Page 1

HOME & REAL ESTATE guid�

Everything you need to know about buying, selling and owning a home in Baltimore.


DINE spa sTYLE sTAY HOME ART SHOP THE VILLAGE OF CROS S KEYS B e y o n d t he Ordinary L ife + St yl e Bowers & Snyder | Chezelle | Coldwell Banker | Donna’s Coffee Bar & Café The Fine Swine | J.Jill | Jean Pool | Octavia Boutique | Out of Office | Pied Piper Radisson Hotel | Rebecca Myers Collection | The Red Door | Renaissance Fine Arts Schmatta | Scoozi | The Store LTD | Talbots | Village Square Café | Williams Sonoma

5100 Fall s Rd, Baltimore, MD • villageofcro sskeys.com @crosskeysbaltimore

@shopsatcrosskeys

@vlgofcrosskeys


Where The Past Becomes The Future.

Southfen is a historic restoration and home

David Sutphen Design is an

construction firm that combines the highest

architectural design firm with the belief

and traditional installation techniques

living environment – thoughtfully crafted

quality materials, expert craftsmanship

to restore the past and build the future.

that a home should provide a simple, with quality materials.

David Sutphen Design, in concert with Southfen Restoration Home Builder,

provides homeowners with creative, functional designs and well-executed craftsmanship.

southfen.com

davidsutphendesign.com


Editor’s Note Home & Real Estate

T

guide

he Baltimore Fishbowl Home & Real

dated colonial near the Loch Raven reservoir, it

Publisher and Editorial Director

Estate Guide is a project we look for-

demonstrates the possibilities of using repurposed

SUSAN G. DUNN

ward to all year long. As I visit houses

materials to add character to newly built construction.

for the Hot House column, I see lots of

Before you get rid of all your old “brown furni-

Editor-In-Chief CYNTHIA MCINTYRE

Managing Editor

beautiful homes. From a fixer-upper in Hampden,

ture,” read Meg Fielding’s article about the modern

to a beautifully renovated Bolton Hill church, to

way with antiques, which have not lost their power

Ad Sales

a historic farm in the county, Baltimore has such

to make a home richer and more cultivated. And

CHRIS FREDERICK

a wealth of housing stock that it can be hard to

if you are even thinking of redoing your kitchen,

JULILE SAWYER

decide which projects to share with our readers.

consult our report on kitchen trends.

For 2018, we've chosen a Federal Hill condo

The winds of style that blow through the world

whose owners were downsizing from a larger home

of home design are mysterious and ever-changing.

in The Orchards, a move that required a complete

Our job is to put them into context, and make

change of style (and furniture). Writer Kit Waskom

them relevant to your own home projects, big or

Pollard has captured the highlights of the experi-

small. Hopefully, we have done that.

ence, and we hope you will take inspiration from

MUFFY FENWICK

KAREN BARK HUGH COLLIE

Contributing Writers RACHEL BONE MEG FIELDING KIT WASKOM POLLARD

Photography ANNE GUMMERSON

Stylist FRANCIS TURNER

the success of their city-centric adventure.

In a different vein, we offer a peek at the in-the-

works concept house being built by the founder of the non-profit architectural salvage company

Cynthia McIntyre

Second Chance. Built on the foundations of a

Editor-In-Chief

2

baltimorefishbowl.com

This guide was produced for Indicia Media by Today Media Custom Communications, 1014 West 36th Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21211, 410-828-0120, todaymediacustom.com


Table of Contents 4

In Store Baltimore

Amazing finds sourced at cool stores in our own backyard.

10

DESIGN TRENDS: Kitchens

The 2018 kitchen watcher’s report.

16 The Second Chance House

A look at Second Chance founder Mark Foster’s repurposed, reclaimed concept house.

20 Antiques: The New Look of Old

Antiques are a thing of the past — or are they?

28 Smaller HOME, Bigger Life

A Baltimore couple downsizes in style.

35 Neighborhood Guide

Six great city neighborhoods to put on your house-hunting radar. SPONSORED CONTENT

24

Agents You Should Know

40

Directory

page 35

PHYLICIA GHEE

Baltimore’s premier real estate agents speak for themselves and their teams. A selection of local companies that come highly recommended.

Locally owned and operated, Porter Buckley Construction Group is a veteran general contracting group specializing in unique custom new homes, reconstruction, and the highest quality of home renovations, in Maryland. With over 60 years of industry experience, we strive to build structures that reflect our commitment to unmatched craftsmanship and leave a lasting impression. Our philosophy is simple: The foundation of a successful project is efficient communication and complete customer satisfaction.

porterbuckleygroup.com | 410-616-9312 | 15 W Aylesbury Road, Suite 400, Lutherville, MD 21093

Home & Real Estate Guide

3


for 2018

18 BALTIMORE

DESIGN

FINDS

IN STORE BALTIMORE

W

hether you are looking for a custom-

modern, like Design Distillery on Key Highway,

made accent piece, traditional fur-

and who-knows-what-you’ll-find treasure troves,

niture with some style, vintage mid-

like Second Chance downtown and Wishbone

century modern or fantastic accessories to put

and Trohv in Hampden. Before you go online

a little zing in a room, it’s all here in Baltimore.

to shop, read on. A glance through these

There are new stores in industrial warehouses,

pages should convince you to forage locally first.

like Cedar & Cotton, havens for the strictly

BY CYNTHIA M C INTYRE

Margot Sofa. Timeless and contemporary, available in five colors, this in Velvet Blush. $2,199 at Design Distillery

4

baltimorefishbowl.com


Golden Starbursts. Mini-satellites in gold-painted metal wire. 7" size, $46, 9" size, $66, 11" size, $88 at Stony Run Home

Vintage Dresser.

Mid-century dresser, hand-finished in hunter green, with white and gold accents. $225 at Cedar & Cotton

Cobbler’s Mirror. Made from vintage children’s shoe molds, each one slightly different. $350 at The Store Ltd

Hensleg Table. Cheeky Victorian Gothic side table, metal in matte black finish. $239 at Trohv

Real Good Copper Bar Stool. Raw copper will oxidize over time, creating a mellow patina. $399 at Design Distillery

Home & Real Estate Guide

5


Cyclone Table.

Vintage table designed by Isamu Noguchi for Knoll, circa 1960. $1,700 at Home Anthology

Satellite Mirror.

Convex mirror with wired, hand-blown glass discs, custom design by McLain Wiesand. $2,300

Architects Vase. Dynamic polished maple vase by Canadian architect Colin Schleeh. $1,400 at The Store Ltd

Remy Coffee Table.

From Mr. Brown. Stone-topped coffee table in white. $1,200 at Antique Exchange

6

baltimorefishbowl.com


for 2018

18 BALTIMORE

DESIGN

FINDS

Turkish Kilim Rug Pillows. Brightly striped wool front with zippered canvas backing. Large lumbar pillow, $225, small square pillow, $46, at Wishbone

Field Lounge Chair. A modern reading chair. Ottoman also available, both in a selection of colors, this in Craig Red. $1,499 at Design Distillery

Home & Real Estate Guide

7


Elizabeth Chair.

By Mr. Brown. Stylish armchair with side cutouts. In grey velvet. $2,265 at Antique Exchange

White Crenulated Urn. By Worlds Away. Matte glazed ceramic urn inspired by classic English 19th-century silver designs. Base and lid in natural ash wood. $330 at Antique Exchange

Heather Mirror.

From Worlds Away. Oval mirror in frame of circular bone discs. $780 at Antique Exchange

Lillian Table. Hand-marbleized paper with gold leaf interior. $2,800 at McLain Wiesand

8

baltimorefishbowl.com


for 2018

18 BALTIMORE

DESIGN

FINDS

Carousel Chandelier. Blackbole gold frame with hand-antiqued convex mirrors and upholstery cording. $3,300 at McLain Wiesand

Hans Wegner CH33 Chairs. Mid-century classics, in teak with original upholstery. $2,900/pair at Home Anthology

Home & Real Estate Guide

9


DESIGN TRENDS:

KITCHENS In 2018, look for increasing simplicity and streamlining in kitchen design, with eat-in kitchens topping most-wanted lists.

10

baltimorefishbowl.com


W

hile one recent shelter magazine (not naming names) has been calling for ultra-violet cabinetry and mirrored backsplashes, we’ve been doing some serious research. What we found is that although classic kitchen looks are firmly in place — white kitchens, wood floors and Shaker-style cabinets still going strong — the signs of change are all moving in one direction.

