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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19-TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2014

Liquor reform bill promises transparency with digital records BY DANIELLE SWEENEY DSWEENEY@BALTIMOREGUIDE.COM

A new bill is the first to address major administrative shortcomings found by the 2013 audit of the Baltimore City Liquor Board. Senate Bill 846, co-filed as HB 831, and titled the Alcoholic Beverages Act of 2014, which is sponsored by Senator Verna JonesRodwell (44th) and will be co-sponsored by Baltimore City senators, is the most significant piece of legislation to come out of the postaudit Liquor Board workgroup, of which State Senator Bill Ferguson (46th) is a member. A major focus of the bill, said Ferguson, is making the Liquor Board more transparent. “It will help enhance accountability of the agency and provide more oversight for finances and operations,� he said. Among the bill’s most notable provisions is requiring the Liquor Board to digitize all of its licensee records and make them available online for public review starting July 1, 2015. Currently, all licensee records are in CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

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Crime concerns bring 500 residents out on snowy night BY ERIK ZYGMONT EDITOR@BALTIMOREGUIDE.COM

The big crime meeting drew a big turnout, with 500 people packing into the Breath of God Lutheran Church at Pratt and Clinton streets. The church was so full that some of the crowd had to overflow into the church basement. “Some of the things taking place in this community should not be happening,� said Police Commissioner Anthony Batts, drawing applause from residents as he apologized for the recent violent incidents in the area, including the brick attack of Jon Fogg and murder of Kimberly Leto. “I’m embarrassed that we have to come here to this meeting. The

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city deserves more and I will do my all to turn this city around to your expectations,� Batts continued. In addition to Batts, the meeting brought out the majority of the Police Department’s command staff, as well as city leaders including Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, City Council President Jack Young, and Councilmen Jim Kraft,Brandon Scott and Nick Mosby, as well as state representatives Senator Bill Ferguson and Delegates Peter Hammen and Luke Clippinger, who organized the meeting. Also in attendance were candidates for 46th District Delegate Liam Davis and Brooke Lierman, as well as Marilyn Mosby, candidate for State’s Attorney. CONTINUED ON PAGE 3

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Police make arrest in Patterson Park area rape case

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On Monday, the Baltimore Police Department reported on social media that officers had arrested Bernard Burton and charged him with rape and robbery for an incident that occurred last week. Last week, police told the Guide that on Monday, Feb. 10, about 12:30 p.m., the suspect approached a woman walking on N. Streeper St. near Patterson Park. He then revealed that he had a gun, police said, and he forced her into an alley behind the 2800 block of Fairmount Ave. and raped her. Police then distributed a sketch of the suspect, who wore a mask over the bottom half of his face. Burton has also been charged with a rape and robbery that occurred in July of 2012.

Wolfe Street Academy nets top honors Wolfe Street Academy, located at Wolfe and Gough streets in Upper Fell’s Point, is one of 18 Maryland Title I public schools that were honored on January 31 for their efforts to improve student achievement. The Maryland State Board of Education and the Maryland State Department of Education recognized Wolfe Street Academy as a “Title I Highest Performing

Reward School” on several criteria, including meeting annual measurable objectives for “all students” and all subgroups for two consecutive years (last school year and the prior year), and for having a 10 percent or lower achievement gap between “all students” and the lowest performing subgroups.

Man found dead in Fell’s Point portable toilet

Gmart to open this Saturday

Police say that a man was found dead in a port-a-john on Wednesday, Feb. 12. A spokesperson for the Baltimore Police Department, Detective Brandon Echevarria, said that at about 10:17 a.m., officers responded to the 900 block of Wolfe St. at Thames St. for an adult male found inside a port-a-john. The state Medical Examiner’s Office currently has the body, which is listed as a John Doe, because there was no identification found with the body, Echevaria said. He added that homicide investigators were called to the scene, but “at this point there were no signs of foul play, and no obvious injury to the body.”

—From the Baltimore Curriculum Project

According to a sign on the building, Gmart International Foods will be holding a grand opening this Saturday, Feb. 22. The grocery store is at 3800 Lombard St., the former location of Santoni’s Super Market, which closed last year. Buzz for Gmart grew earlier this year, when a similar sign was spotted on the building announced that the international foods market was coming to the location. The sign disappeared amid reports that no lease had been signed with the building owners, but it soon went back up. According to the retailer’s website, there are seven Gmart stores between Maryland, Virgina and Georgia. Two more are planned for Florida; one is planned for Alabama.


BALTIMORE GUIDE 3

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Crime meeting: Police, mayor answer residents’ questions CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Rawlings-Blake assured the crowd that, contrary to conclusions drawn from recent media reports, she does indeed care about violence in their area. She said that she talked about everybody having to work together, “and somehow that got twisted into me blaming residents and that I didn’t care about people who paid property taxes,” she said. “There’s not a day that goes by—there’s not an hour that goes by—that I don’t think about public safety.” She added that growing up in Baltimore at a time when the yearly homicide rate was over 300 was what “motivated me to get involved in public service.” In addition to answering residents’ questions and answering to their concerns, the meeting was also held to introduce the new commander of the Southeast Police District, Acting Major Deron Garrity. “One of the reasons I brought him back to this district is because he is extremely good at what he does,” commented Batts, adding that Garrity’s recent presence in the Northern District had helped ameliorate a “crime spike” up there. Eventually, the mayor and the commissioner wrapped up their introductory remarks. “What we’re going to do—I’m going to stop talking, and I’m going to start listening,” said Batts, indicating it was was time for residents to ask their questions. Police presence The first question was about police presence in the Southeast District, or, more specifically, whether the district will have an increased number of foot patrol officers and whether vehicle officers will get out of their cars and engage with the neighborhood. After explaining officer deployment on a “macro level,” Batts eventually answered, “In short, the answer is yes—we’re going to have foot patrol and we’re going to get out of our cars.” Garrity said that vehicle officers getting out of their cars “is one of the biggest things we’re putting in place.” He added that the Southeast District is trying to instill in its officers that “Every officer should be a foot officer; not every talk with a person has to be adversarial.” “We hear it time and again,” Garrity added. “The cops are like robots. They ask what went wrong, they take a report, and nothing else.” Batts noted that the way police interact with the public was a major concern identified by the department’s recent strategic plan.

