__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

E XCLUSI V E M AG A ZI N E FO R T H E J E W EL L ERY B USI N E SS I N T H E BA LT I C SE A R E G I O N

March 2019 (36)

FASTEST WAY TO THE BALTIC SEA REGION!


AMBER TRIP CLUSTER • TOGETHER WE ARE STRONGER • JOIN AMBER TRIP CLUSTER WITH YOUR IDEAS • RECEIVE OUR HELP FOR YOUR BUSINESS •

w w w.amb er t r ip clus ter.co m

• cluster@amber trip.com • +370 688 56 063


Whichever way you look, there are no prospects. Europe is not interested in amber products because their prices are still too high. Likewise in the USA, where as the latest experience shows, stimulating the demand might not be impossible, but it is seems impossible to produce jewellery so cheap that the Americans would like to buy it. The producers are looking at the Indian market with some hope, as it is said to have potential. It is indeed a tempting perspective, though the question is how much investment is needed in order to promote products with a stone that is virtually unknown there... And yet again the amber industry is awaiting the Amberif and Ambermart trade fairs – hoping that they will bring the answers to at least some of these questions... Anna SADO

www.balticjewellerynews.com

p. 1 36 –2019

the beginning of the year again, and once again there are questions about the future. The closest future – that is the time connected with the spring edition of the trade fairs, and the more distant – that is how to run a business. It is hard not to get the impression that in the last few months these questions have been occurring more and more often, and an increasing number of entrepreneurs from the amber industry are asking these questions themselves. Working with amber has never been easy, but for the last two years – as a result of the decreased interest in the stone on the Chinese market – it appears to be more difficult than usual. Unstable prices of the raw material and the lack of outlets for the raw material as well as the constantly increasing costs of running a company have led to a serious drop in mood due to the lack of perspectives for development.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Itʼs


AMBER TRIP RAW TRADE IS HERE AND ONLINE!


Contact us via:

FB: Amber Trip Email: info@ambertrip.com Phone: +370 618 53 538 www.ambertrip.com


March 2019 (36)

EXTRACTION OF AMBER BY BELGEOPOISK LLC

PAWEŁ ADAMOWICZ – THE MAYOR OF WORLD CAPITAL OF AMBER

SYNTHETIC DIAMONDS: TECHNOLOGY AS AN ART

ISABEL TRISTÁN OCHOA. CREATIVE FREEDOM

INTERVIEW WITH ARI PYÖRÄLÄ

KARIN NORDMANN. DESIGNER, COLLECTOR AND FORMER MUSEUM DIRECTOR

16

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 4

10

40

88

72

102

Baltic Jewellery News / March 2019 (36) Manufakturu st. 16–7, LT-11342, Vilnius, Lithuania; tel. +370 687 72 175; e-mail: magazine@balticjewellerynews.com Editor / Anna Sado Designer / SAVITAI, Translators / VERTIMU GURU, CIRCULATION 5 000 Distribution in the whole Baltic Sea Region. Copyright: Contents of “Baltic Jewellery News” are copyright. ISSN 2335-2132 Reproduction of material in part or in whole is not permitted in any form without the written authorization of the publisher. The editorial office is not responsible for the content of advertisements and for the accuracy of the facts presented by the authors.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


CONTENT /

MINING 10

Extraction of amber by Belgeopoisk LLC

72 76 80 84 86 88 92 96 98

Isabel Tristán Ochoa. Creative freedom Interview with Märta Mattsson Open spaces in a closed world Audrius Krulis. Playful forms evoked by nature The contemporary metal art biennial METALLOphone 4: SIGNATURE Interview with ARI PYÖRÄLÄ Project “GOODWOOD” Legnica SILVER Festival Coral

COLLECTION 102

Karin Nordmann. Designer, collector and former museum director

IAA JEWELLERY REPORT 108 110

Katara Kahraman exhibition in Qatar Michalina Owczarek. Black’n’Amber

MARKET REVIEW 114 116 117 118 119

Kaliningrad Amber Combine prices Worldwide price for raw amber Silver prices Gold prices Major jewellery trade fairs

www.balticjewellerynews.com

36 –2019

ARTISTIC INSPIRATIONS

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

14 Jewellery industry in 2023 16 Paweł Adamowicz – the mayor of world capital of amber 18 AMBERIF 2019 20 JUBINALE 2019 22 S&A. Where talents become a master 28 JUNWEX ST. PETERSBURG 2019 30 Records of the Kaliningrad Amber Combine 36 ESTONISHING! 40 Synthetic diamonds: technology as an art 44 JEWELLER EXPO UKRAINE 46 OONA GALLERY 54 Åsa Elmstam (Sweden): Art requiring a responsible approach 58 Precious 2019 60 The first in the world natural amber sauna 63 Cartoon 70 Report by WORLD GOLD COUNCIL

p. 5

BUSINESS INSIGHTS


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 10

MINING /

EXTRACTION OF AMBER BY BELGEOPOISK LLC By Chanau YAUHENI

The

extraction of amber in Belarus has a long history. Untreated pieces of amber are found on the Paleolithic sites of an ancient man whose age is 10–12 thousand years. Since from the Mesolithic age, the stone has been processed into figures of animals and people, decorations and details of clothing. Perspective squares with amber observed on the Belarussian Polesje as result of geological exploration. Amber is existed in-situ in marine Paleogene deposit sandin Quaternary glacial deposits. In Brest and Gomel regions were found more than three dozen amber occurrences in anthropogenic sediments. At the most explored Gatcha-Osovsky deposit in Zhabinka district of Brest region, the estimated amber resources amount to 6, 47 tons and the amber reserves calculated for category C2 are 2.87 tons till 9 m depth with content of amber 1–398 g/m3. In June 2016 the “Belgeopoisk Limited Liability Company” was created. Main tasks of Belgeopoisk LLC are the organization and implementation of activities for exploration and mining of mineral resources in the Republic of Belarus

and abroad. The main focus at that time was set on exploration and extraction of amber.

Since the foundation of LLC Belgeopoisk,

the works have been carried out to study the reporting materials of prospecting and exploration works performed earlier,

including the documents from geological funds of the Republic of Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine. For further exploration of the subsoil for amber, Belgeopoisk LLC obtained geological allotments in Lelchitsy, Kobrin, Malorita and Zhabinka districts. The total area of the geological allotments is more than 117 hectares. On December 27, 2016 the State Enterprise "Research and Development Center for Geology" developed a project to carry out trial explotation mining on previously discovered amber deposits within the pilot site of the Gatcha-Osovskyamber occurrence in Zhabinka district.

In the period from July 2017 to October 2017 (3.5 months) Belgeopoisk LLC conducted trial exploitation of amber deposit No. 2 at the specified site. During the trial exploitation in 2017 one of the methods for the extraction of amber was used such as open-pit mining using a dredgers the area of this deposit was completely flooded. Taking into account the experience of 2017, in 2018 the works were carried out to extract amber on the remaining deposits trough by direct hydraulic erosion in boreholes. Investors were attracted and brigades with such a similar work experience were hired. In 2017–2018 the extracted amber was evaluated by the Belarusian Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Employees of “Belgeopoisk LLC” compiled a geological report to the State Enterprise Belgosgeocentre (State Geological Fond). Belgeopoisk LLC invite all companies that are interested in exploration and exploitation of amber for collaboration on the Gatcha-Osovsky amber occurrence and other place on the territory of Belarussian Polesje. ■ Address: Minsk, 220114, Republic of Belarus, Nezavisimosti av., 169–710 (south block) Phone/fax +375 17 218 11 81 Director: PODGORNY Eugene

www.balticjewellerynews.com


www.balticjewellerynews.com B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 11


www.aimdisplay.com.pl

AIM DISPLAY POLISH MANUFACTURER OF DISPLAYS, ETUI, BUSTS AND TRAYS FOR EXPOSITION, SALES AND STORAGE OF JEWELLERY PL

ul. Taborowa 24, 02-699 Warszawa, Poland, T/F: +48 226449815

v

www.aimdisplay.com.pl

v

aimdisplay@aimdisplay.com.pl


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / WORLDWIDE JEWELLERY REPORT

A MULTIFACED INDUSTRY: JEWELLERY INDUSTRY in 2023

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 14

By Nadejda KREČ, Senior Analyst at Euromonitor International

JEWELLERY INDUSTRY HAS GLITTERING PROSPECTS Every industry has to innovate, and jewellery is no exception to this obvious rule. The interesting elements, however, are always in the detail of how such innovation is implemented. In five years from now, jewellery designers are having to become adept at employing sophisticated tools and technologies in order to meet ever-increasing customer expectations. JEWELLERY RETAILERS TO EXCEL IN OMNICHANNEL RETAILING Jewellery retailers are finding ways to make the online and in-store experiences work together to provide better overall customer experiences. One reason jewellery brands have been reluctant to invest heavily in the digital space was the belief that customers would not shop online for such expensive items. However, the jewellery industry is constantly evolving, and the best of modern retailers already adapt quickly to the changes in the retail landscape. Right now, that means omnichannel. This trend is set to continue over the next five years as well. Therefore, for jewellery retailers looking to expand from a local presence to a regional or global one and connect with their customers, this is paramount. There are many reasons jewellery retailers need to be thinking omnichannel. It helps business owners engage with their clients on an ongoing basis, sharing details, product news, and events valuable to each specific person. Customer service should be a top consideration for jewellery businesses looking to excel in 2019 and onwards, as this is the foundation to building strong relationships that will keep clients loyal and engaged with the brand. Part of building a relationship is ensuring the customers feel they are known and valued, and that each experience is tailored to their needs. Therefore, for jewellery retailers, an omnichannel platform could help support the customization and personalization element of jewellery pieces. It also offers up-to-the-minute insights

into what is in stock and what can be ordered. Creating an experience custom to each person also builds the credibility of the retailer, and the interaction is more likely to turn into a repeat visit or transaction. PERSONALIZATION – AS A WAY TO ENHANCE THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE It is no secret that many of today’s consumers like to stand out from the crowd. They want something uniquely different from what everyone else is wearing or carrying. That is one of the main reason why there has been such a huge growth in the personalized jewellery market and within the next five years this trend is expected to dominate the entire industry. Retailers should be creative when it comes to the items they offer as well as how to personalize those items. Moreover, there is a growing demand for combinations of materials, for example metal and wood or stone. Combining different techniques is also creating great new designs and opportunities for jewellers. When implemented correctly, personalization offers an appealing, cost-effective way for consumers to form an emotional connection to a particular product or brand, while jewellery retailers enjoy increased loyalty and customer satisfaction rates. Social networks also play a critical role here, allowing consumer to instantly share, rate and comment on their purchases, further cementing the connection between the person and the product. Customers who are happy with their purchases readily share photos of their personalized products online, helping to transform shoppers into brand advocates. Smaller jewellers are set to enjoy a distinct advantage when it comes to product personalization for one simple reason – consumers already see local and independent retailers as being better equipped to create personalized experiences than large jewellery retailers. Moreover, it is becoming obvious that consumers expect a higher degree of customer service at a smaller, local jewellery retailer, and come in looking for a different kind

www.balticjewellerynews.com


of experience than what can be found in chain stores and outlets. It is obvious that while small players cannot compete over price, they can deliver value through customer service and making highly personalized products. Price is no longer the main point of connection for a vast number of consumers. Small jewellery retailers are set to be uniquely positioned to provide customers with an intimate and custom shopping experience what that “local flavour” that many customers, especially Millennials, are seeking. SMART JEWELLERY – CREATING OPPORTUNITIES Smart jewellery as a trend has been growing for the past three years or so and now it has reached the stage where, no matter which piece of jewellery a customer would like to see smartened up, there are a couple of different options.

Start-ups like Bellabeat, alongside big names such as Swarovski, Michael Kors, Kade Spade, etc, have been quick to realize the potential of these form of jewellery pieces, and have created some beautiful designer jewellery that does more than just look good.

With added smarts for fitness tracking, notifications and stress management, the next generation of earrings, necklaces, bracelets and rings is set to be connected. The Swarovski Activity Crystal, for example, or previously the Swarovski Shine – the pendant allows fitness tracking features. It is very smartly built, and it manages to track steps, distance, calories as well as sleep monitoring, with result delivered via the Misfit smartphone app. Another good example of smart jewellery which proves to be successful is the unisex smart ring, Motiv, which promises fitness tracking from the finger. It is very smartly built – titanium, just eight millimetres wide, two finishes of rose gold and slate grey, plus seven sizes to cater to men’s and women’s hands. As for the features, the real impressive thing is that Motiv has managed to get an optical heart rate sensor into this form factor. There is also a 3-axis accelerometer for tracking steps, distance, calories as well as sleep. Battery life is five days, the ring is waterproof up to 50m and it now works ith both iOS and Android. That being said, the interest and awareness of smart jewellery have already become widespread, and the forecasts show that the market is ready for it. These smart jewellery pieces are attractive to many because it shows that jewellery pieces can be stylish, glamorous, and functional – all at the same time. ■

www.balticjewellerynews.com

Ganyklų str. 18, LT-00138 Palanga, Lithuania Tel./fax: +370 460 51230; Mob. +370 698 79791 E-mail: info@ambermanus.com www.ambermanus.com


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

Photo by www.gdansk.pl

p. 16

Paweł ADAMOWICZ, the Mayor of Gdańsk

PAWEŁ ADAMOWICZ – THE MAYOR OF WORLD CAPITAL OF AMBER By Anna SADO

Gdańsk is the World Capital of Amber. Contrary to Kaliningrad, it does not have its own amber deposits, which is becoming more and more often the reason for criticism, but it is the unqestionable centre of amber processing. It became famous primarily thanks to the activity of Paweł Adamowicz, the president of Gdańsk for the last 20 years, who was murdered this January...

“Gdańsk

is the most wonderful place in the world” – were the last words of the President, mere moments before he was stabbed in the middle of January this year. President Adamowicz put a lot of work and emotions into making the city the way it is. Today, Gdańsk is mostly associated with solidarity,

freedom, tolerance, and of course amber. Amber has always been in Gdańsk, but it wasn't until President Adamowicz launched efficient (and attractive!) activities in order to make it one of the most important pillars of the promotional activity of the city in Poland and abroad that Gdańsk became so closely associated with amber.

GDAŃSK – THE WORLD CAPITAL OF AMBER “Amber is our competitive advantage” – Paweł Adamowicz used to say and he knew very well how to use this advantage skilfully. It is not surprising then that the project “Gdańsk – The World Capital of Amber” was included in the city development strategy in 2006.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


www.balticjewellerynews.com

NOT ONLY FOR GDAŃSK “Today Gdańsk is amber and amber is Gdańsk” – this is how Professor Ryszard Szadziewski, the president of the Amber Capital of the World summarised the activities undertaken during Paweł Adamowicz's tenure. “The president had a great understanding and made a very good use of the potential in amber. Thanks to him amber is the most precious gem in the “crown” both of the city of Gdańsk and Poland” – he adds. Because Gdańsk – what is worth noting – has never appropriated amber, it has always been keen on sharing its achievements and experience. It has shared with other counties the revolutionary resolution regulating the rules of city ground tenancy for amber mining, or built amber associations such as the Amber Route Cities Forum, or took part in projects strengthening those relations, like the international “Amber expedition”.

Gdańsk is a city of strong Hanseatic traditions as it constantly upholds the idea of commercial and cultural cooperation.