The overall trend to watch is an ever-increasing simplicity and streamlining. Eat-in and open-plan

kitchens are on most wish lists, with clutter-free worktops running close behind. Smart technology? Bring it on. As kitchens become more than ever a place to hang out and decompress, the busy-ness of wallpaper, curtains and faux finishes feels dated. A sleeker, modern, and especially, a more neutral aesthetic has taken its place.

Home & Real Estate Guide

11


Schools Culture Lifeline Real Estate Politics & Business Food & Drink Shop Local JProviding a daily catch of news for the past seven years.I

BaltimoreFishbowl.com

12

baltimorefishbowl.com


On the other hand, who wants their kitchen to look like a Crate & Barrel catalog? Sleek and neutral doesn’t have to be boring. The best kitchens manage to work in one high-voltage item — a statement-making stone countertop, a brass faucet, a farmhouse sink. There can be tons of personality in the materials themselves, whether it’s concrete or stone, metal or glass. Quartz has become a popular replacement for granite and marble, mainly because it requires less upkeep with just as much natural beauty. Tiles, lighting and hardware all have a role to play. Texture is a good replacement for color in the kitchen. Within the scope of neutral, there’s lots of room for the quirks of personal style, and the realities of budgets. To show you specifically what we mean, we’ve pulled together our favorite kitchen trends for 2018, along with some beautiful inspirational images. If you’re looking for new ideas — and who isn’t? — here are the important ones to keep an eye on.

Waterfall Countertops They’ve been gaining traction for a few years, but in 2018 the clean lines and dramatic drop of waterfall countertops are moving to the top of every kitchen’s most-wanted list. Nothing shows off the beauty of countertop materials more than a long expanse of stone, quartz, wood or metal as it tumbles over the edge (a mitered edge looks better than a pieced edge). The waterfall is a pricey upgrade, but if you are going to spring for one bling item, this should be it.

Built-in Sinks These are sinks with the same composition as the countertop. Particularly effective when executed in stone, integrated sinks, like waterfall countertops, showcase the materials and create a sleek, unified

look. And with no joinery or crevices at the sink rim, they’re super-easy to clean. It hardly needs to be said that you want to avoid unusual color and shape choices on this item (like the pink seashell porcelain in your grandparents’ bathroom).

Flat-Front Cabinetry For people who crave simplicity, fewer details and a modern look in their kitchen, flat-front cabinetry appeals. Always popular in Europe, the vogue for flat-front, or slab, cabinets comes and goes in the U.S. People with traditional or country-style homes may find that cabinetry with a bit more detail is a better fit. Flat-front cabinets come in a wider range of materials and colors than raised panel doors. They are also cheaper, easier to clean, and create a more streamlined space — especially when combined with the next item on the list.

There is beauty and personality in the choice of materials, whether it’s concrete or stone, metal or glass.

Integrated Appliances After decades of showing off their name brands and gleaming steel doors, appliances are going under cover, hiding beneath panels that blend into the cabinetry. Expensive, but unbeatable for achieving a cohesive and finished look.

Ceiling Treatments

A sink integrated into the countertop creates a seamless and modern finish.

This trend is mainly of interest if you’re starting a kitchen from scratch. You can also disregard it if you happen to have hand-hewn oak beams already in place. But kitchen designers are looking up this year, suggesting beams, detailed moldings and coffers that echo the shape of the island. Home & Real Estate Guide

13


BUILT AROUND YOU

Partnering with Homeowners & Baltimore’s Finest Contractors

Forbes Design Center is a family owned window and door retailer in the Baltimore area dedicated to making your remodeling experience worthwhile. We work closely with you to create an experience that fits your vision and home needs. WINDOWS | ROOFING | DECKING

Rick & Doug Fo

rbes

www.ForbesDesignCenter.com • 410-252-1009


Banquette Seating Recent iterations of built-in “banquette” seating are less padded and more architectural then their ’80s counterparts. They can create an eat-in kitchen out of a blank wall, and are genius at making a kitchen feel welcoming. It looks more contemporary when done on just one or two walls, and balanced with chairs or a bench. Choose a solid fabric, and go easy on the throw pillows.

Black Accents A nice change from the all-white aesthetic, a black wall, backsplash or painted accent piece can anchor the room, adding dimension and providing some

A FEW MORE

Trending Items

built-in or boxed-in rather than big and decorative n SMALLER RANGE HOODS:

works only if you have a very big kitchen, but looks amazing n FEW OR NO UPPER CABINETS:

back from the ’80s, but more polished, and in way better colors n SQUARE TILE:

more functional and sleeker than the bi-level islands popular just a few minutes ago. n SINGLE-LEVEL ISLANDS:

a no-brainer. Let the kids heat up their own mac and cheese! n UNDERCOUNTER MICROWAVES:

Brass Hardware

AGED BRASS IONIAN FAUCET BY DEVOLKITCHENS.CO.UK

Recessed lighting always belongs in the kitchen. Discreet LED fixtures can spotlight islands, light work areas and provide a soft glow. But increasingly, eye-catching industrial fixtures or modern, airy chandeliers are being used to add drama and warmth.

contrast. Dark blue, charcoal or red can do the same. Pick up the black, or color, in more than one place, so it doesn’t look random.

Copper is the metal of the moment, but burnished brass just looks better and will be around longer. It’s not an ultra-contemporary look, but in many kitchens, the appeal of a matte brass kitchen faucet with a stone countertop can make up for a lot of cost-cutting elsewhere.

Color and Texture A jute rug adds instant texture — although not under the table, where it will be sure to catch crumbs and spills. Consider a touch of color in an unexpected place. Paint the space between your cabinets and ceiling a bright color, and leave the rest neutral. Create a wall grouping of blue and white china. It will make your sleek kitchen more personal.

Brass hardware is one way to add warmth and texture in a modern context.

AND A FEW TRENDING THE OTHER WAY

(Formerly Known as Out) It’s inexpensive, but also very susceptible to damage, comes in a limited color range, and turns out to be not so totally eco-friendly after all. n BAMBOO FLOORING:

Convenient as they are, they tend to be a catch-all for the kind of clutter we’re trying to avoid. Hide the desk behind a half wall, or build it just around the corner if you can. n KITCHEN DESKS:

It never looks quite as sleek as it does in magazines, and like the desk, tends to accumulate stuff. n OPEN SHELVING:

The clean lines and dramatic drop of a waterfall cabinet are an expensive, but popular upgrade.

PHOTO BY ANNE GUMMERSON, COURTESY OF SUNNYFIELDS CABINETRY

Statement Lighting

Home & Real Estate Guide

15


BY CYNTHIA MCINTYRE

| PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNE GUMMERSON

Second Chance Founder’s Repurposed, Reclaimed House

D

riving down Russell Street on the way out of Baltimore, it’s hard to miss the giant orange warehouse mural: WHAT IS AND WHAT CAN BE. This is the unofficial mission statement for the non-

profit Second Chance. Its official mission: RETRAIN, RECLAIM AND RENEW. That is to retrain people, many just out of prison, for full

employment; to reclaim building materials and architectural salvage for use in renovation and new construction; and to renew usable materials to help eliminate waste in the environment.

Mark Foster is the founder and CEO of Second Chance, a 501 (c)(3) non-profit that has created thousands of “green collar” jobs for the hardest-to-employ in the years since it started in 2001. At the time, Mark and his wife Mary Blake were looking for historically accurate materials to fix up their own house in Roland Park. The complications of finding and repurposing architectural salvage sparked the idea for Second Chance. “There are basically two ways to go with this kind of business,” says Foster, “for-profit and non-profit. Serving the community made it an easy decision.” The idea is simple and appealing. When

people donate unwanted building materials or architectural salvage, they get a tax deduction for the fair market value of the materials up to $5,000 (after $5,000, an appraisal is required). “People respond to the tax deduction, the jobs training and the environmental aspect,” says Foster. Second Chance trains workers in demolition and removal of materials, as well as moving the goods and managing the warehouse — a huge, 250,000-square-foot facility about the size of three Home Depots. The size of the warehouse, and the fact that it is unheated in winter and uncooled in summer, can make it hard for customers to reimagine the largely unsexy materials that form the bulk of Second Chance’s business. For every antique window, wrought-iron gate or mid-century find, there are hundreds of say, refrigerators — many of them brand new. Ditto toilets, sinks, stoves, doorknobs, tiles and reclaimed wood. What Second Chance needed was a showroom. And for the past year or so, Foster has been building one, a “concept house,” piece by repurposed piece. This is the Second Chance concept house. Steps from the Loch Raven reservoir, and sitting well back in its two+ acre lot on Seminary Road,