“We’ve got to crank up our professionalism,” he said, adding that he would like officers to “sit down and talk with the community. I want them to hear from you what you expect from them.” Should police live in Baltimore? A resident asked if the police commissioner believes that there are negative consequences of officers living outside of the city. “If I had my druthers, I’d have everyone live in the city,” Batts replied, but then he told a story about how, when he was a young officer living where he worked, someone he had previously arrested threatened him and his pregnant wife in a grocery store. “About a week later, I moved my family out of that city,” he said. Bob Cherry, president of the Fraternal Order of Police, the police officers’ union, chimed in and said that about 30 percent of Baltimore’s police officers do live in the city. “It’s not where DPW is, but it’s growing,” Cherry said. Batts noted that while officers may not live in Baltimore, he hopes to recruit police who are at least from Baltimore. Currently, he said, many recruits come from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Rawlings-Blake said that the city has recently invested $12 million into “homeowner incentives” that could result in more Baltimore police officers living in Baltimore. Defense of self and family A pregnant resident noted that her house has been burglarized once before, and that her husband often travels for work. “If someone enters my home, what force can I use—what steps can I take...as a resident who wants to protect her kids, before I’m sent to jail?” she asked. “I want to answer that question in a little different way,” replied Batts. “The reason you’re asking that question is because you have a sense of fear, and you don’t feel your community is as safe as it should be.” Garrity noted that many residents feel unsafe due to juveniles who canvass neigborhoods, banging on front doors, and—if there is no response—going to the back of a home to make a forced entry. Contractors, too, have been known to work on a property and come back later and burglarize it, he added. Directly answering the resident’s question, Garrity stated, “If somebody would enter into your home, and you’re there, you have a right to defend yourself.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

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To the Editor

Mayor could take a lesson from commissioner To the Editor: My wife and I moved to Baltimore to be a part of the renewal of a great city. We left a downtown apartment in DC because we wanted a livable community, a place with history and invested residents. I love that many of my neighbors have been in the same Canton house for 50, 60 or more years. In our DC neighborhood, we rarely ran into anyone who had been there more than a few years. To find someone who was born and raised in the neighborhood was an almost-unheard-of oddity. We willingly signed up to pay property taxes that are double those in the rest of the state because it meant we could own in an exciting urban core, convenient to everything, for less than the rent on our DC apartment. I believe in the social services that my taxes support. I think the least fortunate in our city deserve every opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty, and I am incredibly proud that Maryland consistently ranks as having the best-educated kids in the nation in spite of our struggling, inner-city schools. However, I was appalled when our mayor responded to a drastic rise in street robberies and gun-related incidents in our neighborhood since just last year with, “if crime happens in an area where property taxes are higher, we’re supposed to care more?” (Editor’s note: The “Baltimore Brew,” baltimorebrew.com, reported the above quote in the Feb. 10 article “Mayor says citizens can be part of the solution or part of the problem in curbing violence.” It was also reported on Feb. 12 by the “Baltimore Sun” in the article “Southeast on edge over crime as neighbors call for measured debate.”) No Ms. Mayor, but you are supposed to care. Violence is tragic wherever it occurs. The fact that violence occurs more in other neighborhoods is no excuse for it to happen in mine. To her credit, the mayor did express sympathy at last Wednesday’s Southeast community meeting on crime. Then again, a statement that she was focused on, “finding partners who are doing more than complain, that are willing to do more than write a check for their property tax,” raised my eyebrows. (Editors note: The above quote was reported on Feb. 12 by the “Baltimore Sun” in the article “Southeast on edge over crime as neighbors call for measured debate.”) Notably missing from her statements was any sense of responsibility. In response to recent critical social media posts from neighborhood residents, she suggests that any time spent criticizing her leadership on crime would be better directed toward community service. Questioning the community contributions of the citizens that she is supposed to protect is not an appropriate response. Kim Leto, the smiling bartender from our corner pub, would not have been saved from a brutal murder in her own home by volunteering more of her time. Compare the mayor’s deflections to Commissioner Batts’ statement that he was “embarrassed” by what was happening in Southeast. He took full responsibility for the neighborhood’s slide on crime and outlined actions that his department would take to reverse the trend. The mayor could take a lesson from her commissioner. Law-abiding citizens do not want to hear that their lack of action is responsible for surging crime. It is not as if residents suddenly decided to turn a blind eye to crime and volunteer less of their time this year compared to last. A number of commentators have discussed moving away from Baltimore due to the increase in crime. I do not blame them. There are places just over the city line where paying your much lower property taxes might earn you the right to feel safe. There are also places where the mayor might listen to and respect the voices of taxpayers without questioning their contributions to the community. My wife and I are not going anywhere anytime soon. We have fallen in love with Baltimore’s charm and love living where we do. I only wish we had a mayor who listened to her citizens and took responsibility rather than blaming the victims. Steve Bloom, Canton


BALTIMORE GUIDE 5

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Liquor reform: ‘Padlock law’ a possibility CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

hard copy form and publicly accessible only by visiting the Liquor Board in person during business hours. The bill also requires the board to annually establish performance measures for financial management, issuance of licenses, and enforcement of alcoholic beverages laws via Citistat, the city’s data-driven management system, and to make data on those performance measures available on OpenBaltimore, the city’s open data catalog. Another key provision would require that a complete liquor license application, transfer, or renewal be posted online for public view at least 14 days before a liquor license hearing.  “These are all tremendous advances in the Liquor Law, and would greatly benefit the communities of Baltimore City, along with the community members that deal with the liquor board on a regular basis. The transparency … will allow community leaders to work on liquor license issues without having to take time off of work to go to the Liquor Board offices to research license transfers, violations, etc.,. ” said Kevin Bernhard, former president of the Highlandtown Community Association, who now chairs the organization’s liquor license and zoning committee. “The 14-day rule would also give the community more time to mobilize when needed,” added Bernhard. “Currently, we get the [Liquor Board docket] … emailed to us once a week for the following week’s schedule. This is not enough time to organize residents to action.” The proposed legislation also creates a fourth member of the Liquor Board, an alternate commissioner able to serve when a regular member is absent or recused, which reduces the likelihood of a two-commissioner hearing (in which case licensees can request a postponement). The bill also establishes a two-year term for commissioners.  “The term can be renewed, and they will serve until replaced. But the opportunity for turnover will be every two years,” Ferguson clarified. Victor Corbin, president of the Fell’s Prospect Community Association, said the bill is a good start. “Does it address all issues? No. And I’ve submitted some changes I’d like to see made,” he said. Corbin and the Fell’s Prospect Community Association would like to have part of the legislation amended so that the proximity of substance abuse and treatment centers—and not only schools and churches—is considered when transferring an existing license or

