Page 1

Highlights

Newsletter May 2012 THE

1 1 1 1

Cluster "Baltic Impulse - saving the Baltic Sea waters" Faces behind projects (COHIBA, PURE, Baltic Compass) Maritime Spatial Planning - BaltSeaPlan Vision 2030 Interview with Omar Frits Eriksson, Danish Maritime Authority

E

ITIM

MAR

ISSU

E

Baltic Impulse - saving the Baltic Sea waters The Baltic Sea is threatened by eutrophication (over-enrichment of nutrients) and pollution. Both problems can be described as sea water having substances that should not be in the water. The difference is that the nutrients are not harmful as such. On the contrary: they are very valuable, but the excessive amounts of nutrients in the aquatic system cause algal blooming which leads to other problems. The marine nature of the Baltic Sea is very vulnerable for environmental problems due to its large catchment area, its shallowness and its closed form. The European Union has recognized the alarming state of the Baltic Sea. Through the Baltic Sea Region Programme it supports environmental projects with different approaches to the challenges with the Baltic Sea. Some have looked at the nutrient leaching from the agricultural sector, some have focused on waste water treatment, some have concentrated on hazardous substances and others to the past sins in the form of contaminated sediments. However, the main problem is

Baltic Sea Coast, Latvia

common to all: the deteriorating nature of the Baltic Sea. There needs to be cooperation and exchange of knowledge between the projects. Baltic Sea Region Programme launched an initiative “Saving the Baltic Sea waters”: • • • • • • • • •

Baltic Compass Baltic Deal Baltic Manure Beras Implementation COHIBA PURE Presto SMOCS Waterpraxis

Together these projects form an environmental “water” cluster called Baltic Impulse. Baltic Impulse has two parallel thematic lines: nutrient over-enrichment and hazardous substances. The focus is on prevention of phosphorus and nitrogen leaching, phosphorus recycling, and environmentally sound management of hazardous substances. Baltic Impulse has 15 cluster partners from seven countries. by Paula Biveson, Baltic Sea Action Group/ Baltic Compass, Lead Partner Baltic Impulse

Baltic Sea coast, Finland (Photo: Johanna Logren)

1

Harmony between agriculture and environment (Photo: Helena Rosenlew)

Industrial pig production, Poland (Photo: Knud Tybirk) Part-financed by the European Union European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument


THE

ME

ITI MAR IS

Newsletter May 2012

SUE

Faces behind projects Three questions to Ansa Pilke (COHIBA), Hannamaria Yliruusi (PURE) and Staffan Lund (Baltic Compass) 1. What do you consider to be your project’s main achievement? 2. How does your project contribute to cleaner Baltic Sea waters? 3. We are facing a new Programming period – what are the needs that should be tackled in the future in your specific field?

Ansa Pilke COHIBA Project

1. COHIBA project had wide scope of work. The project brought new, targeted and useful information on hazardous substances, which have been prioritised in the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP): on emission sources and discharges of these substances and on their occurrence in wastewaters. 2. Hazardous substances are one of the issues important to the state of the Baltic Sea. Our project created data and advanced information on these substances. Also protocols to assess for instance the emissions were developed. Protocols can more generally be adapted to many hazardous substances. Also biological methods for wastewaters built an integral part of the project's analyses. Finally, methods to decrease emissions and discharges of these substances were developed to recommendations. All these are building blocks, which contribute to the development towards cleaner Baltic Sea.

Hannamaria Yliruusi PURE Project

1. PURE project aims at annual reduction of at least 500 tons of phosphorus load. This is done by supporting selected wastewater treatment plants in Jurmala and Riga, Latvia and in Brest, Belarus to reach a phosphorus content of 0.5 mg/liter in outgoing wastewater. This level is recommended by the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan to reach a good environmental status of the Baltic Sea. Reduction of especially phosphorus load is urgently needed since phosphorous causes eutrophication of lakes, rivers, coastal waters and the sea. 2. Eutrophication is the major environmental problem of the Baltic Sea caused by overload of nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus, entering the sea mainly from land. Symptoms of eutrophication include reduced water transparency, massive occurrences of harmful algae, slimy beaches, dead zones in the bottom of the sea and