THE SUPPORT FOR ENTREPRENEURS For Poland, who is a European centre of amber processing without access to rich enough amber deposits, president's attempts to grant that access were of vital

importance. In 2007 a resolution regulating the rules of city ground tenancy for amber mining was signed. The resolution was unique as nobody else had taken care before to ensure that the highly necessary amber raw material could be mined before the grounds are built over. On the power of the resolution between 1007 and 2010 the City Hall in Gdańsk leased 21 ha for amber mining. As a result, amber of exceptional beauty has been made available on the market and to the Amber Museum; cooperation was launched between amber producers, civil servants, geologists, police officers and customs office representatives in order to eliminate illegal amber mining in Gdańsk. “Thanks to the president we felt that somebody cares about us and our business. His personal interest and initiative as president of Gdańsk have resulted in the realisation of a number of projects which in turn have contributed to improved conditions for our work. His support has led to the growth of trade organisations supporting dynamic development of the industry in the world and the promotion of Gdańsk goldsmithery in the world. The president was a real Gdańsk citizen, who felt personally responsible for his city, and its biggest treasure – amber – was most important to him” – sums up Adam Pstrągowski, the president of the board of the S&A S.A. QUO VADIS GDAŃSK? Amber triggers creativity, thus many of the ideas for its promotion originate from Gdańsk. Some of them have not worked, so they are not continued. However, all of them have had a great impact on promoting Gdańsk and the amber brand in the world. Is anything going to change with the new president? “The amber producers should not be worried. The regional civil servants from Gdańsk know amber very well and know how great a role it has played in promoting the city. I do not think that anybody would like to change that...” – argues Zbigniew Strzelczyk. ■

36 –2019

to being open to the world and exchanging thoughts – in 2006 president Adamowicz established the Amber Council which is currently an advisory and consultative body. The Council deals with the issues of what is broadly understood by amber trade and amber products around the world, as well as promoting the natural beauty of amber and its properties. Currently, it consists of 20 experts from all over the world who research and promote amber, its history, properties and deposits.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

As a part of the strategy, a number of concepts have been implemented, which aimed at promoting Gdańsk as a city strongly connected to amber, as well as creating various tools to support the amber industry, which is very strong in the Pomerania region. The foundation of the Amber Museum, whose primary aim is documenting the history of amber and the amber industry in Poland, with particular emphasis on Gdańsk and the Pomerania Region, is seen as the most important part of the strategy. The rich and varied exhibitions of the Museum, and the largest collection of contemporary amber art attract thousands of tourists from Poland and other countries every year. “This museum is an example of very good cooperation between the amber community, which has been talking about the need, or even necessity to create such a place in Gdańsk, for a long time; and the civil servants who have been listening to these demands carefully and are open to discuss their implementation” – summed up Zbigniew Strzelczyk, the president of the Polish Chamber of Amber Commerce. The project includes also support for the Amberif and Ambermart, the biggest amber trade fairs that take place in Gdańsk every year, as well as their accompanying events such as the International Competition for Best Jewellery Design – Amber Design Award whose aim is to promote the creative thought and new ideas in the field of artistic jewellery design and to broaden the knowledge about the properties and nature of the Baltic amber (with the Main Prize sponsored by the President of the City of Gdańsk) and AMBER LOOK Trends & Styles – the Amber and Fashion Gala, which is the place t present the latest achievements of the designers in the field of contemporary fashion and amber jewellery. Both editions of the trade fairs, as well as the competition have their own, recognisable brands in the world and significantly contribute to promoting Gdańsk on the global scale. Cooperation with other amber centres and experts in the field were also factors that contributed

p. 17

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / POLISH JEWELLERY REPORT


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / POLISH JEWELLERY REPORT

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 20

KRAKOW

WILL SHINE WITH THE SPLENDOUR OF JEWELLERY FOR THE TWELFTH TIME! Jewellery

of any kind: gold, silver, fashion, designer, amber, wooden, ceramic as well as components, machines, tools and watches, accompanied by the range of offers of jewellery schools and associations – these are just a few proposals that we will see at EXPO KRAKOW in Poland on June 13–15, during the 12. edition of International Jewellery and Watches Fair JUBINALE. Around 200 exhibitors from over dozen of countries, including leading brands and smaller local companies, will meet in Krakow for the twelfth time to present their latest collections and establish valuable business contacts there. For the second time

the exhibition will be joint with the exhibition of gifts and decorations, GiftON.top, with even wider offer from these exhibitors. The idea of connecting these two trades was met with great enthusiasm from both industries and it seems that new exhibition will be now a regular part of JUBINALE. Another initiative once again presented at JUBINALE will be the exhibitions “In my opinion...” which presents the jewellery of designers who want to express opinion about particular subject. The exhibition was organized by Open Gallery (Mariusz Pajaczkowski), Magan Gallery (Andrzej Pacak) and Marek Nowaczyk

together with JUBINALE organizer Andrzej Sadowski. It was shown in many remarkable places strongly connected with jewellery industry around the world. The exhibition was warmly welcomed in every place and new works were coming all year regularly. It is now widely recognized and there is a big chance that it will be continued for much longer than it was originally planed. The visitors of JUBINALE are able to get to know current and upcoming trends, price their jewellery , check its authenticity, find unique jewellery in the Designer Trends gallery or order jewellery according to their own design. They will also be able to take part in the wide range of seminars and trainings accompanying the trade fair. JUBINALE is also a great opportunity to check out the offer of art schools, jewellery associations and other organizations gathering the industry. Over the last 12 years JUBINALE has become an extremely important meeting place for industry members from Central Europe. Also this year, the offer of exhibitors will provide guests with a wide range of products from almost all sectors of the industry. ■ www.jubinale.com

www.balticjewellerynews.com


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 22

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / POLISH JEWELLERY REPORT

Crown for Miss Polonia by Cyprian CHOROCIEJ

WHERE TALENTS BECOME A MASTER S&A after more than 25 years on the market is one of the leading players in the jewellery industry in Poland. The best craftsmen combined with the latest technological developments create an ideal symbiosis. The collections created, the cuts of stones are so unique that specialists from the industry after first look know who the author is. Unmistakable, but in the same time simple shapes of amber and gemstones become the trademark of S&A. So outstanding that no other company is able to imitate the style. And it’s all being made in Gdynia, Poland, in the region called “the capital of amber”. www.balticjewellerynews.com


Together with the growing interest in amber jewellery, the company and its unique style gain

recognition on global markets and jewellery exhibitions. The year 2001 was very significant, when extremely dynamic growth of the company, leads to problems with finding and hiring specialists. A decision is made, to train and specialize talented young jewellers independently. Cyprian Chorociej, one of the key designers that cooperate with S&A for many years, remember ⊲

www.balticjewellerynews.com

“Stay classic” by Ireneusz GLAZA

36 –2019

“Make it different” by Sławomir FIJAŁKOWSKI

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

jewellery is made of natural amber in accordance with the highest technological standards. They merge the traditional jewellery technics with newest production technologies. State-of-the-art machinery, the artistry of designers, and the professionalism and commitment of production and sales stuff, what guarantee products and services on the highest global levels. S&A focuses on design and its designers, that why is constantly looking for people with potential and imagination who are willing to learn. Designers have a lot of freedom in projects, but they must lean on current statistics and market premises. The author must be proud of his work created under S&A brand. And this approach pays off. Frequent awards at the fair for new products, design and quality speak for themselves. The icing on the cake is the prize that was given to S&A during 2017 fairs VICENZAORO – S&A Jewellery Design was named “TREND EXHIBITOR” for excellent and innovative design. And it all started,when a young graduate of the jewellery school, later president of the company, opens his first workshop. For the next years the owner of S&A concentrate on developing new technologies of treatment and framing amber and expending the business.

p. 23

S&A


p. 24 36 –2019 B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

“Touch of nature” by Marta HRYC

⊳ his beginnings in the company and the opportunity he has been given. “As a young goldsmith, I was looking for a job, I was courageous and eager for challenges. In the jewellery industry was opinion that S&A as an employer, is one of the most demanding for specialized skills and at the same time company that will teach you a lot. I took the challenge. I got there. I saw incredible potential and development opportunities. I felt that this company is a good partner for years, they put up in front of me a real challenge and clear goals. I have studied new technologies and novelties from the jewellery industry, I did not think about giving up or changing the industry. I loved my profession even more than ever”.

“Go Fashion” by Małgorzata SZEWCZYK

www.balticjewellerynews.com


p. 25

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / POLISH JEWELLERY REPORT

S&A from the beginning, was looking for talents and the desire to develop. It employed versatile and creative people who look at the world through their own and those around experiences. And this type of opportunities S&A gives continuously.From under their wings came designers who now run their own businesses, having their crowd of admirers. Let`s just mention Izabela Gutowska, Krzysztof Bondarowski, “Chili” by Ireneusz Glaza or “Motyle” by Daria Jankowiak.

S&A continuously cooperate with a group of designers, each of which has a different style, something else inspires them.

Like Marta Hryc from S&A design studio said: “The S&A offer is diversified, and each production segment is associated with other guidelines for the designer. You design differently models that are a kind of DNA for the S&A, differently universal classics, or unique, original collections, and yet others that are

www.balticjewellerynews.com

to respond to rapidly changing style trends. For years, S&A has developed a recognizable style and the highest quality standards, but it is a company that reacts dynamically to what is happening on the market. Therefore, as a designer, I must trust the sense of observation – both at the aesthetic level, and also,or maybe most of all, at the level of socio-cultural changes that, in my opinion, shape our preferences for material objects”. Everyone agrees that the best projects are still ahead of them. The world of fashion and jewellery is constantly going thru transitions, in order to keep up with the tastes of the customers, and only the companies that can follow those changes will stay on the map. “Among many discussions about contemporary design, the view is that the essence of it is not the product – it's functional or stylistic aspects, but the experiences, impressions and emotions of the user. I think that this type of credibility, focused on the recipient, will soon be a recognizable distinguishing feature of the planned S&A collections, also those designed by me”– concluded professor Sławomir Fijałkowski from Academy of Fine Arts in Gdańsk. ■

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

“Elipse" by Sławomir FIJAŁKOWSKI

“Qule” by Sławomir FIJAŁKOWSKI


www.amberprom.com


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 28

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / RUSSIAN JEWELLERY REPORT

JUNWEX ST. PETERSBURG 2019 Annual

exhibition JUNWEX ST. PETERSBURG 2019, which took place from 6-10th of February in EXPOFORUM, opened the jewellery New Year and gave rise to a new term of partnership between suppliers and the jewellery trade for the period of 2019. The total number of visitors, calculated by external audit, which takes place at the exhibition every two years showed a figure of

30,060 people. Last year there were 33,584, which reflects the realities of life and this is already the trend of the past few years. The number of participants has slightly decreased, which more reflects not the market, but subjective reasons and the relative immaturity of the domestic market. The wholesale business contacts ratio is 9,792 in 2019 to 12,527 in the past. But as the participants

themselves estimated, “There are as many active wholesalers as there are at the exhibition, there are simply no other living ones.” Weak preNew Year sales have preserved the fullness of the shelves and the need for new bulk purchases from trade today is absent. Maybe we should hope for deferred demand. By the spring they are dissolved and in May there will again be interest in new collections, all the more summer will require a new summer range. Nevertheless, we are very grateful to all our participants, trade visitors and guests of the exhibition for their attention to the work of the Organizing Committee of the Jewellery Russia Program, for the warm feedback on the work of our employees, for indulgence in possible errors. ■ www.junwex.com overseas@junwex.com junwex_official

www.balticjewellerynews.com


MASTER ALLOY Product lines dedicated to the transformation of metal from a raw material to a finished product.

JEWELRY PLATING

LEGOR galvanic solutions aim to simplify your daily lab life‌ with their very good yield and guaranteed process control, but most of all being easy to use!

Orchid Investments 26-800 Bialobrzegi ul. Jana Brzechwy 2 Poland

+48-531-380-575 www.legor.pl info@legor.pl


Amber is considered to be one of Russian

p. 30

symbols

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

RECORDS OF THE KALININGRAD AMBER COMBINE The absolute historical record of the Kaliningrad Amber Combine was the completion of the plan and above – 500 tons of extracted amber for 2018.

The

extraction of amber at the mining quarry of the Primorsky deposit began in 1976. The reserves are 110 thousand tons of amber. However, over 40 years of development, the yearly extraction of amber did not exceed 350 tons. In 2013, Kaliningrad Amber Combine was transferred under the management of ROSTECH State Corporation. As a result of a comprehensive modernization of production processes, upgrading equipment and effective management in 2017, the plant produced a record 453 tons of the world's best Baltic amber. Having reached the annual production plan in October

2018 ahead of schedule, the plant management decided to achieve a new record. According to the results of the mining season of 2018, Kaliningrad Amber Combine fulfilled its commitment and set a new absolute historical record – 500 tons of extracted amber.

According to the company director general Mikhail Zatsepin, the season has never been so short and at the same time rich since the development of the quarry. A high content of amber was found in the developed area. On average, it is about two kilograms of solar stone per cubic meter of rock.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / RUSSIAN JEWELLERY REPORT

International Economic Forum for the Amber Industry “AMBERFORUM-2019” Resort town of Svetlogorsk Kaliningrad region June 20–23, 2019

p. 31

AMBER FORUM From 20 to 23 June, the International Economic Forum “Amberforum-2019” will be held in the resort town of Svetlogorsk in the Kaliningrad region. This is the leading discussion forum for the amber industry. For four years global trends in the area of mining and processing of solar stone have been taking shape here as well as new vectors of its application and the trade markets. The forum is organized annually by “AO Kaliningradskiy yantarnyy kombinat” (Kaliningrad Amber Combine), with the support of the ROSTECH State Corporation and the Government of the Kaliningrad Region, in the framework of the Strategy for the Development of

the Amber Industry of the Russian Federation, developed as per instructions by the President of the Russian Federation. The programme of the Forum traditionally includes business events, exhibition of products, works of art and technologies as well as entertainment events. Guests of the forum are companies and entrepreneurs from Russia, Lithuania, Poland, Germany, China and other countries, representatives of state authorities and NGOs of the federal and regional level. ■

36 –2019

The auction for the sale of unique stones will traditionally be held at the International Economic Forum “Amberforum-2019”.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

“Having started the mining season later due to the weather conditions, we managed to reach the planned 450 tons of amber ahead of schedule, in October. Two weeks later we set another record in the history of the plant – 500 tons of extracted amber! It’s the success of the entire team. The main priorities of the production activities of the enterprise are the achievement of the objectives without harming the life and health of people and the environment. This dynamic development of the combine is based on professionalism, dedication, initiative and resolve to the common cause of the combine employees,” said Mikhail Zatsepin. On the day of the completion of the mining season, nature itself presented an award to the amber miners – a wonderful gift in the form of a large unique amber stone weighing 2372 grams. This is the largest stone of the 16 nuggets found in 2018.

Kaliningrad Amber Combine, the leader on the amber market, is the only industrial enterprise in the world engaged in amber extraction

www.balticjewellerynews.com


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / L AT V I A N JEW ELLERY R EPORT

ESTONISHING! From March 29 to April 19, the Art gallery PUTTI will be hosting the group exhibition FOGSPEAK, featuring works by the Estonian contemporary jewelry artists.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 36

The dense fog reduces visibility but strengthens beauty. It warns our insecurities but opens new perspectives. Fog is volatile though tangible. It allows us to feel the ethereal un gives us space to breath. Graytoned verticals and foggy conversations will be created by a group of contemporary jewellery artists from Estonia at Art gallery PUTTI.

ESTONISHING!:

13 Estonian artists with a collective national identity background, folk traditions and history, yet they all are so distinct from one another – each with their own individual identity and character. They are like a metaphor that unifies discrete individualists, each with his or her own signature style. The only true thing that unites them is their desire to unlock their own imaginative world using jewellery as the key. The beginnings of this collective go back to 1999, when seven Estonian jewellery artists, all graduates of the Estonian Academy of Arts, were brought together by a shared idea and goal. Naming their group õhuLoss (Castle in the Air), they could be described as poetic idealists dedicated to the development of Estonian art, honorably acknowledging that their Northern lifeblood is the key to their uniqueness. Tanel Venre: ‘Our artisan culture is rooted in the forest. It sounds simple, but it is exactly in this feature that there is magic. The archaic yet clean wooden style is at the base of all abstraction. There is no need for noise here; whispers are loud enough.’

They are a group of soulful individuals whose religion is to dream big dreams on a small scale, and to challenge fantasy into becoming reality. They were successful in creating their own language, and through it, they have presented themselves in the world of Estonian jewellery design. Situated in the European periphery, there has been a certain sensitivity and cautiousness when it comes to borders – ambiguous territories where there is less opportunity, less prosperity, fewer hierarchies of power...yet there are also unbelievable levels of sincerity that, layer by layer, reveal themselves as people get to know one another. It is quite possible that Estonian is the only language in the world in which the word for jewellery and sincerity is one and the same – EHE. Thomas Cohn, a prominent Brazilian gallerist representing Galeria Thomas Cohn in San Paolo, as a bright meteor came to Tallinn to see, get to know the contemporary Estonian jewellery he had heard about. Falling in love with it, he arranged to bring it back to Brazil. By then, six more jewellery artists had joined the collective, bringing the final head count to thirteen.

Tanel VEENRE, brooch “Midnight” – ebony, silver, 2018

When asked about the title of the exhibition, Tanel Veenre, its curator, explains: ‘We had come up with several ideas, but then Thomas suggested ESTONISHING! It seemed the best fit because it was immediately clear that the participating artists came from Estonia, plus, a word written in the wrong way instinctively draws attention.’ Galeria Thomas Cohn premiered the ESTONISHING! jewellery exhibition at Schmuck 2016, the contemporary art jewellery event at the Munich International Skilled Trades Fair. Soon after came exhibitions in Sao Paulo, then at Platina gallery in Stockholm, Sweden, and in the spring 2019, at the PUTTI art gallery (www.putti.lv) in Riga, Latvia. A fantastic catalogue has been exclusively published to accompany the exhibition in Riga. At the core of the group are two pillars of contemporary Estonian art: Kadri Mälk, internationally renown jewellery artist and a professor in the Jewellery Department of the

www.balticjewellerynews.com


p. 37 36 –2019

Ketli TIITSAR, brooch “You Din’t Expect Flowers So Soon” – walnut wood, paint, silver, stainless steel, 2017

Estonian Academy of Arts; and Tanel Veenre, the collective’s mouthpiece, who is also a professor in the Faculty of Design at the Estonian Academy of Arts as well as a photographer, lecturer, and member of many international exhibitions. Each artist showing work in the exhibition is one of a kind. The artists are both united and contrasting at the same time. When looking at the jewellery that they have created, one senses that when making their pieces, these artists focus on spiritual qualities; the works on view have an introverted quality, perhaps even a touch of darkness to them – features that, just like a fixation on details, are so very characteristic of Northern peoples. The aesthetic code found in the artworks of Sofia Hallik includes symmetry of form, the synthetic nature of the material, the latest digital technologies, and use of a visually monochromatic palette. Nils Hint, artist and experimental blacksmith, makes art from wrenches

that he has found in scrapyards and then flattened with an industrial heavyweight hammer. Piret Hirv’s jewellery can be likened to abruptly cut-off gestures that avoids giving away too much… leaving all the subsequent interpretations for the viewer’s/wearer’s imagination. The jewellery of Julia Maria Künnap is like a binding agent that glues shut the gap between the instantaneous and the infinite. Her

www.balticjewellerynews.com

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Piret HIRV, brooch “Gaze” – silver, 2018

Kadri MÄLK, brooch “Sapateiras” – moleskin, black tourmalines, white sapphire, London blue topaz, darkened silver, 2017

pieces are practically a miracle that has come to life; technical obstacles do not frighten her. Künnap uses time-consuming, labour-intensive and extreme techniques to create

Darja POPOLITOVA, brooch, “Coincidentia Oppositorum” – stabilized wood, silver, steel, lab created sapphire modelled, 3D-scanned, CNC-milled, 2016


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 38

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / L AT V I A N JEW ELLERY R EPORT

Nils HINT, “Combs” – forged steel, gilding, 2017

⊳ jewellery from a myriad of different materials and in just as many different shapes. Kristiina Laurits poses the slippery and recurrent question of what is jewellery? – a miniature work of art, or a functional object?