granting a license to sell alcoholic beverages in parts of Baltimore City. “Maybe this is a way to deal with the health issues of alcohol abuse without putting people out of business,” Corbin said, alluding to the proposed phase-out of non-conforming liquor establishments outlined in Transform Baltimore. Corbin said there are six or seven liquor establishments within a two-block radius of a recovery center on S. Broadway in his community. “We’re protecting children and parishioners, but not the people whom alcohol harms,” he commented “Why would you set up [addicts] to fail? This is a no brainer.” Padlock law? As for other liquor establishments that can have a negative impact on the community, Ferguson noted that the group is currently working on getting a padlock law added into the legislation. “Commissioner Batts asked us to strengthen the city’s padlock laws,” said Ferguson. “I would like to have it added to this bill, but it may be a separate piece of legislation.” A padlock law would empower the police commissioner to lock up a liquor establishment   when violence occurs inside, particularly where there is an ongoing threat to health or safety. The law, according to Ferguson, would be a tool for the police to curb the most extreme cases in which there is a concern about the health and safety of the community. Padlocking would trigger an immediate hearing at the liquor board. Being padlocked would not be a liquor license violation in and of itself, but the incidents causing the padlocking would be, Ferguson explained. “That said, Commissioner Batts noted that one of the major benefits of the law is not its actual application,” Ferguson said.  “The padlock action itself proactively influences licensees to maintain better control of their facilities.” Padlocking would occur at the discretion of the commissioner “with factors for consideration outlined in law,” Ferguson said.  “These are still being developed but will likely replicate something similar to DC’s law.” Matt Gonter, who lives in the Patterson Park neighborhood, is pleased to hear that such a measure is being considered. “If a bar is a persistent threat to the safety of its neighbors, then the police should have the ability to padlock it,” he said. “In the case  of La Raza  Cantina, in [Highlandtown] it took several months after a

stabbing occurred on the premises for the Liquor Board to revoke their license. It wasn’t an easy process-- the neighbors had to collect signatures from the neighbors, submit the petition to the liquor board, and find an attorney to represent the neighbors. Fortunately Brooke Lierman from the Community Law Center assisted them, pro-bono,” Gonter said. Even after  Liquor Board Commissioner Steve Fogleman revoked the license, La Raza was still  allowed to remain open and serve alcohol until the appeals board  affirmed Fogleman’s decision, he added. “Neighbors shouldn’t have to jump through hoops to get a known nuisance bar shut down,

so hopefully this law will make problem bar owners  more accountable to the public,”Gonter said. Corbin, who has dealt with problem bars in Fell’s Prospect, agrees. “Residents often call the police to deal with bar issues, and since the police seem to do a better job than the BLLC in regards to enforcement, why not give them the tools,” Corbin said. He added that overall he thinks SB 846 is a good start, but Liquor Board reform still has a long way to go “Maybe next session, we’ll deal with the meat and potatoes: the dead license issue.”

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6 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Email your events to Danielle Sweeney, Session: The City Council Land Use and dsweeney@baltimoreguide.com. Events are Transportation Committee has held several due at noon on the Friday before publication. public hearings on the Transform Baltimore legislation. The committee is now moving into work sessions, which will be open to the Wednesday, February 19 Boot Camp: Get ready to sweat at Patterson public. The remaining February schedule is as Park Sports & Education Center Monday and follows: Feb. 20 at 3 p.m. Stakeholders are Wednesday at 6 a.m. or 6:30 p.m. for a high- invited to submit proposals for amendments. intensity, hour-long workout with ACE- These can be presented at hearings and/or certified trainer Jeff Morton. $100 for eight submitted to the Land Use Committee. They sessions (one session per week) or $180 for 16 can be sent to Antoine.Banks@baltimore sessions. Contact pattersonparkinfo@gmail. city.gov. com or 410-878-0563 to sign up. Friday, February 21 Mother Goose Baby Steps: Wednesdays. Nina Simone Tribute: Nationally renowned 11:30 a.m. An interactive nursery rhyme soul, jazz, and R&B diva Maysa makes her program with music and movement. For Patterson debut with a tribute to Nina Simone children up to 36 months of age with their on the activist-musician’s birthday. Maysa has caregivers. Patterson Park Branch, Enoch collaborated with everyone from Stevie Pratt Library, 158 N. Linwood Ave. Info:410- Wonder and Chaka Khan to Incognito and 396-0983. Angela Bofill. Tonight she crafts a set in honor of Nina Simone – one of her most Thursday, February 20 Buena Casa, Buena Brasa: Todos los admired influences. Tickets: $25. 8 p.m. jueves. Canciones, rimas, cuentos, y juegos, Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 para los niños (0-3 años) y los padres o Eastern Ave. 410-276-1651. cuidadores. 11 a.m. at the Southeast Anchor Saturday, February 22 Branch, Enoch Pratt Library, 3601 Eastern Kerplunk!: Open to families and kids of all Ave. Info: 410-396-1580. ages. Tour galleries and design unique art Transform Baltimore February Work projects linked to the exhibitions. Stop in for a

quick visit, or stay for the entire afternoon exploring art materials and let your creativity soar. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Noon-3 p.m. Free. No registration required. Sat. Feb. 22. Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. 410-276-1651. Audubon’s Wildlife Gardening Workshop: Audubon experts will be on hand to share practical tips and scientific support for gardening with native plants outside urban homes. 1-3 p.m., Feb. 22 at the Patterson Park Branch of the Enoch Pratt Library, at 158 N. Linwood Ave. Half-Price Sale at the Baltimore Potters’ Guild: The Guild is located at 3600 Clipper Mill Rd. The hours of the sale are Feb. 22-23, Sat., from 10 a.m-5 p.m., and Sun. from 12- 5 p.m.

Sunday, February 23

Dinner Bingo: St. Casimir Church Hall at 2736 O’Donnell St., will have a non-smoking, handicap-accessible dinner bingo on Feb. 23. Doors open at 10 a.m. Dinner is at noon, and bingo starts at 1 p.m. The cost is $20 per person. Proceeds benefit the scholarship fund. Call Marlene for reservations: 410-477-2959.

Monday, February 24

Patterson Park Master Plan Review:

Councilman Kraft’s Office will bring together the members of the Patterson Park Master Plan Working Group, the Patterson Park Planning Committee, and all of those who are interested in the future of the park to begin the next step in the process that began on Oct. 1, 2012. The meeting will be held on Feb. 24 at the Patterson Park Casino at 7 p.m.

Tuesday, February 25

Open House at Patterson Park Youth Sports & Education Center: Not sure who we are or what we do? Come visit Feb. 25 between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. to learn about upcoming free spring and summer programs for the entire family. 200 S. Linwood Ave. Info: pattersonparkinfo@gmail.com or call 410-878-0563 for directions.

Save the Date:

March 1, Basket Bingo: Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 8212 Philadelphia Rd., Rosedale, is hosting a Basket Bingo on March 1 at 5 p.m. Tickets are $15 for 20 games. Advance ticket sales only. Tickets and info: Bob, 443-690-7480 or the church office at 410-866-8766. March 5, Lenten Food Sale: The Home and School Association of St. Casimir School will be offering homemade Lenten Foods

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BALTIMORE GUIDE 7

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

COMMUNITY CALENDAR beginning on Ash Wednesday, March 5, and continuing through April 16. Codfish cakes are $2.25 each unfried and $2.50 each fried, and crab cakes are $6.75 each unfried and $7.00 each fried. Potato and macaroni salads and cole slaw are available at $3.00 per pound. Place your orders for Lenten foods by Wednesdays at 3 p.m. Ash Wednesday orders are picked up from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Kolbe Center, directly behind St. Casimir Church on O’Donnell St. Subsequent orders are picked up on Fridays. Call Laureen Brunelli at 410-989-3767 until 5 p.m., or Carol Kramer at 443-414-6784 from 5 until 8 p.m. or by email at lentenfoods@gmail.com. Questions and orders may also be directed to the school at 410-342-2681 or faxed to 410342-5715.