Above: Second Chance founder and CEO, Mark Foster. Opposite page: The windows and doors of the great room were recycled from new construction. The ceiling soars 20' high. 16

baltimorefishbowl.com


Home & Real Estate Guide

17


Clockwise below: Double oak doors, taken from an Eastern Shore carriage house; carved door detail; bed alcove lined in repurposed timber; steam shower with marble tile

18

baltimorefishbowl.com

the house looks at first glance like typical high-end new construction — an 8,300-square-foot shinglestyle house with a circular driveway and a three-car garage in the back. It’s impressive and stylish, with HardiePlank siding and architectural shingles, but the real story is on the inside. Here, reclaimed materials, both vintage and brand new, have been incorporated into the home’s design and construction. With them comes character, and a borrowed history that brings the house to life. When we visited back in March, the house was still in a raw state, its wood floors unstained, woodwork unpainted, tile and marble waiting to be installed. These proved to be optimal conditions for observing the process of repurposing — how vintage and reclaimed materials are worked into an original home design. “Flexibility is the key,” says Foster. “You have to be willing to be creative, bend the plans, take a little more time to make things fit.” Through the (repurposed) front door, the house flows around to the left. The first vista, through a mahogany-paneled library, is to a striking vintage

fireplace on the far wall, its chocolate-brown marble veined with streaks of white. As we linger, Foster describes how the carved paneling, taken from an old home in Potomac, was pieced into its new surroundings. The new joints and seams are visible when pointed out, but quality and workmanship are the main impression. From the library, you walk through an antique oak double door, whose old hardware and soft patina were acquired from a former life in an Eastern Shore carriage house. “Windows and doors are the easiest things to repurpose,” Foster says, “especially in new construction. That, and flooring.” Every room in the Second Chance concept house, with the exception of bathrooms, uses wood flooring removed from building sites by Second Chance training program participants — over a dozen sites in multiple states. The variety is tremendous: floors of English oak removed from a Bethesda residence; random-width hickory, walnut, Douglas fir and heart pine; cherry wood floors from the former Eastern Shore home of Anne Bancroft (Mrs. Robinson!); floors of heart pine


Every room in the concept house, it seems, has a story. Architectural elements have been given a new life, and contribute to a more engaging home.

Above: In chocolate brown marble with white veining, a vintage fireplace acts as the room’s focal point.

from St. Peter’s Basilica in Baltimore. Eventually, they will be polished and uniformly stained, but now, in their unfinished state, the unique color and grain of each board is clearly seen. As we come into the 40'x30' expanse and 20' height of the great room, the effect is light, airy and modern. Here, the windows and doors were recycled from new construction. A large wooden fireplace — removed from a Florida home by Second Chance — dominates the wall on one end. At the other end are oak built-ins from a 1950s home in Bethesda, customized for their new location. A cluster of spotlights, future chandeliers, at each end of the room are raised and lowered electronically when the bulbs need to be changed. The wiring and technology in the house are all new. “Technology is not really where you want to employ used material,” says Foster. The first-floor master bath is clad top-tobottom in marble tile donated to Second Chance. The thickness and matte finish of the Carrera marble tiles make the huge steam shower (the house has three reclaimed but new steam showers) feel like a Roman bath. A large open landing on the second floor overlooks the great room. Off the landing is a wood-

lined office, with partner desks and cabinetry taken from the home of a retail magnate whose projected $21 million dollar home in York, PA was never finished. Many of its high-quality materials were donated to Second Chance.

Every room in the concept house, it seems, has

a story. Architectural and building elements have been given another life, their beauty and functionality now enhancing a new home instead of being wasted in a landfill. For Foster, and for the builders and homeowners who are the clients of Second Chance, the more important story is that of the people who work here.

“There are circumstances in people’s lives that

you just cannot imagine,” says Foster. “For me, this whole thing (the Second Chance business) has been a real eye-opener. I could write a book about the people who have trained here over the years.” Having a job is a major step forward for lives that have been interrupted by prison, addiction and other major barriers to employment. Second Chance has changed the trajectory for many of these people. “It’s hard work,” says Foster, “but training for sustainable employment is absolutely key.”

Home & Real Estate Guide

19


ANTIQUES:

The New Look of Old

F BY MEG FIELDING

or quite a while now, it’s been common knowledge that antiques are out. Not just Victorian, or Regency or French antiques, but an entire category of formerly precious objects, now irreverently referred to as brown furniture, has fallen out of favor with contemporary buyers.

Architectural Digest, Interiors and House Beautiful, magazines

which once showcased rooms filled with polished antiques at unattainable prices, are now showing sleek, clutter-free interiors, with one or two antiques used mainly as accent pieces. Wesley Finnerty, whose store Antique Exchange in Hampden started offering modern accessories and design along with vintage pieces about 10 years ago, puts it this way: “It’s a completely different market than when we opened over 20 years ago. Interest in antiques seems to be in free fall, and clients are more interested in well-designed contemporary furnishings, especially when it comes to upholstered items. I do try to work in antique pieces as often as I can as they add so much character.”

20

baltimorefishbowl.com


Home & Real Estate Guide

21


A recent New York Times article quoted Colin Stair, the owner of an auction house in Hudson, NY, as saying that average prices for antiques are now “80 percent off ” what the same pieces would have brought in the glory days of collecting.

modern and more affordable, these pieces — loosely mid-century in inspiration — are often displayed in well-curated room settings. While the quality can vary, the stuff looks pretty good — young and unstuffy — plus, you can furnish the whole house in a rainy afternoon.

Instead of period or reproduction antiques collected by previous generations, today’s buyers of all ages are gravitating to the clean-lined, mid-price range of furniture from Pottery Barn, West Elm, Arhaus and Ikea. More

But tasteful as it all is, it’s not long on personality. And for the same reason you wouldn’t dress in head-totoe J. Crew or JoS. A. Bank or really anyone, you should probably aspire to more than a one-dimensional look in

H

air to a room of mid-

cabinet in a completely

teapot can serve as a vase

century modern furniture. If

modern bath. It’s perfect

for a loose and casual flower

you have other upholstered

for holding towels and other

arrangement. Use the sugar

the new, and have a home

pieces in the room, keep

linens, as well as beautiful

bowl to hold Q-tips or cotton

that is uniquely your own.

the fabrics in similar shades

bottles and other interesting

balls in the bathroom. The

or patterns. Alternately, if

items. An old three-drawer

creamer can double as a pen-

the chair is not a priceless

dresser can be re-imagined as

and-pencil holder on your desk.

antique, you can paint the

a bar. Put the bottles on the

frame to update it.

top, using a tray with a great

n

ere are some ways you can incorporate the old into

A modern monochromatic

room can be enlivened by adding a classic portrait, made more contemporary by removing the elaborate gilded frame. Be sure to keep the frame, which is sometimes more valuable than the portrait. n

Add a curvy wooden rocker

or a French bergere-style

22

baltimorefishbowl.com

n

Regardless of the age of

your house, storage is always an issue. Creative solutions to the problem include re-purposing your antiques.

design. Use the drawers for glassware, napkins and other accoutrements. If the wood is not great, paint it to coordinate with your room. Deconstruct your grand-

For example, use a Victorian-

n

era armoire or an old doctor’s

mother’s tea service. The

n

If you inherit your parents’

old sofa or dining room chairs, recovering them will be significantly less expensive than buying new ones. Update them with a fabulous fabric. You’re guaranteed that no one else will have one like it!


your home. Antiques, whether valuable or not, come with a history that will add style and character to your space. In newer homes and apartments, which lack the wood and plaster details standard in older homes, antiques can add dimension, warmth and interest. Layered with art, rugs and photographs, they attract the eye and soften a room. In the process, they help express the owners’ personality and style.

If you aren’t lucky enough to have family heirlooms, consider acquiring someone else’s family heirlooms at auctions, estate sales and antiques shops. The Baltimore area has a number of great auction houses that conduct both in-person and online auctions. A big plus (and strongly recommended) for either type of auction is that you can preview the items. You can examine the items to make sure chairs are sturdy, tables don’t have major scratches, artwork isn’t ripped and that the size in the online image isn’t deceptive. And before you get rid of any of that “brown furniture,” consider taking the long view. The pendulum always swings back. There are stirrings of hope these days in the breasts of antique dealers from Baltimore to London. Phil Dubey of Dubey’s Art and Antiques is a fixture on Howard Street, specializing, as he always has, in Chinese export porcelain and American fine antique furniture. “Tastes have changed,” he acknowledges, but “prices have corrected themselves since the bubble of 20 years ago, and I am starting to see green shoots coming up. At the Winter (Antiques) Show in DC this January, there were quite a number of buyers — and young buyers. People are starting to collect again.”