Staffan Lund Baltic Compass Project

1. • Introducing agri-environment measures from a multiple benefit perspective. • Developing policy adaptations for sustainable agriculture and water management. • Developing the project investment program on innovative technologies. • Increasing exchange of experience and research across BSR countries. 2. • Reducing nutrient leaching from agricultural lands to surface- and groundwater. • Promoting change to a more sustainable and resource efficient food- and bioeconomy in BSR. • Bridging gaps between east and west in technologies and management. 3. • Continue to strengthen BSR international (and transnational) dialogue and networking on policy adaptations for both agriculture and water. • Promoting private sector involvement and incentives for turning BSR environmental challenges to business opportunities.

Part-financed by the European Union European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

2


THE

ME

ITI MAR IS

3. In the field of hazardous substances there are many questions still needing answers and many gaps of information, also for others than the BSAP substances. We should increase our knowledge on the circulation of these substances both in the techno system and within the ecosystem in order to be able to prioritise management options. Hazardous substances can have a long life-cycle and it is utmost important that regional cooperation contributes to the protection of the Sea.

deteriorated spawning areas of many fish species. Reduction of phosphorous loading can reduce symptoms that eutrophication causes. 3. First of all it is important that municipal wastewater treatment plant operators will have an opportunity to exchange experiences regarding best available technologies. PURE project facilitates this kind of an experience exchange and this opportunity has been considered to be very important. Secondly we need local commitment to joint and voluntary actions to reduce nutrient loading to the water courses. Currently EU Urban Waste Water directive requirement level for phosphorous is 1mg/liter in outgoing wastewater. According to HELCOM this is not good enough for the Baltic Sea Region. We need to do better and this requires investing in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

Newsletter May 2012

SUE

• Combining public- and private sector financing for environmental investments in foodand bioeconomy. • Initiating a strategic research agenda and a European Innovation and Technology Platform for sustainable natural resource utilization in BSR.

Photo by John Nurminen Foundation

Maritime Spatial Planning – BaltSeaPlan developed a vision for a better future of the Baltic Sea

It sounds almost like a science fiction: in 20 years the countries around the Baltic Sea have set up joint methods of spatial planning for the sea that connects them. Despite all national political barriers, the countries have realised that in the Baltic Sea a lot of activities need transnational coordination. Same is true for the marine environment where everything is connected and needs

protection. And even more challenging: the stakeholders in the multiple areas of interest with maritime dimensions agreed on a constructive use of the joint basin. Players in the field of transport, environment, research, energy, fisheries and tourism agreed on a Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP) concept for the Baltic Sea, which is organising this space in an integrated and coordinated manner.

The Vision 2030 was developed by the BaltSeaPlan project in order to show that it is worth to take a troublesome path of negotiations and that it is possible to share the Sea and its resources in a sustainable way. Next to principles for allocating sea space like pan-Baltic thinking and spatial connectivity the following topics have been identified for transnational cooperation: Continued on Page 4 Part-financed by the European Union European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

3


THE

ME

ITI MAR IS

Newsletter May 2012

SUE

Continued from Page 3 A healthy marine environment 2030 In 2030 the Baltic Sea is a healthy marine environment where high biodiversity and dynamic natural processes sustain a resilient ecosystem. Good environmental status has been achieved as set out in EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive and in the Baltic Sea Action Plan. The capacity of the marine ecosystem to respond to human-induced changes is not compromised and the impact of uses evaluated across borders. A representative network of well-managed Marine Protected Areas is established. Within these areas, uses are avoided that constitute a threat to the respective protection goal. Habitat connectivity is ensured.

A coherent pan-Baltic energy policy 2030 The Baltic Sea states aim to cover as much as possible of their electricity demand from renewable resources, which is allocated according to most suitable places at pan-Baltic rather than national level. Thus some sub-regions even export electricity from renewables to areas outside of the Baltic Sea Region. This is possible as Baltic Sea states have put a pan-Baltic energy infrastructure (including a SuperGrid) into place. Ships use clean fuel, e.g. CNG, and there is development of LNG terminals.