Maria VALDMA, brooch “Territories” – burnt wood, gold 14ct, silver, 2016

Unlike the others, Kädri Malk works with precious metals, and she makes no compromises – either in choice of material or her interpretation of it in the form of a piece of jewellery. Malk’s work gives off impressions of melancholic verse as it expresses her interest in the beauty of the darker passions. A master at working with bone, Eve Margus-Villems surprises with the fragility of her emotional expression and the delicateness of her execution. Maarja Niinemägi creates simple yet elegant brooches with materials such as engraved stone. Clean and sleek lines. Other materials used include milk opal, bison horn, pearls, silver and gold. Villu Plink distances himself from the decorativeness. He makes his jewellery from both metal and decidedly less permanent materials (paper, vinyl, cardboard, fabric), placing them into play with light and shadow and giving them an almost human character. When Darja Popolitova puts together a collection, she concentrates on psychological and philosophical trains of thought, and how a person’s inner emotions are projected into reality. Her work exhibits definite feelings: selfassuredness, pride, and zeal.

Ketli Tiitsar’s material of choice is wood, a popular and abundant material that is ripe with potential; yet it is not without risk – one must be careful of not slipping into the prosaic. The question that Tiitsar contends with (and ostensibly beats): Can centuries-old wood dictate style? Maria Valdma is known for her lyrical processing of cosmic objects. Space and its memory are her focal points as she stages fictive encounters and meetings, then randomly picks numbers and events that go on to form new territories/ future worlds/utopias. Gender, nationality and profession transform – due to fire, they have become more equal. Valdma works with materials such as fire-treated wood, concrete, paint, and silver. The jewellery of Tanel Veenre – whether it consists of an oyster shell painted blue as the sea, or wood, sap, sea horses, a heart, a cross, or a stone – everyone who views it or wears it imbues it with their personal feelings and experiences, thereby making it their own. Moreover, unlike in spoken language, there are no linguistic barriers in a tactile form of communication. Everyone can speak it, their vocabulary consisting of one’s personal experience. ‘Symbols – the

www.balticjewellerynews.com


p. 39 36 –2019

Julia Maria KÜNNAP, ring “Bubble Gem IV” – amethyst, white gold, 2018

heart, a cross, the sun – can be understood without words, which is why I like to use them,’ explains Veenre. People speak about spiritual endeavors, the wish to be active outside the realm of physical reality. The ability to create noise and scraps while retaining a clear surface. The closeness of nature, the sensitivity of a fingerprint, and even if your ears are not within your field of vision, you cannot escape them. A piece of contemporary jewellery illustrates a feeling of magic and temptation; much like a cult, nature is an intrinsic part of contemporary jewellery. It is safe to say that, having attracted the attention of the world, the jewellery artists of today’s Estonia form the foundation of the contemporary art jewellery platform. Of course, it is impossible to completely abandon form and context, yet make no mistake – an artist creates not only objects, but also the space for communication between the artwork and the person. ■

www.balticjewellerynews.com

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Kristiina LAURITS, brooch “Too Much Tenderness I” – buffalo horn, iron, copper, silver, pitch, topaz, 2017

Villu PLINK, brooch “J.T.” – painted silver, plastic, 2016


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / UKRAINIAN JEWELLERY REPORT

SYNTHETIC DIAMONDS: TECHNOLOGY AS AN ART

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 40

Іgor IEMELIANOV, Katerina KORMAKOVA State Gemological Center of Ukraine

When synthetic diamonds appeared on the jewellery market, it became crucial to diagnose them, it was necessary to identify reliable criteria that would allow to distinguish a natural diamond from its synthetic counterpart. By this article, the authors open a series of publications devoted to synthetic diamonds. It is planned to review various methods of synthesis of diamonds, to denote the differences between synthetic and natural diamonds as well as laboratory methods for their diagnosis. THE FIRST ATTEMPTS TO SYNTHESIZE DIAMONDS. One of the first attempts to synthesize diamonds was made in Ukraine in 1823 by V. Karazin, the founder of the Kharkiv University. He obtained firm crystals of unknown substance under severe heating during dry distillation of wood. In 1893, a professor K. Khrushchev also received crystals that scratched glass and corundum as a result of rapid cooling of molten silver which was saturated with carbon. His experiment was successfully repeated by Henri Moisson, who replaced silver on iron. Later it was discovered that it was not diamond synthesized during these experiments, but silicon carbide (muiassanite), which has very close properties to diamond. In 1879, the Scottish chemist James Henney discovered that the interaction of alkali metals with organic compounds results in the form of carbon as thin plates of graphite and suggested that when

conducting such reactions under high pressure, carbon can crystallize in the form of diamond. After a series of experiments, he was able to obtain several crystals, which after an independent study were recognized as diamonds. In the scientific world, his discovery was not accepted, since it was believed that diamond can not be formed at such low pressures and temperatures. METHODS OF DIAMOND SYNTHESIS. The process of obtaining diamonds at pressures and temperatures close to those in nature became possible only in the twentieth century specifically in the 1950s when diamond was first synthesized under laboratory conditions. In 1953, the first synthetic diamonds were obtained by the Swedish company ASEA (Allmänna Svenska Elektriska Aktiebolaget), but the results were not proved. The person who was lucky to be the first to synthesize a diamond was Tracy Hall. Hall created his first machine with the most important parts made of tungsten carbide. The use of carbide allowed to create a pressure of 120,000 atm and the temperature 1,800°C as well as hold these parameters for several minutes. About a year, the researchers pursued setbacks but the first success came on December 16, 1954. This experiment was performed at a pressure of 70,000 atm and a temperature of 1600°C using graphite and troilite (FeS). Diamonds were stuck to the tantalum disc, which was used to connect electric current when the sample is heated. Tantalum, in addition, reduced FeS to metallic iron, since the presence

of sulfur only cannot cause the conversion of graphite to diamond. Diamond synthesis was confirmed on December 31, 1954 by Hugh Woodbury, and on February 15, 1955 this was reported in the press. Several years later, synthetic diamonds were obtained by such companies as De Beers (Johannesburg, South Africa), Sumitomo Electric Indastries (Japan), as well as Russian scientists. The first diamonds that were suitable for cutting as gem were obtained in 1970 by General Electric. The high pressure and high temperature method, called the HPHT (High Pressure High Temperature) was used to receive these diamonds. This synthesis method was the most popular and widely used throughout the world, while in 2003 Appollo Diamonds did not develop a new method for synthesizing industrial diamonds known as the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technology. HPHT METHOD OF DIAMOND SYNTHESIS. In order to create the necessary conditions for synthesis, special devices were created. The most popular devices are the BELT presses used by General Electric, De Beers and Sumitomo Electric Indastries and the BARS system (Pressless Machine “Splitted Out Sphere), which was developed at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Novosibirsk. In the BELT system device, a huge hydraulic press with anvils in the form of rings is used which looks like «belt». The principle of the machine is as follows. In the upper part of the growth chamber at higher temperatures there is a synthetic diamond powder; the molten metal

www.balticjewellerynews.com


A – a simplified scheme of the interior of the « splitted out sphere»: 1 – an outer anvil set, which creates an octahedral cavity; 2 – an internal anvil set, which forms a central cubic cavity in which there is a growth chamber; 3 – a high pressure chamber in which synthetic diamond growth occurs;

B – scheme of the growth chamber: 1 – thermocouple; 2 – the container (pressure is created); 3 – heating element; 4 – diamond powder; 5 – solution of metals – flux; 6 – nucleus crystal; 7 – power supply;

catalyst forces the carbon atoms from the synthetic diamond powder to pass into a solution in the heated zone; being in the solution, the carbon atoms freely migrate towards the cooler end of the chamber, where small synthetic or natural crystals are used as nucleus. The carbon crystallizes on the nucleus, thus the growth of a large crystal of synthetic diamond is carried out (Figure 1). The conditions of synthesis are as follows: temperature – 1100–1700 ° С pressure 50–100 kbar. In the BARS system, pressure is created using two sets of anvil. The outer kit consists of 8 anvils and creates a cavity in the form of an octahedron. There is a set of 6 additional anvils in the middle, that creates a cubic cavity in which there is a growth chamber. These anvil sets are in the middle of the two hemispheres – «BARS» – Splitted Out Sphere (Figure 2). The conditions of synthesis are as follows: temperature – 1350–1700°С, pressure 55–65 kbar; iron, manganese, nickel and other transition metals are used as a catalyst.

Thus, the conditions of synthesis in both machines «BARS» and BELT are similar, but the small size of the growth chamber limits the size of the obtained synthetic diamond crystal (Figure 3).

CVD TECHNOLOGY SYNTHESIS. Besides the HPHT diamond synthesis, there is also a method in which diamond is formed due to the chemical precipitation of the

www.balticjewellerynews.com

Figure 3– Multi-puncheon machine “splete out sphere” for the synthesis of HPHT diamonds.

36 –2019

1 – synthetic diamond powder; 2 – metal solution – flux; 3 – growing crystal of diamond; 4 – diamond crystal nucleus; 5 – heating element; 6 – dividing net; 7 – the bottom of the chamber; 8 – isolation and pressure conducting environment;

p. 41

Figure 2 – «BARS»machine diagram:

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Figure 1 – Belt machine diagram:


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / UKRAINIAN JEWELLERY REPORT

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 42

is metastable. This means that it is impossible to exclude the possibility of spontaneous crystallization of graphite. To prevent this, the mixture of gases is enriched with hydrogen, which prevents the formation of graphite. Atomic hydrogen is extremely active, it corrodes everything that is not diamond. Diamond is also corroded, but slower than graphite. There are a few more techniques to obtaine synthetic diamonds which deserve to be mentioned such as explosive detonation and ultrasound cavitation.

Figure 4 – Diagram of the CVD technology of diamond synthesis 1 – microwaves; 2 – vacuum window, 3 – observation window,

⊳ gas phase – a method based on the technology of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition). After the invention of this method it was a problem to obtain crystals of jewelry quality (only thin films were obtained), but in 2003, Appollo Diamonds reported about single crystals of diamond suitable for further cutting into gem quality diamonds. The principle of the method is as follows. Carbon dioxide (often methane in a mixture with hydrogen) is supplied into a

4 – diamond substrate, 5 – gas outlet, 6 – plasma;

reaction chamber, where, under the action of high-temperature plasma, its molecules are destroyed. At the temperature of 800–1000°C, the crystallization of carbon on the substrate takes place (Figure 4, 5). Synthesis of diamond at high temperatures and pressures (T = 1400°C, P = 55 kbar) takes place in the range where a stable form of carbon is diamond. Under conditions of low pressure at which gas phase deposition (CVD) occurs, the diamond

Figure 5 – Facility for the CVD diamonds production. Scio Diamond Inc. North Carolina, United States.

EXPLOSIVE DETONATION Very small crystals of diamond (5 nm) in diameter can be obtained by detonation in a metal explosive chamber which contains carbon. The explosion creates a high pressure and high temperature, which are sufficient to convert carbon from explosives to diamond. The chamber with explosives is dipped into the water immediately after the explosion, this procedure suppresses the transition of diamonds into more stable graphite. Heating and pressure developed from the explosion, sufficient to convert graphite to diamond. Diamonds obtained in this way are always in graphite and other non-diamond forms of carbon, therefore they require long boiling in nitric acid for removal from the contaminants. This synthesis method is good for abrasive powders production. ULTRASOUND CAVITATION Micron diamond crystals can be obtained under normal conditions in a suspension of graphite in an organic solvent when exposed to ultrasonic cavitation. Ultrasonic cavitation – the formation and activation of gas or vapor bubbles (cavities) in the medium, which is irradiated by ultrasound, as well as effects arising from their interaction with the medium and with the acoustic field. Up to 10 % of initial graphite turns into diamonds. The diamonds obtained in this way are closer in price to the diamonds obtained by the HPHT method, but the quality of the stones obtained is somewhat worse.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


This method of synthesis is not yet industrial embodiment. The process is influenced by many parameters, including the preparation of a graphite suspension, the selection of a solvent, sources and modes of ultrasonic vibrations, the optimization of which can significantly improve and cheapen this technology for producing diamonds.

Samples of synthetic diamonds were investigated in world reputable gemological laboratories. After a comprehensive study, experts concluded that synthetic diamonds, unlike natural diamonds, have some differences (typical growth patterns, residues of metal-catalyst catalysts, etc.). But it would be rather difficult for an ordinary specialist, not to mention

the simple customers and sometimes this task is almost impossible. Then the company De Beers has developed a simple, but effective device – DiamondView TM, which allows to distinguish natural diamonds from their synthetic counterparts with a high degree of reliability. This device will be discussed in our next publication. ■

LITERATURE AND SOURCES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Данилов Б. Ф. «Алмазы и люди» М.: Московский рабочий, 160 с., 1982 г. Сайфутдинов А. Ф., Жизненная стратегия творческой личности, рукопись 1987-1992, 139 с. Солодова Ю.П., Николаєв М.В., Курбатов К.К. и др. Геммология алмаза: учебник/Москва, 2008. – 416 с. Iakoubovskii, K.; Baidakova, M.V.; Wouters, B.H.; Stesmans, A.; Adriaenssens, G.J.; Vul’, A.Ya.; Grobet, P.J. (2000). “Structure and defects of detonation synthesis nanodiamond” (PDF). Diamond and Related Materials. 9 (3-6): 861-865. Decarli, P. and Jamieson, J.; Jamieson (June 1961). “Formation of Diamond by Explosive Shock”. Science. 133 (3467): 1821-1822. Bibcode:1961Sci...133.1821D. DOI:10.1126/science.133.3467.1821. PMID 17818997. Osawa, E (2007). “Recent progress and perspectives in single-digit nanodiamond”. Diamond and Related Materials. 16 (12) Даниленко В. В. Из истории открытия синтеза наноалмазов. Физика Твердого Тела, 2004, Т.46, вып. 4, С. 581-584 Greiner N. Roy. Diamonds in detonation soot/N. Roy Greiner, D. S. Phillips, J. D. Johnson, F. Volk // Nature. – 1988. №.333. – pp. 440-442 Долматов В. Ю., Веретенникова М. В., Марчуков В. А., Сущев В. Г. Современные промышленные возможности синтеза наноалмазов. Физика твердого тела, 2004, Т. 46, Вып. 4.– С. 596-600 Верещагин А. Л. «Наноалмазы — первичное состояние углерода во Вселенной» Galimov, É. M.; Kudin, A. M.; Skorobogatskii, V. N.; Plotnichenko, V. G.; Bondarev, O. L.; Zarubin, B. G.; Strazdovskii, V. V.; Aronin, A. S.; Fisenko, A. V.; Bykov, I. V.; Barinov, A. Yu. (2004). “Experimental Corroboration of the Synthesis of Diamond in the Cavitation Process”. Doklady Physics. 49 (3): 150-153. Khachatryan, A.Kh.; Aloyan, S.G.; May, P.W.; Sargsyan, R.; Khachatryan, V.A.; Baghdasaryan, V.S. (2008). “Graphite-to-diamond transformation induced by ultrasonic cavitation”. Diam. Relat. Mater. 17 (6): 931-936.


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 44

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / UKRAINIAN JEWELLERY REPORT

JEWELLER EXPO UKRAINE Jeweller Expo Ukraine –

the leading international exhibition of jewellery. Jeweller Expo Ukraine is the core sector event for all representatives of jewellery market. Held twice a year – in May and November, Jeweller Expo Ukraine gathers the best representatives of jewellery industry from all regions of Ukraine and abroad. The exhibition gives an opportunity to learn the latest tendencies in jewellery art development, as well as buy different adornments made of precious metals, items with diamonds and natural gems, exclusively designed works with precious gemstones, offered by the most famous companies and private jewelers. Jeweller Expo Ukraine always has a rich business program, which includes seminars, conferences, contests, presentations, jewellery shows and many other thematic events that might interest not only jewellery industry professionals, but also connoisseurs of the beauty. Within Jeweller Expo Ukraine exhibition, a number of events are held, special place among which belongs to: the Best Jewellery of the Year contest (autumn) and the All-Ukrainian Contest for the Best Jewellery Design (spring). At the same time, VIP ZONE, being a thematic exposition, presents original de luxe jewellery collections. ■

Kyiv international contract fair JEWELLER EXPO UKRAINE Tel./Fax: +38 (044) 490 62 19, +38 (044) 461 93 43 E-mail: jewel@kmkya.kiev.ua

www.balticjewellerynews.com


OONA GALLERY. IN THE HEART OF BERLIN

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 46

Interview with ANNA SCHETELICH

Anna Schetelich. A bracelet of Felix Lindner Foto: Charlotte Schetelich

1) What is Your background? When did you become interested in art jewellery? My background is theoretical, my studies were Fine Art History and Cultural Science. During my studies and after

Jiro Kamata, the exhibition “Ghost”

finishing the University I used to work for several Museums, taking care for objects, preparing exhibitions, getting in touch with very different fields of culture, history and particular design. One friend of mine introduced me into the world of

art jewellery and I was impressed about the possibility to express complex ideas in such a small scale. Before that I was not very interested in jewellery but this fact is fascinating me till now. 2) Why did You open a gallery? The first reason was very simple and private. I liked a lot the work at the museums but in that time I had a little child which did not fit with the expectations of the superior, so I started to think about being independent, realising own projects. The same time I started to look for places which represent artistic jewellery, inspired by these places I started to imagine, how I would present jewellery in my own space. Soon I found out, that Berlin has no specific places. There exist some nice workshops with exhibition space, which works well too. But my idea was to found a spaces just with curated jewellery work. So I started to travel and to learn more about contemporary jewellery, schools, collections etc. 3) How do You think German art jewellery differs from the rest of European art jewellery?Could You name 5 jewellers that You admire?