Home & Real Estate Guide

23


Agents YOU

SHOULD KNOW

Finding the right real estate agent takes a balance of chemistry and qualifications. You’ll need a personality match of course — after all, you may be spending months together. Knowledge of the market is a must, as well as an agent who is financially astute, detail-oriented and keeps clients’ interests at heart. On these pages, we let some of Baltimore’s leading agents speak for themselves in describing their teams. 

24

baltimorefishbowl.com


agents you should know

The Whit Harvey Group with Coldwell Banker Real Estate Brokerage charvey@cbmove.com Office: 410-235-4100; Whit: 443-286-5808

If you’re lucky enough to take a real estate ride with longtime real estate agent WHIT HARVEY, you’re in for a treat. As you dart from one street to the next, you’ll receive a history lesson in Baltimore home ownership.

“That’s Jim Rouse’s old house,” he said as he drove through one

Baltimore neighborhood pointing out houses. “Henry Knott raised something like 13 children in that house,” he noted, pointing out another. “That one belonged to my high school wrestling coach,” he offered. “I hear it’s coming back on the market.”

The native Baltimorean, with 35 years of experience in local

real estate, brings that kind of market memory to his role as the head of The Whit Harvey Group with Coldwell Banker Real Estate Brokerage. As a member of a large, old Baltimore family (the legendary Harvey family Thanksgivings number over 100), the gregarious, fun-loving, natural born salesman knows more than most about the history, context and the comings and goings of the local real estate market.

For buyers, that means he often knows before others which houses will come on the market. For sellers, he has

access to a vast circle of friends and relations who can bring a buyer to the table. With ties such as these, he must keep his information close to the vest. “Some people don’t want the attention. They want their homes sold quietly,” he said. He does just that, often selling his listings through word-of-mouth before they officially go on the market. 

It’s that kind of discretion that has made him a trusted agent and helped him build the relationships that make up

what he considers to be the best part of his job.  

“My clients are my friends,” he said. “I like that.”

He makes sure those friends in the seller’s market pay attention to what he believes to be the two most important

elements for a successful sale: price and presentation.

Whit requires a walkthrough with clients to identify small improvements for the best return on investment. A coat

of paint, de-cluttering and a few other simple steps can make the difference between a house selling quickly and sitting on the market. He also offers the services of a professional photographer, a marketing specialist, and a stager for best results. For those in the buyer’s market, he gives this Whitticism: If you can skip the first house and buy something that you can be in for 15 to 20 years, you can build on improvements over time and ultimately be better off.   His experience, contacts, and easy way with clients combined with his passion for houses has made a career in residential real estate the perfect fit for Whit, and it shows. He and his wife recently bought another house (his fourth) and are undergoing a massive renovation project. He understands the spell houses can have, and he encourages his buyers to go for it.   “Life is not a dress rehearsal,” he proffered. “Get something that truly makes you happy. Be ready and when you feel it, buy it.” And when you do, Whit will be there to make sure you get it right.

WITH COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

Home & Real Estate Guide

25


agents you should know

The Dorsey Campbell Group dorseycampbellgroup.com Office: 410-697-4005 Dorsey: 410-967-3661; Liz: 410-365-1064; Michael: 443-265-4703 Last winter, when Baltimore confronted its first major snow storm, The Dorsey Campbell Group of Cummings and Company Realtors was unfazed, trudging through the elements to keep a scheduled home inspection. This attention to detail — and dedication — are what distinguishes realtors DORSEY CAMPBELL, LIZ BOYCE and MICHAEL WILCOX .

Says Dorsey, “With all our listings . . . we want to be involved with every aspect of the transaction. . . . We are part of every

conversation and correspondence.”

As a result, the Dorsey Campbell Group has developed real industry knowledge, not only through the transactions them-

selves but of the market they serve. Through their personal and professional lives, they have developed a comprehensive understanding of Baltimore and can serve clients anywhere in and around the city. Often this means knowing what is coming on the market even before it is listed.

As a resource to sellers and buyers alike, they advise, “Price is the most important factor.” A well-appointed, tidy house can

also accelerate a sale. Simple fixes like fresh paint, clean windows and organized spaces set a home apart, while general maintenance highlights how well it has been maintained. Despite the popularity of HGTV home improvement shows, they notice more and more buyers looking for the finished product rather than the never-ending fixer upper.

Regardless of your taste, however, Liz believes the best home, her “dream house,” is one

“filled with friends, family and laughter…and hopefully clean nooks and crannies!” Clients know that partnering with the Dorsey Campbell Group promises just that — a dedicated team with loyalty, a sense of humor and a vision for the perfect home.

The Laurie Karll Vision Group OF Keller Williams Legacy laurie@yourvisiongroup.com • yourvisiongroup.com Laurie: 410-984-8624; Office: 443-660-9229 When it comes to selling houses, there are those who are drawn to the business and those who are attracted to the homes. For LAURIE KARLL , of The Laurie Karll Vision Group of Keller Williams Legacy, it’s both.

The Baltimore-bred daughter of a real estate developer and an interior designer, Laurie’s expo-

sure to the housing market started early. As a result, she developed a practical knowledge of the market, mixed with a passion for home design. It’s a unique point of view that makes her stand out in a crowded field.

“I bring resources to my clients and a perspective or ‘eye’ that other agents don’t have,” she noted.

It’s this savant-like understanding that gives her clients an edge, especially when it comes to reading the market. “I advise my

clients to move quickly,” she said of today’s seller’s market. “Buyers want to be able to take their time, bring in their family or maybe their contractor, and we may not always have that luxury in a hot market. Lengthier due-diligence visits may need to occur after we are under contract.”

Laurie also renovates homes and condos and owns several multi-family properties as an investor. And with her previous

experience as a nurse-midwife, the Columbia University grad has cultivated a sensitivity to homebuyers’ needs as well as a unique ability to advise her sellers.

“If the buyer is older, for example, then we want to make sure that there’s a full bath on the main

level so that they have the potential to age in place,” she said. “If it’s a family with children, we focus on homes that have a nice, level playing yard.”

Whatever your needs, Laurie and her team will guide your buying or selling with an unrivaled

combination of business savvy and finesse.

26

baltimorefishbowl.com


pating potential problems, while having the vision necessary to preserve the character and spirit of a space when incorporating modern conveniences.

To do this, Sutphen says, he imagines

himself in the role of the building’s original craftsman.

“When I look at a project through the

eyes of an 18th or 19th century builder, it simplifies things,” he says. “You don’t overthink the answer. You learn there is more than one right way to accomplish a task.”

Restoring historic buildings requires a special touch MANAGING EXPECTATIONS “The hardest thing to do is set realistic expectations,” says Sutphen, noting that his years of experience have given him confidence not only in terms of design and building, but also in honestly advising clients regarding what to expect.

This was put to the test when Sutphen

and his team restored a 200+-year old log cabin in northern Baltimore County.

RESTORING THE PAST, BUILDING THE FUTURE

Thanks to changing circumstances, the design had to continually evolve, says homeowner Tom Traill. “Part of the old log house proved not to be restorable. There were defects in the log walls that became apparent only after the cladding was removed,” he says.

CAPTURE OPPORTUNITIES, MINIMIZE WASTE

When Robert Voss and Ben Frey decided to

says Voss.

open John Brown General and Butchery, a

food shop and butchery, in an historic build-

terior plans from Towson’s ADW Architects,

Historic projects might not always go accord-

ing in the Shawan Valley, their original plan was

the dilapidated building underwent a signifi-

ing to plan, but they may also come with

to do a bit of renovating to get the building in

cant overhaul, transforming into a shop and

happy surprises.

working order, then to launch the shop and

second floor apartment that blend historic

continue the restoration project while open.

charm with modern fixtures and systems.

for example, led to the discovery of beautiful

With Sutphen’s guidance, along with in-

They loved the history of the building and its role in the community and were excited to get up and running as quickly as possible.

But as so often happens with historic

buildings, things didn’t go exactly to plan.

Once the project got started, “It was a

bit of a nightmare,” says Voss. “Every kind of plumbing, every kind of electric since 1938, wires running everywhere.”

Fortunately, the pair had involved DAVID

SUTPHEN , owner of the restoration company SOUTHFEN RESTORATION HOME BUILDER and

the architectural design firm DAVID SUTPHEN DESIGN . Voss met Sutphen years ago, when

stonework that was previously hidden. It’s im-

BLENDING NEW & OLD

portant, Traill says, to “recognize what’s worth

Sutphen developed a love for historic build-

saving, even in a very unprepossessing old

ings at a young age. He got interested in

structure.”

woodworking in high school and during his late teens and twenties, was exposed to historic homes in Baltimore and on the Eastern Shore.

