handful examines the unique and morally fraught terrain of Ukraine. “Wunderkinder” provides a vivid and revealing sense of the powerlessness of ordinary people, especially Jews, to negotiate the whipsaw turn of events there in the early years of World War II. It should be noted that the film avoids the usual portrayal of all Ukrainians as anti-Semitic opportunists, instead depicting some characters as kind (albeit gruff ) and others as complying out of fear of their new Nazi overlords. “Wunderkinder” also eschews the winsome movie cliche that art can bridge ethnic or national divides. The most bracing character in the film is music teacher Irina Salomonowa (Gudrun Landgrebe), whose passion

The film “Wunderkinder” provides a vivid sense of the powerlessness of ordinary people to negotiate the events of the early years of World War II.

Photos provided

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for liberty and justice surpasses even her dedication to musical excellence and her students. One imagines that Hanna Reich carried Irina’s inspiration, among others, to every performance of her career. JT

“Wunderkinder” will be screened as part of the 23rd annual William and Irene Weinberg Family Baltimore Jewish Film Festival at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts, 3560 Gwynnbrook Avenue in Owings Mills. For information, call 410-5592377 or visit baltimorejff.com .

Michael Fox is a San Francisco-based freelance writer.

THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH WOMEN’S ORGANIZATIONS OF MARYLAND Honoring Linda Hurwitz

Keynote Speaker Deborah Adler

E.B. Hirsh LifeƟme Achievement Award

Area Director of AIPAC

TZEDEK AWARD HONOREES

TZEDEK AWARD HONOREES

Adat Chaim Ͳ Linda Boteach

Jewish Caring Network Ͳ Musia Bibliowicz

AMIT Ͳ Pearl Greenbaum

JWI/Lillie Straus/Hope Chapter Ͳ Jacqueline Wilen

BalƟmore Hebrew Ͳ Shirley Simon

Kappa Guild Ͳ Rusty Heyman

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Levindale Auxiliary Ͳ Barbara HyaƩ

Beth Israel Sisterhood Ͳ JudiͲDickman Narrow

Mildred Mindell Cancer Found., Inc. Ͳ Lynn Fram

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Miriam Lodge, K.S.B. Inc. Ͳ Norma Samson

Bnai Jacob/Shaarei Zion Ͳ Lea Fischer

Moses MonteĮore Anshe Emunah Siserhood Ͳ Toba Falk

Brandeis Nat’l Comm. Ͳ Anita Potemkin

NaƟonal Council of Jewish Women Ͳ Anne London

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96TH ANNUAL CONVENTION MAY 3, 2012 BALTIMORE HEBREW CONGREGATION 9:30AM Ͳ 2:30PM

Ner Tamid Sisterhood Ͳ Charlene Jacobson Sinai Hospital Auxiliary Ͳ Diane Stoler Temple Emanuel Sisterhood Ͳ Elizabeth Yarsky Temple Oheb Shalom Sisterhood Ͳ Bynny Kravitz The Associated Women Ͳ Alllison Magat True Sisters Inc. Ͳ Seema Goldbergh

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Cover Story |

Dr. Paul D. Schneider was working at a Los Angeles synagogue when Rabbi Joel H. Zaiman, Chizuk Amunoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rabbi emeritus, recruited him to come to Krieger Schechter Day School in 1983.

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A Real

Class Act Written By Alan H. Feiler Photography by Justin Tsucalas

Dr. Paul D. Schneider looks back on his career at Krieger Schechter Day School.

On a wall hanging unobtrusively and inconspicuously in the main office of Krieger Schechter Day School, a plaque reads, “One who teaches another’s child Torah is regarded by the tradition as one who gave birth to the child.” if that Talmudic inscription, from Sanhedrin 19 B, is to be believed, then it might be said that Dr. Paul D. Schneider has given birth to thousands of children during the past three decades (although their mothers may strongly beg to differ). Since 1983, Dr. Schneider, 65, has served as headmaster at KSDS, the K-8 school that is affiliated with Chizuk amuno and shares space with the Stevenson synagogue. he is stepping down from that position at the end of the 2011-2012 academic year and plans to serve as a third rabbi for Chizuk amuno. Bill Zarch, 41, head of school at the lander-grinspoon academy in northampton, Mass., will succeed Dr. Schneider as of July 1. Over the years, the avuncular, hardworking but easygoing Dr. Schneider has built up a strong reputation as a visionary educator, a well-respected leader, a world-class raconteur and an exemplary role model. with his penchant for a good joke and a thought-provoking anecdote, as well as an intense love for all things Jewish, he is a beloved figure in the KSDS, Chizuk amuno and general Jewish communities. in fact, the auxiliary services led by Dr. Schneider annually at Chizuk amuno are among the

hottest high holiday tickets in town. (See sidebar.) “i just feel he’s extremely unique in that he is so authentic,” says liz Minkin-Friedman, co-president of KSDS’ Parents association. “Dr. Schneider has a lot of insight into the politics and pulse of the community. and he has the ability to make you feel whenever you’re talking to him that he’s really listening to you, that you have his undivided attention. That’s a real gift. … he’s such a mentsch, and his responses are usually very inspirational and powerful. Everything about him exudes Jewish values, and he always finds the best way to look at things, but through a Jewish lens.” Minkin-Friedman credits Dr. Schneider, a father of three sons and grandfather of two granddaughters, for the school’s ability to thrive over the years, even during tough fiscal times. “People don’t always realize how sharp a politician he is. he doesn’t miss a thing, but he accomplishes things in a gentle way,” she says. “he saw [KSDS] through its infancy and adolescence, and he steadied the ship. he had a vision and made it happen and kept it growing and changing with the times. Twentynine years in the same place and he never became

stale along the journey.” e BalTiMOrE JEwiSh TiMES chatted recently with Dr. Schneider — who received his rabbinical ordination from Jewish eological Seminary and his doctorate in education from Columbia Teachers College — about his career at KSDS, his views on contemporary Jewish learning and worship, and his plans for the future. JT: So you’re kind of retiring, but you’re not. You’re leaving Krieger Schechter, in a way, but you’re going to Chizuk Amuno, even though you’ve been there for decades?

[laughs] Yes, i’m transitioning. look, i’ve been very fortunate and blessed. it’s an unusual Jewish educator who can remain in the same place for so long, to have kindergarteners and watch them celebrate their bar and bat mitzvahs and weddings, and watch their kids become students at Krieger Schechter Day School. it gives me a great deal of satisfaction.

Dr. Schneider:

How did you wind up at Krieger Schechter?

i was in los angeles and working at Sinai Temple, a large congregation in a very affluent community. Then, rabbi [ Joel h.] Zaiman [Chizuk amuno’s rabbi emeritus] called me. he’d heard that i was exploring the possibility of day school administration. i was the assistant rabbi of education at Sinai Temple and i was involved in adult education. i really enjoyed teaching and i realized i wanted to jewishtimes.com

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Dr. Schneider says he finds that teaching the meaning of davening to students often resonates best while visiting Israel.

Dr. Schneider shares a laugh with one of his puppet alter egos.

go into day school education. Rabbi Zaiman had family in L.A. and he wanted to meet with me. I was so impressed with him. He’s a remarkably intelligent person of great integrity. Krieger Schechter was in its third year of existence. I’ll never forget what Rabbi Zaiman said to me — ‘Paul, come back to Baltimore with me and we’ll build a community together.’ That impressed me so much. I knew nothing of Baltimore or Chizuk Amuno, but Rabbi Zaiman and I really clicked and I was very excited. What in particular intrigued you?

Here was a small school — kindergarten, first and second grades. Forty kids, a handful of teachers. And we started and we grew. Everything was new and exciting. Rabbi Zaiman wanted us to be an intellectually-based school, producing the best and the brightest. We added a grade every year, and we discovered something on the way — siblings. If you’re a synagogue-based school, how can you accept one kid and not another? If you want to make a change in Judaism in this country, you need to take in the family, not just a child. So we expanded and grouped kids according to their ability level. At first, we’d only look at kids who were at an 34

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

exceptional level, and we got a reputation as an elitist place. So we divided the kids and brought in math and reading specialists to meet the needs across the board. But some people feel math and science and other general studies get lost in the shuffle because you are a Jewish day school with an emphasis on Hebrew comprehension.

We basically have a school of kids who are academically advanced, and we have a bilingual school. So before an application even comes in, there’s a big decision-making process for families. We feel the Hebrew language is important on a number of levels. It’s the language of our tradition. It’s fine to study Torah in English, but you miss so much. Secondly, modern Hebrew is the language of the Jewish people around the world, not just in Israel. That’s the language of the Jewish people for communication, and we want the kids to feel at home in Israel. In addition, there is much research pointing to the acquisition of a second language at a young age as enhancing a child’s cognitive development. Also, we want children to feel comfortable when they come into a synagogue. Their facility with reading Hebrew should make them feel

much more at home in a synagogue. How does that all play out?

What happens at this day school is that starting at kindergarten, there are opportunities for the children to present publicly. Every grade has its special thing. By the time you get to eighth grade, they’re not afraid to stand in front of people and present. We have 20 years of putting on a play in Hebrew. Their ability to stand in front of a group of people and read Torah and lead davening and be in a play and be comfortable, it’s really remarkable. And it’s a natural thing for our kids. Can you talk a little about your own upbringing?

My father was a merchant. He left for work at 4 in the morning and came home 10 at night, Mondays through Saturdays, so he didn’t know from Shabbos. My mom raised the kids. My grandmother lived with us. She worked constantly for Israel and the [ Jewish National Fund] and European welfare and B’nai B’rith and her sisterhood. She went to shul every Shabbos, so I went to shul every Shabbos. I went to religious school three days a week and on Sundays, and I was involved in [United Synagogue Youth]. Also, I went to Camp Ramah for a summer and attended Hebrew high school.


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Dr. Schneider points out an important passage to a pair of KSDS students.

‘People Wanted To Stay’

The following is a conversation with Dr. Paul D. Schneider about his popular auxiliary High Holiday services at Chizuk Amuno.

Your Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services are legendary, almost having cult-like status. Part of the draw seems to be your personality and haimishness, and in particular your poignant and often amusing sermons.

I love the High Holidays. I enjoy that time of year very much, and all year long I collect articles and make notes. I do a lot of reading in June and I start writing down my ideas by July, and in August I have things formatted. There is some stress involved. If you only do it one time a year, you really want to do a good job. I really put my heart and soul into it. A lot of us call it ‘the Schneider Service,’ even though you prefer calling it the ‘Stulman Service’ because it’s in the Stulman Auditorium.

When did you decide to become a rabbi?

I was majoring in Near Eastern and Jewish studies at Brandeis [University], and I had [the late Biblical scholar] Nahum Sarna as a professor. Can you imagine?! There were so many exceptional people there. I loved it, and in my junior year I decided to become a rabbi. Who were the people who most profoundly informed you as a person and Jewish professional?

When I was growing up in Detroit, I had a youth director named Noam Shudofsky, of blessed memory. I loved that man, and that was where I developed a love for Judaism and Israel. He was my mentor and worked for Adat Shalom as a youth organizer. [Rabbi] Herman Savitz is another. I love this guy. When I was at Jewish Theological Seminary, I served under him as the assistant rabbi at Lake Hiawatha Jewish Center [in Parsippany, N.J.]. He loves stories and Yiddishkeit, and he’s such a sincere, fine human being. He’s someone I have such high regard for, and he’s still one of my best friends. Also, I admired my bubbie for her involvement and commitment to the Jewish people. I was looking for that. I didn’t just want to exist; I wanted meaning in my life.

It’s actually called the ‘Stulman Family Service.’ There was a need for a family service at Chizuk Amuno that would be shorter [than the regular High Holiday service] and that people could come to with their children. When it started 22 years ago, there were only families from the school. Their children led the Shema and the Ashrei. The key elements were what an adult service required, but children participated, too. It was never a junior congregation service. I could never give a sermon if there are children crawling around on the floor or if there’s any noise. I’m just the kind of guy who needs undivided attention. That’s just how I am. So it just grew, to the point that there was a waiting list.

The [original] idea was that families would come and five years later, different [KSDS] families would come. But people wanted to stay. They felt that whatever they got, they couldn’t get it elsewhere. So what’s your secret? How do you keep ’em coming back for 22 years? That’s no small feat.

People love the intimacy and they love the level of participation. Look, I know who I am and what I value and what’s important to do. For instance, we invite people to stand and share the name of a friend or relative who needs healing, and I’ll recite a Mesheberach. So we do that, and it’s unusual. We also have a “simcha moment” [at which worshippers call out joyful events that

happened to them during the year]. You can’t really do that with a larger crowd. We have family aliyot. Most services don’t do that. And there are other opportunities for involvement. What I love about it is that a lot of the people who come are also people who come to shul every Shabbat. These are people who feel comfortable in a synagogue. I’m not doing a show for them. We’re davening together. These people want to daven. And your favorite part of the service?

My favorite part is when we sing the melody for Avinu Malkeinu. When every person is singing, it simply lifts me. I don’t want it to ever stop. But what about your sermons? I’ve gone some years and everyone around me is weeping profusely. How do you do that?

People come on the High Holidays and they expect to be touched. If the sermon doesn’t touch people, they’re disappointed. That’s why I spend months working on it. My typical sermon goes through five drafts. It takes tremendous effort. Storytelling is a big part of your sermons, and some of those stories are quite personal. Do you consider yourself a maggid, a storyteller, of sorts?