www.balticjewellerynews.com


I think, the technical level of German German with Japanese precision. He is Brooch by Benedikt Fischer (big yellow); Circle brooch by Marc Monzó; or Germany based artists is very high. one absolutely patient, precise jeweller, Ceramic spheres by Uhlala Ceramic; Technical solutions for pins, fasteners, who would never let something out, Necklace with glass spheres by any kind of connections are a very which is not perfectly done. Christian Metzner; Big colourful bracelet by Svenja John; Object Mirror by important part of their work. Also the Marc Monzó apply of different technic, like enamelling 4) How did You choose a location for or engravement is very popular. I just Your gallery? tell you two artists but there are much In the heart of Berlin – also called Berlin more: Felix Lindner has a wide spectre Mitte- there are some streets with a 5) Why did you choose to promote of technic, using and combining different number of galleries, boutiques, small contemporary art jewellery and not materials. He loves to work very classical stores and art collections. I was looking any other art form? with gold and in the same time he treats for a small space there to start with the Due to my studies in Cultural Science I plastic as careful as it would have the gallery. But suddenly this space with was used to connect different aspects same value as gold. The result is big windows, lots of light and also lots like art, design, daily life, cultural habits. jewellery, which looks somehow simple, of space in the middle of Auguststrasse For me it is so exciting to discover, how you can’t see the effort he has to do for was to rent. It seemed a bit too big for artists and also the audition appreciate it. Florian Milker made a obviously simple jewellery but otherwise I knew, this the balance of different ideas and at the brooch in the shape of paper fold plains, chance you just get once in your life. end you have one piece of jewellery. I which is made by children. He made it So I’m here for 18 years now, having like very much the size of jewellery. It super precise with steel sheets. The pin audition who plans to come, customers is not only to wear, but if you can hold it at the backside is so elegant, fitting with who return and also some people who in your hand, it gives a different relation the body of the work, it is a pleasure to just discover the gallery. It is somehow between human and object than with a see. And one more artist – Jiro Kamata, luxury, to present the artist work with big sized art work. If I had the chance he is Japanese, but his education was lots of space and light, it is a bit like to found one business now, I would do in Germany. I think in his work meets setting the work on a stage. the same again. ⊲

www.balticjewellerynews.com

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 47

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / GERMAN JEWELLERY REPORT


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 48

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / GERMAN JEWELLERY REPORT

Marc Monzó Exhibition “Level”

Shell brooch “Pearly White” (Benedikt Fischer); “Campfire” brooch (Marc Monzó); Ceramic sphere (Uhlala Ceramics); pendant (Benedikt Fischer)

⊳ 6) How do You find artists for 7) Do You let people touch, feel, pick up exhibitions? How do artists find You? the jewellery? There are several ways to watch and Absolutely. All work is presented in discover artists. One of the best source is open way. Of course, people have to want to show very personal things of the annual SCHMUCK at Munich, which be careful with all the work. But to hide the artists. That’s sometimes of course features the most international choice of the jewellery in showcases takes a bit a quiet hard part of work for artists, to jewellery artists. It is also surrounded by the lively aspect. I’m trying to present filter thoughts and ideas until they get many additional shows of galleries, artist jewellery as small objects. I want to something universal, essential. But at the groups, very inspiring. But also smaller communicate, that the most of the end that makes for me the difference to fairs, like the Grassimesse in Leipzig can work has a double quality – it can be common goldsmithing. Since I work very offer interesting positions. I’m in contact worn as jewellery. But the moment you intense with all artists, the gallery has a with art academies, visiting annual don’t wear it, you should never hide limitation. I prefer to work with a group exhibitions and projects. And, also from in a box. The pieces can become part of ca. 20 artist. Each of them should be time to time I work as a member of jury of your daily sourrounding, hanging represented well. So, even if there is a at jewellery competitions. There I can at the wall, being placed on a coffee number of very interesting artists I only discover also interesting work. table, making small assembly with fruits, choose very very few of them to have a I think, artists find the gallery by boxes, objects. You have so many ways really well curated group. recommendation, through website and to keep it. If you own a painting, it will be social media and press. At the end it fixed at the wall and thats it. These small 9) Are you familiar with amber? works more in that way, that I discover works in contrast to art you can move Why do you think young generation something that catches me than by each day, this has a very lively and also has departed from it and how applying. But of course I can imagine, contemporary aspect of our live. could we raise their interest in this artists want to introduce their self. material? 8) What requirements do artists have to I like very much the light yellow amber. meet to get a place to exhibit in Your It can be a nice material with it’s soft gallery? touch and translucent body. If I would That’s hard to say. I’m hunting for work, be a jeweller or designer, I would like to that can give something new to the do something using amber in a very pure existing spectre of the gallery. This can and clean way, without any addition of be a new technic, material, language. In silver etc to provide it’s special character. general I can say, that I prefer a certain It can be a good challenge to create level of abstraction in the work. I don’t something contemporary with amber. Maybe it needs a fresh access, better by product design than jewellery? ■ The white porcelain bracelet (Saskia Diez); yellow brooch (Svenja John); green necklace (Helen Friesacher); yellow rings (Karin Seufert).

OONA Gallery www.oona-galerie.de

www.balticjewellerynews.com


JEWELLERY IN GERMANY PROSPECTS LUXURY JEWELLERY SEEN AS AN INVESTMENT

In 2018, luxury jewellery recorded solid current value growth in Germany, largely as a result of increasing polarisation within the German jewellery category between entrylevel and high-end products. A greater willingness among consumers to spend more on luxury jewellery was reflected not only in rising interest in precious materials such as gold, platinum and especially diamonds but also material assets.

WOMEN’S LUXURY FINE JEWELLERY BENEFITS THE MOST FROM CURRENT TRENDS

Although millennials are becoming increasingly relevant as a target audience within luxury jewellery in Germany, high net worth women of all age groups account for the largest share of value sales in the category. There is now a growing tendency among women to wear luxury jewellery not only on special occasions but also on a regular basis as a way to reflect their personality.

INTERNET RETAILING CONTINUES TO GAIN GROUND IN LUXURY JEWELLERY

Specialist retailers are in a particularly strong position as a distribution channel due to the individual service and advice they offer, as well as the opportunity to try on products and so get a better appreciation of the materials used and quality of the piece in question. However, despite these factors, internet retailing continued to gain share in luxury jewellery in 2018.

COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE CARTIER MAINTAINS ITS POSITION AS THE LEADING PLAYER

In 2017, Cartier remained the leading player in luxury jewellery in Germany. The company continued to see its value sales increase as consumers opted for more expensive and higher quality jewellery.

WELLENDORFF CONTINUES TO BENEFIT FROM A MORE TRADITIONAL APPROACH

In 2017, the German manufacturer Wellendorff remained one of the three leading players in luxury jewellery in terms of value sales. Contributing to Wellendorff’s success has been its unique image as a family-owned company with a long tradition for producing handmade jewellery.

INTERNATIONAL BRANDS REMAIN DOMINANT IN LUXURY JEWELLERY

Despite the strong presence of Wellendorff, the category continued to be dominated by international brands. This is because for most consumers such brands have greater appeal and prestige, especially among international tourists.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


OBJEKT “THINGS 6” “A spatial environment of consumption” Made year:

2010–2016 Dimensions:

23 cm x 26 cm x 11 cm Material:

Brass, wood, clay, textile, mdf, paint Technique:

Hand sawed, soldered, crocheted, riveted, glued etc. Edition:

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 54

1 unique

ÅSA ELMSTAM (SWEDEN):

ART REQUIRING A RESPONSIBLE APPROACH By Jurgita LUDAVIČIENĖ

Lithuanian

viewers mostly experience Nordic jewellery as manifestations of the influence of the Nordic countries in the works of Lithuanian artists who studied in Tallinn in the 20th century. Lithuania-Estonia-Finland, followed by Denmark, Sweden and Norway, if to follow the geographical chain of associations. The Nordic countries were the ones that inspired a significant part of Lithuanian artists minimalism, respect for detail, conceptualism, responsible approach to the environment and presentation of the jewellery object are the aspects that firstly relate with Nordic jewellery in the Lithuanian consciousness. We tend to think that out there, in Scandinavia, modern conceptual jewellery thrives much more, and the context and circumstances are much more favourable to the

development of this branch of art and that it has always been so. However, Nordic jewellery, as a form of art, is actually a recent phenomenon that emerged in 1970s; in the early 1980s, relying on a considerably new concept of “wearable objects”, the Scandinavian artists began to ironize Nordic Functionalism and Scandinavian design ideas, which formed the entire aesthetic environment and at the same time restrained the artistic idea. A young generation of young artists that formed at the end of the twentieth century saw the politicized and rebellious 1960s with their own eyes and focused on ready-made and recycled materials. The environmental and nature conservation ideas were very important to them; it was also important to them that the artists were no more in need to prove that conceptual jewellery was a branch of art. Jewellery achieved its autonomy and became independent, and the jewellery object turned into a storytelling object, showing a resilient interface between the artist, the user and the viewer. According to Widar Halen, the

www.balticjewellerynews.com


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / SWEDISH JEWELLERY REPORT

www.balticjewellerynews.com

Made year:

2009–2010 Dimensions:

20 cm x 20 cm x 5 cm. Material:

Brass, (plastic) Technique:

Hand sawn, soldered, sandblasted. Edition:

3 quite similar

The exhibitions of the project “Things” (“Things” 2016, Stockholm; “More Things” 2018, Stockholm) speak of constantly, annually emerging new trends that force us to buy new things. Trends change, changing colours, shapes, and the look of our homes. Let’s change, refresh, get rid of old things, buy new ones, buy, buy, buy – the advertisements shout out to us. But will a new chair instead of the old one really make us happier? Will we see the world in a new way having replaced a brown carpet with a pink one? Åsa Elmstam goes to the annual furniture exhibition and records trends of new colours, shapes, fabrics and upholstery; from all of this she creates one object that reflects our new preferences this year. A thing made up of what is the most fashionable. A thing made of things. A thing that will not be outdated next year, unlike its constituent components, which will not be fashionable in the coming years and will be replaced by others. This project is ironic, witty, influential and emotional. Not for nothing was it one of the four nominated to Swedish Design awards in 2018. The artist’s objects are handmade, they are made very diligently, dedicating a lot of time to the making process; this emphasis on fact that they are handmade is another form of protest against rapid consumption and fast times. She works refusing machine-facilitation, giving each object a lot of time. That is why Ås Elmstam’s things are not about things – they talk about ideologies. About us. Patiently, quietly, but relentlessly. ■

p. 55

NECKLACE “THINGS 1” “Is questioning the fact that all designers should make their own chair. A new groundbreaking, more comfortable and more good looking one than what already has been done through history. The piece is uncomfortable to wear with many sharp points sticking into the wearer's neck.”

36 –2019

This is also true of the modern Swedish jewellery, which, since 2004, has been strongly influenced by the Dutch artist Ruudt Peters who came to teach at Konstfack University College of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm, and whose work was carried on by Karen Pontoppidan. Åsa Elmstam, an artist who is particularly concerned with sustainability, the climate change, culture/nature, and excess consumption issues, also studied there. On the other hand, as with most Nordic artists, she finds the aspect of mastering the craft to be very important as well. This is partly related to the jewellery infrastructure of this region: there are not many galleries exhibiting contemporary jewellery there; they are much more focused on individual workshops, working with the audience, which is usually very sensitive to the technical performance of the works. Therefore, in Sweden, as in other Nordic countries, there are some well-equipped jewellery workshops / ateljés where individual artists or groups of artists create and sell their works. There are not many jewellery collectors, the works are sometimes bought by the National Museum and Art associations from companies, many artists actively cooperate with foreign galleries, but this obviously is not enough. That is why artists need to work with customers. However, not only restrictions, but also inspirations come out of this necessity. When working with clients, Åsa Elmstam draws ideas for her exhibitions from consumption, more specifically, from consumer criticism. However, how is it possible to criticize consumption while being a creator, i.e., a multiplier of objects? This is probably one of the main issues of interest to the artist. It is already 12 years that the artists has been interested in the issues of environmental protection, climate change and over-consumption; back in 2006, having travelled from Sweden to Japan for internship, she worked with sustainable projects at Tokyo Zokei University. How to make use of what has already been used? How to avoid constant production of objects so as to protect the nature and environment? Åsa Elmstam finds really unexpected and witty solutions: in the exhibition “More Things” (Stockholm, 2018), she creates a transparent relief on the walls of the gallery from used transparent plastic packaging, creating quite an unexpected plane-changing effect. In this way, questioning the endless desire of designers to create ever-new chairs when there is an infinite number of them already created, she creates miniature furniture that would probably be suitable only for

lilliputians seen by Guliver. Purposeless, openwork, aesthetic, these pieces of furniture and other items made of metal join into the circle transforming into large spatial necklaces; chairs of various forms, armchairs, mats, carpets keep only a flat shape, two dimensions, and then anything can be made of them – a lamp hood, décor for a clock, collier. Or those items that are reproduced infinitely lose size by keeping three dimensions, and turn together into imaginary tiny fragments of the interior that, in turn, are designed to decorate the interior. Reductio ad absurdum. Interior within interior, meaningless, all-absorbing multiplication of things is brought to futility, without losing the common sense and sense of humour.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

philosopher and curator of the Oslo National Museum, Nordic jewellery is exploring existential issues. The artists question the perfect body syndrome, sustainability, nature, gender issues, racism, national myths and stereotypes alongside with purely decorative and aesthetic problems.


SUPER VIP BUYER President

Shigefumi INUI Name of company:

Order Salon IN U I Co.,LT D 1-19-21-1 Yamadahigashi Suita Osaka 565-0821 JAPAN wanchan@mth.biglobe.ne.jp JAPAN +81648641579

Amber makes people beautiful and happy.

Our company considers that feeling important.

Pendants and necklaces of the Baltic Amber


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 58

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / SWEDISH JEWELLERY REPORT

You are Precious Precious – Stockholm Nordic Watch & Jewellery Fair is the Nordic region's most important venue for the watch and jewellery industry. It is the platform where new products receive invaluable attention, exciting brands are established, and trends are given space to grow.

The

industry is facing new challenges, and we have therefore introduced several new features and changes to Precious to keep up. Unfortunately, last year's statistics showed fewer visitors, yet one positive aspect was that the number of companies represented among visitors increased. We also saw visitors from more countries than previously. Ahead of this year's trade fair, we are seeing several exciting suppliers who are interested in exhibiting at Precious. We also look forward to hosting many of the faithful exhibitors who have been with us for many years and for whom Precious is an important part of their interaction with customers. We have several news items to present ahead of 2019. We have rethought our approach and further adapted Precious to the market. The trade fair has been brought forward by one week and is reverting to the Friday, Saturday and Sunday schedule, from 30 August to 1 September. We have changed halls at Stockholmsmässan so as to be by the main entrance. This makes for proximity and provides better service and accessibility. Logistically speaking, it also makes the hall location easier for both customers and exhibitors to reach. The trade fair's common celebratory evening has moved from a gala theme to a club feel, and is being held in Victoria Hall at Stockholmsmässan this year. We are planning a wonderfully fast-paced party evening with a night club feel, including cocktails, dinner and a prestigious awards ceremony. All of it imbued by industry pride, togetherness and a pleasant atmosphere.

The Friday evening mingle will be a great way to round off the first day of the trade fair in a pub located just outside the fair entrance. A breather before continuing the evening with your own planned activities, or just to charge your batteries ahead of the next exciting exhibition day. Precious is introducing a new Hub located smack in the middle of the exhibition hall. Precious Hub will be the trade fair's natural meeting platform, with a café, bar, activity area and inviting settings for socialising. Precious Hub will play host to trendspotting, encounters with interesting characters and exciting guests during all the exhibition days. A new digital strategy has been developed that envisions visitors meeting exhibitors not only in the stand, but also in our digital platform in order to network and communicate before, during and after the trade fair. People with similar interests will be matched and displayed as suggested contacts in our platform. All for the sake of more encounters and business opportunities. Precious Talents is a department for promising new watch and jewellery designers who are given the opportunity to compete for a spot at Precious. The talents are offered a free stand and the opportunity to connect with purchasers and suppliers in the industry. ■ About Precious 2019 Date: 30 Aug – 1 Sep 2019 Location: Stockholmsmässan www.preciousfair.

Contact: Åsa Axelson, Project Manager Precious, asa.axelson@preciousfair.se phone: +46 (0)224 863 00

www.balticjewellerynews.com


e ar You s ou i Prec Precious is a sparkling and exclusive platform for watches and jewellery where we gather, inspire each other and share knowledge. We meet not only to do business, but also to reward individuals in the industry and nurture our relationships. What is precious to you? For us, it is you. FRIDAY - SUNDAY 30 AUGUST - 1 SEPTEMBER 2019 STOCKHOLMSMÄSSAN

preciousfair.se


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 60

BUSINESS INSIGHTS / LITHUANIAN JEWELLERY REPORT

IN LITHUANIA – THE FIRST IN THE WORLD NATURAL AMBER SAUNA Three tons of natural Baltic amber was used to install the first and the biggest in the world natural amber sauna located in Lithuania. Resembling a cosy and luxurious amber room, this sauna is the first in the world amber sauna open to the public. Ceilings, walls and even sauna beds are covered with natural amber. THE SAUNA INTERIOR IS COATED WITH 3 TONNES OF NATURAL AMBER  To the amber sauna is give the name of the Sun (“Saulės”). Its area is 22 square meters, there will comfortably fit up to 15 people at the time.  The first largest natural amber sauna in the world is installed at the recreation and health complex “Atostogu parkas”. The installation process of the amber sauna lasted nearly a year – there were a thorough study and discussion with experts on how for the best of people’s health to use the properties of amber which is called the Lithuanian gold. Among other things, the sauna was intended to be installed very aesthetically. „The main goal for us was, how to correctly use such useful mineral as amber for the benefits of human’s health. We have discussed with scientist and almost after a year we got the result. The interaction between amber, heat

and infrared rays was the answer to us” – says the amber sauna creator and director of “Atostogu parkas” Ricardas Jovaisa. According to R. Jovaisa, in order that amber acid (Succinic acid) released by warmth and infra-red rays would leave a significant impact on the human’s well-being and health, there should be lots of amber. Also, aesthetical and physical sensations while surrounded by the beauty of natural amber is extremely warm and bright.  WARMTH AND INFRA-RED RAYS RELEASE THE BENEFICIAL PROPERTIES OF AMBER  Around 35-140 mln. years ago formed amber (fossilized tree resin) has properties and one of the most important is – amber acid (Succinic acid). Human’s body produces a small amount of amber acid (Succinic acid), but with increased physical and physiological activities, the recourses

of Succinic acid is rapidly reduced, therefore the immune system is weekend, also feeling tiredness and apathy. Amber acid (succinic acid) passes into the human’s body through a diffusion method, in contact with amber, being massaged with amber or very small parts of it can be inhaled. University of Hamburg, Germany, has confirmed the traditional positive and safe effects of amber and fumaric acid on human metabolism. With the help of infrared rays in a natural amber sauna, along with amber, the human body is also warmed up. The body relaxes and heats up in a deeper layer while amber releases volatile substances.  The sauna pleasant smells of resin, the human body through the skin and by inhalation more easily absorb the useful properties of amber: stimulates metabolic processes, suppresses various inflammation, improves blood circulation. ■

www.balticjewellerynews.com


XVII INTERNATIONAL BALTIC JEWELLERY SHOW

AMBER TRIP 11–14 MARCH, 2020 VILNIUS, LITHUANIA

P i

Contact us for more information:

+370 618 53538 info@ambertrip.com www.ambertrip.com


SILVAMEX Andrzej Szczypior ul. Kielnieńska 60 80-299 Gdańsk, Poland Tel. (48) 58 5209700 Fax (48) 58 5209701 Mobile. (48) 501 236895


BUSINESS INSIGHTS / WORLDWIDE JEWELLERY REPORT

OUTLOOK 2019: ECONOMIC TRENDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON GOLD THE GOLD MARKET IN 2019

Potential for growth and heightened risk in 2019

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 70

As we look ahead, we expect that the interplay between market risk and economic growth in 2019 will drive gold demand. And we explore three key trends that we expect will influence its price performance: • financial market instability • monetary policy and the US dollar • structural economic reforms. Against this backdrop, we believe that gold has an increasingly relevant role to play in investors' portfolios.