Since then, he’s been involved in the de-

sign and restoration of many historic buildings, mostly in the Baltimore area.

“He ‘gets it’ when taking a building of some

years and treating it with the integrity it deserves,” says Robert Voss’s mother, Barbara

he renovated Voss’s childhood home, an his-

Voss, who worked with Sutphen on the resto-

toric farmhouse.

ration of her home. “He’s very knowledgeable

about the historic structure of homes and what

Based on his experience, Voss knew that

Sutphen had the technical chops to restore

are the right materials to use.”

the building. But Voss also recognized that

Sutphen had another less tangible quality

older homes is the need for critical thinking and

that made him a good fit for the project: he

problem solving; restoring an historic home is

simply loves older spaces.

more than just assembling parts. It requires

understanding the building’s quirks and antici-

“He’s in it for the warmth and the detail,”

The restoration of Tom Traill’s log cabin,

Part of what appeals to Sutphen about

For Sutphen, this is a calling. “I look at

an older home being torn down and my first thought is, ‘What a waste,’” he says.

Another Sutphen project, Tom Spencer’s

now 160-year old fieldstone farmhouse, located in northern Baltimore County, was initially slated for demolition. Hoping to help the building avoid that fate, Spencer hired Sutphen to completely restore and update the interior and add a small addition and garage, all while preserving the historic nature of the home. “As preservationists, this is gratifying,” says Spencer, noting that, “it’s a privilege to live in a house like this.” David Sutphen Design www.davidsutphendesign.com Southfen Restoration Home Builder www.southfen.com

Home & Real Estate Guide

27


28

baltimorefishbowl.com


Smaller Home, Bigger Life A stunning condo and a move downtown raise the fun quotient for one Federal Hill couple. BY KIT WASKOM POLLARD

|

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNE GUMMERSON

Home & Real Estate Guide

29


YOUR BREATHTAKING VIEW. NEWLY RELEASED PREMIER RESIDENCES AVAILABLE NOW. SCHEDULE YOUR TOUR TODAY.

Your Life. Your Journey. Your Anthem.

844.916.9277 • ANTHEMHOUSE.COM 900 EAST FORT AVENUE, BALTIMORE MD WAR HORSE CITIES


“ We are city people, and we knew we

wanted to be in Federal Hill. We love the history, and the strong sense of neighborhood here.” —Faith Millspaugh

W

hen Faith and Ted Millspaugh moved from The Orchards to Federal Hill in 2016, they did more than simply change homes. They also updated their lifestyle.

sporting events for Saturdays spent

them to take advantage of Baltimore’s

exploring Charm City.

best features.

The move was prompted when they

realized that with both their daughters

quick 10-minute ride across the harbor

grown and out of the house, they weren’t

— and when the weather is nice, Faith

making the most of their Orchards

exercises outdoors, walking along the

The Millspaughs closed on their new home — a two-story, 2,300-square-foot condo at the top of Federal Hill Park — in the summer of 2016. They were sold on the quiet luxury of the building, the light and the wrap-around terrace with its views of the stadiums on one side and the harbor on the other. “And the parking!” adds Faith. The condo came with two deeded parking spaces, which the Millspaughs appreciate on a daily basis.

home. “We weren’t around that much,

promenade to stay healthy. Together,

and when we were, we were just sitting

they also spend more time on their boat

in two rooms,” says Faith. “The rest of

than in the past. “We can go for a boat

the house wasn’t being used and all I was

ride for cocktails and see the skyline

doing was taking care of a yard.”

light up at night,” says Faith.

Since then, they’ve renovated the space, fine-tuning the design to best meet their needs. They’ve also tweaked their day-to-day lives, trading shopping trips to Eddie’s for visits to Harris Teeter, and weekends driving kids to

Ted takes the water taxi to work — a

Ted, a partner at the law firm Venable

Their new home is an easy walk to

LLC, and Faith, who is vice president

Federal Hill restaurants and bars that

of the Mt. Vernon Place Conservancy,

cater to a wide range of ages, like The

had been keeping an eye on the Federal

Outpost American Tavern, which has

Hill property market for several years.

become a regular stop for the couple.

“We are city people,” says Faith, “and

Their downtown location also makes it

we knew we wanted to be in Federal

easy to hit Baltimore’s many festivals,

Hill. We love the history, and the strong

including Light City, which they love.

sense of neighborhood here.”

Today, their smaller space requires

their “old” life; they attend The Church

less upkeep and its location allows

of the Redeemer, and Faith is quick to

The couple still embrace elements of

Home & Real Estate Guide

31


32

baltimorefishbowl.com


How to Make Downsizing Easier Moving from a large, family home to smaller digs can be tough, but working with an expert makes it easier. Here, experts share key advice. START EARLY. “It’s best to call

somebody the minute you think you might be moving,” says Sally McCabe, president of Next Step Baltimore, a service that helps homeowners with the downsizing and estate sale process. This will minimize stress — and potential rush charges. START SMALL. Taking it one room at

a time, clear out items that are not essential or laden with emotional significance. SHARE HISTORY. “It’s a good chance

to share your family history,” advises Ashley Ingraham, owner of Home Perspective LLC. Sharing photos and stories makes it easier to keep the memories, but leave the stuff. MANAGE YOUR EXPECTATIONS. All

the experts agreed with McCabe that “the hardest thing we have to do is tell people their sofa and antiques really are not worth thousands of dollars.” PAY ATTENTION TO DETAILS. Once in

say she loves her old neighborhood and misses seeing those friends daily. Since the move, the couple has become more intentional about seeing old friends, and naturally, they’ve made new ones. “Federal Hill is a wonderful neighborhood. You walk down the street and say hi to everybody,” says Faith. And what about Fed Hill’s reputation as a rowdy neighborhood for the post-college crowd? Faith says it’s not a problem and, in fact, older residents often visit the same bars the younger crowd frequents, but for dinner instead of late-night drinks. Downtown’s reputation for crime isn’t a major concern, either. “I feel very safe where I live,” says Faith. Her building is secure, she says, and living close to other neighbors adds to her sense of comfort.

your new place, check locations of “electrical outlets, bulkheads, vents in walls — that all makes a difference in where you can place furniture,” says McCabe. Her team creates furniture outlines with tape in the new space. DONATE, BUT NOT TOO SOON. It’s

great to donate to charity, and you will have your chance. But hold off a bit. Smaller furniture and decorative pieces you may not think of as essential in your old home space may look fresh in your new home.

Logistically, moving from a larger space to a small one presented both challenges and opportunities. The Millspaughs hired Caryl Siems, owner of Senior Moving — a friend and a downsizing expert — to help them navigate the process, figuring out what to move, and where to donate or sell the things that would not make the move with them. About a third of the furniture in their current home came from their old house; the rest was newly purchased. “You realize some of your old furniture doesn’t fit,” Faith says. “You get new things, which is so fun. It’s like being young again!” Home & Real Estate Guide

33


Inner Harbor

*Image courtesy of Prime Building Advantage.

BALTIMORE‌One City Fits All

Whether you need to upsize or you're ready to downsize...Baltimore has everything from grand estates to waterfront condos to meet your needs. Even better, the city has incentives to help you get there. Visit Live Baltimore’s website to learn about the Resident Retention Tax Credit, a new $4,000 tax credit for families relocating within the city.

Lauraville

*This home is not currently for sale.

Learn more about Baltimore City's $4,000 Resident Retention Tax Credit at LiveBaltimore.com/RRTC


BA LT I MOR E :

Coldspring

Harwood

Hunting Ridge

Beverly Hills

Abell

Medfield

A N E IG H BOR HOOD G U I DE

Baltimore is a diverse and energetic city, with students

from 14 area universities sharing neighborhood blocks with

Coldspring ✽

Beverly Hills ✽

growing families, young professionals, and longtime residents

Abell

of multiple generations.

COLDSPRING LANE

83

Home buyers looking for that perfect combination of

attractive homes, abundant green space, nearby restaurants,

✽ ✽

Medfield

Harwood

NORTH AVENUE ✽

Hunting Ridge

shops and schools often gravitate toward popular, higher-priced destinations like Roland Park, Fells Point and Homeland. But with over 250 residential neighborhoods to choose from in the city,

Baltimore

there is truly a dream home — at the right price point — for everyone. Why not take a weekend afternoon and check them out?