A maggid is a professional storyteller. I just happen to love stories. I grew up in Detroit. Rabbi Jacob E. Segal, alav hashalom, at Adat Shalom Synagogue was the rabbi. I’d go every Shabbat — I was the only one there under 60 — and I’d hear Rabbi Segal tell stories. Rabbi Segal had a great voice, wonderful timing, and he spoke with passion. He was an impressive person. What is the power of stories that resonates so strongly with people?

The power of the story is that you identify with the characters. It touches your heart. When I read a story, I ask myself, ‘Will this touch people? Will it make a difference? Will it teach?’ So where do you get your stories from?

I have lots of books with stories, and people send me stories throughout the year. And I keep my eyes open. I keep a memory bank. — A.H.F.

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Dr. Schneider recently portrayed the prophet Isaiah for students.

Let’s go back to your career at Krieger Schechter. How did you grow the school and make it succeed?

The truth is, I’ve been blessed with incredible people here — teachers, administrators, parents, everybody on staff, the people who buy into the values of this school. We’ve actually had very little turnover in staff over the years. They really look at this as their family, and they have a high level of satisfaction that our children get into wonderful high schools and marvelous colleges. To meet our alumni is particularly gratifying. I ask them what difference Schechter made in their lives. A fellow in Washington, an attorney around 31 or 32 with a wife and child, said, ‘I feel I’m a good person, and Krieger Schechter had a lot to do with it. I think the values I have today I got at Krieger Schechter,’ which was then Solomon Schechter. One girl told me, ‘Dr. Schneider, I still remember how you told us why it’s important to marry a Jewish person.’ For those of us who value the Jewish future and see that a large percentage of children of intermarriage are not raised Jewish, it’s an important thing. What is the biggest problem confronting Jews today?

We have a marketing problem. People feel strongly about individual freedom and that organized religion shouldn’t interfere with their lives. But if you 36

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

“People come on the High Holidays and they expect to be touched. If the sermon doesn’t touch people, they’re disappointed. That’s why I spend months working on it.”

Looking at the feel you have somefuture, what are thing important and Krieger Schechter’s special, you sometimes challenges? Some — Dr. Paul D. Schneider have to convey that and people say the tuition stand up, in a home setting gap between the school or a family setting. Rabbis and local non-sectarian schools who can articulate how Judaism has diminished considerably. enriches one’s life will be successful in My sense is we’ve always been about twoattracting people and having people live Jewish thirds [of the tuition fee compared to non-sectarlives. But it’s not an easy thing. ian schools]. I think it’s the ability to provide So what do we need to do to create committed, knowledgeable young Jews?

I admire the community and its insistence on education. I’d want every child to receive a Jewish day school education. I don’t think there’s any problem with the quality in terms of the day schools of Baltimore, not just at Krieger Schechter. For those families who don’t send their children to day schools, we have to make sure religious schools are staffed by quality people. There have to be quality programs, and I think in Baltimore we’ve done a good job. We have to make sure that every institution is providing Jewish education that is taken seriously. Good teachers and well-articulated programs result in the transmission of knowledge and value to the next generation. But we need more money and to collaborate and work smarter to accomplish our goals.

scholarship dollars in the amounts needed, to continue providing day school education for the number of children who want and need it. Secondly, we need to change the perception in the community that a day school education means making a compromise [regarding] general studies. That’s a hard sell. Until people are willing to come and visit us, there’s a perception that if you don’t spend 100 percent of your child’s time in general studies, you’re wasting your time. The fact is, kids who go to day school are challenged at an early age to learn and think. They have advanced skills, not only in creative writing in English but in Hebrew as well. People worry that their kids won’t get enough of a general studies education if they go to day school. If they could only see our alumni and how they have advanced skills. It’s amazing. All day school alumni do well in their college education.


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On Sunday night, April 29, Dr. Paul D. Schneider will be honored by the Krieger Schechter community for his 29 years of service to the day school. For information about the dinner and reception at Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 8100 Stevenson Road, call 410-824-2050 or email alisonw@soink12.ksds.edu .

Some people feel that an intensive dayschool education leads to Jewish saturation and insularity.

All my years here, not once has someone said to me, “It’s a shame I went to a Jewish day school.” People who want their children to be exposed to other cultures do so readily. There’s ample opportunity. We teach respect for all human beings. Our goal is to enrich people Jewishly and bring them closer to God and Torah. But we don’t do it aggressively. It’s done with compassion and reason. We just want people to participate in a conversation that’s been going on for thousands of years. To do that, you need the tools, which we provide. How do you get kids jazzed about ritualistic Judaism?

Look, davening is difficult to get people excited about. Davening works best in a family where everyone buys into it, that kind of culture where this flows automatically. In our culture, among Conservative Jews, it’s unusual where you have fathers davening every day. So we’re asking [students] to go somewhere their parents usually haven’t gone. You have to spend time discussing what these prayers mean or you’re bound for failure. There’s nothing automatic with our kids, but in Israel we see davening taken to a higher level. When we take our eighth grade to Israel, I say to the kids, ‘Think for a moment and pray from your heart. Share with God what prayer you have in your heart.’ It’s a very powerful, transformative experience. It’s not just a trip, but one is touched by deep moments of spirituality. You walk on the grounds of the prophets and meet Jews from all over the world. Why is Israel such a major focus at Krieger Schechter? After all, some Jewish educators say kids are less interested in Israel than ever before.

For nine years, our students study Hebrew and learn about Yerushalyim and the successes and challenges Israel faces. ey learn how Israel brought to its borders communities of Jews, and we also talk to

them about the tsuris in Israel with Arabs and antiIsraeli stuff in the world. ey get a good sense of what Israel is and can be, and where there are legitimate concerns. We’re honest with them, because we want them to be able to answer people about Israel. We want them to make the case for Israel. Are kids different today than when you first arrived at Krieger Schechter?

[Pauses] Kids are more distracted today with electronics — Facebook, Twitter. It’s taken a lot of their time that was once spent in other activities that are educationally sound. Kids were more engaged in reading or sports or going outside. My sense is now they run home to their computers and cellphones to check their messages. So that makes this generation different. at’s our culture today, and I think it’s problematic in the type of relationships we want people to have with each other. So is leaving Krieger Schechter after 29 years tough on you?

There are tender moments and thoughtful ones and funny ones. When a child hugs me, that’s a tender moment. Thoughtful ones are when I go through my office and wonder what I’m going to do with all that stuff — it’s 29 years of stuff ! The funny moments? A friend in Boston recently said to me, ‘I know the new head of school [at Krieger Schechter]. He’s my best friend … and he’s nothing like you!’ [Laughs] I thought that was very funny. Wherever I look reminds me of my time here. I walk in the classrooms and the shul and everywhere, and I feel very blessed. Not everyone has a job for 29 years that they’ve loved. ere was never a time I went home and said to my wife [of 43 years, Marilyn], ‘I’ve got to go, I can’t stand that place.’ How many rabbis can say that? Am I lucky or what? Do you know your successor, Bill Zarch?

I’ve met him a couple of times. He’s a very bright guy and very personable. I think the school is in very good shape. We could use some additional

money for our projects and programs, but I’m leaving the school in good hands. So what will you be doing after you officially step down?

I will be joining the rabbinic staff here at Chizuk Amuno Congregation. I’ll be the education rabbi. My primary responsibilities will be teaching in the schools — Krieger Schechter, Netivon [Chizuk Amuno’s high school program], perhaps Rosenbloom [the synagogue’s religious school]. I’ll be raising funds for Krieger Schechter and the congregation. I think that’s something I’m good at, and it’s needed. And I’ll be doing congregational programming, perhaps holiday programming. My rabbinic background will be helpful, but that element will be determined. And I’ll continue to do the life cycle events I do. There’s a lot here that’s not been ironed out yet. I imagine there will be opportunities to teach from the pulpit and touch the entire Chizuk Amuno community. In your spare time, what do you like to do?

Working as the headmaster of a school with 350 students and 100 employees is an intense job. The truth is that the nature of my job here is such that there’s precious spare time. That’s for spending time with my family and reading and working out. I hope to travel with my wife in the years to come. Some people describe you as possessing heroic qualities. Dr. Schneider, who are your heroes?

My personal hero is Janusz Korczak, the doctor who ran a Jewish orphanage in Warsaw before World War II. When the Nazis rounded up the children and put them on a train for Treblinka, Korczak was given the option to leave. Instead, he chose to accompany the children so that they would not be alone. That level of commitment and courage is inspiring. JT

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By Rochelle Eisenberg

CREATIVE LICENSE

Justin Tsucalas

Yaakov Bar Am: “I’m here to support the arts.”

If Yaakov Bar Am had his way, the world would have a few more paintbrushes and a few less guns. Bar Am is a Pikesville-based woodworker who specializes in customcraed furniture and wood collectables. He is also president of the Maryland Artisan Guild, a nonprofit group he established that provides marketing and business support to area artists so they can concentrate on their creative work. With a current list of 14 artisans, MAG offers show opportunities, Internet and social media exposure, and publicity opportunities to maximize artists’ sales. “These are tough economic times,” Bar Am says. “We need more beautiful things in the world, and I want to help artists who don’t know how to use the Internet.” One of his initial goals in establishing this organization was to provide a venue for Jewish artists. “There are an amazingly talented group of Jews who can do more than paint Moses,” he says. “It’s important

Justin Tsucalas

Maryland Artisan Guild provides business acumen for artists.


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hired him to spend a day at his shop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like Michael Jordan teaching you how to play basketball,â&#x20AC;? he says. A father of ďŹ ve and a business analyst by day, Bar Am decided to establish MAG last August. Bryna Lazarus says of the guild, â&#x20AC;&#x153;î&#x201A;&#x160;ey are good at getting places for us to show our work. î&#x201A;&#x160;ereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also camaraderie with people you otherwise may not know.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Yaakov Bar Am

Working with other Jewish artists has been exciting for Aleksandra Fadeyeva, who specializes in silk painting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It helps spiritually,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many of us have the same point of view, and we can look at our work and see a lot in common.â&#x20AC;? Ultimately, Bar Am says he would like to see the group grow to 20 members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to support the arts,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to make the world a prettier place.â&#x20AC;? JT

The Maryland Artisan Guild will have a booth at the Quarry Lake Spring and Garden Show, at 2510-2850 Quarry Lake Drive in Pikesville, this Sunday, April 22, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. More than 55 vendors are expected to display. Proceeds benefit the Pikesville Chamber of Commerce. For information about MAG, visit mdartisanguild.com/Mary land_Artisan_Guild,_LLC/Wel come.html or call 443-6105613.

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for artists to help each other â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reform, secular, all Jews.â&#x20AC;? At the same time, Bar Am says he realizes that for his organization to be successful, there are not enough Jewish artists to support the guild. He says the non-Jewish members can help man the shows on Shabbat. Bryna Lazarus is a mixed-media artist who has her own line of notecards. A MAG member, she says she oî&#x2020;?en draws inspiration from Judaism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of my most popular pieces is called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Unity,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a series of one shape, like my â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dance of Unity,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; with circles that go off into space. It symbolizes Jewish unity.â&#x20AC;? Having recently moved to Baltimore from Cleveland, Lazarus says she was looking for an art manager when she discovered MAG. Unlike another artist group of which she was a member, Lazarus says MAG offers her a business approach to help sell her products, something with which she is not as comfortable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;î&#x201A;&#x160;ere are not many painters in the group, but there are [artists] who talk about the trials and tribulations of promoting artwork,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yaakov has more of an entrepreneurial spirit. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not an entrepreneurial person. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking for shows, contacting them, doing the legwork. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve very indebted to him.â&#x20AC;? In 1990, after years watching the PBS show â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New Yankee Workshop,â&#x20AC;? Bar Am says he thought to himself, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can do that.â&#x20AC;? He tried his hand at furniture making, and many of his pieces exhibit a Jewish flair such as his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chaiâ&#x20AC;? boy, a highboy shaped like the Hebrew letter. The piece includes such features as seven drawers representing the seven days of the week. In addition to his custom furniture, Bar Am also makes other wood objects, including custom bowls and tzedekah boxes. One of his most rewarding experiences, he says, was when David Ellsworth stayed with him. Calling Ellsworth the â&#x20AC;&#x153;granddaddyâ&#x20AC;? of woodturners, Bar Am

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mary@mayersteinberg.com jewishtimes.com

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Amalie A m R malie Rothschild: ooths thssch schild: h hild: AR etrosp s eccti spec ctivve V iew Retrospective View

Notes Of A

Jazz Man

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By Adam Stone

Jazz pianist draws on his classical background and Israeli roots for inspiration.

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

Alon Nechushtan is expecting (with Marcus Rojaz and Frank Lonhis first child next month, and a lot of things are going to change in his life, starting with his place of residence. A move from loud, hectic Manhattan to quieter Brooklyn or New Jersey is likely. Sleep patterns will have to shift, too, more so for Nechushtan than is usually the case. As a jazz pianist and composer, Nechushtan keeps “jazz cat hours,” which may not mesh well with the new demands of fatherhood. “Right now, I have no idea,” he says. “We’ll just have to see what happens.” Nechushtan chatted recently about music, geography, progeny and other topics in advance of a visit to Charm City. He will perform two sets tonight, April 20, at Baltimore’s An die Musik. A Tel Aviv native, Nechushtan has been in the Big Apple for nearly a decade. He earned his bachelor’s degree in classical composition in Israel and continued his studies at the New England Conservatory of Music. He has played piano and collaborated with dozens of other jazz players, serving as a sideman to various ensembles including Frank London’s trio

don), Baye Kouyate and his Afro Beat Ensemble, and Nechushtan’s own trio (with Noam Wiesenberg on bass and drummer Yoni Halevi), with whom he has already recorded five albums. Nechushtan has performed at the Washington, D.C, Jewish Music Festival, the Palm Beach Celebrates Israel Festival, at Carnegie Hall, New York’s celebrated Blue Note Jazz Club, Joe’s Pub at the Public Theatre in Manhattan, and other venues. And he has drawn kudos from such high-profile publications as DownBeat magazine, which called Nechushtan “a talent to watch, with a surfeit of ideas, an unbridled spirit

“I don’t want to appear like I am not ready, like I am making it up on the spot.” — Alon Nechushtan

Spencer Gordon

042012

www.towson.edu/artscalendar www ww w.towson.edu/a .towso edu/artscalendar rt calenda a


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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to appear like I am not ready, like I am making it up on the spot,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to take the listener down a roadmap, to show that at least I have an idea of where I am starting and where I going. I want to be well aware of what is going to happen.â&#x20AC;? î&#x201A;&#x160;e result is a body of work that spans a broad landscape. A song like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Entrancedâ&#x20AC;? presents a soî&#x2020;?, sambaesque drowsiness, while â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fold,â&#x20AC;? composed for the Neta Dance Company in New York, stitches together fragments of voice and electronica into a composition that is at once melodic and yet hyper-modern. If the pianistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s styles range widely, so do his musical activities. Nechushtan is a teacher, a performer, a recording artist and also an international traveler, returning to Israel at least twice a year See Jazz Man on page 42

Wednesday, May 2 7:00 p.m. Offit Auditorium Join Maestra Alsop as she discusses her career and musical association with Leonard Bernstein. )UHH DQG RSHQ WR WKH FRPPXQLW\ GHVVHUW UHFHSWLRQ WR IROORZ )RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ FDOO (OOHQ 0DUNV DW  RU HPDLO HOOHQP#EHWKHOEDOWRFRP

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and bold, two-fisted sense of Architecture.â&#x20AC;? The Village Voice praised the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ominous noisesâ&#x20AC;? that sometimes emanate from his compositions. Compositions they are, and not just the open, free-form experiences that sometimes characterize jazz work. Nechushtan leans on his background in classical composition to give his music substance and structure. Composition is what makes music accessible and sustaining, he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are the bricks of the building â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the motifs, ideas, themes,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of these are things I can borrow from the classical values.â&#x20AC;? Classical can have its drawbacks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; too rigid or constrained â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but the lessons of classical music prepared Nechushtan to tackle the limitlessness, experimentalism and elasticity of jazz.

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Jazz pianist Alon Nechushtan will perform two sets tonight, April 20, at 8 p.m. at An die Musik, 409 North Charles St. For information, call An die Musik at 410-385-2638 or visit andiemusiklive.com/ . For information about Nechushtan, visit musicalon.com .

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

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to visit friends and family while hitting the local music scene. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty amazing,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The clubs are there, the interest is high, the places to hear jazz are expanding. There are a lot of young players and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing pretty much the same as we are doing here.â&#x20AC;? At the same time, Israeli jazz is taking on an increasingly international flair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There may be some trends of Sephardic music or Ladino or Eth-iopian music. There is always something happening,â&#x20AC;? he says. Contemplating his various activities and endeavors, Nechushtan sees some clear distinctions, for example in his dual roles as a live player and a studio craftsman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the studio, you have all this modern technology of recording, re-recording, choosing the best take and having the luxury of listening back through the music,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In a concert, the audience erases. It will erase the music from the memory. So there is no chance to try it again.â&#x20AC;? It all may seem like a lot of effort to devote to a genre that lives mostly on the periphery of the music scene these days. But it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trouble Nechushtan that the golden age of jazz gleams in the rearview mirror. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am well aware I am not a rock star,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But for what I love about music and for what I want to do, well, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty much where I am right now.â&#x20AC;? JT

Adam Stone is an Annapolis-based freelance writer.


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A Wondrous Approach It just might be the most innovative home furnishings store in the Baltimore metropolitan area. Conveniently located but hard to find, it’s well worth the effort to discover Working Wonders’ showroom, and the headquarters of its visionary website, on Clarkview Road in Mount Washington. On a recent aernoon when I visit the showroom, I’m greeted by BethAnn Lederer, Working Wonders’ founder and CEO. Graciously, Lederer shows me into a tastefully furnished room that showcases some of the items sold directly through the store. With clean, simple lines and natural hues, the showroom, which opened in 2008, and its contents create an ambience of tranquility and beauty. Lederer regards Working Wonders as the Whole Foods of the home sector. She believes that while most people now realize how diet affects their health, they are less cognizant of the health risks posed by harmful chemicals and toxins in their homes. Lederer hopes to change that. Working Wonders is much larger than what can be displayed in its showroom or even on its website. Launched last November, the website features only 10 percent of the sustainable home furnishings that

Provided

Green home furnishings store and website give consumers healthier options. By Simone Ellin

have met the company’s strict aesthetic, environmental and socially responsible standards. People are encouraged to call the showroom to find out about options that may not be displayed online. “As a green-from-the-ground-up brand, we have a big vision of doing great things on the home retail landscape, but we’re a resource that has a lot to offer Baltimore right now,” says Lederer. In addition to her website and showroom, Lederer also is available for consultation with designers, builders and architects.

Looking For Green Originally from the Midwest, Lederer, who now resides in Towson, moved to Baltimore in her early teens when her father got a position with

the Wilmer Eye Clinic. Lederer’s interest in sustainability and environmentally sound consumerism began when she became pregnant with her daughter Casey. “I was inspired to start looking for healthier food products, and from there, a whole world opened up to me,” says Lederer. “I became a certified childbirth educator and doula, attending more than 100 births in Baltimore.” Lederer started a nonprofit organization called the Better Childbirth Council of America, which proposed a wellness model of maternal child health that provided healthy choices for parenting. “I started learning about creating a healthier world, starting with cotton diapers and organic baby food,” she says.

BethAnn Lederer: “As a green-fromthe-ground-up brand, we have a big vision of doing great things on the home retail landscape, but we’re a resource that has a lot to offer Baltimore right now."

Then, in 2005, Lederer started a home remodeling project. “I was looking for ‘green’ cabinetry and other sustainable products and while I was able to find them on the Internet, I couldn’t find anyone who dealt with them in Baltimore,” she says. In her effort to find “green” products, Lederer began to learn more and more about how many toxins are added to the products we use in our homes. Lederer also became aware of the movement to protect the people who create those products and she knew she wanted to play a role. “I believe that when consumers See A Wondrous Approach on page 44 jewishtimes.com

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A Wondrous Approach om page 44

know about and can find items that are safe and healthy — made without toxins — by people who are treated humanely and paid a fair wage, consumers will choose to buy those items over conventionally produced ones.”

Storytellers presents

WYPR’s Tenth Anniversary Celebration

Dan Rodricks WYPR Host Midday with Dan Rodricks

Sheilah Kast WYPR Host Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast

Wednesday, May 23 Centerstage

Safety Concerns

700 N. Calvert Street

The Stoop Storytelling Series joins WYPR & NPR personalities sharing their stories about “Ten” - The Perfect Number Live music by Felicia Carter/Amy Shook r Caterer: The Classic Catering People For tickets: Centerstage.org

Nathan Sterner WYPR Morning Host

Ken Rudin NPR’sPolitical Junkie”

Tamara Keith NPR’s Congressional Reporter

$50 8pm show general admission/followed by a dessert reception $150 VIP 6:30-7:30pm cocktails and light supper/ reserved seating for event/dessert reception

Maria Broom Actress, Dancer, Storyteller

event sponsors

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to give you peace of mind Situated on the beautiful Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Campus, this well-designed community offers an active, worry-free lifestyle for seniors 62+ and persons under 62 with disability. 7iˆ˜LiÀ} *>Vi] ˆÃ ̅i º«>Vi» ̜ Li vœÀ Ãi˜ˆœÀà Ài>`Þ Ìœ i˜œÞ ̅iˆÀ ÀïÀi“i˜Ì] ˆÛi ˆ˜`i«i˜`i˜ÌÞ >˜` ÃÌ>Þ >V̈Ûi° /…ˆÃ ˆ˜Ã«ˆÀˆ˜}] Üi‡iÃÌ>LˆÃ…i`  Vœ““Õ˜ˆÌÞ œvviÀà ÀiÈ`i˜Ìà “>˜Þ Li˜iwÌà ˆ˜VÕ`ˆ˜} i>ÃÞ >VViÃà ̜ œ˜i œv >Ìˆ“œÀi½Ã ̜«‡˜œÌV… “i`ˆV> v>VˆˆÌˆià >˜` œ˜‡V>“«Õà >`ÕÌ `>ÞV>Ài° Additional features include:

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

Call today to schedule a tour

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To that end, Lederer uses an eightpoint system of rating products based on environmental health, and social and economic concerns. She believes that educated consumers are not only interested in need, aesthetics and price, they also want to know the answers to three value-based questions: Is it safe for me and my family? Is it good for the environment? Is it safe for those who produced it? e products sold through Working Wonders are rated on whether they: • Improve air quality • Save energy and water • Conserve natural resources • Reduce waste • Use better production practices • Use better shipping practices • Have better customer relations • Are manufactured in the U.S.A. or internationally by businesses that employ sustainable and fair trade practices. That being said, Lederer stresses that products that meet environmental, health and socially responsible criteria can also be affordable and beautiful. “If you went to Bloomingdale’s in New York City,” suggests Lederer, “there would be some things you liked that were in your budget and some that were not. The world of sustainable products is no different.” Pointing to one of the gift items carried in the showroom, Lederer says, “These sustainable candles made from palm wax with cotton wicks are comparable in price or even less than Yankee Candles, but they are so much better. They burn absolutely clean with no soot.” Yankee Candles, explains Lederer, emit petroleum-based chemicals that are harmful to our air and lungs.


Down To Earth For some customers, the fact that Working Wondersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; products are sustainable is just an added bonus. The merchandise in the showroom and online is so stylish and well-made that even shoppers who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t savvy about sustainability will be drawn to it for purely aesthetic reasons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our products oďŹ&#x20AC;er earth-best design and function. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lovingly sourced every line,â&#x20AC;? says Lederer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m passionate about giving people choices.â&#x20AC;? JT

Next Wednesday, April 25, at noon, BethAnn Lederer will share the story of Working Wonders as part of the Raymond V. Haysbert Sr. Entrepreneurship Lecture on the Commons at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County, 5401 Wilkens Ave. For information, contact Vivian Armor at armor@umbc. edu/ entrepreneurship/speakers. The Working Wonders showroom is located at 1416 Clarkview Road, Suite 100. For information, call 410-828-0113, ext. 305, or email bethann@ workingwondersUS.com. Visit Working Wonders on the web at workingwondersUS.com .

1:27 PM

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From our family to yours. Hj]hYjaf_ ^gj l`] ^mlmj] `Yk f]n]j Z]]f kg aehgjlYfl& L`Ylk o`q o] Z]da]n] qgm k`gmd\ `Yn] Y ljmkl]\ hYjlf]j ogjcaf_ gf qgmj Z]`Yd^ lg eYpaear] ghhgjlmfalq Yf\ eafaear] jakc& Lmjf lg L`] KYoq]j ?jgmh$ Y ^Yeadq g^ ljmkl]\ o]Ydl` hj]k]jnYlagf hjg^]kkagfYdk$ ^gj l`] caf\ g^ service, respect, and support you deserve.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of our mattress lines is very well-priced, but unlike commercial brands, it is healthy, made with natural plant-based materials and contains no neurotoxins, which are typically used for ďŹ&#x201A;ame retardation. Instead, mattresses sold through Working Wonders use natural, non-toxic treatments and wool covering to ensure ďŹ re safety. Our organic, fair trade linens come in a variety of price points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And our kitchens range in price depending upon what cabinetry finishes are chosen,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We ask ourselves how we can meet both the budgetary and the aesthetic needs of our customers. And there are a number of ways to achieve that balance.â&#x20AC;?

4/18/12

Small Enough to Know Your Name ... Large Enough to Take Care of Your Financial Needs

HOPKINS FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK As an independent bank for over 85 years, Hopkins Federal Savings Bank is proud of its growing family of employees. They are experts in their fields and dedicated to helping you. From Lending to Savings, we are here to provide the best personalized service and products. We look forward to working with you!!!

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jewishtimes.com

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You Are Invited... YESHIVAT CHOVEVEI TORAH RABBINICAL SCHOOL honors

RABBI NISSAN ANTINE Alumnus of the Year Sunday, April 29, 2012 4:30 PM Rabbinic and Medical Bioethics Expert Panel 5:30 PM Buffet Dinner 7:00 PM Program and Dessert

Beth Sholom Congregation and Talmud Torah Potomac, MD Dinner Chairs: Debra Sunshine and Dr. Abraham Cherrick Evelyn Marcus-Wheeler and Charles Wheeler For more information contact nsmook@yctorah.org or 212-666-0036 www.yctorah.org

3700 Henry Hudson Parkway, 2nd Fl, Riverdale, NY 10463 www.yctorah.org

040612

YCT is funded in part by a generous grant from the Jim Joseph Foundation.


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Check out jewishtimes.com for a full calendar of events.

Inca Son

{e It List}

Our top picks for this week

Family

(Sat Apr 21) This weekend, travel back in time to explore the magnificence of ancient civilizations at the Ancient America Family Festival, inspired by the exhibition “Exploring the Art of the Ancient Americas.” Experience the flavors, sounds and colors of Meso, Central and South America, create artwork inspired by ancient cultures, and be awed by vibrant performances of traditional music and dance. It’s happening at the Walters Art Museum this Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. For information, call 410-547-9000 or visit thewalters.org .

ON STAGE

ART (Fri Apr 27) Celebrate the arrival of spring! Awaken the senses with fine contemporary crafts as jury-selected craftspeople show and sell one-of-a-kind handmade items in pottery, sculpture, jewelry, fashion, home accessories, photography and fine art, judaica, and much more. A Sensory Celebration is the theme of this season’s Sugarloaf Crafts Festival, taking place at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium on Friday, April 27, and Saturday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sunday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $7-$9. For information, call 800-210-9900 or visit sugarloafcrafts.com .

(Fri Apr 20) There’ll be a hot time at the Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric this weekend! Lyric Opera Baltimore presents the fullystaged production of Gounod’s Faust, based on the novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, demonstrating the age-old battle between good and evil as re-imagined in contemporary times. Performances are this Friday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets range from $40-$135. Call 410-547-7328 or visit lyricoperahouse.com .

Provided

Provided

Judaica teapot by Olga Goldin

Compiled by Phyllis Levin

Amazon.com

{Good Reads}

Broadway Baby Alan Shapiro Algonquin 2012, $14, 269 pages, paperback

If ever a book could make you laugh and cry simultaneously, this is the one. e novel, written by a man but focused on and examining the life of a woman, is deeply emotional and true-to-life. “Broadway Baby” is about Miriam Bluestein, who grew up with a single, working mother and was raised by her Holocaust-surviving grandparents. Her grandmother was fascinated with Broadway and

spent hours singing with Miriam and talking about the stars. Miriam had talent, and she decided by age 10 that one day she, too, would be on Broadway; this idea was her dream. Miriam marries young and has children early. She marries a man she believes has promise to make her dreams come true, but he is a working man and he does only that — work. She has three sons and her days are the days of a typical Jewish mother. She wants a life of high drama and passion; she has a life of the mundane. She loves her family dearly, but has trouble showing it. One of her sons shows some Broadway talent and

she begins to live vicariously through him, always believing he will make it big. en he dies at an early age, having never gotten his big break — though just about to. e book takes you to the end of Miriam’s and her husband’s life. e journey is oen inside her head, showing the pain of her love for her family and her inability to properly show it. It demonstrates the tension between husband and wife — the lack of intimacy and the inability of one woman to let go of a dream. I would recommend the book to anyone looking for a quick but emotional read. — Maayan Jaffe


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Dishing It Out | Rochelle Eisenberg

Dinner Dash Victoria and mother Arlynne Brown enjoy cooking together.

Photos David Stuck

Grilled salmon is a quick dinner favorite.

Spring Time Menu Hummus and Celery, Baby Carrots and Snow Peas

Reisterstown resident Arlynne Grilled Salmon with Brown Brown enjoys cooking, but sometimes Sugar and Fresh Garlic making dinner can get quite hectic. Spinach Strawberry Salad There are those crazy nights when she with Poppy Seed Dressing has a half-hour to put together a meal after running around carpooling her Artisan Bread 10th-grade daughter, Victoria. Mixed Fresh Blueberries “I have to get Victoria to crew pracand Blackberries with tice on the other side of the South Whipped Cream Hanover Bridge,” she says. “I need to be able to make quick meals so she can get to her school work and go to bed. I try to keep my menus simple and use fresh spring vegetables and prepare most of the meal ahead of time.” On days she’s in charge of crew carpool, she may not get home until 7:30 p.m. and the family doesn’t eat until 8, so Arlynne relies on several shortcuts. “I might make a bunch of turkey burgers ahead of time, freeze them, and defrost them the next morning,” she explains. She may cut up cherry tomatoes and stuff with feta cheese for a delicious side. Then there are always leftovers. One of her favorite meals on a busy night is this salmon. She suggests cooking it skin-side-up for two minutes to sear in the flavor. JT 48

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

Grilled Salmon With Brown Sugar And Fresh Garlic (Pareve)

Spinach Strawberry Salad With Poppy Seed Dressing (Pareve)

1-1⁄2 pounds salmon fillet, cut into 4 pieces Salt and pepper to taste 1 ⁄3 cup soy sauce 1 to 3 cloves garlic, crushed through a garlic press 1 ⁄3 cup brown sugar 1 ⁄3 cup orange juice 1 Tbsp vegetable oil Canola oil spray

2 bunches fresh spinach, washed and dried 1 pint fresh strawberries, washed and dried 1 ⁄4 cup sugar 1 Tbsp sesame seeds 1/2 Tbsp poppy seeds 1 to 1-1⁄2 teaspoon onion, minced 1 ⁄4 tsp Worcestershire sauce 1 ⁄4 tsp paprika 1 ⁄4 cup canola oil 1 ⁄8 cup cider vinegar

Preheat gas grill to high for 10 minutes. Rinse and pat dry salmon fillets. Sprinkle fish with salt and pepper. Combine soy sauce, garlic, brown sugar, orange juice and oil. Marinate fish in soy mixture for two hours. (If short on time, skip the marinating; baste with soy mixture and continue with recipe.) Prepare cooking surface. If you have a flat grill plate “topper,” spray it with canola oil spray and let preheat for one to two minutes, or carefully spray the grill grates with canola oil spray. It will flare. Grill, skin-side-up for two minutes. Flip and grill five minutes more until fish is flaky. Slide spatula between the skin and flesh of the fish and serve.

Arrange spinach and strawberries attractively on individual salad plates. Make dressing: Place the next six ingredients in a blender. With the blade running, add oil and vinegar in a slow, steady stream until thoroughly mixed and thickened. Drizzle 1 to 2 teaspoons dressing on spinach and strawberries and serve immediately.


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DATE:

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1:18 PM

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TIME:

Plant Your Roots April 16â&#x20AC;&#x201C;29 At Beazer, we create more than great homes. We create communities. That is why we invite you to plant your roots and grow your future with us during our special savings event!

Up to $50,000 in Savings!*

The P The Parke arke a att M Mount ount W ashington Washington Baltimore, B altimore, M MD D Luxurious ssingle-level Luxurious ingle-level lliving iving llocated ocated Beltway Baltimore iinside nside tthe he B eltway â&#x20AC;&#x201D; cclose lose tto oB altimore and Mt. Washington. a nd M t. W ashington. From Fr om m the upper $500s 410-415-3740 41 0 - 41 4 5-3740

Quarry Q uarr y L Lake ake Baltimore, B altimore, M MD D

Priced from the mid $200s

Impeccable sstyle. Impeccable tyle. U Unrivaled nrivaled a amenities. menities. Unsurpassed IImpressive mpressive sspaces. paces. U nsurpassed ccondominium ondo dominium lliving. iving. The H Highlands from from the m mid $200s 410-415-1408 41 0 - 41 4 5-1408 The B Bluffs Blufffs fr from om the mid $300s $ 410-504-6698 41 0 -504 - 6698

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THE WILLIAM AND IRENE WEINBERG FAMILY

BALTIMORE JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL at the Gordon Center For Performing Arts

in beautiful Mt. Vernon at the Washington Monument

Friday, May 4th 11am - 8pm and Saturday, May 5th 11am - 8pm (weekend before Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day)

March 25 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 30, 2012 ING

ONLY 3

flowermart

MAIN E R S M L FI

FOOD! FUN! FLOWERS! 130+ VENDORS UNIQUE MOTHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY GIFTS

Mabul (The Flood)

Contests, comedy hypnotist, dancing, music, magician, crab cakes, lemon peppermint sticks! GREAT KIDSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; AREA ON SATURDAY 12-5!

Sunday, April 22; 3:00pm Israel 2001; Hebrew

$2 FlowerMart parking at 15 W. Franklin St. -OR- Take the Charm City Circulator Mabul

Wunderkinder

WIN an heirloom quilt created by the Village Quilters of Wunderkinder

Catonsville, Seminole Sampler and Linda Newsom!

Visit our web site to see more: WWW.FLOWERMART.ORG

Wednesday, April 25; 7:30pm Germany 2011; German

2012

Quarry Lake Spring & Garden Show

The Time of Silence

The Time of Silence (Le Temps du Silence) Monday, April 30; 7:30pm

Sunday, April 22nd 11am-6pm

France 2011; French

Greenspring Ave off Beltway Exit 22 in Baltimore County CHILDRENSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Craft Vendors AREA

Tickets: $10/film general admission, as available

For more information, call 410.559.2377 or email ngoldberg@jcc.org

Garden & Flower Vendors Antique Cars Great Food & Drink

including moon bounce, face painting, caricatures and balloon art

Visit us online: www.baltimorejff.com

042012

Noon- 6pm 1pm 2pm 3:30pm 4:30pm

DJ Steve Wolf Sponsored by: Joe Palanzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kenpo Karate â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quarry Lake Can Singâ&#x20AC;? Karaoke Contest for PRIZES U /Â&#x2026;i Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;i` U >Ă&#x17E; -VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â? >Ă&#x152; Magic of John Carrington Baltimore Hebrew Encouraging Youth to Dream Performing Arts U /Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC; ,Â&#x2C6;`}i ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192; Proceeds to Benefit The Pikesville Chamber of Commerce

50

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

042012

On Stage.....

U iĂ&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026; /Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x192;


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Simone Ellin

Be Cute, Comfortable And Green Get yourself a pair of Oka b. shoes this spring. Made in the U.S.A. from recycled materials, Oka b. calls its 2012 line of flip-flops, sandals and ballet flats its “spa for the street” collection. The shoes are waterproof, bacteria-resistant and have ergonomically designed foot beds. Flats retail for $45, but in celebration of this year’s Relay for Life, anyone who enters coupon code RELAY415 between now and May 4 will not only get 15 percent off their first shoe purchase but also $10 will go directly to the American Cancer Society. Oka b. also is sponsoring Our Greatest Feat, another AC S program. For every pair sold between now and Oct. 31, 2012, Oka b. will donate a pair of slides to a cancer patient. Visit the company’s website at oka-b.com .

| Live Green

World On Your Mind This Sunday, April 22, is Earth Day, and Baltimore is celebrating our planet in all sorts of ways. Ever wonder about the history of Earth Day? Even if you’ve never considered it before, it’s worth knowing, since many believe the holiday’s founding in 1970 signaled the birth of the environmental movement as we know it today. A half-century ago, the publication of Rachel Carson’s “Silent Spring” raised the consciousness of hundreds of thousands of people across the globe about the dire need for environmental protection. Sen. Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin shared many of Carson’s concerns. He was frustrated by the government’s inattention to environmental issues. As the 1960s progressed, Nelson witnessed the grass-roots efforts that spawned the powerful civil rights movement, women’s liberation and massive anti-war protests. In 1970, the senator came up with an idea he believed could bring environmental issues to the forefront.

Capitalizing on the climate of activism pervading American culture, Nelson reasoned that he could generate the same type of enthusiasm for creating a movement to save the planet. While speaking at a conference in Seattle, Nelson announced his plans to hold a national demonstration calling attention to environmental concerns. His message spread like wildfire, and on April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans across the country held demonstrations, protests and educational forums about the need for environmental reform. The success of Earth Day led to the formation of the Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water and Endangered Species acts. It’s hard to imagine our nation without crucial laws like these. Yet, there is more to do — so much more. Why not start by attending some of the Earth Day events below, all sponsored in our community?

April/May Green Calendar Earth Day Counts at the Jewish Museum of Maryland! Bring the whole family down to the Jewish Museum of Maryland to celebrate Earth Day and help us Count the Omer. Taste the seven ancient species of the Land of Israel and use them to make sandwiches for the homeless. Jewish Museum of Maryland, Sunday, April 22, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. jewishmuseummd.org/event/family-fun-day Baltimore Green Works 9th Annual Green Week April 21 to 28: Kicks off with Ecofest on Saturday, April 21, noon to 5 p.m. in Druid Hill Park baltimoregreenworks.com Mitzvah Makers on the move — Spring Planting Day Help clean up outside Weinberg Park Assisted Living. Visit with residents, too. This activity is geared toward families with young children.

Weinberg Park Assisted Living, Sunday, April 29, 10 a.m. to noon jvcbaltimore.org Earth.Pray.Learn. A Jewish Family Celebration of Earth Day Enjoy puppet shows, songs, crafts and Earth Day treats! Join Rabbi Kelley Gludt to explore how people are stewards of the Earth and what that means to us as Jews. Beth Am Synagogue, Sunday, April 22, 10 a.m. to noon. All ages are welcome. bethambaltimore.org What’s Jewish at the Irvine Nature Center? Meet members, families, educators and clergy from Beth Israel Congregation. Irvine Nature Center, Sunday, May 6, 1 to 3 p.m. Tickets required. cjebaltimore.org/pjtown


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 YOU LL LOVE THIS MOVIE! “

SHAWN EDWARDS / FOX-TV

KEVIN HART IS

BRILLIANT!!!”

042012

KEVIN HART

THE EDWARD A. MYERBERG CENTER ANNUAL SPRING FUNDRAISER

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A RAINFOREST FILMS PRODUCTION A FILM BY TIM STORY “THINK LIKE A MAN” MICHAEL EALY JERRY FERRARA MEAGAN GOOD REGINA HALL KEVIEXECUTIVEN HART TARAJI P. HENSON TERRENCE J JENIFER LEWIS ROMANY MALCO GARYBASEDOWEN GABRIELLE UNION WRITTEN CHRIS BROWN MUSICBY CHRISTOPHER LENNERTZ UPON THE BOOK PRODUCERS STEVE HARVEY RUSHION MCDONALD ROB HARDY GLENN S. GAINOR “ACT LIKE A LADY, THINK LIKE A MAN” BY STEVE HARVEY BY KEITH MERRYMAN & DAVID A. NEWMAN DIRECTED PRODUCED BY TIM STORY BY WILL PACKER

SPY-NOVELIST AND NEW YORK TIMES #1 BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF 14 BOOKS

LOCAL LISTINGS FOR STARTS FRIDAY, APRIL 20 CHECK THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

IN CONVERSATION WITH JAMIE GANGEL NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT FOR THE TODAY SHOW

HONORING: JANE

GET THE news. THEN GET THE FULL STORY. T Find out what’s happening 24/7 @jewishtimes.com. Then find out what it means, each week in the JT.

K. SCHAPIRO

Tuesday, May 15—7pm BETH EL CONGREGATION 8101 PARK HEIGHTS AVENUE Reservations and Information:

410-358-6856 www.myerbergseniorcenter.org

General Admission $40 Patron $125 Includes reserved seating & dessert reception with Daniel Silva All proceeds to benefit the Edward A. Myerberg Center, a 501c3 non-profit organization

042012

For home delivery, call 410-752-3504.

52

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012


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î&#x201A;&#x160;e Jewish View Rabbi Daniel Cotzin Burg

Kosher: Not Passed-Over

is h aF Ron

Rabbi Daniel Cotzin Burg is spiritual leader of Reservoir Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beth Am Synagogoue.

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A Sensory Celebration!

Designer Crafts Home Furnishings Affordable Art Specialty Foods Family Fun

Ć&#x2019; APRIL 27, 28, 29, 2012 Maryland State Fairgrounds 4IMONIUM -$ s %8)4  /&& )  &RI  3AT   3UN  

Admission $7 online, $9 at the door - good all three days Children under 12 and parking are FREE DISCOUNT TICKETS, show info, exhibitor lists, directions and more at:

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041312

1966. how incisive and prescient their words seem to us today! Seen in this light, kashrut becomes a powerful tool to remind us of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relevance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not just in synagogue or during prayer services, but throughout the day! in this way, Dresner and Siegel also debunk the myth of kashrut as an ancient â&#x20AC;&#x153;health measure.â&#x20AC;? intelligent people need only to read the ingredients on a box of manischewitz cake mix or schmaltz herring to know that kashrut is about holiness, but not always about health. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get me wrong; i would argue that the more we know about which foods are healthier and life-preserving, the more we should seek out those healthier foods. For the Torah also says with regard to the mitzvot, â&#x20AC;&#x153;vâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;chai bahem,â&#x20AC;? and you should â&#x20AC;&#x153;live by themâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; life-preservation being a sacrosanct ideal in Jewish tradition. But we should also not confuse this ideal with the particulars of kashrut. Kashrut provides the framework for â&#x20AC;&#x153;hallowing the everyday.â&#x20AC;? The rest is up to us. When considering kashrut, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so easy to get lost in the trees and miss the forest, but the particulars, the nuances and â&#x20AC;&#x201D; yes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the complicated details of Jewish dietary laws are not an end in and of themselves. Rather they are an invitation into the sacred. if Jewish tradition has something valuable to say about how we treat others (as it did so profoundly during Pesach), shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it also have something meaningful to say about what we put into our bodies. Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t this also be a religious act? JT

Jewelr

minuTe Pesach ended, Jews across Baltimore celebrated another important tradition: comparing pizza joints. it seems this custom may be threatening to eclipse another honored tradition: Chinese food at Christmas. But before we ďŹ&#x201A;ee too quickly from these seemingly repressive dietary laws, Torah comes to remind us that kashrut is something we ought to consider year-round. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parasha, Shemini, deals directly and comprehensively with the topic of kashrut. We all know the basics: Jews arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t supposed to eat pork and shellfish. Kosher land animals are restricted to those that both chew their cud and have split hooves, and sea creatures must have fins and scales. Animals have to be slaughtered in a particular way and the meat prepared in an equally particular way. Dairy and meat products are to be separated. Viewed as an assemblage of laws and dietary restrictions, the details of kashrut may seem arcane, even arbitrary. Yet, kashrut, like many other aspects of Jewish law and tradition, is about making the everyday and the ordinary sacred. As Rabbis Samuel Dresner and Seymour Siegel put it: â&#x20AC;&#x153;When there is love and devotion between husband and wife, marriage is hallowed; when we vote for the ability and integrity of a man and not the favors he may grant us, we hallow our country; when we deal fairly with our employee, we hallow our business. The duty of the Jew is to lift up all of life to God, to hallow the everyday, so that all of life becomes holyâ&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Jewish Dietary Laws,â&#x20AC;? p.17). Dresner and Siegel were writing in

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Certified Mohelim Linda L. Esterson

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Favorite Pastime: Spending time with each other

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

noticed the sparkle from her heels and the twinkle in her eyes. Esti Korb was a princess. “I could feel it right away,” says Reuven, a Elizabeth, N.J., native, who insisted he come to Baltimore despite her offer to come north because “chivalry isn’t dead.” It was only natural when Reuven decided to propose just 10 weeks later that he would give her the royal treatment. “I thought it would be the hardest decision of my life,” says Reuven, 24. “But it was so easy.” After meeting in November 2010 through his sister, Michal, Esti’s former classmate at Stern College, Reuven set the plan in motion just after New Year’s. Reuven asked Esti to come to New York for a celebration of his grandmother’s successful surgery. She did, and they arose early to do errands. Reuven’s father, Shalom Rakovsky, drove them to the party. Esti thought it strange to be at the airport, but shrugged it off. They stopped and Reuven revealed two

tickets to Orlando, Fla. She figured they were about to become engaged, perhaps at a beach, but there was much more. While on the plane, Reuven pulled out a storybook, “The Fairy Tale of Us,” and read aloud. The story chronicled their dates in Baltimore, New York and New Jersey. After he read about the prince finding the princess of his dreams, he stopped. Reuven reopened the book in front of Cinderella’s castle at Disney World, where he read about the prince taking the princess to the “most magical place on earth.” After sprinkling Esti with pixie dust, he knelt down and asked her to marry him. Reuven promptly pulled out a beautiful ring and a crown with the wording “Just Engaged” for Esti. Just like in the movies, a gathered crowd clapped and cheered for the young couple, who spent the rest of the day in the Magic Kingdom. The royals were handed balloons and flowers along the way, and they never waited in line for a ride.

After the fireworks, they headed to the airport. They celebrated over Shabbos with Charlotte and Shalom Rakovsky upon their return, and with Denise Chesner and Charles Korb in Baltimore. Their June 30, 2011, wedding at Beth Tfiloh Congregation was just as magical. Around 400 guests witnessed the t’ish and bedekken and the service officiated by Rabbi Herschel Reichman. “She looked surreal,” says Reuven of Esti at the photographer’s staged reveal. “I couldn’t believe I was about to spend the rest of my life with a person so beautiful.” It was the royal wedding Esti always dreamed of. “I miss it every day,” says Esti, 22. “I had such a fun time.” When he looks at his bride, Reuven is reminded: “Esti is definitely a princess. I call her a princess.” JT Linda L. Esterson is a freelance writer in Owings Mills. For “Beshert,” call 410-752-3504 ext. 1251 or email Linda.Esterson@ verizon.net.


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Provided

Engagements

Schneyer— Inselman Fred Schneyer and Helen Klatsky of Baltimore and Marc and Ilene Inselman of Cherry Hill, N.J., announce the engagement of their children, Danielle Schneyer and Andrew Inselman.

Danielle is a graduate of Towson University with bachelor of science and master’s of science degrees in occupational therapy. She is an occupational therapist at Marlton Rehabilitation Hospital. Drew is a graduate of Towson University with a bachelor of arts degree in business administration. He is currently the director of real estate at Burlington Coat Factory. Danielle is the granddaughter of Manya Schneyer and the late Alexander Schneyer, and Bena Dublin Frank and the late Samuel Dublin, and Marvin Frank. Andrew is the grandson of Margorie Inselman and the late Marvin Inselman, and the late Benjamin and Mae Kravitz. The couple is planning a March 2013 wedding.

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Births & Adoptions

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BlUMeNTHAl Noah and Sprintza Blumenthal proudly announce the birth of their son, Hershel leib, on Tuesday, March 27, 2012. Hershel leib is named aer his maternal great grandfather, Dr. Harold Moroson of New York. excited siblings are Asher Hillel and esther luba. Kvelling grandparents are Jill Moroson and Dr. Bruce Blumenthal. Send submissions on births, engagements, weddings, anniversaries and deaths via e-mail to plevin@jewishtimes.com or mail to Phyllis Levin, BJT, 1040 Park Ave., Suite 200, Baltimore, Md., 21201. Please send a stamped, selfaddressed envelope for returning photos. Items will be selected and edited at the discretion of the editors.

Hello. My name is Lacey and I am a beautiful dog who is DEAF. Yep, I am deaf and my previous owners taught me a bit of sign language — sit, stay, come. They did love me, but just didn’t have the time and attention I needed. I am a sweet and hyper, happy girl who loves people and attention. I also enjoy toys of any kind. I lived with cats and children age 7 and older in my previous home, and loved playing with them all. I did not live with dogs, but my previous owner did socialize me with a few who I got along with. I really hope there is a family who will open up their home and hearts to me even though I have special needs. Maybe there is even someone out there who has experience with special needs dogs who will want me. Please consider me as an adoption choice and visit me at BHS soon. Thank you.

Lacey

Hi there! My name is Monty and I was brought here from another shelter that no longer had room for me. I love kids and just visited a whole group of them at the library who all had a chance to pet me. I'm a very sweet guy and am looking for someone to give me lots of love and attention!

Community

Students Race rough Time Students currently in grades 6 to 10 are invited to register in teams of two for the Shoshana S. Cardin School’s Amazing Race on April 22, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Temple Oheb Shalom Auditorium. Students will “Travel Through Time” as they complete challenges and compete for fabulous prizes. Registration is free; walkins are welcome. All contestants must sign in at Temple Oheb Shalom auditorium at 1 p.m. on the day of the event. For more information call 410-585-1400 ext. 220.

monty The adoption fee for Lacey is only $105, and $50 for Monty. Plus get a free bag of starter food! For more information visit www.bmorehumane.org Black Cat Fridays and Torti Tuesdays—1/2 Off Adoption Fee Throughout April Text “HUMANE” to 80000 to donate to the Baltimore Humane Society

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Obituaries

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ASKIN — On April 10, 2012, MURRAY, survived by wife Marguerite (nee Lang), father of David (Lisa) of West Palm Beach, Fla. and Ronald ( Jacalyn) of Phoenix, Ariz. Grandfather of Kenneth and Amanda, also survived by brother Frank (Marilyn) of West Orange, N.J. and numerous nieces and nephews. Interment in Meadowridge Memorial Park, Elkridge, Md. COLE — On April 13, 2012, GWEN (nee Caplan ), beloved wife of the late Morton B. Cole, devoted mother of Lois (Sam) Shore, Barbara (Fred) Casden, Lawrence Cole and the late Philip Cole, dear sister of the late Aaron Caplan and Danita Goodman, loving sister-in-law of Haron Goodman and Eddie (Lee) Cole. Cherished grandmother of Tina (David) Berkovits, Natania Casden, Jonathan Cole and Jennifer Cole. Interment in Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation. DANOWITZ — On April 12, 2012, SHEILA (nee Kaminsky), beloved wife of Louis S. Danowitz, cherished mother of Jeffrey Danowitz and Gaye Danowitz and fiance Brian Weiss. Devoted grandmother of Jared and Sam Lubell, also survived by loving family and friends. Interment in Moses Montefiore Woodmoor

Hebrew Cemetery. Contributions to the Lewy Body Dementia Association, 912 Killian Hill Road, S.W., Lilburn, Ga., 30047. DILLON — On April 10, 2012, FLORENCE, beloved sister of Helen (late Albert) Gerber, devoted aunt of Dr. Paul (Veronica) Gerber, loving great-aunt of Dr. Rebecca Gerber, Ariel G. (Dr. Ben) Leshchinsky, also survived by other loving family and dear friends. Interment in Oheb Shalom Memorial Park. GOETZ — On April 16, 2012, GOLDIE (nee King), beloved wife of the late Morton Goetz, cherished mother of Gilbert ( Joyce) Goetz, adored sister of Harold (Marcia) Snyder and the late Yetta Belzer and Abe King. Devoted grandmother of Alison (Steven) Marston and Andrew (Kimberly) Goetz, dear great-grandmother of Morgan Marston, Carley Marston and Owen, Grant, Leah and Noah Goetz. Interment in Hebrew Young Men’s Cemetery. Contributions to the American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454, Alexandria, Va., 22312.

KATZEN — On April 15, 2012, ZELDA (nee Falk ), beloved wife of the late Emanuel Katzen, beloved mother of Shelley (Harry) Rosenthal and Steven Katzen (Diane Zeitlin), devoted sister of the late Eda Rabineau. Loving grandmother of Andrew Rosenthal and Michelle Rosenthal. Interment in Anshe Emunah Aitz Chaim Cemetery. Contributions to American Cancer Society, 8219 Town Center Drive, Baltimore, Md., 21236 or Gilchrist Hospice Care, 11311 McCormick Road, Suite 350, Hunt Valley, Md., 21031.

ISMART — On April 15, 2012, MORRIS, beloved husband of the late Marilyn Ismart (nee Polansky),

KIRSH — On April 11, 2012, JEAN (nee Gendason), beloved wife of Carroll Kirsh, cherished mother of Ellen

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

cherished father of Dane (Carolyn) Ismart, Jacqueline (Bruce) Hillman and Glenn (Dorene) Ismart, devoted brother of the late Jack Ismart and Fannie Miller. Adored grandfather of Seth Ismart, Thad (Sara) Ismart, Alyssa (Eric) Fritz, Brigid (Rob) Williams and Carl James Albert, dear great-grandfather of Cody, Bailey and Travis Fritz, and Hannah Williams. Entombment in Har Sinai Cemetery. Contributions to the Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, 101 W. Mt. Royal Ave., Baltimore, Md., 21201.

Support United Way of Central Maryland and enjoy an evening of food, drinks and fun on Thursday, April 26, from 5-8 p.m. The Mall in Columbia will host an innovative and exciting night of shopping, wine tasting and food sampling. “Sip, Savor, Shop,” a benefit event for United Way, provides wine and beer tastings, demonstrations, samplings, music and entertainment, and much more. For tickets and information, call 410-730-3300 or visit uwcm.org/sipsavorshop .

Find Work Fast Jewish Community Services Career Services presents “Get the Job FAST: Finding a Great New Job in Half the Time through Networking,” a workshop with nationally known speaker and best-selling author Dave Sherman, on Wednesday, April 25, from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Weinberg Park Heights

Jewish Community Center, 5700 Park Heights Ave. Participants will be given tips, tools and techniques to help find a job fast through networking. This program is free and open to the community, but space is limited and reservations are required. Call 410-843-7514 or visit jcsbaltimore.org .

JCS Group Offers Comfort Jewish Community Services in Howard County is offering a Community Bereavement Group, beginning on Monday, April 23. The group will meet from 6:30 to 8 p.m. for eight weeks, and will provide a welcoming place where participants can be with others who are grieving, find support within the Jewish community and benefit from the opportunity to talk with specialists about grief. Pre-registration is required. For registration, location, fee and more information, call 410-730-4976 ext. 120.


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TALLES — On April 12, 2012, SHIRLEY (nee Tamres), beloved wife of the late Irvin Talles, loving mother of Bettye and Jerry Leibowitz, Ellen Talles and Bruce Harrison, devoted sister of the late Rhona Lieberman and Florine Lafferman. Loving grandmother of Amanda and Ari Kodeck, Alicia and Aaron Bickoff and Stephanie Harrison, loving great-grandmother of Dylan and Lila Kodeck. Interment in Arlington

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Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation. Contributions to the Miriam Lodge, c/o Jane Davis, Chaplain, 3415 Woodvalley Drive, Baltimore, Md., 21208. ZETLIN — On April 16, 2012, HENRY P., devoted son of the late Bertha and Samuel Zetlin, beloved husband of the late Mildred Zetlin (nee Savetman) and the late Bernice Zetlin (nee Siscovick), dear father of Ilene Z. (Dennis) Brave and Linda Z. (Richard) Isen, loving stepfather of Dr. Harriet S. (Stephen) Davidson, Abbye S. Sperber, and Dr. David (Eileen) Siscovick. Cherished grandfather of Andrew Brave, Dr. Laura Whiteley and Joseph Abel, beloved step-grandfather of Michael Davidson, Dr. Rachel Davidson Wolf, Dr. Nina Sperber Fruth, Kate Sperber, Leslie S. Lamb, Gabe Sperber, Ben Siscovick, Jonathan Siscovick and Miriam S. Schlusselberg, and 14 great-grandchildren. Interment in Beth Tfiloh Cemetery. Contributions to Beth Tfiloh Congregation, 3300 Old Court Road, Baltimore, Md., 21208.

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Kennedy Krieger Institute’s annual “ROAR for Autism” event will take place on Sunday, April 29, as families join together, on bike and by foot, to raise funds for autism research, at Oregon Ridge Park. Take part in a day full of fun family activities, featuring bike rides including 50- and 25-mile rides, a 10-mile ride, a 5-mile ride and a youth fun ride. Attendees can also take a scenic walk on Oregon Ridge Park’s family-friendly trails. After the ride or walk, relax at the Family Fun Festival and enjoy live music, children’s entertainment and carnival games, along with healthy snacks. For more information, or to register, call 443-923-7300 or visit kennedykrieger.org .

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LUERY — On April 14, 2012, TILLIE (nee Flitt) , beloved wife of the late David Luery, beloved mother of Marilynn Glaser and Susan (Brian) Dziuba, devoted sister of Vicky Miller and the late Sarah Klein, Harry and Isadore Flitt and Esther Hoffman. Loving grandmother of Judith (Stephen) Shaw and Mindy (Christopher) McShane, loving great-grandmother of Dana and Megan Shaw, Benjamin, Aislinn and Joseph McShane. Interment in Bnai Israel Cemetery.

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Kirsh (Pierre Clemenceau). Adored grandmother of Ian and Jordan Kirsh-Clemenceau. Interment in Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery. Contributions to Gilchrist Hospice Care, 11311 McCormick Road, Suite 350, Hunt Valley, Md., 21031.

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LEGAL NOTICES

Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice to Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice to Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

Estate of (167864) Rhoda P. Levin

MICHAEL C. EISENSTEIN Personal Representative GRACE G. CONNOLLY Register of Wills for Baltimore County, Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204-4403. 042012

Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice to Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

Estate of (167809) Diana L. Steward Notice is given that DEBORAH A. DAVIS, 7 Truman Court, Baltimore, Maryland 21244, and DIANA L. DAVIS, 1612 Margaret Avenue, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 were on April 5, 2012 appointed Personal Representatives of the estate of Diana L. Steward who died on March 18, 2012, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representatives or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 5th day of October 2012. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representatives or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representatives mail or otherwise deliver to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. DEBORAH A. DAVIS DIANA L. DAVIS Personal Representatives GRACE G. CONNOLLY Register of Wills for Baltimore County, Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204-4403.

041312

BONNIE LEVIN Personal Representative GRACE G. CONNOLLY Register of Wills for Baltimore County, Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204-4403.

Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice to Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

Estate of (167819) Isadore Liebowitz

Estate of (167927) Pearlee Nelson

Notice is given that KAREN LIEBOWITZ, 2 Swampscott Court, Apt. 1, Baltimore, Maryland 21234, was on April 5, 2012 appointed Personal Representative of the small estate of Isadore Liebowitz who died on March 18, 2012 with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter.

Notice is given that SHENAE GEORGE, 3528 Carriage Hill Circle, Apt. 101, Randallstown, Maryland 21133, was on April 13, 2012 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Pearlee Nelson who died on December 2, 2011, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13th day of October 2012. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

True Test Copy

True Test Copy

Notice is given that MICHAEL C. EISENSTEIN, 2018 Rockrose Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, was on April 10, 2012 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Myles R. Eisenstein who died on September 17, 2011, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 10th day of October 2012. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

Notice is given that BONNIE LEVIN, 4914 43rd Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016, was on April 10, 2012 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Rhoda P. Levin who died on July 5, 2011, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 10th day of October 2012. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claims will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.

True Test Copy

Estate of (167875) Myles R. Eisenstein

True Test Copy

Small Estate Notice of Appointment Notice to Creditors Notice To Unknown Heirs to all Persons Interested in the

KAREN LIEBOWITZ Personal Representative GRACE G. CONNOLLY Register of Wills for Baltimore County, Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204-4403.

042012

True Test Copy

Elliot N. Lewis 111 North Charles Street, 7th Floor Baltimore, Maryland 21201

042012

WE share WITH FRIENDS.

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SHENAE GEORGE Personal Representative GRACE G. CONNOLLY Register of Wills for Baltimore County, Courts Building 401 Bosley Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204-4403.

042012


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buying and selling silver and gold

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ELDER CARE

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S U B S C R I B E TO T H E 60

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

J EWISH TI M ES.

CA LL

410-752-3504 ( B A LT I M O R E

AR EA) OR

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forcleaner cleaner carpets upholstery for carpetsand and upholstery

HAULING

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

J EWISH TI M ES.

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62

• Furniture • Yard Waste • Basements and Attics

CA LL

410-752-3504 ( B A LT I M O R E

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FR E E)


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TRAVEL AND LEISURE

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Just purchase your qualifying Trane system through April 30th, 2012. Reliability, energy-efficiency, indoor air quality & the flexibility of payment options or an instant rebate...theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all yours with Trane.

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Call 410-252-7732 & ask for Eric or Regina. jewishtimes.com

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MARKETPLACE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

ELDER CARE

HOME IMPROVEMENT

I BUY ONE item or entire estate. Cash/Consignment. Joseph: 443-695-4707

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ELECTRICAL SERVICES

LANDSCAPING

TRANSPORTATION

GROUNDSCAPE INC. For all your lawn and landscaping needs. Spring cleanup, planting, mulching etc. 410-415-LAWN/ MHIC#126283

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MARC ELECTRIC MASTER ELECTRICIAN LICENSED in Baltimore City, Baltimore County & Carroll County. Master Electrician in Baltimore City & County. Decorative lighting, house, power and repairs. Marc Balotin. 410-922-7081. SEE MY AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY. MARTIN ELECTRIC INC. Master Electrician, licensed, insured, bonded. No job too small. Full quality service. 410-526-0232

LAWN & GARDEN

FOR SALE

MOVING

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ATTENTION MD BUILDERS: 263 Fully-approved lots. Great for rentals. $9,000/lot. 732-887-9650

FURNITURE ARISTA CUSTOM FURNITURE: Make your design a reality! Serving the Baltimore area for over 22 years. Call Gus: 410-371-1589 SEE OUT AD IN SERVICE DIRECTORY

HANDYMAN IRV’S HANDYMAN SERVICE No job too small. Free estimates, prompt service. MHIC#77548. 410-486-7454 HANDYMAN- FOR THOSE little jobs the big guys won’t do! David 410-239-7455. MR. ODD JOB. No job is too odd. Specializing in nuisance, small jobs around the home. 443-243-4860

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J/L HAULING/LAWN-CARE. JUNK removal. Basement, yard, garage. Free estimates. 410-710-7014

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

REASONABLE PRICES: Grass cutting, General Landscaping Quality Service at 410-978-1536

ABBA MOVING LLC. Full service. Local/Long Distance. Insured. Free estimates. 410-281-6066 SIMCHA’S MOVING LLC. Residential and commercial. Please call 410-358-7636, 866-764-MOVE(6683)

PAINTING & WALLCOVERING ARTIST HOME IMPROVEMENT painting interior/exterior, Powerwashing, drywall repair, carpentry work. License#19441. 410-282-1579 MICHAEL STEPANOVICH. Quality Home Painting Company. Interior Specialist. MHIC#10432. 410-517-2054 INTERIOR/ EXTERIOR Painting, Wallpapering, Wall paper removal, decorative moldings. Free estimates. MHIC #44233. Call Yaakov. 410-484-8350. SEE MY AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY. THE PAINT MAN INC. Interior/ exterior. Dry wall, power washing, wallpaper removal. Free estimates. 410-710-8245.

FINE INTERIOR PAINTING Decorator colors, paper hanging and removal. Graduate of Maryland Institute of Art. Free Estimates. MHIC #26124 Bert Katz 410-356-4722 FELIKS LEYBENGRUB. BEST of Baltimore 2004. 410-916-2083 MHIC # 49059

PRESSURE WASHING

HAUL AWAY: Prompt professional affordable. Residential/ commercial. Insured/ bonded. Free estimates. SEE OUR AD IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY. 410-526-6000 www.haulawaymd.com

64

SCOTT’S LAWN MAINTENANCE: Leaf cleanup, seeding, planting, aerating, mulching, trimming, weeding, landscaping. Commecial/Residential. 410-484-9494

SQUEAKY CLEAN PRESSURE WASHING: Fully Insured Hot-Water Pressure Washing. Commercial & Residential. We bring our own water. 410-977-9165 www.Squeakycleanpressurewashingmd.com J & B PRESSURE WASHING: Decks, Concrete, Siding & Gutters. 443-854-3070. GREEN TO CLEAN PRESSURE WASHING: House, decks, patios sidewalks, more. Great Spring deals. 443-824-0737

DRIVER-LICENSED TAXI OWNER: 20 years experience. Professional,dependable, courteous. Airports, trains, buses, events, courier service. Credit card accepted. Sam Bach.410-302-0057. NEED A RIDE? ANYTIME. ANYWHERE. CALL DON SHEIN. LICENED BY MD PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION.410-274-3620

TREE SERVICES FORESTER TREE SERVICE: Early Season Discounts. Call Bill: 410-486-TREE. www.forestertree.com

WANTED BUYING BASEMENTS; ATTICS; COSTUME JEWELRY, VINTAGE CLOTHING/RETRO FURNITURE. EDDIE: 443-974-2661

WANTED TO BUY 1950’S, 60’S, 70’S, Modern. Furniture, art, lighting, etc. Robert 410-960-8622

WINDOW TREATMENTS DISCOUNT DRAPERIES Rods, Verticals, Mini- blinds. Drapery cleaning, restringing, repair, installation. Norman Goldschmitt 410-358-1651

MARKETPLACE ADVERTISING RATES Ads cost $17 for the first ten words, each additional word is $1.50. Payment due at time of order. Charge over the phone or mail a check to: BaltimoreJewishTimes, 1040 Park Ave, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201. All ads are due Monday by Noon. Please call 443-451-0720 to place an ad.


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R E A L E S TAT E F O R R E N T

PART-TIME OFFICE AVAILABLE Beautiful furnished office in Timonium for mental health professional. Pleasant environment w/lots of windows. Collaborative effort with 5 therapists. Internet & phone services included. If interested, contact us at Core Counseling Services.

410-560-6135

Chai. News for people who know we don’t mean spiced tea. Every Friday in the new JT. For home delivery, call 410-752-3504.

ER COV S I 2009 Award RED

Beautiful Wellwood Split

Winning Community Voted by MMHA

3 bdrm / 2 full bath COUNTY home. $1,850/mo + utils. Call Highline Management at 410-979-1234

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A P A R T M E N T S

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Please accept our invitation to view our lovely garden apartments

Unparalleled Customer Service • Fully Equipped Kitchen Cost Efficient Washer and Dryer in Every Home • Dishwashers Frost Free Refrigerator with Ice Maker • Gas Cooking • Hot Water Included • Individually Controlled Air Conditioning and Heat • Trash Pick Up at Your Door • Wall to Wall Carpet • Outstanding 24 Hr Maintenance Service • Cable Ready • Olympic & Tot Pools • Tot Lot

11 SLADE APARTMENT FOR RENT Large 1 BR, 2 BA features spacious den, living room, dining room, updated kitchen and bathrooms, all in excellent condition. Reserved parking in secured building

The immediate neighborhood includes houses of worship, schools, recreation, shopping and restaurants. 1•2•3 Bedroom Apartments from $845/mo. plus utilities.

410-486-8900

$1485/mo. Tenant pays electric. Shown by appointment. 443-983-4557

Monday - Friday 9-5 Saturday By Appt Only Sunday 11-4

Rich in Tradition

All apartments feature generous living areas and spacious closets. 1BR/SOLARIUM STARTING AT

2BR/2BA

$925

STARTING AT

2BR/SOLARIUM STARTING AT

$1025

3BR

$1125

STARTING AT

$1225

• Heat and hot water included • Full eat-in kitchens •Washer and dryer in each unit •Walk-in closets • Cable/FIOS ready •Trash collection at your door • Large patios & balconies • Summer swimming pool membership

Rental office open 9-6, Monday-Friday & Saturday by appt.

410.484.2040 www.pomona-apartments.com

GONE, BUT never FORGOTTEN. T

Honor the yahrzeit of a loved one with a memorial message and photograph in the JT. For more information, call 443-451-0720.

J E W I S H T I M E S . C O M / R E A L E S TAT E jewishtimes.com

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OWNED AND OPERATED BY NRT LLC

410-821-1700 WE KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD & REACH THE WORLD. CHESTNUT RIDGE / FALLS RD. AREA (21030RIS)

OWINGS MILLS (21117BIR)

LOCH RAVEN MANOR (21286DOX)

ANNEN WOODS (21208COB)

MCDONOGH MANOR (21133SAM)

REISTERSTOWN (21136KEN)

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$479,999 JEANNE WACHTER 410-978-1183

$324,900 ILENE BECKER 410-404-5745

$225,000 BETTI ROBINETTE 410-598-9506

$199,999 KEN ROCHE 443-310-6729

$169,000 LEN BERNHARDT 410-207-2467

$169,000 ELLENE PELOVITZ 410-218-7160

QUEEN ANNE VILLAGE (21117FIT)

OWINGS MILLS (21117STO)

COURTLAND WOODS (21208COR)

BEDFORD COMMONS (21208GRE)

THE TOWERS (21209FAL)

PARK TOWERS EAST (21215PAR)

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$159,990 LEN BERNHARDT 410-207-2467

$139,999 KEN ROCHE 443-310-6729

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$98,900 JEANNE WACHTER 410-978-1183

$139,900 MARIA ILLIANO 443-996-7003

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$89,900 ILENE BECKER 410-404-5745

$65,000 ELLENE PELOVITZ 410-218-7160

Carl J. Herber

It’s a GREAT time to start your real estate career! Licensing classes forming NOW! Get your license in 2 WEEKS!! For more information: Call 443-841-1201 or visit www.careerscb.com

Branch Vice President COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE Greenspring 10751 Falls Rd. Suite 265

443-841-1201 carl.herber@cbmove.com

2010 Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An equal opportunity company. Equal housing opportunity owned and operated by NRT LLC.

LEN BERNHARDT ANNEN WOODS - COBBLER CT. - Super 3BR, 2.5BA townhome in secure gated community. 1st–floor den, living rm with fireplace. Model w/ huge master BA & sitting room. Priced at $169,000 to sell! ANNEN WOODS - HIGH STEPPER CT - 2BR, 2BA unit in elevator building. Pool & tennis courts available. Super condition, super price of $149,900 QUEEN ANNE - Terrific 3BR, 2.5BA townhouse. Only $159,000

AUCTION– SPECTACULAR HOME IN THE FALLS RD. CORRIDOR MOTIVATED OWNER SAYS SELL! This beautiful 13,000± sq. ft. estate home has 9 BR’s, 9 FB’s and 3 HB’s. This 3 yr. old one-of-a-kind home boasts 3 finished levels all serviced by elevator. Custom finishes and woodwork throughout. Features include grand, 2-story foyer & family room, chef’s kitchen with SS appliances, butler’s pantry, custom cherry cabinets & travertine floors, library, media room, 1000-bottle wine cellar, sauna, and much more! THIS MAGNIFICENT HOME IS A MUST-SEE!

Office 410-821-1700 • Cell 410-207-2467 • Home 410-484-0829 Search all active listings on my website at cbmove.com/len.bernhardt

Stevenson

Sale on the premises

13108 PENDLETON COURT, REISTERSTOWN, MD 21136 042012

SATURDAY, MAY 5 @ 11:00 AM Open Houses: 4/22 & 4/29, 1-3 pm

In cooperation with

Sara Rubinstein

BROKER REFERRAL FEE. Deposit required to bid: $50,000 certified check. Visit www.FoxResidentialAuctions.com to download the Property Information Package, including full terms & conditions, or call 410-484-8618 for more information.

Pat Warren, Agent

Exclusively Residential Real Estate 410.484.8618 • www.FoxResidentialAuctions.com 66

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

off: 410-653-1700 ex. 3031 cell: 410-585-7657

Stevenson brick rancher 3BR, 3 full BA, 1st floor den, kitchen w/ breakfast room, full finished walk out lower level to 1 acre park like grounds, 2 car carport with breeze way to kitchen, recent up grades; heating and central air system,full tiled bathroom in ll. Sliding glass doors in lower level. Priced to sell. Must see.

Highview at Hunt Valley 2BR, 2BA, fireplace, balcony, garage parking, tennis pool & gym. For rent as of June 1st $1750/mo.

Nancy Sack 410-653-414


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Harriett Wasserman, CRS 410-458-5300 PM

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12108 LAMOTTES CT. | $385,000 11221 APPALOOSA DR.| $549,500

124 RIVER OAKS CIR| $349,500

Karen Wartzman 410-456-2477

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

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31 EVAN WAY | $869,000 Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

Ina Leboe 443-540-3974 Renee Reamer 443-744-9610

VALLEY HILLS | $450,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

GARRISON FOREST | $1,195,000

VELVET VALLEY | $769,900

PARK HEIGHTS-PRIVATE LANE | $699,000

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

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WORTHINGTON VALLEY | $1,450,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

BROADVIEW | $239,900 Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

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FIELDS OF SAGAMORE WILSON FARM | $600,000 LONGMEADOW AT GARRISON | $474,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

REGENCY PARK | $699,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

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GABLES AT SUMMIT CHASE | $469,900 Karen Wartzman 410-456-2477

VELVET HILLS SOUTH | $415,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

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PIKESVILLE| $399,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

STEVENSON CROSSING | $369,000 Karen Wartzman 410-456-2477

CANTON | $379,900 Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

CAVES ROAD CORRIDOR | $368,000 Gerri Miller 410-356-3333

MAYS CHAPEL NORTH | $349,900 Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

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BARTONWOOD - NEW LISTING $69,900

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2BR 2BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

CT

BEDFORD COMMONS - $119,900, 2BR

Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

GOLDSBOROUGH MANOR | $269,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

TIMONIUM HEIGHTS | $258,800 Sharon Mezei 443-226-5007

MCDONOGH | $219,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

GREENGATE TOWNHOMES|$219,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WYNANS WOODS | $225,000

VILLAGE OF MILL RUN|$179,000 Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

VILLAGE OF PAINTERS MILL | $174,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WORTHINGTON GLEN | $339,900

Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

CRADOCK ESTATES | $339,900 Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146

Terry Reamer

Karen Wartzman

443-570-7672

410-456-2477 410-375-9700

Marni Sacks

Randi Sopher

Sharon Mezei

1BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 BECKETT GREEN - $169,900 2BR 2BA. Karen Wartzman 410-456-2477 PAVILION IN THE PARK - $299,900, 3BR 2BA, Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 11 SLADE - $99,900, 2BR 2BA. Nancy Sacks 410-653-4146 THE TOWERS - $99,900 2BR 2BA Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 GREENSPRING EAST - $169,900, 2BR 2BA. Karen Wartzman 410-456-2477 PAVILION IN THE PARK - $119,900, 2BR, 1.5BA. Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 BARTONWOOD - $69,800, OR $1200/mo RENTAL 2BR, 2BA. Renee Reamer 443-744-9610

Michelle Kurman Diane Baklor Michelle Johnson MaryZimmerman Kathleen House Gerri Miller

410-299-7222 443-226-5007 443-255-9605 410-303-7700 443-904-3943 443-845-8868

410-484-7253 • 410-458-5300

410-236-5919 410-356-3333

Renee Reamer Ina Leboe David Pensak 443-744-9610 443-540-3974 410-908-2787


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LONG & FOSTER Greenspring Valley – Lutherville

410.583.5700

7904 IVY LANE $464,000

12600 BONITA AVE (12BO) $2,100,000

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LIBBY BERMAN 410-978-4920

GILI GUETER 410-258-0277

ANN NEUMANN 410-978-4920

CAROLE OR LINDA 410-409-8110

TIMBER GROVE (08SUP) $349,900

MT. WASHINGTON (18FA) $475,000

SUMMIT PARK (24HU) $249,900

ROCKLAND (24ST) $1,399,900

W NE

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G TIN LIS

W NE

G TIN LIS

W NE

G TIN LIS

GLORIA BASS 410-493-6899

CARRIE CRONIN 410-236-4455

NAOMI ROVNER 410-358-1850

CAROLE OR LINDA 410-409-8110

GREENGATE (72DE)

IVY LANE (79IV)

GREENE TREE (31RA) $314,900

REISTERSTOWN (74CO) $329,900

W NE

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W NE

G TIN LIS

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CAROLE OR LINDA 410-409-8110

CAROLE OR LINDA 410-409-8110

LINDA OR CAROLE 410-375-6532

AL MUMMERT 443-858-5354

REISTERSTOWN (08QU) $750,000

WORTHINGTON OVERLOOK $450,000 (83CR)

FIVE SPRINGS WEST (11WE) $629,900

GREENGATE (71PH) $379,900

MAUREEN FLYNN 410-978-4466

LISA RICHLAND 443-844-5507

CAROLE OR LINDA 410-409-8110

LINDA OR CAROLE 410-375-6532

CAVES VALLEY (23CA) $679,000

ROCKLAND (25ST) $560,000

UPPER PARK HEIGHTS (37CL) $139,000

MIDSUMMER HILL (14WO) $549,000

MORT OR ANN 410-905-1401

AMY HARLAN 410-440-3479

KRISTINA JOHNSON 410-404-4104

PATTI SPIGEL 410-241-9797

GREEN VALLEY NORTH (12SH) $849,000

UPPER PARK HEIGHTS (57NA) $174,900

CONDOS & TOWNHOMES

ON SLADE . AVENUE

MCDONOGH. THS, 3BR, 3.5BA, $209K, Jackie S. (410) 493-1794 BROOKSHIRE. QUAD, 3BR, 2BA, $119,900, Rosa A.(443) 928-9106 ARLINGTON. THS, 3BR,1.5BA, $137,500, Debbye B.(410) 591-3133 GREENGATE. CNDO, 2BR, 2BA, $116K, Marilyn D. (443) 285-9108 UPPER PK HTS. CNDO, 3BR, 2.5BA, $249,900 Linda S.(410) 375-6532 COPPERHILL.THS,3BR,2BA,2HBA,$186K,DEBBIEA.(410)336-1266 ANNEN WOODS. CNDO, 2BR, 2BA,D, $129,900, JennY.(410) 303-3880 NEWTOWN. CNDO, 2BR, 2BA, $159,900, JOHNW.(443) 744-1799 TOWERS. CNDO, 4av fr $97,900 Naomi/Sharon (410) 599-5303

MORT OR ANN 410-905-1401

SHARON ZUCKERBROD 410-599-5303

MILLBROOK. THS, 3BR, 1.5BA, $155K, Naomi R.(410) 358-1850

REAL ESTATE • MORTGAGES • TITLE • INSURANCE FALLS AND GREENSPRING VALLEY ROADS

www.greenspringmd.com 68

1808 BY WOODS LN $639,900

2409 STILL FOREST RD $795,000

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

1 SLADE. 2 available from $149,900. ANN/MORT 410-905-1401.

7 SLADE. 2BR, 2BA. $48,500 LIBBY BERMAN 410-978-4920.

11 SLADE. 3 available from $39,900. OFFICE 410-583-5700.


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Marc Goldstein Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI

410-598-9900

UNDER CONTRACT

Page 69

C

elebrating 25 years! 410-653-SOLD(7653)

Dmitry Fayer

Rebecca Conway

Anna Yashnyk

Realtor

Realtor

410-236-1901

410-491-6524

Realtor, ABR, CDPE Certified Distressed Property Expert

Ida Volkomich

443-983-0426

Gennady Fayer

Realtor

Realtor, CDPE Certified Distressed Property Expert

410-978-5544

443-324-3280

Aaron Pearlman Realtor

410-961-5773

UNDER CONTRACT

SUMMIT CHASE $519,900 (SAP)

HONEYSUCKLE HILL $499,900 (OLD)

CRADDOCK ESTATES $449,900 (HAR)

Upgraded 5BR/3.5BA Colonial w/granite kit & MBR &gardenbath,1st–flFRw/FP.Mahoganyflrs,fin'd LL.

5BR/4.5BAexpandedColonialon2ac!Cherrykit,2mastersuites,hdwdflrs,FRadd'n,walkoutLL.Multitierdeck.

4BR/3.5BA Colonial w/eat-in kit, MBR suite, fin'd walkout LL. 2 FPs, deck w/amazing views!

CRADDOCK ESTATES $419,000 (HAR)

GREEN GATE $399,900 (JOL)

Remodeled 3BR/3.5BA Colonial w/eat-in kit, expanded DR, FR w/FP. MBR w/soaking tub & walk-in closet. Fin'd walkout LL.

5BR/3BA Rancher w/eat-in kit, open LR & DR, 1st fl FR w/FP. Fin'd walkout LL.

GREEN GATE $259,900 (WIN)

VILLAGE OF LONGREACH $229,900 (WIL)

UNDER CONTRACT

OFFUTT RIDGE $389,900 (OFF) 4BR/2.5BA Colonial w/wraparound porch on 5 ac! Eat-in kit, 1st–fl FR w/FP, hdwd flrs, big MBR suite.

G

E

$319,900

REENSPRING AST (QUA) Remodeled 3BR/3.5BA brick Townhouse. You've been waiting for this one! Sunken LR, granite eat-in kit, hdwd floors, MBA w/jacuzzi tub & separate shower, vaulted ceilings. Fin'd walkout LL. SOLD IN 2 WEEKS

Fully renovated 3BR/2.5BA Townhouse w/new roof, siding,windows,kit,baths,HVAC,woodflrs & more!

2BR/2BA two-level gar Condo LR w/FP, sep DR, MBR suite. Vaulted ceilings.

UNDER CONTRACT

PRESERVE AT MANOR WOODS $189,900 (HID)

ANNEN WOODS $174,900 (LAM)

GARRISON WOODS $174,500 (HIG)

JONES VALLEY $169,900 (JON)

Brick Townhouse w/eat-in kit, 2 MBR suites, loft. Fin’d bsmt, deck, 2–car garage.

3BR/2.5BA EOG in newest section! Eat-in kit, huge LR/DR, MBR suite w/priv BA.

3BR/2/2BA Townhouse w/eat-in kit, hdwd floors, fin'd walkout LL w/FP & half BA.

TIMBERGROVE $159,900 (KEN)

2BRmid-lvlCondow/updatedkit&floors,fresh paint, fireplace, balcony & corner location!

3BR/2BA top floor Condo w/eat-in kit, laminate floors,cathedralceilings,balcony.Communitypool.

OWINGS MILLS $144,900 (HUN)

STEVENSON VILLAGE $124,700 (STO)

ROCKLAND RUN $94,900 (SNO)

SHELBOURNE COURT $59,900 (PAR)

Move-in ready 2BR/2BA mid-lvl Condo in secure, elev bldg! Eat-in kit, sep DR, MBR suite w/priv BA.

2BR+DenpatiolevelCondow/eat-inkit,bigMBRw/priv bath,parquetflrs.Overlooksopen,landscapedgrounds

SEVEN SLADE $49,900 (SLA)

UNDER CONTRACT

Move-in ready 2BR/2BA first–fl Condo w/open 1BR/1BAtopfloorCondow/eat-inkit,sepDR,MBR 2BR/2BA first fl Condo w/eat-in kit, sep DR, MBR w/lrgcloset.W/Dinunit,extrastorageinbldg.Balcony. w/walk-incloset.Parquetfoyer.Closetoelev.Securebldg. floor plan, over 1200 sq ft, large balcony..

410-653-SOLD (7653) Office • 1-800-770-6404 Toll-Free www.nationalrealtyhome.com jewishtimes.com

69


www.HomeRome.com STEVENSON

Baltimore Luxury Condo 6317 Park Heights

IF YOU WANT SOLD ON YOUR HOME CALL MARGARET ROME Historic Fieldstone

ENJOY SPRING IN YOUR NEW HOME Hernwood Heights - 3703 Laburman Dr. Under $270,000

Elegant Lobby, Spacious 2–Bedroom, 2–Bath 4th–Floor condo. Washer/Dryer. Beautiful views from covered balcony! Swimming pool, guest rooms (for out–of–town company), all utilities included in condo fee. Move-in condition. For photos go to www.HomeRome.com.

7 Slade Ave. Under $70,000

Spacious one bedroom one bath, Separate utility room has full–size washer and dryer. Sliding glass doors to 16–foot covered balcony with treetop views. Security buzzer/intercom, inside mail and paper delivery. Assigned parking. Pool available for fee. Convenient location close to shopping, houses of worship and public transportation. For photos go to www.HomeRome.com

Under $45,000

Bartonwood Condo #504

Custom Brick Rancher with 3 car garage, enclosed sunroom and finished lower level. Fireplace in sunken living room and in recreation room downstairs. Large landscaped private lot. Central air, gas heat, public water. Hardwood floors on first level. Abundant storage in enclosed sheds in garage plus workshop and more storage in basement. Beautiful Neighborhood of custom built homes!.

2804 Woodland Ave. Baltimore 21215 Under $75,000 Walk to Sinai Hospital. Single family cape with 2 bedrooms on the first floor and a huge finished attic that could be a studio, recreation room or office. Off street parking with a concrete pad, enough room for garage or carport. Central air, gas heat, eat in kitchen and wood floors under carpet. A lower level is ready to finish. Great buy! For photos go to www.HomeRome.com

The Towers #102 C Under $150,000 Two bedrooms with full bath plus a TE powder room is a perfect size. Very IVA O PRPATI bright with oversized windows and double sliding doors to the very private enclosed first–floor patio with gated locked entrance. For photos go to www.HomeRome.com

H IT UY W B NT TO RE ION T OP

the right way

Rome

Margaret Rome author of Real Estate

Here is a brick Canton Townhouse from which you can walk to the water, The Can Company, Safeway, Little Italy and Patterson Park. Great forentertainingwithenclosedbrickpatiooffthe gourmet kitchen plus a spacious rooftop deck with sunset views! Very special home with 2 master bedrooms with private baths, one with Jacuzzi and the other with stall shower. Gas heat and Central Air. A move–in–now beauty! For photos go to www.HomeRome.com.

Canton - 209 S. Milton St. Under $275,000

• NEEDED – LARGE RANCHER OR VERY LARGE 1ST FLR MASTER, OR ELEVATOR W/ 3–CAR GARAGE IN GATED COMMUNITY.

• 2 STORY W/ LARGE YARD IN FRANKLIN OR FORT GARRISON SCHOOL DISTRICT. UP TO $500K

• NEEDED CARROLL COUNTY HOME WITH PUBLIC UTILITIES AND GAS HEAT UP TO $500K

Exciting Custom Beauty! Brick, stone and cedar, 5 Bedroom 3½ Bath 2–story contemporary on beautiful 2–acre landscaped lot. 3–door garage, high ceilings, multiple skylights, 2 fireplaces and minutes from I–83 and Wegmans. Serene Greencroft location! For photos go to www.HomeRome.com

1 Clipping Tree Lane - Hunt Valley Under $650,000

The Newest Home In Old Pikesville. This two–story four–bedroom home is located on a private cul de sac with plenty of parking, first floor family room, first–floor laundry, finished lower level, a fenced rear yard, deck, shed, quartz counters and more ... It is pristine! For photos go to www.HomeRome.com

105 Church Ln. - Pikesville Under $350,000

SELL YOUR HOME WITH MARGARET ROME Carroll County - Single family home 3301 Kelsey Ct Under $250,000

www.HomeRome.com

Carroll Co. 3-4 Bedroom Single family home with huge country kitchen and possible in-law suite. For photos go to

Under $200,000

BEST BUY IN PIKESVILLE THREE–bedroom Brick Colonial has an addition (first–floor bedroom and ½ bath plus a beautiful master suite, 2 5’x5’ walk–in closets). Finished clubroom with ½ bath. This home has it all…Hardwood floors, fireplace, fenced yard and Central Air! For photos go to www.HomeRome.com .

Parkville - 2523 Wentworth Rd. Under $210,000 Charming updated home with big front porch, deck and patio. New country kitchen. Two bedrooms on first floor with new full bath. Finished lower–level "man cave". Large deck overlooks beautiful fenced yard, patio, storage shed and parking space . Central air, gas heat. For photos go to www.HomeRome.com

Heritage Crossing Under $165,000 This brickfront end-of-group townhouse has 3 bedrooms, 31⁄2 baths. Bamboo floors, gas heat, central air. The eat-in kitchen has pass through to the dining room. "Man cave" with a wine cooler, wet bar and 3rd full bath. Parking pad. Urban living in downtown Baltimore. For photos go to www.HomeRome.com

www.410-530-2400.com

Search over 50,000 active listings through my website. www.HomeRome.com • mrome@HomeRome.com ABR, ACRE, BROKER, CAP, CRS, e-PRO, GRI, PMN, RECS, SRES, CyberStar™

© o

Baltimore Jewish Times April 20, 2012

70

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YWGC Realty Is Now... OPEN SUNDAY 12-2

Still locally owned. Now nationally known. BRAESIDE

TUFTON SPRINGS

Scan with any smartphone

HARBOR EAST

5hurdleford.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;161891â&#x20AC;? to 79564

12dippingpond.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;27058â&#x20AC;? to 79564

2415tuftonsprings.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;92624â&#x20AC;? to 79564

spinnakerbay504.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;13416â&#x20AC;? to 79564

$319,000 5 Hurdleford Ct Sharon Friedman 410-303-1664

$1,195,000 12 Dipping Pond Ct Marc Witman 443-463-6100

$899,900 2415 Tufton Springs Ln Marc Witman 443-463-6100

$898,000 717 President St #504 Cindy Conklin 443-629-0152

INNER HARBOR

THE QUARRY AT GREENSPRING

THE CLEARINGS

1306musgrove.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;53886â&#x20AC;? to 79564

$1,295,000 1306 Musgrove Rd Michael Yerman 410-583-0400

SILO POINT

harborcourttowers.com

10 E. Lee St #702 $795,000, #901 $799,000 Cindy Conklin 443-629-0152

THE MOORINGS

DUMBARTON

6908graniteridge.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;89176â&#x20AC;? to 79564

PLGĂ&#x20AC;HOG\ZJFLQIR For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;52282â&#x20AC;? to 79564

$754,900 6908 Granite Ridge Ct Peter/Aex Bulkley 443-742-3520

  0LGĂ&#x20AC;HOG 5G Carole Fradkin 410-978-7786

SAGAMORE FOREST

CAVES VALLEY

1200steuart918.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;1026â&#x20AC;? to 79564

2612lighthouse.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;163485â&#x20AC;? to 79564

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11014parkheights.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;257â&#x20AC;? to 79564

$750,000 1200 Steuart St #918 Marc Witman 443-463-6100

$599,000 2612 Lighthouse Ln Cindy Conklin 443-629-0152

$549,900 14 Timber Way Ct Marc Witman 443-463-6100

$495,000 11014 Park Heights Ave Michael Yerman 410-583-0400

STEVENSON

GREENCOURT HILLS

GUILFORD

STEVENSON COMMONS

114swanhill.ywgc.info For more info TEXT â&#x20AC;&#x153;141138â&#x20AC;? to 79564

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SUMMIT CHASE

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Federal Hill 410.727.0606

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Phoenix 410.667.0801

Timonium 410.561.0044

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When kids are in the hospital, they want their parents by their side. Now you can stay there.

Introducing the new Samuelson Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital at Sinai. Where family-centered care means that the voices of patients and parents and siblings are every bit as important as those of our renowned pediatric specialists. Within this modern facility, families can be as comfortable with treatment decisions as they are with our spacious private rooms.

In concert with the multidisciplinary teams of physicians of the Sandra and Malcolm Berman Brain and Spine Institute, our Division of Neurology evaluates and provides care for children with seizure disorders and a variety of neurologic and neuromuscular disorders, including concussion management. Clinics are held five days per week and emergency consultation is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. That means that our expertise is always available when you need it most.

410.601.WELL (9355)

lifebridgehealth.org/children

Profile for Lindsey Bridwell

BJT 042012  

April 20 2012 issue of the Baltimore Jewish Times

BJT 042012  

April 20 2012 issue of the Baltimore Jewish Times

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