2018 ups and downs

Gold’s price seesawed in 2018 as investor interest ebbed and flowed despite steady growth in most sectors of demand. Gold faced significant headwinds for most of the year. The dollar strengthened, the Fed continued to hike steadily while other central banks kept policy accommodative, and the US economy was lifted by the Trump administration’s tax cuts. These factors fuelled positive investor sentiment which, in turn, pushed US stock prices higher, at least until the start of October. But as geopolitical and macroeconomic risks continued to increase, emerging market stocks pulled back. Eventually, developed market stocks followed, in a selloff led by US tech companies. This resulted in short-covering in gold with its price ending the year near US$1,280/oz (-1% y-o-y).

CHART 1: GOLD OUTPERFORMED MOST GLOBAL ASSETS Key global asset performance*

Focus 1: Drivers of gold Gold has a dual nature: consumption and investment. And its price drivers can be grouped into four categories: • wealth and economic expansion • market risk and uncertainty • opportunity cost • momentum and positioning. As a consumer good and long-term savings vehicle, gold demand historically has been positively correlated to economic growth. As a safe-haven, its demand historically has been strongly responsive to periods of heightened risk. In the short and medium term, however, the level of rates or the relative strength of currencies, as well as investor expectations, can either enhance or dampen gold’s performance. We expect: • Increased market uncertainty and the expansion of protectionist economic policies will make gold increasingly attractive as a hedge • While gold may face headwinds from higher interest rates and US dollar strength, these effects are expected to be limited as the Fed has signalled a more neutral stance • Structural economic reforms in key gold markets will continue to support demand for gold in jewellery, technology and as means of savings.

Financial market instability

Oil MSCI EM MSCI EAFE Commodities Global Balanced Index S&P 500 NASDAQ Gold US$/oz Global Treasuries USD Index (DXY) Long USD Gold -25 %

We expect that many of the global dynamics seeded over the past two years and the risks that became apparent later in 2018 will carry over. And with them, we see a set of trends developing that will be key in determining gold’s demand. In turn, their interplay will be most relevant for gold's short- and long-term price behaviour (Focus 1).

-20 %

-15 %

-10 %

-5 %

0% 5% 2018 return

* As of 31 December 2018. Based on named indices, WTI front Future, BBG Commodities Index, New Frontier Global Balance Index, LBMA Gold Price, Bloomberg Barclays Global Treasury Index, Solactive Long USD Gold Index. Source: Bloomberg, ICE Benchmark Administration, World Gold Council

Globally, there were net positive flows into gold-backed ETFs in 2018. While North American funds suffered significant outflows in Q2 and Q3, this trend started to shift in Q4 as risks intensified (Chart 2). We believe that in 2019 global investors will continue to favour gold as an effective diversifier and hedge against systemic risk. And we see higher levels of risk and uncertainty on multiple global metrics: • Expensive valuations and higher market volatility • Political and economic instability in Europe • Potential higher inflation from protectionist policies • Increased likelihood of a global recession.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


1,400

80

1,350

60 1,300

40 20

1,250

0

1,200

-20

1,150

-40 -60

10/2017 01/2018 04/2018 07/2018 10/2018

 North America  Other

 Europe 

1,100

 Asia

Gold (US$/oz, rhs)

* As of 31 December 2018. Source: Bloomberg, Company Filings, ICE Benchmark Administration, Shanghai Gold Exchange, World Gold Council

First, despite the recent market correction, many stock valuations remain elevated, especially in the US, after almost a decade of almost uninterrupted price appreciation. Yet bond yields remain stubbornly low (Chart 3). Even in the US the 10-year Treasury yield is 1.5% below its 2008 pre-Lehman crisis level, providing investors less cushion in case of further market volatility. Indeed, volatility metrics have begun to creep up, with the VIX jumping from an average of 13 in Q3 2018 to an average of 21 in Q4.

CHART 3: STOCK PRICES RELATIVE TO SALES REMAIN HIGH AND YIELDS REMAIN STUBBORNLY LOW Price-to-sales ratio of global stocks vs. global bond yields* Price-to-sales

Yield (%)

2.0

8.0

1.8

7.0

1.6

6.0

1.4

5.0

1.2

4.0

1.0

3.0

0.8

2.0

0.6

1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 Global equities price-to-sales (lhs)

1.0

Global aggregate bond yield (rhs)

* As of 30 November 2018. Source: Bloomberg, World Gold Council

Second, while European growth has recovered from the aftermath of the sovereign debt crisis it has failed to reach the level of the US economy, making it more vulnerable to shocks – and explaining why Europeans have been adding gold to their portfolios steadily since early 2016. Today, Europe is facing major challenges. The most obvious is Brexit. Not only has it imposed a continuous level of unease among investors, but its timing and implications – both for the UK and for continental Europe – are best left to diviners. What is certain, however, is that clarity will not come any time soon. In addition, continental Europe continues to face internal turmoil. France is grappling with social unrest; Spain is fending off secessionism and fragile political alliance, and Italy's populist government continues to highlight the inherent instability of the monetary union – to name just a few.

www.balticjewellerynews.com

Structural economic reforms

Emerging markets, making up 70% of gold consumer demand, are very relevant to the long-term performance of gold. And among these, India and China stand out. These two countries have begun to implement economic changes necessary to promote growth and secure their relevance in the global landscape. China’s Belt and Road initiative, for example, is focused on promoting regional economic development, boosting commodity markets and upgrading infrastructure . India has been active in modernising its economy, reducing barriers to commerce and promoting fiscal compliance. In fact, India’s economy is expected to grow by 7.5% in 2018 and 2019, outpacing most global economies and showing resilience to geopolitical uncertainty. Given its unequivocal link to wealth and economic expansion, we believe gold is well poised to benefit from these initiatives. We also believe that gold jewellery demand will strengthen in 2019 if sentiment is positive, while increase marginally should uncertainty remain. Similarly, efforts to promote economic growth in western markets are expected to result in positive consumer demand, as has been observed generally in the US since 2012.

Why gold why now

Gold’s performance in the near term is heavily influenced by perceptions of risk, the direction of the dollar, and the impact of structural economic reforms. As it stands, we believe that these factors likely will continue to make gold attractive. In the longer term outlook, gold will be supported by the development of the middle class in emerging markets, its role as an asset of last resort, and the ever-expanding use of gold in technological applications. In addition, central banks continue to buy gold to diversify their foreign reserves and counterbalance fiat currency risk, particularly as emerging market central banks tend to have high allocations of US treasuries. Central bank demand for gold in 2018 alone was the highest since 2015, as a wider set of countries added gold to their foreign reserves for diversification and safety. More generally, there are four attributes that make gold a valuable strategic asset by providing investors: • a source of return • low correlation to major asset classes in both expansionary and recessionary periods • a mainstream asset that is as liquid as other financial securities • a history of improved portfolio risk-adjusted returns. ■

p. 71

US$/oz

100

36 –2019

Tonnes

Third, more and more governments around the world seem to be embracing protectionist policies as a counter movement after decades of globalization. And while many of these policies can have a temporary positive effect, there are longer term consequences that investors will likely grapple with in the coming years; for example, higher inflation. Protectionist policies are inherently inflationary – either as a result of higher labour and manufacturing costs, or as a result of higher tariffs imposed to promote local producers over foreign ones. They are also expected to have a negative effect on long-term growth. And although so far investors have taken some of the trade war rhetoric as posturing, it is not without risk to restrict the flow of capital, goods and labour.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

CHART 2: EUROPEAN GOLD-BACKED ETFS HAD NET INFLOWS WHILE A TREND OF HEAVY US OUTFLOWS REVERSED IN Q4 Monthly flows into gold-backed ETFs by region*


p. 72 36 –2019 B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

THE WINNER OF “AMBER TRIP” ART JEWELLERY CONTEST 2018 “NOTHING TO DECLARE”. GRAND PRIX

ISABEL TRISTÁN OCHOA (Spain)

CREATIVE FREEDOM By Vicky CATALÀ

Isabel Tristán Ochoa understands jewellery as her personal form of expression of creative freedom. This vision of her work made that “Nothing to declare”, the theme with artists got invited to participate to last year's edition of “Amber trip”, art jewellery contest, was the perfect frame in which reflecting about the idea of being free to decide about our own future.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


A R T I S T IC I N S P I R AT ION S / S PA N I S H J E W E L L E R Y R E P OR T

www.balticjewellerynews.com

idea had for the sake of a perfection and technical requirement that we sometimes complicate unnecessarily due to ignorance. But, once when you get everything more controlled you give yourself the freedom to enjoy the project. Mind and hands are synchronized together. While the mind searches the memory files of apprehended, the hands dance smoothly with the materials. ⊲

p. 73

able to express emotions, feelings or, why not, simply play with the forms, the materials, the colors, ... Maybe in this way it will be possible to connect with that person who, from the other side, observes, touches and treats him or herself with piece of contemporary jewelry. In her own words: “Looking, observing, analyzing, trying to discover the creative process of objects, the materials they are made from and the need to learn have let me grow and develop my own style of working in diverse artistic disciplines. I enjoy the freedom of speaking my own language that reflects my inner and critical self.” Isabel's pieces achieve an intimate intimate language and they are meant to be in order to defend creative freedom at all costs, perhaps with a certain vehemence but always passionately. Since her beginnings in the world of jewelry till today her work has evolved. The first concrete and defined drawing forms have given way to other more conceptual and more formally refined. This evolution of her works invites to contemplation and dialogue. Behind each of her pieces there is a story, a word, a concept, a photograph, a film, a poem, ... She describes all this learning evolution process: “You start with cutting, filing, welding everything and it all almost at once, with a certain fear or confusion. You lose the freshness that the initial

36 –2019

more when thinking about the parallelism of Catalan and Lithuanian history. A hundred years ago Lithuania became independent and nowadays Catalonia is actively fighting for the same rights. For a better understanding of her practice, we should take a step back to her first movements into the world of artistic creation. She graduated in graphic design from the “Escola Massana, Centre d’art i disseny” in Barcelona, where she also studied painting. In 2009 she started focusing on contemporary jewellery through courses at Massana Permanent and Taller Perill (Barcelona). Graphic illustration, typography and the use of painting with textured effects can be clearly observed in her work. Nowadays jewelry occupies most of her time. What was once a parttime hobby has become her full time passion. Nevertheless, she continues working as a graphic designer or getting her hands dirty again with paint. When you meet her or talk to her, you realize that she understands life itself as an act of constant creation It might be easier now to understand the reason why jewelry is for her an exercise of creative freedom. It is not the same to create to meet commercial objectives, as is the case in graphic design, than creating from the innermost self, without clients, without external pressures and being

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Even


You have reached a moment of harmony and balance.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 74

You have finally found yourself” A clear example of this process is the “Restoration vs. Reconstruction” series. The series that won the “Nothing to declare” competition. A work which began in 2017 and continues developing today. A critical and introspective series with herself and the social environment, in confrontation between two possible paths to follow. Pieces that tell stories of pain and hope. Pieces about how to repair wounds or learn to write a script again based on what has been learned, concepts that are valid personally or as individuals within a community. The Reconstruction pieces are made of recycled wood and extracted from the remains of other works, without changing their initial shape, only adapting them to a new perimeter as a border. Combinations of shapes that evoke narrow streets and squares with arches so typical in the villages of Catalunya. The wood is always alive. It inflates with moisture or dries and which fragilely passes from the coal to the dust by fire or pests. All the pieces are covered with a thin layer of sand, painted or dyed, in the manner of mask, veil of concealment, an allegory to the life of people, of peoples in permanent movement or mutation sometimes guided by reason, in others by the intransigent for no reason, lately too present in this global world. The Restoration series shares with the Reconstruction one the wood as the main material, although this time without veils. This time structures are created with many small pieces of cut wood, carved and grouped as intentional architectures to which we wash face to leave uncovered the layers of history that hide the walls of any city. Constructions that in some cases remember narrow windows through which circulates a small blade of fresh air. Buildings scraped to discover and recover, with the greatest fidelity and

www.balticjewellerynews.com


www.balticjewellerynews.com

have facets and do not stop being ourselves with some nuanced touch? Nowadays she develops her professional work in two main ways: On one side, promoting the diffusion of contemporary jewelry from Ingallerybcn, space opened in 2014 in the neighborhood of Gràcia (Barcelona). A place that welcomes the work of national and international artists, showing unique pieces or limited editions and with a wide exhibition program schedule. On the other side, participating with her own work in numerous exhibitions, both individual and collective. Moreover than through the gallery she also helps promoting jewelry with exhibitions in which she participates and co-curates with the work of other artists. An example of it is ABC, ... a group exhibition where the work of 25 artists is shown as a sort of visual alphabet of their common language: contemporary jewellery. Isabel Tristán Ochoa is firmly convinced that art has always been and will always be a way of innovation, change and revolution that forms a critical spirit while humanizing society. Jewellery and most specifically contemporary jewelry offers us

the possibility to go beyond the concept of body ornamentation and to transcend the purely aesthetic to achieve the transmission of a message. When wearing contemporary jewelry we all become itinerant galleries. An invitation to join the game and a provocation to anyone who is looking to express themselves through jewelry.. A game, to which the main public has not yet surrendered. A pedagogical job that day by day she tries to transmit from its gallery with the intention of generating new followers to contemporary jewelery. She consciously is aware that author and public, as has happened with other new artistic disciplines, do not have the same timing. The experimentation of the first users requires the learning of the second ones. When both sides connect it is the right time when the game starts. ■

instagram: @isabeltristan facebook: @isabeltristanochoa.jewellery Author‘s gallery: www.ingallerybcn.com facebook: ingallerybcn

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

historical respect, the original. We could talk about excessively simple materials that somehow pretend to pour vital and transcendental concepts. But not all the pieces of this author have a critical background. For instance, her Passion series were made as an exercise of formal and aesthetic fun. These pieces share the techniques mentioned above with the use of wood, sand, acrylics, leather and the additional use of metal as the protagonist. A radical use of red color is applied to all of its materials as a formal and colorful provocation. When she talks about her work she likes to emphasize the word “SERIES” against seriation. With the use of the word “series” she wants to declare that all pieces are different, that the process is never finished, that you can always keep adding new things. In the end, its like life itself that evolves as the pieces. This way of working and living jewelry has made her call it eclectic and she defends it like this: “We can facet a stone or shape a metal into jewelry. Something similar happens when we talk and change the tone and volume of our words. Why can not we admit that we also

36 –2019

p. 75

A R T I S T IC I N S P I R AT ION S / S PA N I S H J E W E L L E R Y R E P OR T


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 76

A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / SW EDISH JEW ELLERY R EPORT

Interview with Märta MATTSSON by Simona GULBINIENĖ

I DON'T SKETCH ON PIECES OF PAPER, I SKETCH IN MY MIND

Sometimes I see beauty in things that other people find strange or are even repulsed by. I become fascinated when there is something you do not want to see and the feeling you get when you do not want to look at something, yet you still do. My jewellery deals with the tension that lies between attraction and repulsion. I take seemingly inappropriate materials, making ordinary and familiar objects seem extraordinary and unfamiliar.

In

the 18th century many new breeds of animals and plants were discovered and it was the main era of cabinets of curiosities. People collected rarities because it gave them the feeling of being in the presence of something extraordinary and marvellous. The cabinets of curiosities were not meant to sympathize with the creatures on display, only marvel over their oddity. In a world where not many new and exotic breeds are discovered I use dead creatures in my pieces to evoke wonder. The creatures are transformed and reborn; given a new life as objects of astonishment.

1) Tell us about yourself. How has your path as a jewellery artist started? I grew up as a typical Swede, very close to nature. My mother’s eye for seeing beauty in unconventional matter has influenced the way that I view the world. She would bring in things like deer skulls, dead butterflies and snakeskin that she found in the woods into our

home and present them as beautiful objects in our house. So I grew up with dead matter presented to me as objects worthy of admiration. When I was a child I was been obsessed with my mothers jewellery box and I started collecting semi-precious stones and gems when I was around 9 years old. I have always been drawn to both biology and art and when I was growing up I had a personal battle, deciding whether to become a 2)

biologist or a jewellery maker. My mind for my path in life was finally made up when I couldn’t face dissecting the eyeball of a sheep in science class. I now make jewellery, but have continued to use animals and my interest in biology as a source of inspiration. In the last couple of years I have introduced real animals as a material in my jewellery pieces. What was the first jewellery piece that you have created? It was a braided snake ring made from metal wire and red glass beads as eyes that I made when I was around 6 years old. It was inspired by an antique necklace with a snake in gold and gemstones that belongs to my mother.