In this year’s Baltimore Fishbowl Neighborhood Guide, we partner with Live Baltimore to highlight six extraordinary neighborhoods on the rise: they are lesser known, well worth your attention and easier on your budget than the neighborhoods already on your radar.

➺ Home & Real Estate Guide

35


COL DSPR I NG

A planned community between Cross Keys and Cylburn Arboretum

Built in the 1970s as a planned living community, the neighborhood of Coldspring is nestled between the Village of Cross Keys and Cylburn Arboretum. The neighborhood stands out for its abundance of green space and two large condo communities: Coldspring Newtown and The Woodlands, which together comprise about 300 homes. The Newtown community boasts many amenities, including an Olympic size swimming pool, tennis courts, pedestrian walking paths and a bird sanctuary. Ideal for those commuting by highway and light rail, the neighborhood is bordered by Northern Parkway and Greenspring Avenue, with plenty of resident parking and serene, quiet surroundings.

Architecture: A combination of modern condominiums, town homes and apartments, with plenty of inviting green space.

H A RWOOD

Walk To:

Baltimore’s 200-acre urban oasis, Cylburn Arboretum, which is free to the public and open year-round. The nature sanctuary offers gardening and nature classes for all ages, and hosts a full calendar of special events.

A short walk to the Waverly Farmers’ Market

Home to the original Oriole Park at 25th

and street cleanup. Homes in the area

Street and Greenmount Avenue during

and surrounding businesses are decorated

the 1880s, the re-energized communi-

by mosaics created by artist and longtime

ty of Harwood exists just south of the

Harwood resident, Tamara Payne.

new community center at 29th Street. The tight-knit residential neighbor-

Architecture:

hood is part of both the Johns Hopkins

brick row homes built in the early 1900s

University patrol route and the Charles

with wide tree-lined sidewalks and

Village Community Benefits District,

well-maintained front gardens. Note to

which provides extra trash collection

buyers: 11 of Harwood’s 14 city blocks

36

baltimorefishbowl.com

The neighborhood is also home to the Waldorf School of Baltimore and Ruscombe Mansion Community Health Center, and sits just across Greenspring Avenue from Sinai Hospital.

Two and three-story

are eligible for Baltimore’s Healthy Neighborhoods programs, which help strong, undervalued neighborhoods grow through grants and low-interest loans for homebuyers.

Walk To:

The 29th Street Community Center, with a brand new playground, is one block away, offering classes from Zumba to Math Club, enrichment programs and family-friendly events year round. Next door is Barclay Elementary/Middle School, which benefits from financial partnerships with both Johns Hopkins University and Goucher College, and offers a comprehensive after-school program. The neighborhood is one mile north of Penn Station, walking distance from Johns Hopkins University and just blocks away from the popular Waverly Farmers’ Market.


H U N T I NG R I DG E

Leakin Park and Gwynns Falls are neighboring green spaces

With Leakin Park and the adjoining

of them historic — surrounded by ample

Baccalaureate) schools in Baltimore, offering

Gwynns Falls Park virtually at their door-

yards and public parks.

students special programming to develop

steps, Hunting Ridge residents enjoy the large houses, tall trees and peaceful quiet of a suburban setting conveniently locat-

Walk To:

Over 1,000 acres of wilderness

playground make up the area’s two local

the skills needed to live, learn and work in a rapidly globalizing world. The school is also a Maryland Green School, participating in

ed near urban amenities, as well as easy

parks, Leakin Park and Gwynns Falls, with

access to I-695 and I-70. This attractive,

hiking and biking trails, picnic areas, playing

composting, attractive playgrounds with

multi-cultural community in West Balti-

fields, tennis courts, and more. Hunting

nature trails, eco-friendly gardens, and

more takes pride in well-kept yards, and

Ridge’s Thomas Jefferson Elementary

lesson plans focusing on local environ-

awards a coveted “Hunting Ridge Horn”

School is one of only four IB (International

mental issues and professional practices.

“green” programming such as recycling and

award (a yard sign) to the best looking yard each month. The community was developed in 1926, with portions designated as a historic district today. The neighborhood association publishes a quarterly newsletter, and hosts a number of events throughout the year including an annual picnic, a holiday progressive dinner, a spring cleanup and gardening days.

Architecture: Large, well-kept stone and brick colonials and bungalows — many

BE V E R LY H I L L S

Craftsman and bungalow homes from the early 20th century

That’s right, Baltimore has its very own

beautiful neighborhood near Herring

coffee aroma. On the National Register

Beverly Hills. While it may not be home

Run Park was home to former Mayor

of Historic Places, homes here are eligible

to as many celebrities as California’s

Martin O’Malley until he took over the

for multiple historic tax credits. Near-

famous

North-

Governor’s Mansion. It also houses

by Garrett Heights Elementary/Middle

east Baltimore community enjoys a

counterpart,

the

Zeke’s Coffee Roasters, which some-

School, for which half the neighborhood

wealth of assets and amenities. This

times lends the neighborhood a delicious

is zoned, has a 10-year plan to convert to a public Montessori School.

Architecture: Craftsman and bungalow styles from the 19th century dot the community and feature pleasant, manageable yards.

Walk to:

Restaurants and shops along

Harford

Road,

including

Maggie’s

Farm and Koco’s Pub, home of the “best crab cakes in Baltimore.” Morgan State University is just a mile west, and I-95 is a short drive east, making possible a 15 minute trip to Canton, or a trip north out of the city, without the hassle of downtown traffic.

Home & Real Estate Guide

37


A BEL L

A tiny, entirely residential neighborhood near Charles Village

This tiny community of nine square blocks in the heart of Charles Village has just celebrated its centennial. Known for its vibrantly colored “Painted Lady” townhouses, it is almost entirely residential. A close-knit, diverse community of faculty families, students and longtime residents, Abell’s wide, tree-lined streets and an active community organization are among its many charms. The Abell Improvement Association organizes a multitude of events throughout the year, including a musicfilled street fair and children’s parade in September, a chili cook-off in the fall, and outdoor movie screenings each Friday in the summer. Abell is just blocks from convenient bus routes, including the free Charm City Circulator, Metrolink and the Johns Hopkins Shuttle. Less than two miles from Penn Station, the neighborhood is also home to many D.C. commuters.

M E DF I EL D

families to stay and grow in Baltimore

munity, tucked in west of Falls Road

City. Medfield meets the criteria by

between neighboring Roland Park and

offering affordable houses, kids in the

Hampden. The Medfield Community

neighborhood,

Association keeps residents up-to-date

and restaurants in Hampden, and a

on community activities with a lively

great public school. Medfield Heights

monthly newspaper. Medfield has been

Elementary School, one of Baltimore’s

identified as one of Live Baltimore’s

top-rated public schools, has one of the

5 Star Family Friendly Neighborhoods

most culturally diverse student bodies

in the organization’s “Way To Stay”

in the city. It offers small class sizes, onsite

program, which focuses on helping

aftercare, many extracurricular pro-

baltimorefishbowl.com

Abell’s well-preserved brick row homes were built at the turn of the century, and feature broad front porches and modest backyards. Many are painted with bright, whimsical colors, as part of the longstanding “Painted Lady” tradition.

Walk To:

In the center of Abell is a small, community-maintained park and playground, known as the Abell Open Space. The park provides a center for recreation and community gatherings. Also nearby are the Barclay School, the Waverly Branch of Enoch Pratt Library, the 32nd Street Farmers Market and historic Huntingdon Baptist Church. Just blocks away to the west are the Baltimore Museum of Art, Union Memorial Hospital, and a large number of restaurants, cafes, shops, grocery stores and other retailers along St. Paul Street.

South of Roland Park, north of Hampden, and family friendly

Medfield is a quiet, family-friendly com-

38

Architecture:

walkability

to

shops

grams and the promise of a brand new building as part of the 21st Century School Initiative.

Architecture:

Medfield offers a range of home types, from brick row homes to ranch houses, bungalows and apartment buildings.

Walk To:

Medfield is less than a mile from the restaurants and cafes along Cold Spring Lane in Roland Park, and Loyola University just beyond. A few blocks east up 41st Street are grocery stores, pharmacies and restaurants. “The Avenue” in Hampden is also a short distance away. Nearby Woodberry hosts high-end restaurants, bars and recreation, and the soon-to-open Union Collective off 41st Street will offer craft beer, locally made whiskey and a branch of Earth Treks climbing gym.


Rich and Sue Walther live in Baltimore’s Charles Village neighborhood.