Community Notebook

Protect Your Pipes: The Department of Public Works (DPW) reminds everyone that pipes and utility meters can freeze when the temperature remains below 25 degrees for extended periods of time. The DPW offers the following tips to help protect water lines: Let a thin stream of cold water run from a basement faucet. The stream should be a continuous flow, about the thickness of a pencil lead. This water can be caught in a bucket and used later as laundry or dish water. If your pipe is frozen, gently warm it with hot air from a blow dryer at the point where it enters your house. The DPW maintains outdoor water lines,up to and including the meter. Water lines running from the meter to the house, as well as internal plumbing, are the responsibility of the property owner. For water emergencies in Baltimore City, please call 311. Steven Scott Gallery: Winter preview featuring Robert Andriulli, Kristin Helberg, Ellen Hill, Sheep Jones, Amy Lamb, Kathryn O’Grady, Alison Saar, and Frank Trefny. Through March 29, at 808 S. Ann St. Hours:

Tuesday - Saturday,12-6 p.m. Info: 410-9029300, www.stevenscottgallery.com. Picture Windows: “The Painted Screens of Baltimore and Beyond” marks the centennial of Baltimore’s tradition of painting vivid images on row house screens. The exhibition is on view through March 16 in MICA’s Fox Building’s Meyerhoff Gallery, at 1303 W. Mount Royal Ave. A comprehensive look at the history of screen painting. Info: www.mica.edu. Free Adult Education Classes at PPPCS: Patterson Park Public Charter School offers the following classes: beginner Spanish Mon/Wed; intermediate Spanish Tues/Thurs; computer literacy Mon/Wed; pre-GED Tues/Thurs. All classes are free and open to the community and are held at PPPCS (27 N. Lakewood Ave).Classes start the week of Jan. 27 and run from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Classes will run until the end of the year, and a new semester will start in fall 2014. Please preregister on the website (www.pppcs.org) or by calling Melissa Logan, 410-558-1230 ext. 327, or MLogan@pppcs.org. After-school Programming: Patterson Park Youth Sports & Education Center is enrolling students in grades 6, 7, and 8 for after-school programming, Monday-Friday from 3-6 p.m. Homework assistance provided daily. Info: 410-878-0563 or emailpatterson parkinfo@gmail.com to sign up. Free Program for 2-year-olds: United Evangelical Church, at 3200 Dillon St., is offering a program for 2-year-olds and their parents. Info: Concetta Clark at 410-9950118. Volunteer With Audubon: Time to spare? Audubon would love your help making environmental education programs in Patterson Park successful. Please contact Kate Creamer, volunteer coordinator, at 443-6230717.

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Fells Point Corner Theatre Presents

Tales of Ordinary Madness Written by Petr Zelenka Translated by Stepan Simek

Sacred Heart of Jesus Highlandtown

Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014 in the Church Hall Foster Avenue & Conkling Street Bingo begins at 12 noon. Tickets are $20 per person and includes dinner and a package deal. Please reserve tickets by contacting the Rectory at

410-342-4336

or Carol at 410-522-2825

Don’t miss this humorous play by one of Europe’s finest playwrights.

Directed by Barry Feinstein February 14-March 2, 2014 Thursday/Friday/Saturday 8pm, Sunday 2 pm

www.fpct.org

It’s Ravioli Time! homemade ravioli, imported spaghetti, homemade meatballs

St. Leo’s Catholic Church in Little Italy

THE SPAGHETTI RAVIOLI DINNER Sunday, March 2 • 12-6 • 914 Stiles St. Adults $12 • Children $6 • Carry-out 50¢ extra

Dinner includes: ravioli or spaghetti, meatballs, salad, bread, coffee Available for purchase: cannoli, Italian cookies, wine and soft drinks

Carryout in the Church Hall on Exeter Street

For Information: 410.675.7275

Come and make homemade ravioli at St. Leo’s on February 8 & 15 beginning at 9 a.m. Lunch will be served. Instructors will be available for beginners.


8 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

The

boats

tug that

at heart

strings

“I’ve never run into anybody that doesn’t smile when you say ‘tugboat,’” says Captain Bill Eggert. The thought of the harbor’s workhorses and the men who crew them brought more than a smile out of Eggert. It brought curiosity, which Eggert satisfied by riding with and interviewing men from the tugboats of the past. The end result is “Gentlemen of the Harbor: Stories of Chesapeake Bay Tugboats and Crews,” a collection of anecdotes, historical information, and beautiful black-and-white photographs. Eggert says that he began gathering information for his book in 1980, when Captain Herbert Groh invited him to work and observe on board the “Cape Henlopen,” a tug that worked Baltimore Harbor. “He took me under his wing,” said Eggert.” With Eggert on board, the “Cape Henlopen” brought a German container ship, the “Stuttgart Express” to a pier at the Dundalk Maritime Terminal. It also helped ship leave the harbor for New Orleans. The book can be left on a coffee table, picked up, opened to a random page and read. Filled with small vignettes and profiles, it can be enjoyed piecemeal, without plodding from the first page to the last page. The stories are written matter-of-factly, and deal with both heavy and light subject matter. There is a chapter on a family towing business, based in Canton, that has been around since 1922. The redevelopment of the area was double-edged to the owner, who felt that “some of the people downtown have adopted a policy of ‘you’re in business, you are ugly, and you’ve got to move.’”