3) What is your philosophy of creativity? Stick close to your interested and your creativity will never run out… If you need things to spark your imagination and creativity; travel, read and talk to people you would not encounter in your everyday life. It is great way to get inspired! ⊲

www.balticjewellerynews.com


www.balticjewellerynews.com B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 77


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 78

A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / SW EDISH JEW ELLERY R EPORT

⊳ 4) What is the most interesting “invisible” side of jewellery creation process, which is often not seen by wearer? The many hours when the piece only existed in the mind of the artist. Sometimes I think about a piece of jewellery for a few years before I finally create it. The piece has lived inside of me for much longer then the time it took to physically create the piece. I don't sketch on pieces of paper, I sketch in my mind.

throughout the day. I also wear a lot of art jewellery. My own pieces but also pieces by other artists and friends as well as fashion jewellery. I swap work with a lot of my art jewellery friends and I am a keen collector both for pieces that will be displayed in my home in vitrines or on the wall but also to be worn by myself.

5) What do you demand from yourself the most as a creator? To stay curious and to keep digging deeper into my concepts. My work tends to bring out a lot of questions 7) How has your works change over and also curiosity in people. I enjoy time? watching people inspect my work. I like It has moved on from being aesthetically that second when they start to realize inspired by nature and animals to that my pieces are actually made from using real elements from nature in real animals. They lean in closer to my pieces. I am continuously trying to investigate and I can see that they are explore new ways of tickling my own trying to figure out what they are looking and also other people’s fascination for at. I want my pieces to evoke wonder so materials and subjects that hold the for me seeing people interact with my power of being both appealing and work and the discussion that follows is repelling. Attraction and repulsion are a very important part of my process. I two opposites emotions but they are don’t make my pieces for any kind of very closely related and human behavior ‘shock value’. They are being made to and psychology are great inspirations tickle people’s curiosity. for my work. 6) Do you wear jewellery yourself? 8) How would you describe your Always. I love wearing rings since jewellery in 3 words? it is jewellery pieces that you get to Curious, peculiar and uncanny. admire a lot yourself during the days you wear them. Earrings you don't see 9) DWhat‘s a project you are currently unless you look in the mirror but you working on? What is your dream are continuously looking at your hands project?

Right now I am working on a solo exhibition named ‘Only Mermaids can spot other Mermaids’ that will open at Gallery Marzee in Nijmegen on the 31st of March. This last year I have been very interested in creating hybrids between insects and other materials and by mythology and fantasy creatures. The pieces I am creating for the exhibition are a mixture/hybrids of beetles, seashells and sea creatures. I will show some of my other hybrids with fake flowers at Putti Art Gallery in Riga in the exhibition ‘Sunlight In Butterfly Wings’ from March 7 until April 30. I am also working on the group exhibition ‘Finding Dodo’ together with Jelizaveta Suska, Marion Delarue and Lore Langendries for Munich jewellery week in March (Schmuck) as well as a solo exhibition and a duo exhibition in Sweden later in 2019. I mainly work with creating unique art jewellery pieces but I would also be very interested in creating a collection or working together with a fashion brand or fashion designers that I admire like Gucci or Viktor&Rolf. ■

martamattsson_jewellery www.martamattsson.com

www.balticjewellerynews.com


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 80

A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / LITHUA NI A N JEW ELLERY R EPORT

By Vincent KIPP

OPEN SPACES IN A To

say that the works of Karolina Šiburkytė are inspired by nature would be a grand understatement. The artist used to draw her visual impressions of the natural world in a sketchbook, but then found more luck taking photographs and giving them enough time to sink in. The images can come from anywhere, however the depths of the forests and animal realms, as well as long walks through unknown territories are what really make the difference for Karolina. The author then matures the photos to form a fluent entity, and after a while narrows a specific creative base down for a new piece of jewellery. All in good time. Having studied sculpture in Lithuania, Karolina moved to the UK to sharpen

her tools in three-dimensional design. Although both study programs focused more on conceptuality, her works very evidently possess all the functional aspects too. Still, the first thing that the majority of clients tell the author is that they resonate with the motifs of nature the most. Karolina’s artworks portray nature as a bit secretive, shamanistic, animalistic, and at times even viscous like the very bottom of a dark lake. The jeweller knows that her creations will outlive the actual plants and animals, therefore the pieces are a certain continuation of nature. The decaying natural world is brought back for a new life in the form of metal. We use metals to destroy nature (construction,

vehicles, chainsaws, etc.), however this is an authentic way to preserve it nearly forever. The word “anima”, mainly signifying the soul in Latin, also refers to air, breathing, life, vitality, and wind. ANIMA’s pieces do seem airy, however in a slightly different sense. Even if you can’t feel the gentle breeze that nature typically soothes you with, there is definitely a sense of peaceful breathing here, especially within the works that look “opened up”. The author has been a big fan of open spaces rather than concentrated urban structures since she was a child. Her pieces are far from minimalistic; most of them – at least for our imagination – seem enlarged up to the size of miniature sculptures.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


p. 81 36 –2019

Still, that might be another effect of nature: the atmosphere contained by these works is the same one that nature creates in its majestic open sites, letting our minds breathe and feel fresh. From open spaces to close quarters: after witnessing this restful pulse of life, it was time to get my head back to the city. While visiting a pop-up store where Karolina’s works were exhibited, I overheard quite a few conversations next to the displayed items. After all, most of contemporary art is what others talk about it, not what it talks about itself. One young man, who looked hip yet rough, approached the stand with his mother, commenting on the pleasant and somewhat

www.balticjewellerynews.com

“The atmosphere

contained by these works

is the same one that nature creates in its majestic open sites,

letting our minds breathe and feel fresh”

feminine forms the jeweller used. Being instantly fascinated with the rings despite them being probably aimed at women, the young observer expressed his feelings to the mother in a straightforward manner, saying “I like these very much. You should buy them for yourself.” This basically encapsulates the essence of nature whenever we’re deeply in tune with it: we want to admire it, preserve it, and our feelings towards it become nobler – we want to both experience it ourselves and share it with others. ANIMA allows us to do all of that. ■

ANIMA, contemporary jewellery by Karolina ŠIBURKYTĖ

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

CLOSED WORLD


Patogiam ir gražesniam Jūsų poilsiui

KOLEKCIJA MOMMENTS.

GULTAS SUNRISE.

KĖDĖ LEAN.

KOLEKCIJA CONIC.

STALAS PURE.

Vilnius

vadasiga.lt

Kaunas

cane-line.com

Klaipėda akmeja.lt


p. 84 B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

PLAYFUL FORMS EVOKED BY NATURE. A glimpse into imagination narrated through sculpture

By Vicki STRATEMAN Audrius KRULIS was born in Lithuania and graduated with a Master's in Sculpture from the Vilnius Fine Arts Academy.

Upon

coming to New York he adapted his knowledge to jewelry, working as a shop foreman for 20 years, before persuing his own creative vision. Audrius finds inspiration in many forms. Part of it is the intrinsic nature of building something, and seeing it come to life. The shape takes on its own soul and character, which fuels the creative process.

Wearing something of his is an intimate connection to the imagination of an artist. It is as much a reflection of an individual’s taste as it is the craftsmanship of the artist, and so it is not just the jewelry that is unique, but the nature of the bond between art and collector. To express the work of Audrius Krulis with mere words may at first come across as a paradox. Melding themes of growth and decay, movement and peacefulness, the

elements of each piece balance in dynamic tension. Audrius achieves this delicate equilibrium by taking a cue from the inherent creativity of the natural world, folding organic methods into his own creative strategy. In a verdant forest or wildflower-laden meadow, for instance, the combinations of contour, texture, and color are not random, for all they may seem to be at first glance. As in nature, the artist allows his

www.balticjewellerynews.com


A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / LITHUA NI A N JEW ELLERY R EPORT

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 85

Necklace “Flowers neckless”

“Morning dew” collection

pieces to grow and unfold by building upon existing qualities within the metal and stone. Spectacular, unique, and vivid stones are a signature feature of Audrius' work. In many cases, the appearance of a striking gem will be the catalyst for an entirely new jewelry design, instead of simply filling an existing form. Followers of the artist know that he puts momentous effort into not only selecting individual

www.balticjewellerynews.com

stones, but also in arranging them into rhythmic, harmonious patterns. As natural stones catch and reflect light, they often present new, unexpected color palettes into the mix. Audrius picks up on these subtleties, allowing the full range of hues present in the stones to complement and contrast with each other in a nuanced, sophisticated manner. ■ www.audriuskrulis.com

Ring “Long shadow”


Brooch “The Swollen Part” by Malene KASTALJE

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 86

The contemporary metal art biennial METALLOphone 4: SIGNATURE The title is symbolic: metallophone is an instrument that can make metal sing. In Lithuanian, fonas, from fond in French, also stands for background, setting or ground, and we see metal as able to become a fertile ground on which to explore fresh thoughts, regardless of the form in which they can materialise in the artwork.

The

2018 METALLOphone biennial was special. Lithuania was celebrating the Centennial of the Restored State of Lithuania. The space that was selected for the exhibition is also special: it is the exhibition hall of the House of Signatories at the National Museum of Lithuania. It is a unique, formidable and historically significant venue. It was in the House of Signatories that the Independence Act, the document that officially declared and affirmed the declaration of independence of Lithuania, was signed. Every signatory’s autograph

is their personal confirmation of and contribution to independence. That is what inspired the theme of the biennial – “Signature”. It is an allusion to the House of Signatories and signatures on the Independence Act, while at the same time being an encouragement to artists to demonstrate their creative individuality and unique touch. Every artist’s style is like their personal signature with which they mark the outside world. Every creator uses their signature style to affirm their existence in the world; every artist’s creative output constitutes their signature. Participants: Ulla Ahola (FI), Nevin Arig (FR), Ruth Sara Brown (UK), Monika Brugger (FR), Siegfried De Buck (BE), Linnea Blakeus Calder (NO), Isabelle Carpentier (BE ), Eglė ČėjauskaitėGintalė (LT ), Putte Helene Dal (NO), Annette Dam (DK), Hilde De Decker (BE), Marytė Dominaitė (LT ), Frieda Dörfer (DE), Åsa Elmstam (SE), Jurgita Erminaitė-Šimkuvienė (LT ), Katrin Feulner (DE), Jantje Fleischhut (NL), Darijus Gerlikas (LT), Živilė Guigaitė (LT),

Sophie Hannagarth (CH/FR), Heidemarie Herb (DE/IT ), Peter Hoogeboom (NL), Ramunė Jundaitė-Misevičienė (LT ), Rasa Jundulaitė (LT ), Malene Kastalje (DK), Karina Kazlauskaitė (LT), Marie-Louise Kristensen (DK), Mervi Kurvinen (FI), Emmanuel Lacoste (FR), Claire Lavendhomme (BE), Eimantas Ludavičius (LT), Sandra Malaškevičiūtė (LT ), Simona Martinkutė (LT ), Merlin Meremaa (EE), Veera Metso (FI), Una Mikuda (LV), Marc Monzo (ES), Ted Noten (NL), Anneli Oppar (EE), Kristi Paap (EE), Roberta Pavone (IT), Nathalie Perret (FR), Ruudt Peters (NL), Darja Popolitova (EE ), Neringa Poškutė-Jukumienė (LT), Vita Pukštaitė-Bružė (LT), Anna Rikkinen (FI), Mette Saabye (DK), Ieva Sadauskaitė (LT ), Philip Sajet (NL), Kairi Sirendi (EE), Runa Vethal Stølen (NO), Birutė Stulgaitė (LT), Eglė Širvytė (LT), Jelena Škulienė (LT), Anna Talbot (NO), Terhi Tolvanen (FI/NL), Kotryna Vaitekūnaitė (LT), Saulius Vaitiekūnas (LT), Kadi Veesaar (EE), Andrea Wagner (NL), Petra Zimmermann (AT) ■ Curator: Dr. Jurgita Ludavičienė Architect: Eimantas Ludavičius www.metalofonas.com

www.balticjewellerynews.com


Ring “Tersiis” by Kotryna VAITIEKŪNAITĖ Brooch “Flybyprobe” by Jantje FLEISCHHUT

www.balticjewellerynews.com

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 87

A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / LITHUA NI A N JEW ELLERY R EPORT


A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / FINNISH JEW ELLERY R EPORT

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 88

ARI PYÖRÄLÄ works in Kautokeino, FinnmarksVidda, FAR FROM THE CROWD

Kautokeino winter in Aksomuotki. Photo: Theresa Gräfe

By Antonio ALTARRIBA

Ari PYÖRÄLÄ was born in Oulu, Finland, in 1965. He studied stonecutting in Lappeenranta and silversmithing in Lahti, today called Lahti University of Applied Sciences. In those days Lahti had two lines of jewellery: silversmithing and goldsmithing, the fact is that both lines has produced very well-known, creative, innovative and very talented contemporary jewellers.

Ari

had his jewellery studio in Helsinki in the middle of everything. Some time ago Ari surprised the jewellery community when he announced that he decided to move to the far North, to Kautokeino, Norway, to work at Juhls silvergallery ( www.juhls. no/en). The place is in the middle of Finnmarks Vidda, almost fourteen hours by car from Helsinki. The Spanish mystic

and poet Fray Luis de Leon (1527–1591) yellow spot on the orange background wrote an ode in his Beatus ille and Locus makes us feel fresh and joyful. The amœnus called Retirement in which recent series “Walking on thin ice” he praises the way of life far from the frames a landscape, but also transforms madding crowd, since silence gives a scene for new interpretations. To seek meaning to spiritual life. The time in answers to questions or either to make which Fray Luis de Leon lived is over us see things from a new angle. To try four hundred years ago. Travelling and to see more behind the thin ice is a very the way of life in the countryside was deep approach. much more different. Nowadays Ari can enjoy the beauty and the contrasts of 1) Ari, how Finnmarks Vidda the wild nature of the North and still sorroundings and nature inspire your be in contact through social media to creative work ? Tokio / New York / Helsinki. He is not It is inspiring to see all four seasons isolated like munk Fray Luis de Leon and how familiar surrounding changes and certainly he was not searching for through the year. These season changes it. Peripheral is not the periphery we I was longing in Helsinki. I like hiking and used to know since creativity happens exploring nature. I get inspired in the anywhere. shapes of small trees, ground vegetation and the forms the wind creates in the I recall an old piece of work from snow. Ari Pyörälä that I saw in an exhibition, I have experienced minus 42 degrees a brooch from the series “Nullipara” celsius and it was fun to walk to work made in 1996, just one year after his having many layers of clothing on top. graduation. The brooch was made of That day was just cold and calm to make painted wood and zirconia and the it bearable. I remember that half of the piece reflected the contemporaneity of way to my work my shoes became stiff Ari’s interpretation of materials and the like stone even it is only a fifteen minute importance that colours has for him. The walk. ⊲

www.balticjewellerynews.com


Jeerer-Bold, necklace, 2014. Material: Polyolefin, glass- and metal beats, air.

Walking on thin ice – Kutsu, brooch, 2014. Material: Acryl, silver, paint.

Photo: Ari Pyörälä

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Photo: Wilfred Gachau

p. 89

Jeerer-Lasso, necklace, 2018. Material: Polyolefin, lasso, metal beats, air.

36 –2019

Keepsake, necklace, 2017. Material: Lasso, reindeer skin, cotton.