©2018 Live Baltimore Home Center, Inc. Live Baltimore is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Just ask Rich and Sue, who retired to Baltimore from Montgomery County. After converting an historic rowhome into their modern, light-filled dream house, they spend time enjoying their space—not maintaining it. What will you discover more of in Baltimore? Find out at LiveBaltimore.com.

Find your home in the city. LiveBaltimore.com


Editor’s Choic�

Directory Finding the right person to work on your home can be a daunting task. The Editor’s Choice Directory is a list of recommended service providers created by contributors to the Baltimore Fishbowl Home & Real Estate Guide.

ARBORISTS A-AAA TREE SERVICE

treeworkmd.com 410-321-0921

A&A TREE EXPERTS

aatreeexperts.com 410-486-4561

CARROLL TREE SERVICE

carrolltreeservice.com 410-998-1100

DAVEY TREE EXPERT COMPANY

davey.com

410-377-4002 ARCHITECTS VINCENT GREENE ARCHITECTS

PENZA BAILEY ARCHITECTS

penzabailey.com 410-435-6677

ratcliffearchitects.com

pdjassociates.com 410-494-1017

MELVILLE THOMAS ARCHITECTS, INC.

mtarx.com

410-433-4400 MARK MOBLEY ARCHITECTURE

mmarchitecture.com 410-385-8570 40

baltimorefishbowl.com

410-655-4367 SWIFT CHIMNEY SERVICE

410-484-7010

443-992-5629

SM+P ARCHITECTS

DOWNSIZING SERVICES

info@smp-architects.com 410-685-3582

HOME PERSPECTIVE LLC

CARPENTERS

443-386-3438

CIESLA CARPENTRY AND CABINET WORKS

NEXT STEP BALTIMORE

410-366-2444 GREG GENSHEIMER

410-961-5436

homeperspectivellc.com

nextstepbaltimore.com 410-207-4475 SENIOR MOVE SUCCESS

caryl@seniorsmoving.com 410-323-3853

SUNNYFIELDS CABINETRY

sunnyfieldscabinetry.com PATRICK D. JAROSINSKI & ASSOCIATES

markandbuttons.com

RATCLIFFE ARCHITECTS

vgarchitect.com 410-366-9982

MARK & BUTTONS CHIMNEY SWEEPS, INC.

6305 Falls Road, #100 Baltimore, MD 21209 410-823-6666 CHIMNEY SWEEPS/ REPAIR CONTRACTORS ACE OF DIAMONDS CHIMNEY SWEEPS, INC.

aceofdiamondschimneymd.com

DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY SERVICES

GLYNDON LORD BALTIMORE CLEANERS

glyndonlordbaltimore.com 6 Central Avenue Glyndon, MD 21071 410-883-5200

410-477-9144 indicates a featured listing advertiser.


UPGRADE YOUR GARAGE FLOOR TO LOOK AND LAST LIKE GRANITE. 3 Industrial Quality 3 Easy to Clean 3 Designer Finishes • Industrial Quality - Extremely Durable & Chemical Resistant • Easy to Clean - No Staining, Peeling or “Hot-Tire Pick-Up” • Designer Color Finishes - Granite, Quartz, & Terrazzo • Locally Owned and Operated - Since 2010 - Licensed & Insured • Experienced Installation Team - Exclusively Epoxy Floors - 5M Sq Ft Installed • Lifetime Satisfaction Warranty - 100% Guaranteed

443-552-4992 GraniteGarageFloors.com

EPOXY

COATING

SYSTEMS


ELECTRICIANS

WESTERN PEST SERVICES

HEATING AND A/C CONTRACTORS

GEORGE GROSSMAN

410-356-7128

ACCURATE HEATING AND A/C

410-905-9886 GURLEY ELECTRIC

410-668-9627

westernpest.com

FINANCIAL AND FAMILY

410-747-7111 ALL STEAMED UP

CARE PATROL

410-321-8116

410-235-4095

Paula Sotir 410-844-0800

BLUE DOT

STEPHEN S. SCALF

MBA CONCIERGE

carepatrolbaltimore.com HEUBECK ELECTRIC

410-662-8464 CASPER G. SIPPEL, INC.

mbaconcierge.com

James MacFarlane 410-771-8555 Harry Bond 410-868-2664

410-668-3910 WINN ELECTRIC

winnelectric.com 410-484-5544 EXTERMINATORS ATLAS EXTERMINATOR COMPANY, INC.

410-296-1212 EHRLICH PEST CONTROL

jcehrlich.com

410-882-1000 PEST-A-REST

410-600-3113

FURNITURE REPAIR AND UPHOLSTERY DOVETAIL RESTORATION

dovetailrestoration.com 410-243-8300

GUTTER CLEANING AND REPAIR

410-803-4323 HOME AND OFFICE CLEANING AND ORGANIZING SERVICES THE CLEANING AUTHORITY

thecleaningauthority.com 410-989-4382

GOMEZ J&H CLEANING SERVICES

443-415-4098 HOME PERSPECTIVE LLC

homeperspectivellc.com 443-386-3438

THE GUTTER GUYS

thegutterguys.com 800-GUTTER-1

NEXT STEP

nextstepbaltimore.com 410-207-4475

HAULING/JUNK REMOVAL 1-800-GOT-JUNK

Mark Pratt 410-274-2986

SIMPLIFY ORGANIZING SERVICES

simplifyorganizing.com 410-370-4109

HOME DECOR ANTIQUE EXCHANGE INTERIORS

wesley@antique-exchange.com 410-532-7000

BOZZUTO GREENE ART

bozzutogreeneart.com CEDAR & COTTON

cedarandcotton.com 443-990-1427

DESIGN DISTILLERY

ddistillery.com

Facing the Senior Living Challenge? Let our team help navigate the way through safe licensed Independent, Assisted living and Memory Care living choices. Our service is FREE to families and has been for 25 years. Baltimore County/Baltimore City

410-844-0800 www.carepatrolbaltimore.com

1414 Key Highway Baltimore, MD 21230 410-433-1616 DUBEY’S ART AND ANTIQUES, INC.

dubeysantiques.wordpress.com 410-383-2881

DUTCH FLORAL GARDEN

dutchfloralgarden.com 410-467-7882

HALCYON HOUSE CarePatrol is a FREE COMMUNITY SERVICE and is reimbursed by the community that you choose . Awarded Franchise of the Year in 2016

42

baltimorefishbowl.com

halcyonhouseantiques.com 410-828-8889

indicates a featured listing advertiser.


HOME ANTHOLOGY

info@homeanthology.com 410-744-0042

JOHNSON SOKOL INTERIOR DESIGN

johnsonsokol.com LINENS & LINGERIE

linensandlingeriemd.com 410-825-1736

LIZA HATHAWAY MATTHEWS

lizahathawaymatthews.com lizamatthews@comcast.net 7347 Brightside Road Baltimore, MD 21212 410-458-0644 MCLAIN WIESAND

mclainwiesand.com 410-539-4440

RENAISSANCE FINE ART GALLERY

renaissancefinearts.com 410-484-8900

SECOND CHANCE

secondchanceinc.org 410-385-1700

THE STORE LTD

410-323-2350 STONY RUN HOME

stonyrunhome.com 410-435-4666

SUNNYFIELDS CABINETRY

sunnyfieldscabinetry.com 6305 Falls Road, #100 Baltimore, MD 21209 410-823-6666 TROHV

hellobmore@trohvshop.com 410-366-3456

WISHBONE RESERVE

wishbonereserve.com 443-961-3376

HOME IMPROVEMENT/ RENOVATION CONTRACTORS DELBERT ADAMS CONSTRUCTION GROUP

dacgllc.com

410-583-7575 BADGER CONSTRUCTION

badgerconstruction.net 410-252-1633

Making the Abstract Real. 16 Willow Avenue Towson, Maryland 21286 f 410-825-2582 l 410-825-2583 www.altitle.com American Land Title provides title services throughout the State of Maryland Woman’s Business Enterprise Certification (WBE)

Home & Real Estate Guide

43


CROSSROADS BUILDING INC.

FULTON CONSTRUCTION, INC.

crossroadsbuildingmd.com

fultonconstructionmd.com

410-472-2754

E & F CONTRACTORS

410-282-6677 FEDERAL HILL KITCHEN, BATH & CLOSET

410-783-1992

443-463-4775

GRANITE GARAGE FLOORS

granitegaragefloors.com

722 Dulaney Valley Road, Suite 392 Towson, MD 21204 443-552-4992

FITZGERALD DESIGN BUILD/ PATRICK FITZGERALD

GREENBUILDERS INC.

fitzdesignbuild.com

410-472-7072

443-838-4095

FORBES DESIGN CENTER

forbesdesigncenter.com

1940 Greenspring Drive, D Timonium, MD 21093 410-252-1009 FRANKLIN & ALEXANDER

franklinandalexander.com

greenbuilders.com

410-783-1355

2900 Butler Road Reisterstown, MD 21136 410-526-6008 THOMSON REMODELING COMPANY, INC.

thomsonremodeling.com BOB TUTTLE ROOFING & REMODELING

443-418-4067

PORTER BUCKLEY CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION

porterbuckleygroup.com

15 West Aylesbury Road, #400 Lutherville, MD 21093 410-616-9312 RANDLETT CONSTRUCTION LLC

443-277-8290

UNIQUE RESOURCES

uniqueresourcesinc.com 410-539-1000

VOLKMANN CONSTRUCTION LLC

410-715-9069 LAWN AND LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS ATLANTIC LANDSCAPES LLC

SMITHOUSE CONSTRUCTION

frenchmanwhite.com

southfen.com

410-889-7391

410-494-1635

FRENCHMAN WHITE

SOUTHFEN

smithouseconstruction.com 410-329-1262

410-952-3975 BRADY LANDSCAPE LLC

bradylandscape.com 410-798-0879

Traditional and modern styles in lighting, lamp shades and accessories!

208 York Road · Towson | 410.823.0423 | MON - SAT 9:30 - 5:30 www.wilsonlightingandinteriors.com /wilsonlightingandinteriors

44

baltimorefishbowl.com

indicates a featured listing advertiser.


GREEN FIELDS NURSERY AND LANDSCAPING COMPANY

greenfieldsnursery.com 410-323-3444 HEMPHILL’S GARDEN AND AQUATIC CENTER

pondpals.com 410-803-1688 MAPLE CREEK LANDSCAPES

maplecreeklandscapes.com 410-790-3901 MAXALEA, INC.

maxalea.com 410-377-7500 MICHAEL’S IRRIGATION, INC.

michaelsirrigation.com 410-557-8580

RKC LANDSCAPING

MARTIN TURNER MASONRY

410-329-3079

443-310-6942

WM F. TURNER LANDSCAPE, INC.

RUANE CONTRACTING, INC.

turnerscapes.com

443-643-6512

410-472-9333 NATURAL CONCERNS

naturalconcerns.com 53 Loveton Circle Sparks, MD 21152 410-472-6860 PINEHURST LANDSCAPE COMPANY

pinehurstnursery.com 410-592-6766

MASONRY CONTRACTORS ALDO CONSTRUCTION, INC.

aldoconstruction@gmail.com

PAINTERS ABSOLUTE BEST CUSTOM PAINTING

410-882-9072

410-817-4466

BALTIMORE PAINT AUTHORITY

APPEL STONEWORKS

410-484-0753

appelstoneworks.com

baltimorepaintauthority.com

443-623-1258

From helping you buy your first home to helping you sell your last one –

We want to be your Realtors for Life!

WITH COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

Main: 410.832.2583 Whit Harvey: 443.286.5808 38 Village Square | Baltimore, MD 21210

Home & Real Estate Guide

45


BILL BISCHOFF

443-992-6045 EDWARD CRUTCHFIELD

410-377-6421 CUTTING EDGE CUSTOM PAINTING

443-789-4111 PAVEL FALKO

443-570-7357 FIVE STAR HOME SERVICES

fivestarmaryland.com 410-661-4050 GOODE DESIGN, PAINTING AND WALLCOVERING

goodepainting.com 410-893-1860 HADLEY HOME SERVICES

443-992-2770 M & M BROTHERS PAINTING

410-908-8060 NIKITARAS PAINTING

443-417-5886 SAM’S PAINTING

samspaintingllc.com 443-610-3471 SLATER PAINTING AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS

slaterpaintingandhomeimprovements.com 410-371-4210 ROBERT SMITH

443-375-1514 PLASTER/SHEETROCK CONTRACTORS FIVE STAR HOME SERVICES

Design. Real Estate. Lifestyle. Baltimore Fishbowl delivers. Reach our educated, affluent and influential readership on our home guide subdomain coming soon to Baltimorefishbowl.com. Contact Mary Wargo at mary@baltimorefishbowl.com for details.

fivestarmaryland.com 410-661-4050 PLUMBERS AURORA PLUMBING & HEATING, INC.

dandb.com 410-377-3356 C.W. FOGARTY PLUMBING & HEATING

410-239-4171 FORSTER PLUMBING

forster-plumbing.com 410-444-0016 46

baltimorefishbowl.com

indicates a featured listing advertiser.


GASPER’S PLUMBING & HEATING

KATHLEEN LAUMAN

443-686-2394

Primary Residential Mortgage, Inc.

O’NEILL PLUMBING AND HEATING

oneillplumbingandheatinginc.com 410-433-4047 SAFFER PLUMBING & HEATING

safferplumbing.com 410-665-4238

primaryresidentialmortgage.com 410-977-4003 LIVE BALTIMORE

livebaltimore.com 343 North Charles Street, 1st Floor Baltimore, MD 21201 410-637-3750

All of your Home Textiles Cleaning & Care

REAL ESTATE SERVICES CLAUDIA O’HARA AMERICAN LAND TITLE CORPORATION

Monument Sotheby’s International Realty

altitlecorp.com

theoharagroup.com

16 Willow Avenue Towson, MD 21286 410-825-2582

410-274-2936 ROOFING CONTRACTORS

Columbia Roofing DORSEY CAMPBELL AND LIZ BOYCE

The Dorsey Campbell Group/ Cummings & Co. Realtors

dorseycampbellgroup.com 1515 Labelle Avenue Ruxton, MD 21204 410-697-4005 CINDY CONKLIN AND BOB MERBLER

Berkshire Hathaway/Homesale Realty

cconklin@homesale.com 443-629-0152 CROSS STREET REALTY

csrealtors.com 410-778-3779

columbiaroofing.com 410-379-6100 FICK BROS. ROOFING & EXTERIOR REMODELING CO.

fickbros.com 410-889-5525 METICULOUS METAL ROOFING BY RJ STONER CONTRACTING LLC

tinandcopperroofing.com 301-432-2163 REMARKABLE HOME LLC

remarkablehomellc.com 443-618-5225

One Cleaner

SHOPPING

LISA HARDIMAN AND BONNIE MARKELL

Sotheby’s Realty

lisa.hardiman@ monumentsothebysrealty.com 443-465-1580 WHIT HARVEY

The Whit Harvey Group/ Coldwell Banker

home@whitharveygroup.com 38 Village Square, Village of Cross Keys Baltimore, MD 21210 410-235-4100

VILLAGE OF CROSS KEYS

villageofcrosskeys.com 5100 Falls Road Baltimore, MD 21210 410-323-1000 WILDLIFE REMOVAL SERVICES TRAPPRO

trappro.com 800-651-TRAP (8727) WINDOW WASHERS

LAURIE KARLL & ASSOCIATES

Berkshire Hathaway/ Homesale Realty

lauriesellsmdhomes.com 1425 Clarkview Road, Suite 700 Baltimore, MD 21209 410-984-8624 or 410-583-0400

FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD WINDOW CLEANING

fnwcinc.com 410-733-5511 TOM SHERIDAN

443-330-5305

410-833-5200 glbcleaners.com Keeping Baltimore Looking its Best Since 1921

Home & Real Estate Guide

47


Pretty in Pink

F

resh and timeless, pink is rising over the design horizon like a new dawn.

18-18367_Image Resize for L Cipriano.indd 1

Paint company Benjamin Moore has named this shade “Dream Whip” for the ethereal beauty it illustrates. Bryan Koerber, owner of Budeke’s Paints, says “it’s a special shade that is both warm and welcoming.” And as every decorator knows, there is no color more flattering. 

48

baltimorefishbowl.com

Find Dream Whip 4/17/18 10:33 AM by Benjamin Moore at BUDEKE’S PAINTS,

9484 Deereco Road in Timonium.


Free Estimates

SHOWROOM NOW OPEN!

230 GATEWAY DRIVE, BEL AIR, MD 21014 (Behind Harford Mall)

Voted Best of Baltimore 4 times! ssional e f o r P a Bon roducts P g n i n Clea ble for a l i a v A Now se purcha

INSTALL • SAND & FINISH • SALES

JASONBROWNWOODFLOORS.COM OFFICE@JASONBROWNWOODFLOORS.COM


Profile for Baltimore Fishbowl

Baltimore Fishbowl Home & Real Estate Guide 2018  

Baltimore Fishbowl Home & Real Estate Guide 2018