g

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

There are funny stories. During World War II, a tug crew awoke to the sound of something hitting their hull, hard. They figured it was an errant blast from a practice bombardment the Army was conducting nearby. It was something else, and the crew ate exceptionally well that day. Eggert says that things have changed drastically in the tug business over the last few decades. “What I find the most interesting—there were always five men on board. Now they operate a lot of boats with two men,” he says. “It’s because they can do it, and I also think it’s done to cut down on salaries.” He feels fortunate to have had the access to tugboats that he did. “Just to get near them now—it’s amazing what you have to go through, even if you’ve been invited on board,” he says. Eggert, 66, grew up in Baltimore, but now lives near Annapolis. Beyond the research he did for “Gentlemen of the Harbor,” he knows a thing or two about the maritime life. A life-long educator, and currently a high school assistant principal, Eggert spent 17 summers as a water taxi captain, starting in the mid-1970s. “It was sort of my fun job,” he says. He was active in Baltimore Harbor during the early days of Camden yards, and he remembers ferrying big crowds of baseball fans—particularly Boston and New York fans—to and from Fell’s Point. After the games, Eggert says, his riders were often “three sheets to the wind.” “Boston fans were always about as nice as can be,” he remembers. “New York fans were the opposite.” While a win meant that he would be ferrying a group of singing, happy, harmless drunks across the water, a lose could make fans “nasty.” “I had to put on my captain’s hat a few times and lay down the law,” laughs Eggert. Overall, though, Eggert had a blast. “My extra jobs—my avocations—have always kept me sane,” he says. Currently, Eggert is gathering material for his “proverbial next book.” The response to his first has been more than he anticipated. “I get a lot of letters,” Eggert says. “There are still some old codgers, now in their 90s, who worked with Captain Groh, and they’re still sharp as a tack.” He said he also gets a lot of thank you letters. “They say, ‘Thanks Bill, you’re telling our story,’” Eggert says. “To me, that’s the best praise you can get.” “Gentlemen of the Harbor: Stories of Chesapeake Bay Tugboats and Crews” is available at gentlemenoftheharbor.com. STORY: ERIK ZYGMONT EDITOR@BALTIMOREGUIDE.COM

BALTIMORE GUIDE 9

Lifelong photographer Tom Scilipoti, a resident of Upper Fell’s Point, was kind enough to share these photos of tugboats he has taken over the years.


10 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Lives of not-so-quiet desperation in ‘Tales of Ordinary Madness’ by ERIK ZYGMONT EDITOR@BALTIMOREGUIDE.COM

Did you know that when you wear somebody else’s clothes, you learn to empathize with them? Did you ever wonder if you could fit a lightbulb into your mouth? These questions can be explored at the Fell’s Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., this weekend and next. In “Tales of Ordinary Madness,” set in Prague, Czech playwright Petr Zalenka delves into the almost-comical unhappiness and misadventure with which everyday people contend. In this case, the situation is exacerbated by the recent fall of Communism and the upheaval—or lack of a tangible adversary—it has brought to citizens in the Czech Republic. The play, directed by Barry Feinstein, follows Peter—a 30-year-old, unemployed, heavy-drinking neurotic—as the world crumbles around him, or maybe inside him. Through it all, Peter, played by Vermont native and FPCT veteran Tucker Foltz, is pulled in the opposing directions of his best friend, Midge (Alexander Scally), who has apparently completely lost it, and his mother

(Helenmary Ball), who—in her own mind—is one of the few sane people remaining. In this dysfunctional family and social circle, however, Peter’s mother’s sanity is only relative. Moe Howard appears intelligent when you’re always seeing him with Larry and Curly. In “Tales of Ordinary Madness,” Peter wavers between occultish schemes to win back his ex-girlfriend Jeanette and periods of complete despair in which he ceases to pursue anything, mentally curling into the fetal position as his family and friends grow increasingly erratic. There’s Alice (Lisa Bryan) and George (Rick Lyon-Vaiden), neighbors of Peter’s whose relationship has gone stale. George’s mediocre art does not impress Alice anymore, possibly because the fall of Communism has caused him to lose a crucial attractive quality—his “open opposition to the state.” WIthout that boogeyman, his so-called artistic suffering just looks pathetic. George must find something to oppose, and at one point in last Sunday’s showing, a couple of audience members wondered if his actions were in fact part of the play or if they should fear for their lives...

Peter’s father—expertly portrayed by Daniel Douek, on his fourth play with FPCT—may or may not suffer from either Alzheimer’s Disease or old-age dementia, but he certainly suffers from embarrassment over a past occupation connected to the oppressive Communist state. Douek’s performance is particularly strong, whether he’s stroking a beer bottle, stealing his son’s phone or wearing his wife’s dress. Another supporting character, Michal Roxie Johnson’s Sylvia, notes that there is a certain “tenderness” about Peter’s father. Even without her saying so, Douek manages to subtly—but clearly—convey that quality. Ample credit, however, must be also be given to Helenmary Ball. As Peter’s mother, she deftly portrays a woman who funnels our profoundest sympathies toward any man with the misfortune of being her husband. As I walked out of the theater and into the cold on Sunday afternoon, I realized that plays are not the movies, and my sense of mild stress and confusion enhanced by a minor redwine headache meant that “Tales of Ordinary Madness” had left its mark as a piece of art. Working with a simple set and talented actors, director Barry Feinstein holds our rapt

attention. He gets a lot of mileage from the few bits of understated action—Peter and his father spinning bottle openers on their fingers like gunslingers, for example, or Midge injuring himself with a sink—in a largely dialogue-driven play. “Tales of Ordinary Madness” shows Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m., through March 2. See fpct. org for more information.

Jessica Taylor, left, Alexander Scally, and Tucker Folz star in “Tales of Ordinary Madness,” directed by Barry Feinstein, at the Fell’s Point Corner Theatre. | Photo courtesy of Fell’s Point Corner Theater

2014 SPRING COURSE SCHEDULE & REGISTRATION. SIGN UP TODAY! LANGUAGE

(Italian language classes start on March 6 & 8)

ITALIAN FOR TRAVELERS (IN VIAGGIO) Thursdays (7-9) ITALIAN FOR CHILDREN Saturdays March 22, 29 and April 5, 12, 26 (12:30-2:00) Fee $40 (plus textbook) EXPLORATORY ITALIAN FOR ADULTS Thursdays (7-9) or Saturdays (12-2) CONTINUING ITALIAN (101) Thursdays (7-9) CONTINUING ITALIAN (105) Thursdays (7-9) INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN (207) Saturdays (12-2) ADVANCED ITALIAN (302) Thursdays (7-9) ADVANCED ITALIAN (310) Thursdays (7-9)

FOOD & DRINK

CULTURAL CLASSES

MAKE YOUR OWN SERIES:

LEARN HOW TO ACQUIRE ITALIAN DUAL CITIZENSHIP Saturday, March 22 (12-2) Free

ITALIAN SAUSAGE Saturdays (dates to be announced) Fee $20 (plus supplies) BREAD, SWEETS & BISCOTTI Thursdays March 13, 20 and 27 (7-9) Fee $30 (plus supplies

PALM WEAVING Saturdays April 5 (12-2) Fee $10 BASIC BOCCE Saturdays April 26 and May 3 (12-2) Fee $20

LIMONCELLO Saturdays March 15 & 29 (12-2) Fee $20 (plus supplies)

ITALIAN CARD GAMES April 10, 24 and May 1 (7-9) Fee $25

RAVIOLI, GNOCCHI, PASTA & SAUCES Saturdays March 29, April 5 and 12 (11-2) Fee $45

SIGN LANGUAGE Saturday, March 15, 22, 29 (12-2) Fee $25

“KiTcHeN KiDz!” Saturdays March 8,15, 22 (10:30-11:45) Fee $15

JEWELRY MAKING Thursdays March 6, 13, 20 Fee $20

ITALIAN COOKIES Thursdays April 3 and May 1 (7-9) Fee $20

INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING Thursdays (7-9) Classes begin on March 6 Fee $80

THE REV. ORESTSE PANDOLA LEARNING CENTER Located in St. Leo’s School in historic Little Italy at 912 Stiles Street, Baltimore

We will have a special day of REGISTRATION on Sunday, February 9, 2014 after the 9:30 am and 11:30 am Masses in St. Leo’s Church Hall. Teachers and staff will answer questions about the sessions.

Visit www.pandola.baltimore.md.us for detailed description of classes or for more info call 410-866-8494. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Saturdays, February 8 and 15 starting at 9:00 am in the school hall to help make homemade ravioli for St. Leo’s Annual Dinner. Novices are welcomed and lunch will be served. Instructors will be available for beginners. Meatballs will be made March 1, 2014 starting at 9 am.

ST. LEO’S ANNUAL RAVIOLI DINNER , ÊÓÊUÊ££\Îä‡x\ÎäÊ*


BALTIMORE GUIDE 11

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

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12 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

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BALTIMORE GUIDE 13

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

BIRDS HOUSE

by Andy Mindzak

Let someone else step up while Machado rests With Manny Machado coming along slowly, it is still not 100-percent certain he will be able to start at third for the Orioles this year. While that might be upsetting, let’s not forget this kid is only 21, and we don’t want the O’s to rush his recovery. So, if he’s not ready, who would play third? One option is Ryan Flaherty. Flaherty has the talent to play multiple infield positions as well as outfield, so he can fill in just about wherever. Last year with the Orioles, Flaherty found playing time at second base, shortstop, third base, first base, and also as a designated hitter. During the 2012 season, he spent some time at third, first, left field and right field. Last year, Flaherty played in 85 games and amassed 246 at-bats in which he batted .224. He also hit 10 home runs, 11 doubles, and he drove in 27 runs. Offense isn’t necessarily one of his strong suits, but he is solid in the

field and gives the O’s some much needed versatility. Another option is Michael Almanzar, a player the Orioles scooped up from the Red Sox in the Rule 5 draft in December. Almanzar spent his 2013 season in AA Portland where he batted .268 with 16 HR and 81 runs battedin, so he does have some pop in his bat. As for Machado, according to MASN, he is not allowed to run the bases or slide yet, but he has been cleared for everything else. He is hoping to be cleared for games by mid-March, but the Orioles will be taking his recovery slow, and they should. The last thing they need is to rush back one of the best third basemen in the game only to have him re-injure himself. While there is a significant gap between Machado and any replacement, it would still be best if he takes his time coming back to ensure he is 100-percent healthy.

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14 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

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Crime meeting: More Hispanic interpreters needed CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

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There was a huge turnout – about 500 people – at last week’s meeting on Southeast crime at Breath of God Lutheran Church in Highlandtown. Some had to overflow into the basement. | Photo by Erik Zygmont

Batts then said that he wants “to keep your external community safe so you don’t have to buy a weapon.” “Call the police department if you have an emergency, and we will give you a timely response,” he added. “If someone’s coming through a window, we’re coming, and we’re coming fast.”

interested in your legal status; we’re here to provide you a service.” Rawlings-Blake added that two years ago, she had made an executive order that no city employee may “ask the question” regarding a resident’s legal status. Regarding the availability of interpreters, the mayor said, “We have to do better.”

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT The same resident who asked about defending her children also questioned the mayor regarding “practical things” residents could do to be more engaged. The mayor said that “sometimes the best way to get things solid is just folks looking out the window and saying something when something doesn’t look right.” She added that her administration is working on “that ‘stop snitching’ mentality and how to get over that.” Also, Rawlings-Blake added, more $500 and $1,000 rewards have been approved for Metro Crime Stoppers, a tip line reachable at 1-866-7LOCKUP.

SERVICES FOR JUVENILES A resident commented on the daytime crime problems neighborhoods face, partially caused by “kids in the community and the perception kids have.” “If we don’t do something about the kids in the community, so the kids have some kind of support system...There’s got to be something in place so we can reach these kids,” said the resident, to applause. The mayor said that the city’s Youth Connection Centers are in place to connect truant students and their families to services. “It...it breaks your heart, and you try to wrap your head around it,” she said, choking up a bit. “Six years old, 7 years old; you see these kids, and how vulnerable they are... What’s going on and what’s not going on? Rawlings-Blake said that the city has to “do a better job of making a connection with chronic truants.” “It’s not about locking kids up,” she said. “It’s about finding appropriate placement, to keep kids safe and keep the community safe.”

HISPANIC RESIDENTS A woman noted that when Spanish-speaking people call 911, they often have to wait several minutes for an interpreter. Deputy Commissioner Jerry Rodriguez commented on the Police Department’s Hispanic relations. “We hear the Hispanic community, and we welcome the growth in the community,” he said. “We, your Police Department, are not

CONTINUED ON PAGE 17


BALTIMORE GUIDE 15

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

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16 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Men chase robbers north after man robbed at ATM on North Highland

Robbery

O’Donnell St., 5600 block, Feb. 9, 1:10 a.m. The victim reported that he was in the McDonald’s parking lot when he saw the suspects talking near a car with dark tinted windows. The victim approached and asked for a cigarette. One of the suspects gave him one and began talking. Then one of the others hit him in the head with a gun. The suspects told him to get in the car. He did. The suspects took his property.

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Eastern Ave., 1400 block, Feb. 10, 10:45 p.m. The victim reported that he was walking when he saw the suspect coming toward him. The suspect pulled out a gun and said, “Give me what you got.” The victim starting to back away, yelling “He has a gun.” He then ran away, still yelling that the suspect had a gun. The suspect walked away. N. Highland Ave., 200 block, Feb. 13, 6:07 p.m. The victim was taking money out of the ATM when he was approached by two men. One grabbed his money and bank card while another placed what the victim believed was a knife to his lower back. The other suspect displayed a gun in his waist band. They made the victim withdraw $300 and hand it over. At this point several men in the area chased the suspects northbound using two sticks. The suspects fled north. An area canvass was negative. E. Lombard St., 4100 block, Feb. 15, 12:30 a.m. The victim, a dancer at the club, reported that the suspect asked for a private dance. While she was giving him the dance, he exposed himself. She told him to pull up his pants; he did, but then tried to

RETIRE IN STYLE

kiss her and again exposed himself. When she told him to stop he grabbed her purse and tried to leave. When she stopped him, he pushed her against the wall. Report ends here.

Burglary

Mt. Pleasant Ave., 3900 block, Feb. 9, 5 p.m. An unknown suspect broke into the vacant property, damaging the rear door. Nothing was taken. N. Janney St., 100 block, Feb. 9, 8 p.m. The complainant was in the process of moving out, and was away from the property for two days. When she returned, she found that someone had kicked in the rear window, made entry, and taken a hot water heater, stove, and copper pipe. There was a large amount of damage to the property. S. Madeira St., 100 block, Feb. 10, 6:45 a.m. Unknown suspect(s) entered the location via the side window using unknown tools and took a bed spread, two laptops and a necklace. S. Chapel St., 600 block, Feb. 10, 7:30 a.m. An unknown suspect entered through the kitchen window, which was

$

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S. Ann St., unit block, Feb. 11, 8:30 a.m. The victim said he was in the block when another man drove up in a white car, accused the victim of having his cell phone, struck him in the arm with a crowbar, and fled the scene.

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found broken, and took a computer, video game system, and $30 in change. S. Conkling St., 400 block, Feb. 10, 10 a.m. Unknown suspect entered through an unsecured front door and took a video game system and tablet. E. Pratt St., 1700 block, Feb. 11, 8:35 a.m. The victim arrived at her apartment and saw her ex-husband fleeing through the gate with a cell phone. The victim’s current boyfriend was in the bathroom and heard a loud noise. He observed the victim and her ex-husband running through the alley. The incident was forwarded to DDU, which is seeking charges. S. Eaton St., 600 block, Feb. 12, 10 a.m. Someone broke the key box to the location, entered, and removed copper pipes and a galvanized gate.

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On January 29th, 2014 The lord took Sonny home to be with his mother, the late Louise D Hanlin. Mom gave him the nickname Sonny, when he was a young boy and Sonny he will always be. He is dearly loved and respected by his family. Sonny, you are always on our minds and forever in our hearts! Rest now until we are all together again! Your Angels


BALTIMORE GUIDE 17

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Crime meeting: Resident calls out State’s Attorney CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

3ECUREYOURHOUSEWITHDECORATIVE 7INDOW'UARDS &2%%%34)-!4%3

s"ALCONY 3TAIR0IPE2AILS 3TEELAND!LUMINUM s#OLUMNS 7INDOW'UARDS 3ECURITY$OORS "ASEMENT$OORS s0ORCHESAND3TEPSs'RATING &ENCESAND'ATES Several media reports have noted that Batts walked among the crowd as he spoke. | Photo by Erik Zygmont

A representative from Baltimore City Public Schools Police told residents that children under 16 must either be in school or accompanied by a guardian Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. If students are seen out violating that curfew, residents should call the school police at 410-396-8858, he said. Consequences for juveniles One woman looked at juvenile issues from a different angle. “What’s happening with consequences for these children?” she asked. The woman told her story: Her car was stolen, suspects were arrested, and she made arrangements—took time off work, etc.--to be a witness against the alleged juvenile perpetrators. However, after waiting at the courthouse, she learned that the youngsters would not be charged with anything. She added that the juveniles also now know where she lives and what she looks like. “Not one of them was charged with anything,” she said. “That’s why they keep doing it over and over again, because they keep getting away with it.” Batts noted that he had wondered himself why certain incidents kept repeating themselves, so he delved into statistics and found that the police in fact “are making the arrests.” “Where’s Bernstein at?” yelled someone from the audience, referring to State’s Attorney Gregg Bernstein, whose office is charged with prosecuting criminals after they are arrested.

“The police are doing their job,” yelled the man. “This is where I get in trouble...” said Batts, expressing some reluctance to comment. “Yeah, you get in trouble,” replied the commenter. “[The State’s Attorney’s Office] needs to seal the deal!” Batts said that all branches of law enforcement would need to work collaboratively to succeed in curtailing violence. “We agree with you, Commissioner, but he’s not sealing the deal!” yelled the man again. Clippinger said that Bernstein has agreed to a March 5 meeting with the community, location to be determined. Spotlight on the mayor Two residents called out Mayor RawlingsBlake. “You and your administration are incredibly dismissive of the community,” said one man. “What will you do to engage us as a community? Because engagement is very much a two-way street.” The audience applauded. “I’m sorry that your interpretation is dismissive,” replied Rawlings-Blake. “For me, it’s incredibly frustrating because it’s engagement we want, but in a meaningful way.” Later, another man told the mayor that he was not satisfied with her response. “If I told my clients, ‘I’m having a difficult time communicating with you, sorry; it’s CONTINUED ON PAGE 23

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18 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

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ABOVE: Maisha Telfer, a secondgrader at Patterson Park Public Charter School, won the K-grade 2 category. She gives us a clear comparison of a healthy harbor and an unhealthy harbor. LEFT: Tae’Vian Pugh, an eighth-grader at Commodore John Rodgers School, won the grades 6-8 category in Councilman Jim Kraft’s Healthy Harbor Poster Contest. Pugh looked at the harbor situation from a fish’s perspective.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

SERVICES

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24

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BALTIMORE GUIDE 19


20 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

SERVICE DIRECTORY

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

BALTIMORE GUIDE 21

EMPLOYMENT

MERCHANDISE

. O C N IO T C U R T S N O C . P . T J. • Siding • Gutters • Windows/Doors • Roof Top Decks • Drywall • Painting • Masonary Work • Brick Pointing

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CRAFT/VENDOR FAIR at The American Legion, 8666 Silver Lake Dr, Perry Hall. March 1 & 2, 10a-2p & 1-5pm. Raffle to benefit The American Legion. Carolyn 443-655-7816

BEER/WINE STOCK PERSON Lifting is involved. Exp. not necessary but welcomed. Apply within 2334 Boston Street 21224. 410-675-4950. Serious inquiries only.

PART TIME - FUNERAL HOME AVON Representatives Needed Pikesville. Answering phones, WAR MEMORABILIA WTD I greeting families, evening hrs. All areas. Earn up to 50%. Call buy uniforms, medals, weap- Exc compensation. EOE. Email 1-800-901-1101 ons, equipment, etc. Call 410- michael@sollevinson.com 241-8171

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22 BALTIMORE GUIDE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD CALL 410.732.6600

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41. Sole 42. Benne plant 44. Small amount 45. Sodas 46. Sino-Soviet block (abbr.) 48. UC Berkeley 49. Express pleasure 50. __ Paulo, city 53. History channel’s #5 show 59. Divertimento 60. Ridge on Doric column 61. Pastries 62. The “It” Girl 63. Hand drum of No. India DOWN 1. Labor 2. North-central Indian city 3. About aviation 4. The sheltered side 5. Salem State College 6. Twofold 7. Unusually (Scot.) 8. Floral garland 9. Birthpace (abbr.)

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10. Tooth covering 11. Confederate soldiers 12. Signing 13. Point midway between S and SE 16. Ground where each golf hole begins 18. A lyric poem with complex stanza forms 22. Atomic #73 23. Thin wire nail 24. Ancient Germanic alphabet character 25. Jupiter’s 4th satellite 26. Woman’s undergarment 28. African antelope 29. Afrikaans 30. Vietnamese offensive 31. Expression of sorrow or pity 32. Scot word for toe 34. Journalist Nellie 36. Compress 37. Whiskies 38. Feathery scarf 40. White clay for porcelain

EQUAL HOUSING All Real Estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to indicate preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for Real Estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby imformed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. If you believe that you may have been discriminated against in connection with the sale, rental or financing of housing, call The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) at 1-800-669-9777.

43. Keeps in reserve 44. Infectious lung disease 46. Draws off 47. Chinese chess piece 48. Parrot’s nostril opening 49. Once more 50. One from Serbia 51. Fleshy, bright seed appendage 52. Plural of os 53. The horned viper 54. Japanese apricot tree 55. Taxi 56. Bustle 57. Feline 58. Malaysian Isthmus Answers. Don’t peek!


BALTIMORE GUIDE 23

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014

Crime meeting: Mayor calls for citizens to work together

PHIL TIRABASSI Owner/Broker 443-690-0552

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

your issue,’ They would fire me,” he said, getting to his question: “If our community hadn’t been as up in arms as we were, when would you have called this meeting?” Rawlings-Blake told the man, “I’m sorry you made the leap from my comment to me blaming you,” and a groan came from some members of the audience. “I wouldn’t say I called [the meeting], but you called it and I’m here,” continued the mayor. At this point, Batts jumped into the exchange: “Calling this meeting shouldn’t be the responsibility of the mayor,” he said, taking the blame. “This should be my responsibility.” At the close of the meeting, RawlingsBlake spoke about working together. “You can hate me and all that stuff,” she said. “That’s fine—I’m a big girl and I can take it. But that doesn’t help us all work together…As long as we’re blaming, we’re only helping the people who are destroying our community.”

Resident reaction Resident Ron Howard said that he thought the meeting was a positive step, overall. “Commissioner Batts seemed passionate about what he wanted to do; it’s just a matter of getting it implemented into the community,” Howard said. Patrick Lundberg said that the meeting brought out some “good questions” that, in his opinion, were “pretty well answered.” “I think Batts did a great job,” he said. “I don’t think the mayor did as good a job, to be honest.” Matthew Mahoney, a resident of Mt. Vernon who spends a lot of time in Canton, said that the meeting brought out “a lot of good comments.” “I felt the police officers spoke candidly about the problems we’re facing,” he said. Regarding Rawlings-Blake, he said, “I felt there were some frustrations she did address. I do wish she had done a little bit better.” “It does take a community coming together to make things happen,” continued Mahoney.

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BALTIMORE BA7962220 Nice 4 BR, 1.5 BA townhouse. As-is. Seller will make no repairs. Needs a little work, but shows well. Buyer responsible for verifying ground rent. If ground rent exists, seller will not redeem. Subject to third party approval.

BALTIMORE BC7992547 Beautiful Cape Cod bungalow style home with 3 BR and 3 FULL BS, finished LL, deck, spacious kitchen, mud room. Being sold strictly as-is, seller will make no repairs but shows very well. Sold subject to existing lease, exp. 9/30.

BALTIMORE BC8012612 3 BR, 3 BA Cape Cod with nice lot. Currently tenant occupied. Subject to third party approval. Sold as is. Buyer reponsible for verifying ground rent. If ground rent exists, seller will not redeem. Sold subject to existing lease.

BALTIMORE BC8080311 4 BR/3BA Cape Cod that has been remodeled and upgraded. Full BA on every floor, huge ktichen, fenced yard and more. Sold strictly as-is, seller will make no repair, but shows very well. Sold subject to third party approval. Existing lease.

BALTIMORE BA8091629 4 BR, 2.5 BA Cape Cod, corner lot on quiet street. Close to everything. Updated kitchen and baths. Lovely detailed moldings, woodwork, hardwoods, finished LL. Lovely back yard. This is a must see! Buyer to verify ground rent amount.

BALTIMORE BC8123976 This is a lovely 2 bedroom bungalow in water oriented community. Access to community park, beach and boat ramp close to beltway and shopping. Home has newly remodeled kitchen and bath. Porch front with a great yard

DUNDALK BC8135885 2 BR in Dundalk MD 21222. Quiet comm., backs to DHS property. 2 car garage w/ additional DW spaces, covered porches, full basement & much more. Close to highways, public transportation & more.

BALTIMORE BA8145652 MUST SEE LISTING IN CANTON! 3 Story, 3 BR, 1.5 BA, 2 car garage. Updated kitchen & BA. Main level all hardwood, stainless appliances, granite, garage roof top deck great for outdoor entertaining.

BALTIMORE BC8168872 This is a lovely home with some tender love and care it can be your dream home. Parking pad in rear.

BALTIMORE BA8175955 This is a lovely 3 bedroom home with a finished lower level. 1.5 bath. Close to Bayview, shopping, schools and belt way.

BALTIMORE BC8178299 Beautiful brick waterfront rancher. From the pool to the pier you can enjoy all water activities. Large deck to watch the sunset and 28X14 Sunroom to continue the entertaining all year round. Rec room / possible 3rd BR in lower level.

BALTIMORE CITY BA8178935 This is a beautiful home. It is close to bus line and shopping. Vouchers welcome!

Why call anyone else?

BALTIMORE BC8192305 This is a beautiful 3 bedroom 1 full 2 half bath home with finished lower level with fire place. 2 great decks overlooking the woods, eat in kitchen with formal dining room. This is a true must see.

BALTIMORE CITY BA8184224 This is a lovely 3 bedroom home with large living room and 1/2 bath on main level with large yard. This home is a must see. BALTIMORE BC8203558 This 3 bedroom end of group townhome has hard wood floors throughout recently replaced windows and heating and a/c. Needs some work but is in generally good condition. Sold as is.

RENTAL: Awesome 2 BR, 1.5 BA 2nd floor apt, 1/2 block from water in Historic Fells Point! Top of the line, everything is brand new! Call Jay for an appointment 410-967-9412.

Nancy Rachuba 410-905-1417 DIVERSIFIED REALTY 410-675-SOLD

OUR FEE AS LOW AS

OFFICE

BALTIMORE BC8210647 This is actually 2 parcels sale it is tax I’d # 04040407059840 and Id # 04041600003965 located on Piney Grove Rd. This home has 3 fireplaces and overlooks a beautifully wooded lot. Property also has a creek running through part of it.

410-288-6700

www.AdvanceRealtyDirect.com

Now Interviewing New & Experienced Agents.


24 BALTIMORE GUIDE

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Baltimore Guide - February 19, 2014  

Baltimore Guide - February 19, 2014

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