Photo: Niclas Warius

www.balticjewellerynews.com

Photo: Niclas Warius


A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / FINNISH JEW ELLERY R EPORT

Kautokeino winter. Photo: Ari Pyörälä

Walking on thin ice – Mahdollisuus kaikkeen, brooch, 2014. Material: Acryl, silver, paint. Photo: Niclas Warius

Walking on thin ice – Takaisin, brooch, 2014. Material: Acryl, silver, paint. Photo: Niclas Warius

Omnipresent, 2015, brooch. Material: Acryl, wood, silver, paint.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 90

Photo: Wilfred Gachau

⊳ All seasons excite me, but Winter I Henry Moore’s sculptures, which I saw I have on my mind. Sometime a sketch in my first visit to London opened my is enough or I just take material I want like most. Snow makes nature looks eyes. It was like a small shock how stone to use and let the creative proces guide amazing especially in the Polar night. can be treated, round, strong, heavy but me. I like the creative working process, In the morning nature reflects pink at the same time light. Until then I had where I have a vision of what I want to colour from the sky making the snow only seen figure sculptors, so I would express without knowing exactly how pink too. Absurd pastel colours around say that Moore’s sculptures influenced to reach it. you and that long blue moment when my early works. everything look different than before. 6) How would you describe your recent The Aurora borealis, the northern lights, work? are amazing on clear sky full of stars. 4) After seing Henry Moore’s exhibition in London you started rethinking My recent works has still memory pattern That make evening walks enjoyable. materials? of works I did in my Helsinki studio. Lot Also the sound of the snow under Yes, in a way, yes. I started to see the of loops, connections and reflections. I your shoes while walking is different possibilities different materials have and add new materials in those works, which depending on the coldness. how they could be more than they are, I found from the sorroundings I live, for for example, how much I can grind stone example, the lasso I use to make loops 2) What is your approach to art making to hide the feeling of stone. The material is a material reindeer herdsman need in / craft? itself was not anymore the main point their daily work to catch reindeer from in my works. Actually hiding the origin the big flock. The works I am doing Craft making has been my passion of material started interesting me more now I combine wood and stone, which since I was a small boy. I see mylself as and more. This path has given me many I collect on my hikes to Vidda. I am a craftsman and jewellery making came good surprises. fascinated with natural surfaces and I later when I graduated as a silversmith. add a lot of colour to it. It may be due to For me every material has potential to 5) What is your creative process for the darkness of Winter time here in the be jewellery or an art piece. making jewellery? North and short daylight that makes me I could describe it like play ful, increase colour into my works. ■ 3) Can you tell about an art piece that experimental because some materials you have seen in a museum that I use now aren’t familiar to me. I don’t changed your understanding of always make tight drawing of jewellery contemporary art?

www.balticjewellerynews.com


On

behalf of The Finnish Goldsmith Association I am very pleased that we will have been granted the opportunity to visit Amber Trip 2019 and report to the Finnish jewellery community about what is happening in the amber field and in the jewellery sector in the Baltic region. The Finnish Goldsmiths association was founded in 1905 and has since then played a vital role in education and monitoring the interests of the jewellery business in Finland. Today our members consists of both manufacturers, retailers and small independent jewellery workshops. For communicating with both members and the public we publish a magazine “Kello & Kulta” which translates Watch & Gold where we address various topics linked to our trade. Apart from domestic issues we are striving to inform our readers about events in the jewellery scene in other countries around the Baltic Sea. The international jewellery community and venues are very interesting for the Finnish jewellery designers. We are always encourageing designers to participate in international events. For that purpose we have created a brand “Jewellery Form Finland” under which groups of Finnish jewellery designers gain visibility. We look forward to share our experience of Amber Trip 2019 with our readers. Henrik KIHLMAN CEO Finnish Goldsmih Association

4x faster

than industry average

User - Friendly Top Choice for

Value

Photo by Matias UUUSIKYLÄ

Precise

Repeatability

OFFICIAL B9CREATIONS DEALER 26-800 Bialobrzegi - ul. Jana Brzechwy 2 - Poland

www.balticjewellerynews.com

+48-531-380-575 - www.legor.pl - info@legor.pl


A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / RUSSI A N JEW ELLERY R EPORT

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 92

ST. PETERSBURG JEWELLERY ARTISTS PRESENT THE PROJECT

“GOODWOOD” By Galina GABRIEL Ph.D., professor, art historian, Member of the International Art Historian Society (AIC)

Wood

has long been an instrument for imaginative and artistic expression in contemporary fine jewelry art. This is not surprising – the beauty, brilliance, texture, rich color palette and malleability or resilience of precious woods, are very similar to that of precious stones and metals. It is no wonder that in the past rare, exotic woods were valued like gold. According to Oleg Tikhomirov, one of the GOODWOOD founders, wood is not just a gracious material for creating jewelry works, but also “... a hidden information field, an accumulation of natural energy under an external static shell. It’s a physical substance, duality of material and non-material, living and dead, and this is necessary for the artist to catch..." Each artist tried to catch these connections in his or her own way and use the expressive possibilities of wood, filling his or her own dialogue with the wood with particular meanings and emotions, boldly connecting wood with other materials, making our consciousness free from the usual ideas about the traditions, forms and materials of jewelry art.

Different types of wood triggered the creation of works in the GOODWOOD project, from precious and rare to simple ash and plywood.

Ebony, an unquestionable favorite of the exhibition, opened up in its full capabilities with lush variations of plasticity, color and texture. It was combined with metal, synthetic hair, textiles and pearls in diverse artist interpretations, giving rise to allusions to certain eras and styles, and reaching beyond to the phenomena of our real life. For instance, one can sense the luxury and surplus of the baroque gardens recreated by the contrast of smooth lines of carved ebony and sophisticated silver inset with an opal in the brooch of Oleg Tikhomirov from the Magic Garden series. In contrast, the same set of materials evokes completely different associations with other times and styles in laconic and graphically expressive earrings “Birulka” of Anna Tereshchenkova. Ebony wood

inspired fine jewelry art works of other artists, who have participated in the project since its foundation: jewelers Natalia Tarasova, Tatiana Tarasova, Oksana Naumova, all well known in St.Petersburg, as well as a Finnish artist Melitina Balabin. These art works are signified by the exact correspondence between the idea and its technological implementation, where the wood and the metal are partners working together precisely to capture an image. The style of their work is impeccable, the craftsmanship is at the highest level and the main point is that their works indeed reflect modern day design. More authentic experiences come from the expressive works of other “elders” of the project. Nikolai Balabin cuts rings brutally and boldly from jet, like archaeological artifact. The precious purple amaranth organically and effectively coexists with the coldness of the metal in the laconic and clearly articulated jewelry of Vladimir Shestakov. By contrast, the bracelets of Vladimir Dubrovsky emit elegance via their magnificent ornamental tracery. For the first time, ⊲ Moscow artists Mila Kalnitskaya

www.balticjewellerynews.com


VLADIMIR SHESTAKOV, St.Petersburg Ring ì DISCOVERYî. Wood, silver, gold, amethyst

MI-MI, Moscow Brooch “Old gan”. Wood, metal, Svarovsky glass

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 93

NATALIA TARASOVA, TATIANA TARASOVA, St.Petersburg Ring ìThe Moonís phaseî. Silver, ebony

▲ OLEG TIKHOMIROV, St.Petersburg Brooch from the collection ìMAGIC GARDENî.Silver, ebony ⊳ NIKOLAI BALABIN, Finland Ring ìNeolitî. Jet TSAGANA BADAEVA, St.Petersburg Rings ìLightî. Wood, glass ▼

YURA BYLKOV St.Petersburg Ring ìGreen Landî. Silver, bronze, wood

www.balticjewellerynews.com


A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / RUSSI A N JEW ELLERY R EPORT

MELITINA BALABIN, Finland Brooch and Earrings ìFrostî. Silver, ebony

ANNA TERESHCHENKOVA, St.Petersburg Earrings ìBirulkyî. Silver, ebony

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 94

VLADIMIR DUBROVSKY, St.Petersburg Bracelet ìThe book of Batterflyî. Wood, mother of pearl

ANNA FANIGINA, Latvia Brooch ARBOR VERTITUR. Silver, vintage glass

⊳ and Mikhail Maslennikov, known as the mi-mi moscow, participated in the exhibition, presenting a brooch from the root of a tropical plant decorated with Swarovski crystals. Anna Fanigina, a designer from Riga, combined thin annular cuts of spruce with bright vintage glass in decorations, giving birth to the image of the New Year's festival. Witty art objects were offered by well-known Petersburg designers Viktor Votsky and Boremir Baharev. This time young masters, playing today an increasingly prominent role in the St.Petersburg jewelry

VLADIMIR NAUMOV, St.Petersburg Collar ìWall -1î. Silver, gold, wood

scene, joined the elder generation. Of note are the works of Yura Bylkov, Tsagana Badaeva and Maria Mamkaeva, bravely operating with new technologies and materials and organically fitting into the dialogue between wood and artist, which takes place at this exhibition. Rather than shining as a one-day butterfly, GOODWOOD has evolved into a continuing project that is inspirational and fruitful for artists and is now being held for the fifth time. It also expands geographically, as this time not only St. Petersburg and Finnish jewelers participated in

the exhibition, but also masters from Czech Republic, Latvia, Sweden, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Belarus, Crimea, Moscow and other cities of Russia. The exhibition also includes, in addition to jewelry, carved miniatures, wood sculptures, block printing artworks. As for the future of this unique project, its inspirers are sure that the next exhibition will be even more interesting and diverse, will more fully demonstrate the possibilities of wood in art, and more artists will participate in project! We believe it. ■

www.balticjewellerynews.com


LO G I S T I C S PA R T N E R O F A M B E R T R I P


A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / POLISH JEW ELLERY R EPORT

S

I L V E R THE 28 INTERNATIONAL TH

JEWELLERY COMPETITION within the framework of LEGNICA SILVER FESTIVAL 2019

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 96

Deadline for submitting works: April 1, 2019 (Works must arrive at the Gallery within this deadline – posting date is irrelevant.)

The International Jewellery Competition, which this year will be held for the 28th time, is the leading event of Legnica SILVER Festival.

The

Festival, celebrating this year its 40 th anniversary, is the oldest, largest and most important in Poland as well as one of the largest in Europe presentation of contemporary avant-garde art of jewellery-making. The main assumption of the Festival is the presentation and promotion of contemporary artistic jewellery and its creators from all over the world, as well as the exchange of experience, knowledge and views on art between artists, theoreticians, critics and enthusiasts of this field of design. The Festival promotes contemporary jewellery as a medium equal to other arts. Currently, the Festival is one of the most important meeting places in Europe for artists creating conceptual, critical,

avant-garde and unique jewellery. Within its framework, over a dozen individual and group exhibitions from Poland and abroad are presented. In addition, there are popular science seminars, jewellery and fashion shows, jewellery contests and workshops, concerts and several artistic actions and happenings in the city space. The theme of this year's jewellery competition is supposed to emphasize the jubilee character of SILVER 2019 and remind about the role of this material as a symbol of the 40-yearlong history of the Festival. Thus, it

refers to its genesis – the reasons why the SILVER Festival was born in Legnica. Legnica, with its population of nearly 100,000, is a historical city located in the heart of Lower Silesia – a unique region, for centuries known for its natural resources, especially for deposits of building and precious stones as well as precious metals – gold, copper and silver. To this day, mines and steel mills, producing copper and silver in quantities relevant in the world’s production, thrive here. Legnica SILVER Festival is an artistic reflection of this region's specificity and the trace of resulting economic activity. The festival, as every year, will take place in May, with its main events (vernissages, meetings with artists and accompanying events) on May 17 and 18. It is also then that the ceremony of announcing the winners of the jewellery competition and granting them silver granules and other prizes will take place. The main principle of the Festival is openness and free admission, and its distinguishing feature – a unique “Legnica” atmosphere. A tradition is also the participation of artists in the debate and lectures from the series “Boundaries of global art” and the meetings of artists, designers, experts and jewellery lovers from all around the world lasting throughout the weekend. We invite you to participate in the Jewellery Competition “Silver” and to come to Poland, Legnica, to experience Legnica SILVER Festival. ■

www.balticjewellerynews.com


to dynamicznie rozwijające się pismo B2B poświęcone branży złotniczej, rynkowi biżuterii i zegarków oraz nowoczesnemu wzornictwu Szeroki krąg czytelników Polskiego Jubilera tworzą: • jubilerzy i projektanci form złotniczych, • właściciele galerii, salonów i sklepów jubilerskich, • kadra zarządzająca dużych producentów biżuterii, • hurtownicy maszyn i materiałów jubilerskich

Prenumerata i kolportaż: prenumerata@pws-promedia.pl tel. +48 22 333 88 26, faks +48 22 333 88 82

NR 1 (19) styczeń/luty 2018 www.polskijubiler.pl

ISSN 1429-3773

INDEKS 38500X CENA 12 ZŁ (w tym 5% VAT)

Tradycyjne obrączki

Srebro z duszą

do bogactwa

Dział reklamy: Wioleta Wiater tel. +48 22 333 88 10 w.wiater@pws-promedia.pl


p. 98 36 –2019 B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

CO R A L By Salvatore CONTE

The text was draw from the Italo ImportExport web site, Italian company that produces coral jewellery from different provenance, that exhibits in various international exhibition among which Amber-Trip (Lithuania – Vilnius) Ring in carved red coral, ebony and gold 18kt made by the Master Francesco Iorio ( Cosenza) for Italo Jewellery Collection


A RTISTIC INSPIR ATIONS / ITA LI A N JE W ELLERY R EPORT

Rings made by the Master Fabio Gori (Florence) for Italo Jewellery collection

Ring (in carved red coral, mammoth tusk and gold 18kt) made by the Master Francesco Iorio (Cosenza) for Italo Jewellery Collection

p. 99

TYPES OF CORAL: ‘‘ Red Coral: can be found in the classic tints that vary from red to red-orange, from orange to skin color to white, whit light and dark tonalities as a result of the conchiolin action and small traces of iron oxide. ‘‘ It’s fished in the Mediterranean (Corallium Rubrum), mainly near Sardinia and Sicily (Sciacca variety) and in the eastern Mediterranean sea as well as in the Red Sea and in the sea near the Japan (Elatium variety) ‘‘ Pink and white coral: of the colour charged pink, light pink and whitish. This type of coral comes from the Mediterranean in a limited amount and in large quantity instead from the Orient (Japan in particular). ‘‘ The variety Angel Skin, very rare and fine, cames from the Mediterranean as well as from Chihili gulf (Cina) and from Japan. ‘‘ Sky blue coral: of the color sky blue, dark sky blue and sky bluegrey. Comes principally from the Philippine seas. ‘‘ Black coral: is the coral black, sometimes presenting small weins that are yellow-brown. It is fished near the Hawaiian island, in the great Australian coral reef, but also in the Red Sea, west coast of Africa, Antilles and, occasionally, in the Mediterranean. ■

36 –2019

and original material. Animal, vegetable and mineral, superstitious, symbolic. Red gold, used since ancient times, is always more precious and rare. Coral is often used with religious, magical and healing meanings. The art of transforming this material in refined jewellery, since the 15th century, has become heritage in a small community at the slopes of the Vesuvius: Torre del Greco. Coral is costituted by a community of small octopus that build, at the base of their soft body, a skeleton of calcium carbonate with the function of protecting and sustaining it self. The octopus grow one beside the other, so that the secretions of limestone fuse themselves and stratify, forming the coral reef, like the one in Australia, the largest in the world, that covers an area more than 80 thousand square miles. Fishing takes place with similar methods throughout the world. Fishermen use a tool called “intelligence” which tears the coral from the bench that remained trapped in the nets. In Japan instead a thick bamboo cane was used whit nets and weight. In Greece, still today divers are used. The fishing of red coral is now done only and exclusively by deep sea coral divers, whit a specific license renewed each year by the region to whom one pertains, generally operating in zones whit high backdrop of about 80 meters and deep about 130 meters.

Mediterranean dark red coral cabochones

www.italoimportexport.it

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Unique


Jewellery made by the Masters Fabio Gori ( Florence) and Francesco Iorio ( Cosenza) for the Italo Jewellery Collection


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 102

This is what Karin NORDMANN collects now

KARIN NORDMANN.

DESIGNER, COLLECTOR AND FORMER MUSEUM DIRECTOR By Anders LETH DAMGAARD

Her

fascination for jewellery, design and amber began in the late 60s. And since then, she has with great passion, commitment and dedication collected, studied and built up an impressive collection of amber. Over the years it has become one of the world's largest private collections of Baltic amber. It contains several new species, and over the years, it has been a backbone in several major research projects. Alongside the scientific view on amber, she works as a jewellery designer, and has built up a unique collection of objects made of and carved in amber. In 1981, she opened an amber and gemstone shop in Skagen, and both nationally and internationally, she has become known for her unique design.

Karin NORDMANN with a great collector of amber pieces Mr Ahmad M ALI. Exhibition in Kuwait

KARIN NORDMANN: “It all has started with a mosquito in a glass of wine. My guest had a sonin-law, a professor in the University of Copenhagen, specialising in millipede. The guest, an old fisherman, was collecting Stone Age materials. He advised me to check all of my old amber pieces for inclusions. There should be one piece of amber with an inclusion among thousands of pieces. This was 40 years ago. My checking has become an incurable disease, and it might have been one inclusion among thousands pieces of amber! Amber took me up! Within that time I collected 400 pieces of very nice inclusions. I have been searching amber on the beaches around my city Skagen and the fields at the distance of 40–50

www.balticjewellerynews.com


JEWELLERY COLLECTIONS / DANISH JEWELLERY REPORT

NEWLY ACQUIRED AMBER COLLECTION HIDES NEW SPECIES

WINDOWS TO THE PAST By STATENS NATURHISTORISKE MUSEUM

www.balticjewellerynews.com

p. 103 36 –2019

kilometres from my home. I exchange my amber pieces with inclusions with other collectors for beautiful beach amber! In 1996 I had 30.000 inclusions, and three foundations had been paying a salary to a Ph.D. student for the whole year to classify my collection. Among the possessed 4.000 pieces, most of them were holotypes. I continued collecting only inclusions partly found by myself, and some of them were bought from other collectors. For 40 years, I haven’t sold a single inclusion. I had a lot of good offers. And when I decided to sell all of them, there were almost 60.000 amber pieces with inclusions in my collection. All of them were Baltic amber pieces! Over the whole period of collecting, I was convinced that my collection should stay in Denmark for a research! I had a few good offers from China and Indonesia, but the University of Copenhagen helped me with payment from foundations in my country. I appreciate that. The inclusion collection is now safe in Denmark, and I wish that scientists enjoyed studying my collection in the future! Once you have become a collector, you will always be a collector. I keep on collecting amber! Now I am passionate about antique 100-years-old Danish amber jewellery, and I have already got very nice samples of it. Amber still takes me up!” ■

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Photo: Karin Nordmann with grandson Noah in Copenhagen. The day when the collection was delivered to the Zoological Museum

One of the World's largest private collections of Baltic amber is being acquired by the National Museum of Natural History at the University of Copenhagen. The collection of nearly 60,000 amber pieces was built up during 40 years by the former owner Karin Nordmann Ernst. The collection has great scientific value because many of the pieces contain insect fossils and other biological material, e.g., parts of plants. The pieces of amber therefore function as small windows to the beetle population of the past, and the Museum's researchers expect that the amber pieces store entirely new species, which have not previously been described by science.

Beetle caught in Baltic amber. Photo: Anders DAMGAARD

It

is thanks to the support of the Augustinus Foundation, the Knud Højgaard Foundation and the VILLUM FOUNDATION that the Natural History Museum acquires Karin Nordmann Ernst's impressive amber collection. It brings great joy to the Museum, which already has an amber collection consisting of approx. 10,000 pieces. Baltic amber was formed approx. 35–40 million years ago in then widespread forests that covered much of the current Northern Scandinavia. Over time, insects and other biological material were trapped in the resin that ran out of the trees – presumably, a form of pine trees. And because the resin

subsequently solidified and became amber – a process that has taken millions of years – we can today admire and study these encapsulated animals from the past. ‘‘ Those animals that were caught and preserved in the amber constitute especially a partly representative sample of the insect fauna from that time, says lecturer and curator Lars Vilhelmsen from the National Museum of Natural History and continues: ‘‘ Generally, the climate was warmer at that time – for example, there was no ice caps on any of the ⊲


JEWELLERY COLLECTIONS / DANISH JEWELLERY REPORT

The 60.000 inclusions were sold to the University of Copenhagen!