Safe, clean and efficient maritime transport 2030 Shipping in 2030 has grown significantly in terms of frequencies and the volumes transported, which increases the threat of accidents. Separation schemes have therefore been put into place to ensure that ships carrying dangerous goods and large ships can travel unimpeded through the whole Baltic Sea. The states have jointly agreed on a spatial shipping strategy. This strategy takes an integrated view of ports and shipping lanes, and takes account of other spatial needs in the sea.

Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture 2030 In 2030 fisheries have become sustainable: they are ecologically sound and non-destructive. Baltic Sea fisheries are managed in such a way that sustainable stocks are secured and the integrity of ecosystems is preserved. Blue corridors for fish are guaranteed that ensure connectivity of fish habitats. Marine aquaculture produces high quality and healthy products. And is – where suitable - combined in a spatially efficient way in Integrated Multi-Trophic schemes with offshore wind parks.

Source: "Vision 2030 - towards the sustainable planning of Baltic Sea space" www.baltseaplan.eu Part-financed by the European Union European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

4


THE

ME

ITI MAR IS

The project actively promoted Maritime Spatial Planning in all countries connected to the Baltic Sea. The EU Blue Book on Integrated Maritime Policy of October 2007 recommends that the Member States draw up their own integrated national maritime strategies, based on a set of common principles. But when the project started in 2008 there was hardly any development in that field in the Baltic Sea countries. Scanning national strategies on all relevant fields with maritime dimensions, the project helped developing Maritime Strategies. Demonstrations of how to

carry out maritime spatial planning have been developed for eight regions from the Western coast of Latvia to the Danish Straights. In addition the project has developed a model showing which type of data should be collected in order to be able to carry out MSP as well as giving recommendations on the exchange & coordination mechanism across the BSR for such data. Thanks to BaltSeaPlan the Vision 2030 is not science fiction anymore. The 14 project partners have taken concrete steps for a joint Maritime

Newsletter May 2012

SUE

Spatial Planning in the Baltic Sea Region and countries across the whole BSR have in the meantime started actions towards MSP. BaltSeaPlan is part of the flagship project of Horizontal Actions of the European Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region to “Encourage the use of Maritime Spatial Planning in all Member States around the Baltic Sea and develop a common approach for cross-border cooperation”. Find out more on www.baltseaplan.eu

Questions to Mr Ómar Frits Eriksson, Danish Maritime Authority, Lead Partner EfficienSea project and strategy as well as the ambitions of the European community in this area. The most significant common denominator for our partners was and still is our interests and responsibilities within maritime matters in the Baltic Sea Region.

What has convinced organisations from six countries responsible for maritime administration to work together in the EfficienSea project? The EfficienSea project came about through an intense dialogue between maritime authorities, academia and others. This dialogue took place over several months, during which each participant touched base at home several times. The result was the content and structure of our project encompassing a set of activities leading to a number of deliverables which were well aligned with each participating organisations mission, vision

EfficienSea is labelled as flagship project of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region. Did this status help you implement the project? Our status as a flagship project of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region was indeed important for the implementation of our project. It helped to ensure continuous and even increasing commitment over time from upper management within the partner¬ship. It also helped us enormously in our endeavour to brand our project as a strategically important project on the European level.

With the help of EfficienSea the Baltic Sea Region shall become a leading region in maritime safety and security – how are the outcomes of the project perceived outside the Baltic Sea Region? It is difficult to judge how the outcomes of our project are perceived outside the Baltic Sea Region without a proper analysis. However, the project initiated two international conferences on -Navigation. Both conferences were titled “e-Navigation Underway”. The first conference, held in January 2011, attracted 136 delegates from 21 countries while the second one (January 2012) attracted 143 delegates again from 21 countries. Both conferences were organized in close cooperation with the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA) the Nautical Institute (NI) and the International Association for Marine Electronics Companies Part-financed by the European Union European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

5


THE

ME

ITI MAR IS

Newsletter May 2012

SUE

contributions to the development of e-Navigation. A third e-Navigation Underway conference is planned for January 2013 which adds to the sustainability of our outcomes. We quite often find that the EfficienSea is referenced in the international maritime community, and new projects like the MonaLisa and ACCSEAS projects, dealing with e-Navigation, claim to build on the outcomes of EfficienSea.

(CIRM). Both conferences included prominent speakers from the international e-Navigation community including the International Maritime Organization (IMO) which is leading the work on e-Navigation World-Wide. Judging from the feedback received from these two conferences, the project outcomes in terms of e-Navigation are perceived as significant

The project has developed several practical tools – can you explain what is special about the EfficienSea e-Navigation? The basic philosophy behind the work carried out on eNavigation within EfficienSea was to take a leap into the future and develop a number of practical examples of possible future e-Navigation services, try them out in a laboratory environment, our e-Navigation Test-Beds, and feed the lessons learnt into the international community involved in the development of e-Navigation today. This approach is somewhat special, being on one

hand futuristic and on the other hand very practical. During the implementation of our project we developed a set of useful practical software tools. In order minimise the risk of intellectual property rights becoming a problem for the further development of our software tools, we also developed an Open Source Policy. As a result, some of these tools can now be utilized by anyone world-wide, including authorities, academia or even industry as a part of commercial products. The Open Source nature of our software platform enables World-Wide collaboration on building new components of the so-called “Maritime Service Portfolio”, which we hope will help to accelerate the IMO e-Navigation process in general.

Mr Eriksson, thank you very much for this interview!

Part-financed by the European Union European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

6


THE

ME

ITI MAR IS

Newsletter May 2012

SUE

Baltic Sea Region Programme Conference 2012 in Norway, 19-20 Sept We will see what difference transnational cooperation can make when successful projects work together in thematic clusters (energy, innovation, transport and water). We will also look into the future of the European Territorial Cooperation 2014-2020 and discuss the relationship between EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region and the Baltic Sea Region Programme.

17 - 2 0 S E P T E M BE R 2 0 12 O S L O R E G I O N / N O R WAY

The 20th BSSSC Annual Conference linked with Baltic Sea Region Programme Conference 2012

Registration, programme and practical information available at www.bsssc.no. Registration deadline is 31 August. The hotel rooms are reserved till 15 July.

Stories and lobbying at the Communication Seminar for projects Communication needs strategic thinking: we have to know what our stakeholders think, learn to speak their language and convince them to support our issues. There is no need to spread information too wide - we have to find out, which communication channels suit our audience best.

Programme met in Riga on 2-3 May to discuss communication planning. We heard about lobbying, social media and writing for the audience. Trainers from the Hamburg's "Academy for journalism" supported us with theory and practical exercises. We learned that we can involve our groups of interest when lobbying for the decision makers, use smart social media mix and write lively stories from the project life.

40 communication managers from projects part-financed by the Baltic Sea Region For further information please go to eu.baltic.net and feel free to contact the Joint Technical Secretariat. Rostock office Phone +49 381 45484 5281 Email info@eu.baltic.net Riga office Phone +371 67357373

Subscribe to the Baltic Sea Region Programme newsletter at eu.baltic.net

Calendar of Programme events Event

Date

Place

European Maritime Day 2012

21-22 May 2012

Gothenburg, Sweden

Monitoring Committee meeting

12-13 June 2012

Riga, Latvia

Annual Forum of the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region

17-19 June 2012

Copenhagen, Denmark

Annual Conference of the Baltic Sea States Subregional Co-operation (BSSSC)

17-19 September 2012

Lillestrøm, Norway

Baltic Sea Region Programme Conference 2012

19-20 September 2012

Lillestrøm, Norway

The Baltic Sea Programme 2007-2013 is investing in Europe’s future by fostering sustainable growth of the region.

Part-financed by the European Union European Regional Development Fund and European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument

7

Maritime issue, newsletter from the Baltic Sea Region Programme  

Maritime issue, newsletter from the Baltic Sea Region Programme

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you