⊲ poles – and this is also reflected in the composition of the fauna, which contains individuals from animal groups that we find today only in a climate warmer than what is now prevalent in our latitudes.

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 104

THE SPECIES AND ECOSYSTEM OF THE PAST Baltic amber has been explored for more than a hundred years. Hundreds species from amber, particularly insects, have been described, and extensive overviews of selected groups, e.g. aphids, bees, ants and spiders that lived 35–40 million years ago, have been drawn up.

In addition to supporting the purchase of the amber collection, funds were also provided for a two-year position of an assistant, which makes it possible to register and integrate the amber collection into the National Museum of Natural History's existing collections. A major effort is now being made to register the amber collection in a database so that it can be made available to the international research community. Every single piece must have a unique reference number and be carefully packed so that it can be stored in the best possible way for future use. ■

‘‘ Although Baltic amber has been researched for a long time, I have no doubt that the newly acquired collection contains many new species that have not been described yet. In other words, we have got even more windows to the past, and I am very excited to look through them, says Lars Vilhelmsen. The ambition is not only to find new species but also to gain greater insight into the developmental history of groups of different organisms. The large amount of material currently available to the researchers will also make it possible to carry out quantitative studies on the fauna composition of the ecosystem the amber insects were included into and thereby elucidate the structure of the then ecosystem and the climate development during the last 30–40 million years.

Mosquito trapped in Baltic amber. Photo: Anders DAMGAARD

Spider caught in Baltic amber. Photo: Anders DAMGAARD

www.balticjewellerynews.com


KARIN NORDMANN E mail: amber @mail.dk P hone : + 4 5 4 01 4 6599 www .amber- r esear ch .dk


AMBER DM AMBER JEWELRY PRODUCTION COMPANY

A VARIETY OF NATURAL BALTIC AMBER PRODUCTS… Mob. tel. (+370) 60613750 Viber (+370) 68759712

d.miliausuki@yahoo.com info@amberdm.lt Skype: dainius777xxx

WeChat dainiusp88 www.amberdm.com

D. M I L I US U K I . , S u ke s k m . , K r e t i n g o s r a j . , LT 97 2 5 1 L I T H UA N I A


p. 108 36 –2019 B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

KATARA KAHRAMAN

EXHIBITION IN QATAR For

the first time, on 10–12 January 2019, in Doha, Qatar amber rosary fair Katara Kahraman was organized. The three-day trade fair aroused great interest among exhibitors, including 80 from Qatar, Turkey, Kuwait, Lebanon, Russia, Lithuania and Poland, as well as thousands of visitors. They presented mainly collections of traditional amber rosaries and unique lumps of Baltic amber, which is a decorative stone in the Arab countries that has been especially valued for centuries.

The participation in the Kahraman Exhibition at the Katara Cultural Village in Doha created an opportunity to launch cooperation between the Association and the Katara Foundation. A letter of intent was signed. The booth was visited by H.E. Ambassador Janusz Janke who discussed the issue of Polish – Qatari cooperation in promoting high quality amber in Qatar and the Gulf with H.E. the Father-Emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani. The International Amber Association and Katara Cultural Village initiated a structured

exchange of experiences, materials and experts. The cooperation would also focus on educating the Gulf publics on amber, its history and modern design. In the next phase the partners aim to jointly launch a Doha-based amber analysis and certification centre taking advantage of the Association's Gdansk Amber Laboratory. The next Katara Kahraman fair will take place from 9–11 January 2020 in the Katara Cultural Village exhibition halls. The organizer confirms the great interest of exhibitors for future exhibition.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 109

IN TER NATIONA L A MBER A SSOCI ATION /

Katara Cultural Village in Doha is a whole newly built area of the city dedicated to culture. It was opened in 2010, but the construction of subsequent stages and facilities is still ongoing. There are museums, galleries, organization headquarters, theatre and concert halls, an amphitheatre, a beach and many restaurants and places to spend time in. ■ Michal KOSIOR

www.balticjewellerynews.com


B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 110

IN TER NATIONA L A MBER A SSOCI ATION /

MICHALINA OWCZAREK BLACK’N’AMBER The IAA Gallery again had the pleasure to host an exhibition by artists associated with the Władysław Strzemiński Academy of Fine Arts’ Jewellery Department. After the DyploMy 2017 exhibition in June, which showcased bachelor’s and master’s degree graduation pieces by students, came a time for a monographic exhibit from Michalina OWCZAREK.

www.balticjewellerynews.com


www.balticjewellerynews.com

self. The Skorupa (Shell) collection is a sculptural way to present the appearances with which we try to conceal our feelings and who we really are. Despite its large size, the entire collection appears to be lightweight and brittle. This effect is obtained not only through the filigrees and thin walls in the pieces, but also through a combination of bright and subdued colours, and the use of a technique which at first glance resembles ceramics. We are happy that more and more young artists take up amber to create interesting, modern and beautiful pieces. And we wish Michalina more such successful amber collections!

The exhibition was on display from 6 December 2018 until 6 March 2019 at the IAA Gallery, Gdańsk. ■ Małgorzata SIUDAK

36 –2019

gemstone settings, which additionally emphasises the simplicity of form. The exhibition also presents the artist’s award-winning piece, for which she received the IAA Prize in 2017 at the IDENTITY International Jewellery Competition. The piece titled “because there are people who are withdrawn, those who wear their feelings on their sleeve and those in between” contains three objects: “open,” “closed” and “in between.” With this prize, the artist won the pieces of amber out of which the Black’n’Amber collection was made. In her work, Michalina Owczarek often refers to emotions, while the form of the objects she makes is remarkably sculptural. The Skorupa (Shell) collection, presented at the IAA Gallery as photographs to complement the exhibition, is another such example. The collection’s description reads: Every one of us has our own shell behind which we hide our true

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

6 December 2018, the IAA Gallery featured the launch of Michalina Owczarek’s Black’n’Amber exhibition. The exhibit was complemented with award-winning pieces from Legnica’s IDENTITY exhibition and the Skorupa (Shell) collection photography series. Michalina Owczarek is a graduate of the Wł. Strzemiński Academy of Fine Arts, Łódź, where in 2018 she received her doctoral degree with the thesis “Rozkład FormyBudowa Formy” (Distribution of Form-Structure of Form) under Prof. Andrzej Boss. At present, she works at the Jewellery Department of her alma mater. Her work can be found in the collections of the Sandomierz Regional Museum, the Gallery of Art in Legnica and more. The main part of the exhibition, the Black’n’Amber collection, was Michalina Owczarek’s first to use amber (we hope it won’t be the last). This is what the artist has written about her collection: The starting point for the collection is a combination of amber with one shape, module, which undergoes transformations. Used in the collection, the colour black, which absorbs light, is just a background, with prisms being only a “structure” to support amber. In my collection, I only wanted to emphasise the colour of amber; this is why I used the phenomenon of parallel contrast, which has made the amber seem lighter and its colours even more vivid. I decided to use amber in several ways, combining it with a prism so that it would seem an integral part of it, or in a way akin to traditional

p. 111

On


• Plates from continuous casting • Wires • Flats • Overall casting service (silver, brass, bronze) • Melting • Refining • Galvanic service • Joints Metal Rolling Mill Office 2 Wojnicka Street 03-774 Warsaw Mon-Thu: 09:00–15:00 Fri: 09:00–14:00

Metal Rolling Mill Shop 115 Marszałkowska Street, flat number 231 00-102 Warsaw Mon-Fri: 08:00–13:00 Phone: 574 080 007

www.walcowniametali.pl biuro@walcowniametali.pl sklep@walcowniametali.pl Phone/Fax: 22 631 88 87 Phone: 602 254 587 Phone: 604 596 199


MARKET REVIEW / WORLDWIDE JEWELLERY REPORT

List of open selling prices of amber production of

JSC Kaliningrad Amber Factory Valid from 01-01-2019

Amber of commission sorting Sort 1

Open selling prices (excluding VAT), EUR/kg

500 gr. – 1 000 gr.

4 539

300 gr. – 500 gr.

4 085

200 gr. – 300 gr.

3 717

100 gr. – 200 gr.

3 346

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 114

Amber of weight sorting Sort 1 50 gr. – 100 gr.

2 718

20 gr. – 50 gr.

1 848

10 gr. – 20 gr.

924

5 gr. – 10 gr.

480

Amber of weight sorting Unsorted 2 gr. – 5 gr.

116

Amber of filter sorting 2,5 gr. – 5 gr. or fraction +16

126

Fraction +14

61

Fraction +11,5

30

Fraction -11,5+8

10

Fraction -8+4

1,28

Fraction -4

0,6

www.balticjewellerynews.com


Beauty and Luxury of Baltic Amber ! Our shops:

Klaipeda, Turgaus str.3, t. +370 46 213390, mob. +370 619 55099 Vilnius, Didzioji str. 6, t. +370 5 261 7058, mob. +370 693 04542 Riga, Kramu 4, t./fax. +371 294 84807 New shop and museum in Riga, Valnu str. 23 t./fax. +371 294 84807


MARKET REVIEW / WORLDWIDE JEWELLERY REPORT

The Worldwide Price for

Raw Amber March 2019

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

36 –2019

p. 116

AMBER FROM RUSSIA

UKRAINIAN AMBER PRICE

No.

Regular Amber Piece Size

Price / 1 kg – EUR

No.

Regular Amber Piece Size

Price / 1 kg – EUR

1

+5 fraction

5

1

2 gr. – 5 gr.

120

2

+6 fraction

8

2

5 gr. – 10 gr.

330

3

+8 fraction

25

3

10 gr. – 20 gr.

620

4

+11,5 fraction

50

4

20 gr. – 50 gr.

1 200

5

+14 fraction

75

5

50 gr. – 100 gr.

1 500

6

+16 fraction

170

7

2,5 gr. – 5 gr.

203

8

5 gr. – 10 gr.

320

9

10 gr. – 20 gr.

720

10

20 gr. – 50 gr.

1 300

11

50 gr. – 100 gr.

2 600

12

100 gr. – 200 gr.

2 900

13

200 gr. – 300 gr.

3 200

14

300 gr. – 500 gr.

3 500

AMBER FROM RUSSIA FRACTIONS 20–50 GR. RAW AMBER PRICE CHANGE 2006 FEBRUARY – 2019 MARCH EUR per kg

4300 3900 3500 3100 2700 2300 1900 1500 1100 700 300

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 06 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03

If you have any questions concerning these prices, please, contact our office:

info@balticjewellerynews.com www.balticjewellerynews.com


MARKET REVIEW / WORLDWIDE JEWELLERY REPORT

The Worldwide Price for

Amber Silver 925 Jewellery March 2019

AMBER SILVER 925 JEWELLERY PRICE CHANGE AUGUST 2010 – MARCH 2019 Eur / gr.

Amber Silver 925 Jewellery

Price EUR / gr.

Handmade

1,84

Machine made

1,53

Data

EUR / ounce

2018 09

12,48

2018 10

12,53

2018 11

12,92

2018 12

12,49

2019 01

13,38

2019 02

13,89

3 2

Handmade

36 –2019

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 08 03 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03 08 03

Machine made

SILVER PRICE CHANGE SEPTEMBER 2018 – FEBRUARY 2019 Eur / ounce

14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6

2018 09

2018 10

2018 11

2018 12

2019 01

2019 02

www.goldenmark.com

If you have any questions concerning these prices, please, contact our office:

info@balticjewellerynews.com

www.balticjewellerynews.com

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

0

p. 117

1


MARKET REVIEW / WORLDWIDE JEWELLERY REPORT

The Worldwide

Gold Price

Monthly average 2018–2019

EUR per troy ounce

2018 January

1 093,0

1200

February

1 078,6

1180

March

1 075,1

1160

April

1 074,6

1140

May

1 087,3

June

1 118,7

July

1 074,1

1120 1100

36 –2019

p. 118

1080

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

Data/Eur

August

1 043,5

1040

September

1 033,7

1020

October

1 024,5

1000

November

1 079,3

December

1 085,3

2019 January

1 120,0

February

1 152,7

1060

2018 2019 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 01 02

invest@gold.org

www.balticjewellerynews.com


M A JOR J E W E L L E R Y T R A DE FA I R S /

MAJOR JEWELLERY TRADE FAIRS

26th Amberif, International Fair of Amber, Jewellery & Gemstones Date: 20–23 March, 2019 Location: AMBEREXPO Exhibition & Convention Centre, Gdańsk, Poland www.amberif.amberexpo.pl ewa.rachon@mtgsa.com.pl Istanbul Jewelry Show March Date: 21–24 March, 2019 Location: CNR Expo, Istanbul Fair Center, Turkey march.istanbuljewelryshow.com inquiries@rotaforte.com BASELWORLD 2019 Date: 21–26 March, 2019 Location: Basel, Switzerland www.baselworld.com visitor@baselworld.com 22nd Hangzhou International Jewelry Exhibition Date: 22–25 March, 2019 Location: Hangzhou Peace International Conference & Exhibition Center, China www.hzqiyang.com qiyanghz@163.com 46th MidEast Watch & Jewellery Show Date: 2–6 April, 2019 Location: Expo Centre Sharjah, United Arab Emirates www.mideastjewellery.com amjed@expo-centre.ae ARU ALMATY, The 32nd International Jewellery Fair Date: 4–7 April, 2019 Location: Almaty, Kazakhstan www.kazexpo.kz kazexpo@kazexpo.kz Oroarezzo Date: 6–9 April, 2019 Location: Arezzo, Italy www.oroarezzo.it oroarezzo@oroarezzo.lt

www.balticjewellerynews.com

New Nordic Date: 23–25 August, 2019 Location: Bella Center, Copenhagen, Denmark www.newnordicshow.dk anne@nord-fair.dk

PALAKISS SPRING Date: 10–12 May, 2019 Location: Palakiss, Vicenza, Italy www.palakiss.com info@palakiss.com

Japan Jewellery Fair (JJF) Date: 28–30 August, 2019 Location: Tokyo Big Sight Exhibition Center, Japan www.japanjewelleryfair.com info@japanjewelleryfair.com

IJK – 23rd International Jewellery Kobe Date: 16–18 May, 2019 Location: Kobe Exhibition Hall, Tokyo, Japan www.ijk-fair.jp ijk-eng@reedexpo.co.jp

AMBERMART Date: 29–31 August, 2019 Location: AMBEREXPO Exhibition & Convention Centre, Gdańsk, Poland www.ambermart.amberexpo.pl ewa.niemczyk@mtgsa.com.pl

JUNWEX NEW RUSSIAN STYLE Date: 22–26 May, 2019 Location: VDNH, Pavilion № 75, Moscow, Russia www.junwex.com overseas@junwex.com

Precious Date: 30 August – 1 September, 2019 Location: Stockholmsmässan, Stockholm, Sweden www.preciousfair.se info@preciousfair.se

Jewellery Expo Ukraine Date: 23–26 May, 2019 Location: International Exhibition Centre, Kyiv, Ukraine www.jewellerexpo.kiev.ua info@kmkya.kiev.ua

VICENZAORO Date: 7–11 September. 2019 Location: Fiera Vicenza, Vicenza, Italy www.vicenzaoro.com sales@vicenzaoro.com

JCK Las Vegas Date: 31 May – 3 June, 2019 Location: Sands Expo & The Venetian, Las Vegas, USA www.jckonline.com inquiry@jck.reedexpo.com JUBINALE Summer Date: 13–15 June, 2019 Location: International Exhibition and Convention Centre Expo Krakow, Poland www.jubinale.com info@jubinale.com The 16th International Jewelry Exhibition JOVELLA Date: 9–10 July, 2019 Location: David Intercontinental Hotel, Tel Aviv, Israel www.stier.co.il/jovella expo@stier-group.com SIJE Singapore International Jewelry Expo 2019 Date: 18–21 July, 2019 Location: Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Centre, Singapore www.sije.com.sg sije@cems.com.sg

SHENZHEN International Jewelry Fair Date: 12–16 September, 2019 Location: Shenzhen Convention and Exhibition Center, China www.newayfairs.com info@newayfairs.com September Hong Kong Jewellery & Gem Fair Date: 16–22 September, 2019 Location: Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre, China exhibitions.jewellerynet.com/9jg/en-us/ salesjwf@cmpasia.com JUNWEX MOSCOW Date: 25–29 September, 2019 Location: VDNH, Pavilion № 69, 75, Moscow, Russia www.junwex.com overseas@junwex.com International Jewelry & Watch Show Abu Dhabi (JWS) Date: 26–30 October, 2019 Location: Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre, United Arab Emirates www.jws.ae info@jws.ae

36 –2019

XVI International Baltic Jewellery Show Amber Trip Date: 13–16 March, 2019 Location: LITEXPO, Vilnius, Lithuania www.ambertrip.com info@ambertrip.com

17th International Gold & Jewelry Exhibition Date: 22–27 April, 2019 Location: Mishref, Kuwait www.kif.net info@kif.net

B A LT I C J E W E L L E R Y N E W S

HKTDC Hong Kong International Jewellery Show Date: 28 February – 4 March, 2019 Location: Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre, China Hkjewelleryshow.hktdc.com exhibitions@hktdc.org

p. 119

January 2019 – October 2019


+370 634 51730

sale@amberground.com

www.amberground.com


ibitor iss exh m ’t n Do adline: tion de a r t is g re 9! 0th 201 April 3

be part of gemworldmunich.com

Profile for Baltic Jewellery

Baltic Jewellery News (March 2019) No. 36  

Itʼs the beginning of the year again, and once again there are questions about the future. The closest future – that is the time connected w...

Baltic Jewellery News (March 2019) No. 36  

Itʼs the beginning of the year again, and once again there are questions about the future. The closest future – that is the time connected w...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded